TSU honored at Arbor Day Celebration by mayor’s office; legendary coach Ed Temple remembered

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University was honored at the city’s annual Arbor Day Celebration for its dedication to help improve the environment.

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TSU legendary coach Ed Temple was remembered at the annual Nashville Arbor Day Celebration, that also honored Tennessee State for its dedication to help improve the environment. In this photo is Coach Temple’s daughter, Edwina, with TSU students studying urban forestry. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Mayor Megan Barry recognized TSU and two other universities on Thursday, March 9, for being part of the Tree Campus USA program, which recognizes college and university campuses that effectively manage their campus trees, and strive to engage their student population utilizing service learning opportunities centered on campus, and community, forestry efforts.

“It shows that TSU is dedicated to helping to improve the environment in Nashville, but also beautifying the campus and recognizing the importance of trees,” Dr. De’Etra Young, assistant professor of Urban Forestry at TSU, said after the event at Centennial Park.

Colleges and universities across the United States can be recognized as a Tree Campus USA institution by meeting five standards developed to promote healthy trees and student involvement.

TSU student Jerome Pittman, who attended the event, said he’s proud Tennessee State was recognized.

“It’s giving us a voice; a chance to impact the community in a positive way,” said Pittman, who’s majoring in agricultural business.

Also Thursday, there was a memorial tree dedication at the park that included legendary track and field coach Edward S. Temple, who died Sept. 22, 2016, at the age of 89. A tulip poplar was planted in his honor.

Coach Temple’s daughter, Edwina, provided remarks and highlighted some of her father’s accomplishments, to which, at one point, she received a standing ovation.

“He’s most proud of having 40 of his Tigerbelles chosen to be on the United States Olympic team,” she said. “And of those 40 women, all 40 graduated with one or more degrees.”

In memorializing Temple and the others – Jane Eskind, John Jay Hooker, Betty Nixon, and Matthew Walker Jr. – Mayor Barry said planting trees to remember them was fitting because “trees are the longest living organisms on the planet.”

“They were a shining example of what is possible, and what we can do as a city,” Barry said of the five. “And the trees … are a fitting tribute to their legacies of leadership.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

Tennessee State University Students Win Top Honors at research conference

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University students recently won top honors in research presentations at the Research Association of Minority Professors 36th annual Conference in Atlanta.

RAMP is an educational and scientific research organization that provides opportunities for minority professors to engage in culturally relevant research projects.

Undergraduate and graduate students from member institutions are also invited to the association’s annual conference to present research projects.

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TSU student and faculty representatives at the RAMP 36th Annual Conference were, from left, T’Shana Carter, Germysha Little, Allen Ezigbo, Dr. Clara Young-White, Dr. Lucian Yates, III, Shabnam Brady, Sarah Iriogbe-Efionayi, Dr. Keisha Bryan, and Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young. (Submitted Photo)

This year, six TSU students were among 18 students selected from across the nation to make presentations at the RAMP conference last month at Clark Atlanta University. Three students placed, with one winning second place in the undergraduate category. TSU took the prizes for second and third places among graduate presenters.

Several TSU professors and administrators, including the university’s chief research officer, Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, accompanied the TSU students. The professors also presented at the conference.

For student research, Germysha Little, a senior biology major, earned second place for “An Investigation of the Experiences of Underrepresented STEM Graduate Students.”

In the graduate category, Shabnam Brady, a doctoral student in the Department of Psychology, won second place for her presentation on “The Assessment of Underrepresented Minority Student Experiences in STEM Graduate Program.”

A presentation on “Examining Early Childhood Education Teachers’ Understanding of Self-Regulation Skills” won third place for Sarah Iriogbe-Efionayi, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

“Our students were outstanding,” said Dr. Clara Young-White, chair of the Department of Teaching and Learning, and immediate past-president of RAMP. “It was very important for our students to participate in these presentations because it gives them the opportunity to connect with other students and professors.”

