TSU National Night Out Event to Highlight Fun and Dialogue with First Responders, Emergency Management

LogoJPEGblueNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – In what is expected to be a fun evening, Tennessee State University, in collaboration with emergency managers, first responders, safety advocates and the community, will host a crime and drug prevention awareness event Thursday, Aug. 27. The event, which takes place on the Presidents Administrative Lawn on the main campus from 5-8 p.m., is in observance of the 32nd Annual National Night Out campaign.

IMG_4367The NNO is sponsored by the National Association of Town Watch. It is a yearly campaign aimed at highlighting crime and drug prevention in neighborhoods across the country. In addition to fun activities, NNO provides residents the opportunity to interact with local first responders in a relaxed setting and learn more about safety in their communities.

Called the Tigers Night, the TSU event is sponsored by the Office of Emergency Management. It is designed to:

  • Heighten crime and drug prevention awareness
  • Generate support for, and participation in, campus crime prevention efforts
  • Strengthen campus community spirit and first responder partnerships
  • Send a message to criminals to let them know TSU is actively fighting back against crime

More than 300 individuals including safety and security-oriented vendors, non-profit organizations, and government entities are expected to attend. Families are urged to bring their children for fun activities and concessions.

“This is not a student event, this is a TSU community event,” said Aerin Washington, Crime Prevention officer in the Office of Emergency Management. “Children are welcomed and they are sure to have a great time seeing the police horses, touring mobile booking, taking a picture on the Fire truck, and getting to shake hands with “SherRuff” of the Davidson County Sheriffs Office.”

Giveaways will include a free $20 first ride coupon from UBER, TSU paraphernalia from the campus bookstore, and a chance to win a hand-turbine radio/flashlight/cellphone charger courtesy of Metro Health Department.

For more information please contact: Aerin Washington at (615) 963-5928 or awashi14@tnstate.edu.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Alumna, Renowned Cancer Specialist and Researcher Named President of the National Medical Association

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News service) – With family, friends and notables in medicine, politics and entertainment watching at the Cobo Center in downtown Detroit Aug. 4, TSU graduate and retired Air Force Brigadier General, Dr. Edith P. Mitchell, was sworn-in as president of the National Medical Association, the nation’s oldest professional society for African-American physicians. She becomes the 116th head of the organization.

Mitchell, a renowned researcher and cancer specialist, is the director of the Center to Eliminate Cancer Disparities at the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University. She was sworn-in during the 113th Annual Convention and Scientific Assembly of the NMA, a 30,000-member organization aimed at promoting equality and eliminating disparities in health care.

“I am deeply honored to be sworn-in as president of this prestigious organization,” Mitchell said. “There is still much work to be done with regards to disparities in medical treatment. I believe that we can all work together and make great strides to address barriers in helping underserved populations get better care and lead to better health care in our nation.”

Elois
Dr. Edith P. Mitchell, left, receives a TSU pin from Associate Vice President for Institutional Advancement Eloise Abernathy Alexis during Dr. Mitchell’s swearing-in ceremony in Detroit Aug. 4. (Photo by Kelli Sharpe, TSU Media Relations)

In a statement from Tennessee State University, President Glenda Glover congratulated Mitchell, referring to her as “one of our very best who has committed her life and career to making sure the least of us receives the best.”

“The Tennessee State University family joins me in saluting Dr. Mitchell on this great achievement,” President Glover said. “Her outstanding leadership in the medical field and life continue to give hope to thousands of people suffering from cancer and who are not fortunate to receive the quality care they need.”

In addition to Glover’s congratulatory message, the university presented Mitchell with a TSU pin. Associate Vice President for Institutional Advancement Eloise Abernathy Alexis made the presentation and noted Mitchell’s achievement as president of the NMA as “representative of her exemplary career leadership and service” in research and medicine.

