TSU Engineering Dean Co-Authors Book Aimed at Helping Minority Faculty Members

HargroveNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A professor from Tennessee State University has co-authored a book aimed at helping minority faculty members succeed during their academic career at higher-education institutions while offering useful strategies for recruiting, retaining and advancing women and minorities.

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering, and Dr. Pauline Mosley, associate professor of Information Technology at Pace University, collaborated for nearly 10 years on their book, Navigating Academia: A Guide for Women and Minority STEM Faculty, because, according to Hargrove, the need for minority faculty and their success in academia is “critical.”

bookNavigating Academia: A Guide for Women and Minority STEM Faculty explores the infrastructure of the academy and provides a systematic account of where and why women and minorities fall behind men in the preparation for and development of their academic careers. The book includes testimonials from faculty and administrators about how they made their ascent within the academy.

“There is a great need right now for minority faculty in institutions across the country,” said Hargrove. “Minorities currently represent 5 percent of faculty members, and their presence and success in navigating the career pathway is important for attracting and increasing the pipeline of new faculty. It is also important for the workforce of the nation.”

Hargrove knows all too well the difficulty some minority faculty may have navigating their career path. Having been in academia for nearly two decades, he has drawn on his own experience as a starting point. He has risen through the ranks from associate professor to dean of the College, as well as work as a research engineer at three major research laboratories and universities.

“I’ve been mentored by many individuals throughout my industrial and academic career, and my achievements are not mine alone,” he added. “They were the result of many supporters and advocates within my social network of personal and professional colleagues that have provided great experiences. Now I am able to share some of what I learned and help others be successful.”

Over the last five years, Hargrove has compiled some of his experiences with other colleagues to published the book which provides insight and reflections on how to succeed in academia for women and minority STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) faculty.

“After taking leadership roles in engineering education, I’ve tried to continue the same level of mentoring I did with students only now with faculty members,” said Hargrove. “Of course I am no expert, but I’ve tried to help the minority STEM faculty navigate outreach activities, research and strategies to become a better instructor. I hope my experiences can help other faculty members achieve their personal and career goals.”

Hargrove’s book also discusses how to modify and expand faculty-recruiting programs, how to diversify search committees, how to encourage intervention by deans, and how to assess past hiring efforts. This guide is an important resource for women and minorities seeking success in the academy as well as for administrators focused on faculty and professional development.

And what does Hargrove hope readers take away from the book?

“I think this is an opportunity for the reader to better understand the academic career pathway, learn from the experiences of others, and develop their own pathway for success in the academy,” Hargrove said. “Each of us is responsible for our own success…and I believe this publication can help make that process more achievable.”

 

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Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Leader Launches “Walk with the President” to Promote Healthy Living on Campus

image001
NASHVILLE, Tenn.
(TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover is launching “Walk with the President,” starting Monday morning, March 2 in an effort to promote healthy habits and fitness on campus. The walk will take place each Monday around the track at Hale Stadium, beginning at 6 a.m.

She is calling on faculty, staff and students to join her in this initiative.

“This effort is geared toward us encouraging each other to live much healthier lives,” Dr. Glover said. “Earlier this year we started this effort in our campus cafeteria and dining services by offering more green and vegetable choices. ‘Walk with the President’ is just a continuation of that effort.”

The Director of the Wellness Center at TSU, Gerald Davis II, called “Walk with the President” a great idea that will give students, faculty and staff “another avenue” to engage in cardiovascular activities.

“This will help them to relieve stress and weight loss in maintaining good health,” he said.

Solving the issue of obesity and unhealthy dieting is a national challenge, and TSU, as an educational institution, has a major role is battling this epidemic, the president noted.

“The lack of regular forms of exercise is a major risk factor in developing illnesses and other forms of disease,” she said.

Studies support the President’s assertion. A recent National Institutes of Health study gives an overwhelming evidence that proves the notion that reductions in daily physical activity are primary causes of chronic diseases.

In Tennessee, the situation is even dire. The state now has the fourth highest adult obesity rate in the nation, according to The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America, published in 2013. Tennessee’s adult obesity rate is 33.7 percent, up from 25.6 percent in 2004 and from 11.1 percent in 1990.