Young-White said TSU will host the conference next year.

“We are bringing the conference here because we want more TSU students to participate in the competition,” she said.

Students interested in presenting at the RAMP conference must submit a 2,000-word abstract of their work that addresses issues and concern for minority populations. A committee that selects the presenters reviews the abstracts.

Iriogbe-Efionayi said her interactions at the conference were beneficial.

“It (the conference) was a treat for me,” she said. “I was able to meet and interact with students and professors with the same background and interest in preschool education.”

Other TSU student presenters were Lydia Davis, a political science major; T’Shana Carter, chemistry; and Allen Ezigbo, elementary education.

Other faculty members and administrators who attended the conference included Dr. Lucian Yates, dean of Graduate School and Research; and Dr. Kisha Bryan, assistant professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU President Glenda Glover among leaders on hand for signing of HBCU executive order by President Trump

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover was among a group of HBCU presidents and leaders who witnessed President Donald Trump sign an executive order he said makes “HBCUs an absolute priority in the White House.”

During brief remarks in the Oval Office on Tuesday, President Trump added, “Historically, black colleges and universities are incredibly important institutions. That’s why today I’m thrilled to be signing an executive order to recognize the importance of historically black colleges and universities.”

While similar to other HBCU executive orders of former presidents, this order officially moves the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities from the U.S. Department of Education to the White House.

“Our goal as a group was to share our collective concerns with President Trump and his executive leadership directly responsible for educational funding and policies that impact our institutions,” said TSU President Glover. “We hope the executive order represents a real commitment to historically black colleges and universities which makes HBCUs a significant line item in the President’s budget. What HBCUs need is funding, and this is precisely why we made the trip to Washington.”

The signing comes one day after Vice President Mike Pence and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos hosted representatives from dozens of HBCUs at a “listening session” in the executive office building next door to the White House. The session was hosted by the White House Domestic Policy Council. The Thurgood Marshall College Fund coordinated the initiative on behalf of the HBCUs.

In the session, HBCU leaders discussed ways they can improve education and enhance the infrastructure of their schools. Representatives from Thurgood Marshall College Fund, United Negro College Fund and National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education also participated.

To view the executive order, visit http://bit.ly/2lVYSzP.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Students, Professor Attend Harvard Conference on Politics and Civic Engagement

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Two TSU students and a professor from the College of Public Service participated in a recent national conference at Harvard University.

The National Campaign for Political and Civic Engagement took place earlier this month at the Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics.

It focused on identifying the causes of the divisiveness following the 2016 presidential election, as well as strategies to bridge the gaps between all Americans.

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Mikala Hodges, a TSU Political Science major, participates in an open discussion at the conference. (Photo by Harvard University Institute of Politics)

Jalen Jennings, a junior urban studies major, and Mikala Hodges, also a junior majoring in political science, were among 70 students from 28 colleges and universities from across the United States who attended the conference.

The mission was to create a nationally coordinated program, Reconnect America.

Dr. Cara Robinson, interim chair of TSU’s Department of Social Work and Urban Affairs, accompanied the students. She said the students’ experience at the conference gave them the skills necessary to move civic activity on campus through academics and community service programs.

“Jennings and Hodges bring a personal passion, steady leadership, and commitment to assisting students and other stakeholders in moving public discourse and action forward and into a prominent place at TSU,” Robinson said. “The opportunity to work with students on civic and political engagement initiatives is a core purpose of the urban studies program and the College of Public Service.”

At the conference, students heard from prominent speakers such as Doris Kearns Godwin, veteran presidential historian, and David Gergen, veteran political analyst and advisor to three former U.S. presidents.

They noted the importance of having unifying leaders as a key to bridging the political divide, adding that young people have a vital role to play in closing the gap.

Jennings said he enjoyed meeting students from across the country and hearing their thoughts.

“We all have different views, [but] you come together and you find that in some ways we have the same ideas in some areas,” he said.