Alum
Several TSU officials and alums were on hand to congratulate Dr. Mitchell. They included from left (front row), Merlton Brandenberg, Dr. Carletta Harlan, Pat Brandenberg, Dr. Mitchell and Dale Mitchell. In the second row are from left, Cassandra Griggs, Rita Jordan, Eloise Alexis, Dr. Jeanette M. Campbell and Dr. Harvey Bowles. George McKinney is far back. (Courtesy photo)

“As a retired Brigadier General, and the first female physician in the history of the United States Air Force to achieve this rank, she both inspires and challenges students and alumni toward excellence,” Alexis said. “Along with her leadership of the NMA, and her fight to end cancer disparities, Dr. Edith Mitchell is spearheading the attack on cancer and its devastating impact on underserved communities and people of color.  We are proud to uplift her advocacy and scholarship as reflective of the educational experience that Tennessee State University has provided for more than a century.”

Mitchell, who received a B.S. degree “with distinction” in Biochemistry from TSU in 1969, is also the program leader of gastrointestinal oncology and associate director for Diversity Programs at Thomas Jefferson Hospital. A former senior medical Air National Guard advisor to the command surgeon and the medical liaison between the active Air Force and Air National Guard, Mitchell was the first female physician to receive the rank of Brigadier General in the Air Force.

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A cross section of family members, friends and notables from medicine, politics and entertainment joined TSU alums and officials to celebrate Dr. Mitchell’s swearing-in as president of the National Medical Association. (Photo by Kelli Sharpe, TSU Media Relations)

In recognition of her advocacy for the underserved population, and her commitment to community health, Mitchell has received numerous accolades. They include the “Tree of Life Award,” the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Control Award” the National Cancer Care Physician of the Year Award, the American Society of Clinical Oncology Humanitarian Award, the Living with Cancer Foundation Looking Glass Award, and the Women in Medicine Research Award, from the NMA.

In her military career, Mitchell received 15 service medals and ribbons, including the Legion of Merit, two Meritorious Service Medals, a National Defense Service Medal, and the Humanitarian Service Medal. In addition to President Glover, industry, medical and business professionals, Dr. Mitchell received congratulatory messages from people across the nation, including several members of Congress, state lawmakers, the Mayor of Philadelphia Michael A. Nutter, and Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf, among others.

At the swearing-in ceremony, TSU was also represented by Kelli Sharpe, assistant vice president for Public Relations and Communications; Cassandra Griggs, director of Alumni Relations; and several TSU alumni. They joined other prominent guests such as Desiree Johnson, CEO of Johnson Publishing Company; Reverend Alvin Kibble, vice president of the Society of Adventist Communicators; music industry mogul Kenneth Gamble; Retired Brigadier General Jackson S. Davis; U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D-Pa.); and Dr. Stephen Klasko, president and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Computer Science Program Filling Critical Need for IT Professionals with Advanced Training

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – High-performance computing and bioinformatics, and cyber security and networking are two of the fastest growing areas in the information technology industry, but few universities are offering advanced degrees with these unique concentrations to meet the demand of students and professionals seeking career advancement or employment. But Tennessee State University has joined a handful of institutions that have answered the call.

Last fall, the University began offering a Master of Science in Computer Science degree with a focus on providing training that is on the cutting-edge. TSU is the only public higher education institution in Nashville offering the M.S. degree in Computer Science.

According to Dr. Ali Sekmen, chair and professor of the Department of Computer Science, the new degree program is also suitable for students who intend to pursue a doctoral degree in Computer Science or related fields. He added that courses are scheduled in the evenings to accommodate working IT professionals.

shutterstock_59508448Sekmen said students could complete either the high-performance computing and bioinformatics, or cyber security and networking concentrations by pursuing a non-thesis option that requires 33 hours of coursework, or the thesis option that requires completion of 27 hours of coursework and a thesis. The thesis option is strongly recommended for students who intend to pursue a doctoral degree, he said.

“The demand for high performance computing (HPC) in industry and research has significantly increased in recent years,” Sekmen said. “HPC has become a dominant paradigm due to the rapid developments in computer architecture such as multi-core, multi-processer, graphic process units.”

Additionally, Sekmen said the global bioinformatics market has been growing in “double digits” with increased demands in medicine, healthcare, and life sciences.