“We know ‘Walk with the President’ will not solve all of our problems, but it is a beginning and I am asking all of our faculty, staff, students and anyone else who is interested to join us in this worthy cause for healthy living,” Dr. Glover said.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU to Host Legislative Forum on Tennessee Academic Standards for Grades K-12 Feb. 26

Leg_Panel_flyer_UPDATE_2.20.15NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – One of the biggest and controversial issues facing the 109th General Assembly in Tennessee this session is what role should the state have in mandating a common set of academic expectations for students to achieve at each grade level. This has significant implications on curriculum, budget and decision making.

To inform the public on what the future holds for education legislation in the state, Tennessee State University will hold a legislative panel and forum on “Viewpoints on Tennessee Academic Standards for Grades K-12,” Thursday, Feb. 26 at the Avon Williams Campus Atrium. The forum begins at 7:30 a.m. and is free and open to the public.

Education Commissioner, Dr. Candice McQueen, will be the featured speaker for the event, with State Senators Steven Dickerson, member of the Senate Education Committee, and Becky Duncan Massey, member of the Joint Subcommittee on Education, Health and General Welfare, serving on the panel provide to let the public to see, hear and digest information on the state’s standards.

Other panel members include State Representatives Brenda Gilmore, Harold Love Jr., member of the House Education Instruction Programs Committee, and Mark White, chair of the House Subcommittee on Education Administration and Planning.

According to Dr. Michael Harris, dean of the College of Public Service and Urban Affairs and moderator of the forum, the panel will provide a balanced representation of views to “allow for a meaningful discussion.”

“Education standards are probably one of the biggest issues taken on by legislators this year,” said Harris. “The panelists will discuss existing positions both in favor or against the standards, present current legislative initiatives that address them, and share evidence-based resources on the standards.”

The panel discussion on academic standards comes on the heels of Tennessee school superintendents recently urging state lawmakers to rethink making any changes this year to the state’s K-12 academic standards and instead give Gov. Bill Haslam time to complete his current review next year.

The Tennessee Organization of School Superintendents Tuesday presented a letter signed by 114 superintendents from the state’s 141 school districts at the State Capitol, asking that, “no legislative action be taken during the 2015 legislative session to change our academic standards.”

Many argue, that the success of the recently signed Tennessee Promise law that offers future graduates of any Tennessee high school the opportunity to receive two years of community or technical college tuition-free, hinges on how prepared students are to succeed. Recently, leaders of all 13 of Tennessee’s community colleges held a press conference at the state capitol to emphasize their support for continuing Tennessee’s commitment to higher K-12 academic standards that prepare students for college study.

“This is an issue that the public needs to be informed about, and kept abreast on what is facing our schools, our students and our legislators,” Harris added.

Along with TSU, the forum is hosted in partnership with the American Association of University Women of Tennessee, and AAUW Nashville. Organizations cosponsoring the event include the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce, Women in Higher Education in Tennessee, the American Society for Public Administration, and Lipscomb University Institute for Conflict Management.

For more information, contact Dr. Ann-Marie Rizzo, professor of Public Administration, at 615.963.7250 or arizzo@tnstate.edu.

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Fruit Tree Pruning and Grafting Subject of TSU Third Tuesday Field Days Workshop February 17

third tuesdayNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences Cooperative Extension Program at Tennessee State University hosts February’s edition of Third Tuesday on Feb. 17. The event takes place from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. at the Agricultural Research and Education Center at 3101 River Road in Ashland City, Tenn.

This month’s program is “Pruning and Grafting Fruit Tree Crops” and will feature two workshops and demonstrations. They include:

  • “Grafting Techniques for Fruit Trees” by Dr. Dilip Nandwani, TSU associate professor of Organic Agriculture; and
  • “Tools and Techniques: Fruit Tree Pruning Basics” by Christopher Robbins, TSU Extension Associate for Farm Operations.