Jennings, who took part in a breakout group that focused on social media, added, “We are trying to come up with different ideas to make sure news gets published to social media sites that is more credible.”

Since 2003, the alliance has held annual conferences to identify collaborative projects, foster engagement in electoral politics, assist students in pursuing careers in public service and provide a foundation in civic education.

“The College of Public Service is very proud of this partnership, especially as we are the only HBCU,” said Dr. Michael Harris, dean of the college.  “It allows our students the opportunity to work with students from across the United States on enhancing citizenship, leadership and civic engagement, a core value that we instill in our students.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Georgianna Priddy retiring from TSU after 48 years of service

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – After working at Tennessee State University for nearly 50 years, Georgianna Priddy is saying goodbye.

The university saluted Priddy at a special event on Thursday, Feb. 23. Her final day is Feb. 28.

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Dr. Curtis Johnson, TSU’s chief of staff and associate vice president for administration, salutes Georgianna Priddy at her retirement ceremony. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

“We appreciate the service she’s given to Tennessee State; commitment and dedication,” said Dr. Curtis Johnson, TSU’s chief of staff and associate vice president for administration. “You don’t find very many people who remain for that length of time at one institution anymore.”

Forty-eight years ago, Priddy started at TSU as a cashier. She held that position for about seven years before becoming a postal clerk in the university’s post office, and eventually supervisor of mail services, where she will finish her career.

Postal clerk Danielle Rhodes worked with Priddy for more than 40 years, and says she’s definitely going to miss her.

“She’s been a great boss, but more than anything, she’s been a special friend,” said Rhodes.

Priddy said she’s enjoyed working at Tennessee State, but that she’s looking forward to having some time off after working two jobs most of her life.

“If I wasn’t here (TSU), I was on the other job,” said Priddy, adding that she really wants to spend some quality time with her new great great grandson.

“I want to take some time and just enjoy home for a moment; enjoy my family,” she said. “I plan to do some reading, travel some.”

Jerry Priddy said he’s happy for his mother, who has been a motivating factor in his life. The 49-year-old double amputee said his mother was his biggest cheerleader when he decided to return to TSU after more than 30 years and get his degree. He said her smile was the first thing he looked for when he got his diploma at last year’s spring commencement.

“She’s done so much for so many people,” Jerry Priddy said. “I’d like for her to go on a vacation, and have someone wait on her.”

Mother Priddy said she’s proud of the educational success of her son and daughter, Michelle Vaughn. In December 2015, Vaughn and her daughter both received degrees in psychology from TSU.

“One of the most rewarding things, was to see both of my children graduate from TSU, and be the best that they can be,” she said.

Priddy said she hopes her three grandchildren will also attend TSU.

“I want them to carry on the tradition,” she said. “If I had it to do over again, it would be at TSU.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Alumna Traci Otey Blunt named RLJ Entertainment’s Urban Movie Channel president

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Traci Otey Blunt has been appointed president of RLJ Entertainment’s Urban Movie Channel (UMC), the first premium subscription-based streaming service created for African-American and urban audiences featuring quality urban content across all genres, including feature films, original series, stand-up comedy, documentaries, and other exclusive titles.

Traci Otey Blunt
Traci Otey Blunt. (submitted photo)

“I am excited to announce Traci’s appointment as UMC President,” said Robert L. Johnson, chairman of RLJ Entertainment and founder of Black Entertainment Television (BET). “Under Traci’s leadership and management, UMC has built a strong business foundation to grow its subscriber base and distribute compelling content to its target audience. UMC has attracted talented producers and writers from the African-American creative community and has acquired films and other content featuring some of the most prominent black actors and actresses. I am confident that Traci and her team will make UMC a successful and valuable digital channel for RLJ Entertainment.”

In addition to leading UMC, Blunt will continue to serve as the executive vice president for Corporate Affairs leading RLJE’s corporate communications and public affairs, a role she has held since 2015. UMC offers the African-American creative community a place to showcase their work product and be compensated by subscribers who enjoy watching UMC entertainment. Blunt will work to expand UMC’s digital footprint by making it available on more platforms and devices.