“HPC and bioinformatics are driving the medical industry’s search for novel systems that will result in innovative therapies. As a result, it is highly important that TSU, as with many other universities, begin to provide opportunities for students to pursue this area of expertise,” Sekmen said.

Although enrollment in the TSU program has doubled initial projections since it started a year ago, it is still a small part of the huge demand. According to the 2013 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the computer science job-opening forecast for 2010 through 2020 is 2.4 times larger than the number of computer science graduates. There will be about one million more jobs than students by 2020.

Between 2010 and 2012, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security increased its cyber-security workforce by 500 percent, but the agency’s demand for more expertise in these critical areas remains very high, with a grim outlook. The U.S. is not producing enough people with the right skills set to make progress in the search for more cyber-security trained experts. When it comes to compensation, Sekmen said Computer Science is among the highest-paid fields in science, technology, and engineering, and the U.S. Department of Labor projects that it will continue to be one of the fastest growing occupations for the near future.

“Employers seek professionals with strong skills in programming and software systems, and development, areas that are strongly emphasized in our Master of Computer Science degree program,” Sekmen added.

For more information on the M.S. in Computer Science program contact Dr. Tamara Rogers at trogers3@tnstate.edu or (615) 963-1520.

Expo Highlights TSU’s Growing Agricultural Outreach as Officials Recognize Tennessee’s Top Small Farmers

University Holds Position for “Biggest Extension Network” Among HBCUs 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Highlighting its broad Cooperative Extension program that now touches more 50 counties in the state, Tennessee State University Thursday recognized four individuals as the “top small farmers” in Tennessee. The recognition, which also included the presentation of the “Small Farmer of the Year” award, marked the conclusion of the 2015 Small Farms Expo that brought together more than 400 agricultural experts, farmers, students and officials from across Tennessee and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Farmers1
Tennessee 2015 Top Small Farmers are, from left, Steve Malamatos, “Alternative Enterprise”; Ken Drinnon, “Innovative Marketing”; Trent McVay, “Most Improved Small Farm”; and Christopher Mullican, “Best Management Practices.” Ken Drinnon received the “Small Farmer of the Year” award. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“These individuals are the ‘best of the best’ in farming in Tennessee,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, as he presented plaques to Ken Drinnon, a beef cattle producer in Cheatham County, recognized for “innovative marketing; and Trent McVay, a vegetable and cattle grower in Shelby County, recognized for “most improved small farm.”

Also receiving plaques were Steve Malamatos, who owns a poultry processing business in White County. He was recognized for “alternative enterprise,” and Christopher Mullican, a beef cattle producer in Sumner and Davidson Counties, who also runs a non-profit therapeutic service for children and soldiers with disabilities.  He was recognized for “best management practices.”

Drinnon, who owns 82 acres of farm land and leases another 60 acres, where he runs a freezer beef business selling wholesale or retail to local restaurants, received the “Small Farmer of the Year” award.

“It is quite a humbling experience to receive this award,” Drinnon said. “My family and I are very thankful to this university and the state for not only working with farmers but also recognizing our contributions in such a public manner. We try to do the best to do a very good job.”

Candidates for recognition were nominated by either their extension agents, government agents or officials in each honoree’s county.

Reddy1
Dr. Chandra Reddy, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, talks to a reporter minutes before the opening of the Expo. He says that TSU now has the “biggest extension network” of all HBCUs in the nation. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

According to Reddy, the recognitions and awards are an indication of TSU’s expansive outreach across the state in helping small farmers recognize their own potential and hone their skills through research, and introduction to new farming techniques, equipment and production methods.

“This annual Expo, now in its 11th year, is a way for Tennessee State University and our partners on the federal and state levels to recognized the role farmers and agriculture play in the state and the nation,” Reddy told reporters earlier.

As the nation celebrates the 125th anniversary of 1890 Morrill Act that created the second land grant system that include Tennessee State University, Reddy announced that TSU now has the “biggest extension network” of all HBCUs in the nation. He said in seven years TSU’s extension program has grown from 10 counties to more than 50.