The registration fee is $15 and includes lunch. To register or request additional information, contact Dr. Dilip Nandwani at 615.963.1897 or dnandwan@tnstate.edu. Visit http://www.tnstate.edu/extension/Third%20Tuesday.aspx for updates, future announcements, and complete 2015 schedule.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Academic Excellence, Parental Engagement Earn TSU “S.W.A.G.” Awards for 50 Elementary Students and Families

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Fourth-grader Marlee Sabria Wade was all smiles as she looked at the blue lapel pin she had just received. The wording on the pin read, “Students with Academic Greatness.”

All semester-long the 9-year-old from Robert Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary School in Nashville came to class every day and on time, participated and scored very high on all her class work, she had no unexcused absences, and no office referrals for bad behavior. Marlee displayed the behaviors necessary to succeed in school.

State Representative Harold Love Jr., pins TSU Students with Academic Greatness Award  winner Marlee Sabria Wade, a fourth-grader from Robert Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary School, during the inaugural S.W.A.G. Award ceremony at TSU on Thursday, Jan. 29. (photos by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)
State Representative Harold Love Jr., pins  Academic Greatness Award winner Marlee Sabria Wade, a fourth-grader from Robert Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary School, during the inaugural S.W.A.G. Award ceremony at TSU on Thursday, Jan. 29. (photos by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

That seems like a badge of excellence, but for Marlee, standing barely 3 feet tall, it is an understatement.

“When I was younger I always knew I had academic greatness but I just didn’t know what it was,” said Marlee, with a grin and a show of confidence that explains how proud she is of her own ability. “I want to be a doctor or a fashion designer and I know I will make it because I do well in all of my work and I am never late.”

She definitely will. Her “no-nonsense” grandmother, Margaret Thomas, a retired seamstress, is a major influence, and already has Marlee watching as she (Thomas) stiches different styles — in case fashion design becomes the choice.

Being on time, working hard and already having career choices have certainly earned stripes of excellence for Marlee, her younger sister, Ilee Wade, a kindergartener, and about 50 other students from their school, thanks to a Tennessee State University initiative that keeps the students on track and their parents engaged.

Participating in the inaugural S.W.A.G. Awards ceremony at Tennessee State University were: State Representative Harold Love Jr., left, Robert Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary School Principal Trellaney Lane, the Dean of the College of Education Dr. Kimberly King-Jupiter, and Robert Churchwell Jr., after whose late father the elementary school was named.
Participating in the inaugural S.W.A.G. Awards ceremony at Tennessee State University were: State Representative Harold Love Jr., left, Robert Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary School Principal Trellaney Lane, the Dean of the College of Education Dr. Kimberly King-Jupiter, and Robert Churchwell Jr., after whose late father the elementary school was named.

About a year ago, the University, through the College of Education, entered a partnership with Robert Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary School through the S.W.A.G. (Students with Academic Greatness) initiative to acknowledge and recognize families and students who strive to achieve behavior and academic benchmarks identified by their home school.

Every nine weeks the Dean of the College, Dr. Kimberly King-Jupiter, and the S.W.A.G. Team travel to Churchwell Elementary School to award certificates to students for maintaining the program’s goals. Students who received two certificates during the fall semester were recognized with a pin and a certificate at the inaugural S.W.A.G. Award ceremony in the Ferrell-Westbrook Complex at TSU on Thursday, Jan. 29.

Essential to the academic greatness of any students are engaged parents. So, the Team recognizes parents for what they do to encourage academic greatness.

SWAG“The goal of ‘S.W.A.G.ging’ these students from K-4th grade is to stress the importance of not just going to school but to do their best academically,” said King-Jupiter. “So often, kids only receive acknowledgement for sports and entertainment. Or, they receive notoriety for bad behavior. The goal of the S.W.A.G. Initiative is to reward students publicly for academic excellence while also exposing them to alternative career choices.”

And the message is getting across, S.W.A.G. officials say. They say parental and family engagement – a key indicator to students’ academic success – is overwhelming.

For instance, Marlee says she does not worry about getting to school on time. It just happens, as she puts it. Her mother, Treva Wade, a TSU graduate with a bachelor’s degree in Communications, knows the importance of being on time and she makes sure Marlee and her sister are out the door in time to be in class on time.