“I am pleased and excited to have the confidence of RLJE management and the opportunity to lead and grow UMC at this time,” said Blunt. “My immediate strategic goals for UMC are to grow our subscriber base by creating a destination for the UMC audience to find compelling and original content created by the most talented African-American writers and producers.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU alumnus named Alpha Phi Alpha executive director

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Dr. Everett B. Ward, general president of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated, welcomes the fraternity’s new Executive Director, Dr. Jamie R. Riley.

Jamie Riley
Dr. Jamie R. Riley. (submitted photo)

“It is with great pleasure that the board of directors announces its unanimous decision to select Dr. Jamie R. Riley, as the next executive director of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity,” Ward said.

“His administrative skills have been demonstrated in previous positions, including having served as the assistant dean of students and director of the LEAD Center at the University of California, Berkeley.”

Riley officially began in the role January 3, 2017. A graduate of Tennessee State University, Riley was initiated into the fraternity through its Beta Omicron Chapter there in 2003. He earned both a Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration and Planning and a Master of Education in Administration and Supervision from TSU, and a Doctorate of Philosophy in Counseling and Student Personnel Services from the University of Georgia in 2011.

Prior to this position, he worked at Johns Hopkins University where he served as the associate dean of Student Life for Diversity and Inclusion.

Riley’s research has focused on addressing the impact of culturally oppressive campus climates on the success of black male college students attending predominantly white institutions.

In addition to his professional accomplishments, Riley is a member of the 100 Black Men of America and has held membership in several Alpha alumni chapters including Tau Lambda (Nashville, Tennessee), Rho Kappa Lambda (Gwinnett County, Georgia), Iota Tau Lambda (Farmville, Virginia), Gamma Phi Lambda (Berkeley, California), and most recently, Delta Lambda in Baltimore, Maryland. He has also served as an Alpha and/or campus advisor for several chapters at colleges and universities across the country.

“I think it is crucial that we streamline processes and procedures to align with the fraternal organizational structure and the needs of individual brothers,” said Riley, whose goals also include helping collegiate members transition from college to professional life. “The General Office is the place where brothers should come to find solutions and answers in a timely fashion. I believe the better utilization of technology and personnel will help us to achieve that and much more.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Planning for 2017 TSU Homecoming underway with help from new external committee

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Planning is underway for Tennessee State University’s 2017 Homecoming celebration, and organizers have taken steps to make it one of the best.

For the first time, an external committee of seasoned professionals from the community has been assembled to provide support and use of their resources to help promote Homecoming activities that draw people from all over the country, as well as right her in Metro Nashville.

TSU’s Homecoming this year is on Oct. 14, when the Tigers will take on the Governors of Austin Peay State University at Nissan Stadium.

This year’s Homecoming chair, Grant Winrow, who is also Special Assistant to TSU President Glenda Glover and Director of Special Projects, said “TSU Homecoming’s are legendary and has become an institution for decades!”

“Homecoming is a very exciting time for our Alumni and Nashville communities to take part in some great traditions, such as our legendary parade down Historic Jefferson Street, as well as tailgating at Nissan Stadium before  the football game. But let’s not forgot the anticipated halftime show from our world renowned Aristocrat of Bands,” Winrow said. “We have assembled a team of some very seasoned professionals, some of whom are TSU alums who agreed to lend their talents and expertise to ensure we take Homecoming to even higher heights. So we thought that it would be a great idea to partner up with people who have a stake in their alma mater.”

Sonya Smith, Assistant Director of Alumni Relations, will serve as co-chair on the committee. She brings years of experience assisting with coordinating class reunions, and other alumni-related events.

The external committee members are:

Lonnell Matthews – Director, Mayor’s Office of Neighborhoods & Community Engagement

Marie Sueing – Vice President, Community Relations Nashville Convention & Visitors Corporation

Jamie Isabel – Founder at Dalmatian Creative Agency, Inc.