“This is quite an achievement that could not have been possible without the support of our TSU leadership under President Glenda Glover, and partners like UT-Knoxville (University of Tennessee), the USDA, the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, and all of the agencies represented in the state,” Reddy said.

He attributed the success of the Cooperative Extension Program to the workers under the leadership of Dr. Latif Lighari, associate dean for Extension.

“We are grateful to Dr. Lighari for his leadership, and his team for the work they are doing, and for ensuring another successful Expo,” Reddy added.

Natalie
Natalie Owens, Extension Agent and Food and Nutrition Education Program specialist in Shelby County, demonstrates how to prepare nutritious blueberry crumble without artificial ingredients. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

At Thursday’s Expo, visitors, including students, saw exhibits, displays and new discoveries that not only showcased the impact of agriculture and its future in the state, but also the educational potential of the University and the level of research it conducts.

kids
Elementary and middle school students prepare to go on a farm excursion during the Expo. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Organized by the Cooperative Extension program along with several agencies and institutions, the 2015 Small Farms Expo exhibited a biodiesel fuel production unit that farmers can use to turn crops into fuel for their equipment, a greenhouse emission reduction system for field crops, community gardening, meat goat production and genetics, beekeeping demonstration, and 4-H and adult agriculture.

Workshops included organic vegetable production techniques, pesticide handling and safety, food preservation, and soil and plant tissue sampling, among others.

Lighari, who has headed the Expo since its inception, recognized his fellow organizers, the various farm managers and research leaders, small farmers, schools and students for their participation.

“Your input and participation made this event very successful,” Lighari said. “We thank you and especially the small farmers who are the lifeline of what we do.”

Other speakers included TSU Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dr. Mark Hardy; Associate Vice President for Research and Sponsored Programs, Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young; State Rep. Harold Love Jr.; Agriculture Commissioner Julius Johnson; and Dr. Tim Cross, dean of Extension at the University of Tennessee.

Other TSU partners, Expo organizers, agencies and sponsors present were the Tennessee Farm Bureau, U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Farm Service Agency, and the Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Metro Guidance Counselors Get Closer Look at Programs and Offerings at Tennessee State University

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – As a new school year begins, deans, admissions officials and staff are making all the stops to spread the word about the quality educational opportunities at Tennessee State University.

On Thursday, July 23, during a meeting of more than  90 Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools guidance counselors on the TSU campus, officials used the opportunity to remind them  about the affordable cost of education at the University, that nearly 85 percent of students get employment immediately after graduation, and that a high number of graduates are accepted in graduate schools.

Since the counselors serve as a direct link between the schools and the University, the goal was to encourage them to steer their students and potential graduates toward post-secondary education at TSU, said Dr. John Cade, interim vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Support Services.

“We offer an affordable, quality education that prepares our students with the necessary skills and competencies to be successful,” Cade said. His remarks were followed by deans of the various colleges, who gave brief remarks on the uniqueness of their offerings and programs.

According to Dr. Gregory Clark, director of Alumni Outreach and High School Relations, 21 percent of TSU’s enrollment comes from Metropolitan Nashville Public High Schools.

“We look forward to admitting all of our potential students from Metro Schools this fall,” Cade added as he acquainted the counselors with University programs,  registration requirements, tuition and fees, and scholarship opportunities.

COE_Brief
Dwight Martin, right, of the College of Engineering at Tennessee State University, talks to visitors about offerings in his college during last year’s meeting of high school guidance counselors on the TSU campus. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The architectural engineering program in the College of Engineering – one of only 20 in the nation – and a flight school program, one of only two in Tennessee, were among programs announced by the deans for their uniqueness.

Additionally, a global education which exposes students to the world around them through travel and study-abroad initiatives is just one of the many good reasons why “TSU is the go-to school,” the counselors were told.

With more than half of the counselors comprise of TSU students and graduates, the message about the quality of the University’s education was easy to get across.

During last year’s meeting of the counselors at TSU, Dr. Barbara Mullins, school counselor for the Freshman Academy at John Overton High School, who earned her doctorate from TSU, said the quality of a TSU education is comparable to the best anywhere.