“My mom gets me and my sister up early and ready for school everyday, so we are never late, and she makes sure we do our homework,” said Marlee.

With no direct University or government funding, how is such a novel program staying afloat, dean King-Jupiter was asked.

“We see the S.W.A.G. Initiative as a low-cost way to build a pipeline, but we are looking for funding sources through grants and other means to sustain the program,” she said.

Until then, resources, including award and gift items, are donated by some of her fellow deans, vice presidents, professors and the core of staff members who help run the program. That’s in addition to members of the community who contributed to the purchase of Kindle tablets for each family. “We got by with a lot of help from our TSU family and friends.”

At the inaugural S.W.A.G. award ceremony that included a catered buffet dinner, University, state and local officials formed a procession to receive the students as they came up to be pinned and presented with their certificate of excellence. A parent, representing each of the more than 40 families at the ceremony received a gift bag stuffed with a Kindle tablet and other University paraphernalia.

Officials included TSU Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dr. Mark Hardy; State Representative Harold Love Jr., Churchwell Elementary School Principal Trellaney Lane, and Robert Churchwell Jr., after whose late father the elementary school was named.

“Your child has been a model student in the partnership’s examination of parental involvement and academic achievement,” Hardy said to the parents, as he presided at the ceremony on behalf of TSU President Glenda Glover, who was away on business. “And to you the Robert Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary School, and Dean King-Jupiter and our College of Education, we applaud you for promoting academic excellence. Your presence here tonight along with all of these officials is an indication of how much importance we attach to the S.W.A.G. program and what it is doing for these young people.”

While S.W.A.G.’s primary target is student academic excellence, parents received rousing ovations for encouraging their children.

“In SWAG we recognize and reward the model of parenting that is engaged. This is the only way we can be sure these students will succeed. We also want ‘S.W.A.G.gers’ to know that a focus on academic excellence will open doors to opportunities,” King-Jupiter noted.

Principal Lane added that the TSU/Robert Churchwell partnership offers an opportunity to recognized students who have academic greatness and parents who give it their all to make sure their children are achieving at their very best.

“Today we celebrate academic excellence and congratulate these students for their accomplishments,” she said. “We thank you parents. You are doing something special; please continue to be the great role models you are.”

The College of Education S.W.A.G. Team received high praise for their contribution. They include: Assistant Dean Alethea Hampton, Assistant Professor Thurman Webb, Assistant Professor Calli Holaway, John Barfield, of the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs; and graduate assistant Darreon D. Greer Sr.

The team also receives support from other members of the college including Associate Dean Heraldo Richards, and department chairs Trinetia Respress and John Tiller; and Ruth Gordon, Jo Mercer and Jennifer Sparks.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

USDA Selects Two Tennessee State University Students to Attend National Summit

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Two students from Tennessee State University have been selected to attend a national conference sponsored by the United States Agriculture Department aimed at introducing university students to future trends, scientific research and agricultural policy in today’s real-world environment.

Alexis Allen (left), a junior concentrating in Agribusiness, and Alison Leathers (right), a graduate student concentrating in Agricultural Education, Leadership & Extension, share a moment with Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, upon the USDA announcement sending the pair to Virginia. Allen and Leathers  are among only thirty students selected from across the country to attend the USDA’s 2015 Agricultural Outlook Forum.
Alexis Allen (left), a junior concentrating in Agribusiness, and Alison Leathers (right), a graduate student concentrating in Agricultural Education, Leadership & Extension, share a moment with Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, upon the USDA announcement sending the pair to Virginia. Allen and Leathers are among only thirty students selected from across the country to attend the USDA’s 2015 Agricultural Outlook Forum.

Alexis Allen, a junior concentrating in Agribusiness, and Alison Leathers, a graduate student concentrating in Agricultural Education, Leadership & Extension, are among only 30 students selected from across the country to attend the USDA’s 2015 Agricultural Outlook Forum February 19-20 in Arlington, Virginia.

The Forum, titled “Smart Agriculture in the 21st Century,” is not only designed to introduce students to contemporary agribusiness, future trends, scientific research, and agricultural, as well as give them the chance to lay the groundwork for a future in agriculture, hear speakers from diverse backgrounds, and help them expand their opportunities in their chosen fields.