John Smith – President of John Smith Marketing.com

Sharon Hurt – Councilwoman At-Large and Executive Director at JUMP, Inc.

Adrian “A. G.” Granderson – Radio Personality/Music & Comedy Venue Owner

Stay tuned for updates on host hotel and other information related to TSU Homecoming 2017.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU graduate student Kyra Bryant wins thesis award

By K. Dawn Rutledge

The Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools has awarded the Graduate Student Master’s Thesis Award to Tennessee State University student, Kyra Bryant.

Bryant recently completed a Master of Civil and Environmental Engineering and is currently pursuing a doctorate in Computer Information Systems Engineering at TSU.

Kyra Bryant presentation
TSU graduate student Kyra Bryant explains research at a recent Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools meeting. (submitted photo)

Among member institution graduate students from across the state of Tennessee, Bryant received the award on Feb. 8 for her research on hurricanes and storm surge search models with the purpose of making prediction more accurate. The title of her thesis was “The Rise and Fall of the Drag Coefficient in Wind Stress Calculations for Hurricane Wind Speeds with a Case Study.” It was published last fall (2016) in the Journal of Marine Science Engineering.

Dr. Muhammad K. Akbar, assistant professor in the Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Department, served as Bryant’s faculty advisor.

Akbar said that when a hurricane is brewing in the deep ocean, the tasks of emergency management become encumbered. They must forecast the hurricane’s wind track and strength for the entire duration through its landfall and beyond. They use the forecasted wind field to predict the incoming storm surge to coastal areas, and use it to set-up evacuation plans. Since the hurricane’s path and strength dynamically changes, the process must be modeled every few hours until the hurricane is two to three days away from landfall. One of the primary variables that influence storm surge simulation is the stress generated on the ocean by hurricane winds, which is approximated using air density, wind speed, and drag. The drag coefficient is typically calculated from an empirical correlation, which has been debated and researched by many scientists for more than half a century. Bryant’s thesis examined and summarized scientific research on the drag coefficient correlations.

“Ms. Bryant presented a case study using some of the commonly used drag coefficients, along with one of her own, to hind cast the Hurricane Rita (2005) storm surge and compare the results with observed data,” Akbar said, adding that she is performing more studies to develop drag coefficient correlations that can be used to predict hurricane storm surge accurately as part of her Ph.D. program.

“Receiving the Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools (TCGS) Thesis Award is a great honor for Ms. Bryant, and all of us at Tennessee State University,” Akbar continued. “It is an encouragement and motivation for us to advance the research to the next level. The outcome of the research will serve a huge coastal population of the world threatened by tropical storms annually. Even a single life saved through this research outcome would give us a sense of accomplishment.”

The Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools is committed to excellence and recognizing the exceptional work of Tennessee graduate students. TCGS’s graduate student thesis award is presented annually to recognize scholarly achievement in graduate students at a member institution of the Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools.

“We are extremely proud of Kyra, her faculty advisors, and the entire engineering faculty,” said Dr. Lucian Yates, III, dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Research.

“This award is a reflection of the expectations and demands of the curriculum in engineering and the dedication of our students,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering. “We are proud of her recognition for this award, and strongly support her continuing study in the graduate program in engineering.”

This is not the first time Bryant has had the opportunity to share her research. Last year, she presented at the Emerging Researchers National Conference in STEM in Washington, D.C. where she interacted with other scholars from around the nation. She has also presented at TSU’s annual research symposium, receiving 3rd place for her work. Additionally, she has the 14th Estuarine Coastal Modeling Conference (ECM14) under her belt, a national conference attracting people from all over the world doing coastal modeling research.

Bryant said she chose TSU because it was the only institution engaged in such research.