“When I talk to students about TSU, I talk about the ‘TSU experience’ because I know about it first-hand,” Mullins said. “More than anything else, the personal care that comes with getting an education at TSU really stands out.”

Like Mullins, teacher recruitment is another key link between TSU and Metro Schools. The University remains a key pipeline to recruiting Metro and area teachers.  Recent reports show that for the past three years, TSU has been one of the top teacher preparation programs in the state, providing exceptionally qualified candidates for teaching positions not only across Tennessee and the southern region, but right here in the University’s backyard with MNPS.

In 2012, 52 of the 553 new hires were from TSU, placing the University in the number one spot, with MTSU coming in a close second with 50 hires. Lipscomb, Trevecca and Vanderbilt came in at third, fourth and fifth, respectively.

Nationally, HBCU Lifestyle, a publication dedicated to “black college living,” ranked TSU No. 1 among the “Top 10 HBCUs that Produce Teachers” in the nation. The publication provides HBCU students and their families with “valuable advice” about college admissions, campus life and financial aid resources. It said TSU’s undergraduate and graduate offerings and concentrations in biology, chemistry and elementary education made the school’s teacher preparation program more attractive.

“We are thrilled about this No. 1 ranking,” the dean of the College of Education, Dr. Kimberly King-Jupiter, said. “Our goal is to contribute to the production of diverse, highly qualified and culturally responsive teachers who can meet the needs of all students.”

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

2015 Tennessee State University Small Farms Expo Opens July 30


NASHVILLE
(TSU News Service) – More than 400 agricultural experts, farmers and officials from across Tennessee and the U.S. Department of Agriculture are expected to attend this year’s Small Farms Expo and Small Farmer Recognition program at Tennessee State University.

SFE FlyerThe Expo, hosted by the TSU College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences Cooperative Extension Program, opens on Thursday, July 30, at the Agricultural Research and Education Center (The TSU Farm). The Expo will culminate with recognition of the state’s top four farmers, and the Farmer of the Year Award presentation.

Highlights of the Expo will include farm demonstrations and tours for area high school students, displays of new research projects and experiments, as well as showcases of the latest farming equipment, agricultural products and produce, and new farming techniques.

One major kickoff activity leading to the Expo is the “TSU Extension Agent Showcase” on Wednesday, July 29, from 11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. in the Ferrell-Westbrook Complex (The Barn). During this period, all 50 Extension agents from across the state will unveil exhibits showcasing the impact of the their activities throughout Tennessee.

Among new research projects at this year’s Expo is an effort to “Promote pigeon pea production for limited resource farmers of Tennessee as a food, forage and soil improving crop.”

Sponsors include the USDA, the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, University of Tennessee Extension, the Tennessee Farm Bureau, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Farm Services Bureau, among others.

Among officials expected are the Commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, Julius Johnson; the President of the Tennessee Farm Bureau Federation, Dr. Tim Cross; the President of TSU, Dr. Glenda Glover; and Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences.

More details on the Expo can be found at http://bit.ly/1D6LXzo.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 45 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Remembers Francis Guess, Alumnus, Civil Rights and Business Leader

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University graduate, civil rights champion and Nashville business leader Francis Guess has died. He was 69.

Guess, a Vietnam veteran who blazed the trails for justice and equal rights, served on the National Civil Rights Commission and as the first African-American commissioner for the Tennessee Departments of Labor and General Services under then-Gov. Lamar Alexander.

“Mr. Francis Guess was an outstanding graduate of Tennessee State University, and a leader in his community and country, who dedicated his life to fighting for equal opportunity,” TSU President Glenda Glover said. “The TSU family is deeply saddened to hear of his passing. To the family, we send our most heartfelt sympathies for your loss. Our thoughts are with you during this difficult time.”

Guess
Francis Guess earned a bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Tennessee State University. (Courtesy Photo)

A Nashville native, Guess earned a bachelor’s degree in Political Science from TSU, and a master’s degree in Business Administration from Vanderbilt University. He later completed the Senior Executives in State and Local Government program at Harvard University.