“This is an excellent opportunity for two of our best and brightest students,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences. “This forum will allow them to network with some of the USDA’s top officials, leaders in the agricultural industry and their peers from across the country. It will also help set them up for successful futures in agriculture.”

The USDA selected 20 university junior and senior students from across the country to attend the conference based on an essay on “Agriculture as a Career,” and 10 graduate students based on their essay, “The Greatest Challenge Facing Agriculture over the next Five Years.” The students were selected from 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, and Non-Land-Grant Agricultural and Renewable Resources Universities.

Allen, from Detroit, came to TSU in the fall of 2014 after completing an associate’s degree at Wayne County Community College. She is excited about the opportunity to attend the conference and would eventually like to work as a food inspector, either through the USDA or the private sector.

“I think I am most looking forward to the diversity and depths of topics that will be presented,” said Allen. “I hope to gain more in-depth understanding to supplement the things I’m learning in class at TSU.”

Leathers, from Preston, Minnesota, received her Bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, and is looking forward to the forum and the opportunities it will create toward helping her achieve her career goal of becoming an Extension agent and a third-generation farmer.

“It will be an excellent learning experience and opportunity to network and meet students and important agricultural leaders,” she said. “I am excited to represent TSU and advocate for our land-grant university system.”

 

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Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Turns Capitol Blue as it Takes Over the Hill

University to showcase academic and athletic programs to lawmakers


TSU Day at the Capitol 1NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee lawmakers will see the impact Tennessee State University is making firsthand with programs like it’s SITES-M project that trains the state’s math teachers to be more efficient and productive, and ground-breaking research in agriculture and health sciences when the University goes to Capitol Hill, Tuesday, Feb. 10 from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m.

Along with providing lawmakers the opportunity to learn about the high-caliber programs at the University, legislators will have the opportunity to interact with students, faculty, staff and student-athletes, as TSU showcases its impressive academic, athletic and research programs during TSU Day at the Capitol. Programs from the University’s various colleges will be on display throughout the Legislative Plaza.

Displays will be available for viewing beginning at 8 a.m. with the official kick-off ceremony taking place at 10 a.m. in the Mezzanine. The event will provide an excellent platform for the state’s elected officials to see and hear firsthand about the issues facing higher education today, and the many student and research success stories from TSU.

TSU Day at the Capitol runs until 1 p.m. and events include:

8 a.m.                                     Displays Open in Legislative Plaza

10 a.m.                                TSU Day at the Capitol Kick-off Ceremony
(Mezzanine)

9 a.m. – noon                  TSU Day at the Capitol Legislative visits

1 p.m.                                  Displays close

Media is invited to attend TSU Day at the Capitol. For more information, call 615.963.5331.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Names Dr. Michael Freeman as New VP for Student Affairs

Dr. Michael Freeman
Dr. Michael Freeman

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has brought a familiar face back in naming Dr. Michael Freeman as the new associate vice president of Student Affairs.

From March 2013 up to his recent appointment, Freeman served as the assistant vice president and dean of Students at the University of South Florida. However, Freeman is no stranger to TSU, having spent nearly seven years at the University, also serving in the same role as vice president for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management from 2006 until 2011, and assistant professor of Higher Education.

“I’m excited to be back at a place I know,” said Freeman. “It’s rare that you get a second, ‘first’ look at an institution and come back to work for a place that holds a special place in your heart.”

Freeman said he has a large task ahead of him as he will be a part of the TSU president’s senior cabinet, and will oversee the following departments: Residence Life, Career Services, Student Activities, Judicial Affairs, the Men and Women’s Centers, Campus and Wellness Centers, Health Services, Counseling, and Recreation and Intramurals.

But it is a task, he said, he is ready to tackle and will focus on three areas to help students prepare for their future.

According to Freeman, he wants to get the staff back to minimum levels to be able to deliver services and support to students, and focus on integrated planning and programing while creating deeper, more meaningful programs for students. He also plans on partnering with departments around campus to help students meet their goals.

“Ultimately, everything we do needs to be geared toward student success and their growth and development,” Freeman added.