“I don’t know of any other university in Tennessee doing hurricane research,” she said. “There are only one in eight professors in the U.S. teaching this program, and I’m very fortunate to be here.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

Mooo over beef and chicken! There’s a demand for goat meat in the U.S., and TSU is leading research to produce more of it

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – So much for where’s the beef? These days, its where’s the goat meat?

TSU Goats-2
Emily Hayes, a TSU graduate student and research assistant, among some of the breeding does. (photo by Joan Kite, TSU Public Relations)

Nationwide, agriculture researchers say there’s a demand for goat meat because of a growing population of ethnic groups within the United States that consume it, not to mention an increasing number of Americans who are choosing goat over other meats, like chicken and beef, because it’s healthier.

To meet the demand, much of the goat meat now in the U.S. is imported from other countries. But Tennessee State University is leading research that seeks to boost goat production in the U.S.

“I probably give 10, 12 talks a year across the country on the research,” said Dr. Richard Browning, the lead goat researcher in TSU’s Agriculture Department. “We have a lot of ethnic groups that have goat as a main part of their diet, and that’s why there’s a demand for goat meat. But we don’t produce enough here.”

According to the most recent statistics from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, all goat inventory in the U.S. on Jan. 1, 2016, totaled 2.6 million, down 1 percent from 2015.

“Right now, we are importing way more meat than what is being sold within the United States,” said Emily Hayes, a TSU graduate student and research assistant.

TSU’s research herd is comprised of approximately 250 breeding does representing diverse sets of Boer, Kiko, Spanish, Myotonic and Savanna genetics. The university began its goat research in 2002, and TSU officials expect to be awarded federal money from the USDA this year to expand their research.

Browning said much of the research focuses on breed characterization and genetic evaluations.

“Our primary target is female fitness in the doe population, in the breeding herd,” he said. “We’re looking for animals that are able to stay healthy and reproduce with limited inputs.”

The research is shared with producers, farmers, to help them be more effective in their goat production.

TSU junior Moet McFall is focusing on goat reproduction and recently presented her research at the 2017 American Society of Animal Science Southern Conference. While she enjoys the opportunity to help producers, she also appreciates the hands-on experience she believes will benefit her in the workforce.

“Hands-on research looks really good,” McFall said. “You can learn in a classroom, but hands-on experience is what most jobs look for. They want to see that you’ve actually put what you’ve learned to the test.”

Whether goat meat is produced in the U.S. or imported, researchers and restaurant owners who sell it say part of the draw to goat meat is its healthy appeal.

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Delicious dish of goat meat at Jamaicaway restaurant in Nashville. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations).

Goat meat is naturally lean, meaning it is much lower in saturated fat and cholesterol, having a naturally higher HDL count (the good cholesterol) and a naturally low LDL count (the bad kind of cholesterol), according to the National Kiko Registry. It is also lower in calories than other meats, like beef, and is easier to digest.

Dr. Sandria Godwin is a family and consumer science professor at TSU, as well as a registered dietician. She has worked with Dr. Browning to produce goat meat recipes.

“It is definitely a healthier choice,” Godwin said.

Ouida Bradshaw owns two Jamaicaway restaurants in Nashville and has had goat meat on her menu since she opened 14 years ago.

“Over the years, it has become a very popular entree,” said Bradshaw, who has been featured on the Food Network. “A lot of people come from far away just to get goat meat.”

Heritage Foods USA is an online butcher based in Brooklyn, New York, that supports farmers who raise livestock, including goats. Its cuts are sold to customers in all 50 states, as well as carried in 130 restaurants from New York City to Los Angeles.

The company is an advocate for more U.S. production of goat meat.

“Goats are environmentally low-maintenance and easy to raise,” said Patrick Martins, co-founder of Heritage Foods. “Goat is actually the most widely consumed meat in the world – and America is slowly learning what the rest of the world already knows – that goat meat is delicious, lean, versatile, healthy, and sustainable.”

To learn more about Tennessee State’s goat research, visit:http://www.tnstate.edu/faculty/rbrowning/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.