In a 45-year career as a civil rights advocate, humanitarian and a business leader, Guess served as vice president of The Danner Company, which operated Shoney’s restaurants, as well as owner and operator of Helicopter Corporation of America. He also served on numerous non-profit boards including the Nashville Convention Center Authority, the Tennessee Supreme Court Access to Justice Commission; Board of Professional Responsibility of the Supreme Court of Tennessee; Nashville Minority Business Development Fund; and the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum Board of Officers and Directors.

Guess received numerous awards during his lifetime for his public and civic service. In 2013, he received the Joe Kraft Humanitarian Award by the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee.

He is survived by his daughter, Maria Guess; his mother, Kathryn Driver; and three brothers and three sisters.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 45 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

John Merritt Classic Press Conference Set for July 24

Courtesy: Tennessee State Sports Information

JMCX_FlyerNASHVILLE, Tenn. – Tennessee State University will host the 2015 John Merritt Classic Press Conference on Friday, July 24 at Nissan Stadium. The press conference will begin at 11 a.m. in the stadium’s Press Room (Lower Level).

The 17th Annual John Merritt Classic football game on Sept. 6 will see the Tigers face the Hornets of Alabama State for the 13th time in the all-time series history. The game will be a rematch of last season when TSU fell to ASU 27-21, on the road.

Head coaches Rod Reed, of TSU, and Brian Jenkins, of ASU, will join the director of athletics from both schools to address the media and speak on the upcoming contest. The honoree for the annual event will also be announced.

Rudy Kalis, long time WSMV sports newscaster, is set to MC the event.

In last season’s John Merritt Classic, the Tigers defeated Edward Waters College, 58-6, to improve to 11-5 all-time in JMC games.

The press conference will be streamed live on the OVCDigitalNetwork.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 45 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Former Tennessee State University Sports Information Director Dooley Passes Away

Courtesy: Tennessee State Sports Information

‪NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Former Tennessee State University sports information director and longtime HBCU administrator Wallace Dooley Jr. died on Tuesday. He was 68.

Dooley served as the associate athletics director for media relations at Tennessee State from 2006-2012.

“We are so saddened by the passing of our friend and colleague Wallace Dooley,” said TSU Athletics Director Teresa Phillips. “He and his family have been a prominent part of TSU athletics for decades. He was a treasure chest of information and history for our programs. The TSU family sends our prayers and love to his wife Bridgette and his children.”

Wallace Dooley
Wallace Dooley Jr. served as associate athletics director for media relations at TSU from 2006-2012. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

In a 28-year span, Dooley held positions in sports information/media relations at several schools and two conference offices. He completed a full circle when he returned to his alma mater, Tennessee State University to finish his career.‪

In 2012, he was honored with the CoSIDA (College Sports Information Directors of America) Lifetime Achievement. After retiring from TSU, Dooley maintained connection to the field working as the media contact (radio/internet) in support of HBCU student-athletes and programs through BoxtoRow and HSRN Radio.

‪His interest in sports information began as an undergraduate student at TSU. He assisted the intramural director with compiling statistics for football and basketball games. In 1978, after working as a part-time sportswriter at The Tennessean and as an assistant in the sports information office at then-Memphis State, he was named the first full-time sports information director at Alabama A&M.

Dooley won 11 CoSIDA publications awards during his career in addition to earning the CoSIDA 25-Year Award. He counted the Lifetime Achievement Award and its recognition as one of his most cherished of his career.

‪His many years in the profession included tenures as SID at the University of District of Columbia (1981-1984), Virginia State (1984-88) and North Carolina Central (1988-92). He served the Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1992-96) as public relations director and the Southwestern Athletic Conference (2001-2006) as assistant commissioner for media relations before returning to Nashville.

‪Dooley also supported athletics off campus. In 1996, he worked with the Atlanta Olympics as a venue press chief. He also worked in the sports information office for the Nashville Kats of the Arena Football and assisted with game day operations for the Tennessee Titans.