But one of the biggest challenges Freeman sees is getting to know TSU in a “new” way.

“I want to make sure I see the University as it is today, and not how it was when I left a few years ago,” he said. “I want to know it in this moment and still be productive. TSU has its own spirit, pride and history, and I’m happy to be a part of this movement.”

Prior to his arrival to TSU in 2006, Freeman served as the vice president and Dean at Saint Mary’s College of Maryland from 1999-2006, as well as dean of Student Affairs from 1995-1999, director of Residence Life from 1987-1989 and associate director for Minority Recruitment and Services from 1984-1987 at the same institution. He also served as senior academic advisor and faculty member at John Hopkins University.

Freeman has a Bachelor of Science in General Studies in Psychology and Sociology, and a Master of Arts in Counselor Education from the University of Iowa, and Ph.D. in Counseling and Personnel Services from the University of Maryland.

 

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Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Sexual Assault, Relationship Violence Focus of Two-Day Summit at Tennessee State University

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Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover addresses participants at a two-day summit on sexual assault on college campus, during opening ceremonies in Poag Auditorium on the main campus. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)


NASHVILLE
(TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover Tuesday welcomed more than 400 representatives from 76 universities, colleges and organizations across the state to a two-day summit on campus sexual assault.

The summit, featuring national experts on sexual assault prevention and complying with changing federal laws, includes customized tracks for campus police, student support services providers, and Title IX investigators.

The Tennessee Board of Regents, the Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association, and the University of Tennessee System, in partnership with the Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence, are sponsoring the summit.

“We are especially delighted and honored that you selected Tennessee State University for this all important summit,” President Glover said, as she presented TBR Chancellor John Morgan. “Sexual assault is a very serious issue, and every member of our campus community has a responsibility to not only know how to prevent it, but also how to respond to it.”

Dr. Glover thanked the summit planners and facilitators from across the state, including the TSU offices of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, and Student Affairs for their contributions.

“Your contribution to this gathering is well noted. Your efforts demonstrate that we must be ready to take every step necessary to support our students when they need us,” the President added.

According to the TBR, the summit also solidifies a partnership between the state’s higher education community and Tennessee’s leading private, non-profit sexual assault coalition.

“Through the development and implementation of effective prevention and awareness programs and campaigns, the statewide partnership will enhance the efforts of Tennessee’s higher education institutions to focus on student safety at all levels,” a TBR release stated.

The summit covers topics ranging from “Domestic and Dating Violence 101” to bystander intervention and the psychological and biological effects of sexual assaults.

Keynote speakers include: Katie Koestner, executive director of the Take Back the Night Foundation and Campus Outreach Services and the first survivor of acquaintance rape to speak out nationally. Others include S. Daniel Carter, director of the 32 National Campus Safety Initiative formed by the families of the victims and survivors of the Virginia Tech tragedy; Connie Kirkland, director of sexual assault services at Northern Virginia Community College and contributing author of the 2014 NCAA guide “Addressing Sexual Assault and Interpersonal Violence,” Jim Hopper, consultant and instructor of psychology at Harvard Medical School specializing in the psychological and biological effects of sexual assault and serving on the congressionally-mandated Peace Corps Sexual Assault Advisory Council, and Kayce Matthews, program specialist with the Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence.

The summit concludes on Wednesday.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Announces Black History Month Events

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University announced today a schedule of events for Black History Month beginning in February. Students, staff, faculty, alumni and members of the public are invited to attend all events.

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TSU 2015 Black History Month Schedule of Events
The University will hold a series of compelling activities to celebrate cultural diversity at TSU and recognize the contributions of African-Americans during the month of February as the nation observes Black History Month. This American history is one all can celebrate as we recognize the achievements and significant roles African-Americans, in collaboration with so many others, have played in shaping the country.

Upcoming program and events include lectures, history and culture conference, panel discussions, and musical and theatrical performances. The University will also hold its annual Day on the Capital Feb. 10, and African-American History and Culture conference Feb. 13. Events are free, unless noted, and open to the public.

For more information, call the Office of Media Relations at 615.963.5331 or communications@tnstate.edu.

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.