‪Along the way, he had an opportunity to promote some great teams and athletes, picking up honors and accolades for his work in the process.

‪While volunteering at Tennessee State in 1970, the Tiger football team finished 11-0 and the men’s basketball squad went 24-3. From 1970 through 1975, TSU’s football team was 55-8 with two undefeated seasons and the basketball teams were 111-32 while making four appearances in the NCAA tournament. During Dooley’s second tenure at TSU, the basketball team won back-to-back Ohio Valley Conference football titles in 1997-98, including an undefeated regular season, and during his final years, TSU women’s track team won three league titles.

‪In 1982, Dooley joined several other SIDs from HBCUs (historically black colleges and universities) to partner with the National Association for Women’s Sports (NAWS) in recognizing female student-athletes as All-Americans.

In 1984 at the CoSIDA workshop in St. Louis, he teamed with 11 other SIDs to form the Black College Sports Information Directors Association (BCSIDA).

‪Dooley worked with and trained a number of former assistants who earned their niche in the profession, including Monique Morgan Smith (former Associate Commissioner, CIAA), Tonya Walker (Athletic Director, Winston-Salem State), Greg Goings (Bowie State SID and President of CoSIDA’s Division II-SIDA group), William Bright (HBCU administrator), Zena Lewis (Washington Redskins PR) and Zekeya Harrison (assistant athletics director for media relations, Tennessee State).

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 45 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

White House Honors Tennessee State University Alum Gerald Durley as “Climate Champions of Change”

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Dr. Gerald L. Durley was the keynote speaker at TSU’s Centennial Celebration Convocation. Durley, who has testified before the Environmental Protection Agency on the clean power plan, is currently working to eradicate fluoride from toothpaste and drinking water.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University graduate and civil rights advocate, Dr. Gerald L. Durley, has been recognized by President Barack Obama as a “Champions of Change.” Durley, former pastor of Atlanta’s Providence Missionary Baptist Church, who seeks to combine faith, science and civil rights, was among 12 people of faith recognized by the White House Monday for their efforts in fighting climate change.

“These Champions have demonstrated clear leadership across the United States and around the world through their grassroots efforts to green their communities and educate others on the moral and social justice implications of climate change,” a White House statement said about Durley and his fellow honorees.

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President Barak Obama described Dr. Gerald Durley and his fellow “Champions of Change” as “individuals doing extraordinary things to empower and inspire members of their communities.”

The Champions of Change program was created as an opportunity for the White House to feature individuals doing extraordinary things to empower and inspire members of their communities.

TSU President Glenda Glover called the White House preferment “a remarkable honor for Dr. Durley” to be recognized by the president of the United States.

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TSU President Glenda Glover called the “Champions of Change” designation a “remarkable honor for Dr. Durley” to be recognized by the president of the United States.

“He is an outstanding example of the great work Tennessee StateUniversity graduates are doing to not only impact their communities but the world,” President Glover said. “We are extremely proud of Dr. Durley. The TSU family joins me in congratulating him on this outstanding achievement.”

As a 1964 TSU graduate, former SGA president and former captain of the basketball team, Durley sees a parallel between faith and science and the lessons he learned as a civil rights advocate of the 1960s. He believes that climate change, global warming, and environmental justice are moral imperatives and civil rights issues.

Durley, who has testified before the Environmental Protection Agency on the clean power plan, is currently working to eradicate fluoride from toothpaste and drinking water. He has worked with several groups on climate change, including Interfaith Power and Light, the Sierra Club, Eco-America, U.S. Climate Action Network, the Environmental Working Group, Green Law, Ambassadors for Clean Air, Moms Clean Air Force, and Water Keeper Inc.

Durley is a former dean at Clark Atlanta University and the former director of the Health Promotion Resource Center of the Morehouse School of Medicine. A highly sought speaker on civil and human rights, Durley serves on numerous boards including the March of Dimes, the NAACP, the Atlanta Union Mission, Vision 2020 of Atlanta, and Healthy Fulton County Initiative, among others.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 45 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.