Graduates say goodbye to TSU, hello to jobs awaiting them

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Nationally syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner helped Tennessee State University showcase its excellence on Saturday.

Glover Joyner photo
TSU President Glenda Glover presents radio personality Tom Joyner with a tribute to his great aunt, Jane Elliott Hall, who has a building named in her honor at TSU. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Joyner, host of The Tom Joyner Morning Show, delivered TSU’s undergraduate commencement address. More than 800 students received degrees in various disciplines at the spring ceremony in the William Jasper Hale Stadium on the main campus.

Joyner, who has long been a proponent of historically black colleges and universities, credits his mother and great aunt, Jane Elliott Hall. Elliott, who started TSU’s cafeteria program in its early days, has a building on campus named in her honor.

Joyner encouraged the graduates to “choose a cause and commit to making a change.”

“If I leave you with anything this morning, it’s to do what you can, and everybody can do something,” he said.

Mr. TSU Jordan Gaither, of Atlanta, was among Saturday’s graduates. Gaither said he met Joyner last year at the Southern Heritage Classic in Memphis, Tennessee, and that Joyner’s hard work ethic is inspirational.

“He’s definitely one of the hardest working people in the business,” said Gaither, who is majoring in exercise science with a minor in mass communications. “Radio is something I’m into. I’d like to be a radio personality one of these days.”

An entrepreneur and philanthropist, Joyner is a champion of historically black colleges and universities. His foundation, the Tom Joyner Foundation, supports HBCUs with scholarships, endowments, and capacity building enhancements.

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Class of 2017 celebrates. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Since its creation in 1997, the foundation has raised more than $65 million to help students stay in school. Last year, the foundation selected TSU to be a “school of the month.” Under the designation, the foundation awarded scholarships to students throughout the month and featured TSU’s accomplishments on Joyner’s weekly morning program.

Also last year, the foundation entered into a partnership with TSU to help students interested in science, technology, engineering and math. Under the partnership, Memphis students graduating from five Tennessee community colleges will receive full scholarships to attend TSU.

“I established the Tom Joyner Foundation because I wanted to continue showing love to HBCUs,” Joyner said. “Schools like TSU make it easy to do.”

Students say the Tom Joyner partnership and other TSU initiatives – like the Career Development Center and the Women’s Center – have helped prepare them for the workforce, as well as find jobs.

Gaither, who has an internship lined up with the Tennessee Higher Education Commission and will be working with an NBA basketball team this summer, is one of a number of TSU graduates who have jobs waiting for them.

Maya Davis of Nashville, a computer science major, and electrical engineering major Cametria Weatherspoon of Memphis, will both be working for Lockheed Martin.

“Having a job after I graduate is a blessing,” Weatherspoon said. “I’m excited.”

While some students have jobs lined up, Joyner joked that for others, they may be asked when they are going to start making money.

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TSU Undergraduate Commencement speaker Tom Joyner gives gift to graduate. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

“The answer is today,” he said, “I am going to give each graduate $5. Some will invest and may save it and put it with other Graduation money. Keep in touch and let me know what you did with it. But whatever you do with it, make it count.”

Also celebrating were TSU’s Class of 1967, who returned as Golden Vintagers. These alumni walked across the stage for a second time, receiving certificates recognizing their 50-year milestone.

Georgia native Alvin Hinkle, an accomplished attorney now residing in Columbia, South Carolina, returned for the Vintagers celebration.

“When I was on campus in 1967 it was during the Civil Rights era and there was a lot of activity,” said Hinkle, who was president of the Student Senate at the time. “I wanted to come back and see people I haven’t seen in 50 years. It’s good to be back.”

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TSU’s Class of 1967 returns as Golden Vintagers. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

The evening before, graduate commencement participants received words of wisdom from Congressman Jim Cooper in TSU’s Howard C. Gentry Complex.

Cooper, who represents Middle Tennessee in the U.S. Congress, said before the event that he was “excited to honor Tennessee State University’s graduate class,” and that the “world is ready for their knowledge and leadership.”

Taking Cooper’s words to heart, graduate George Davis will put his TSU education to work at the U.S. Department of Agriculture where he has secured employment. Davis received a master’s in agricultural science with a concentration in data analysis and business management.

“You’ve got to seize every opportunity that you get,” said Davis, a Memphis native. “Having a job lined up just shows me how hard I’ve worked.”

Altogether, 1,067 TSU graduates – 266 grad and 801 undergrad – participated in the commencement ceremonies. Of the undergrads, 128 got degrees in nursing, 56 in criminal justice, 51 in business administration, and 50 in health sciences.

Student Government Association president Aarian Forman is one of the business administration majors who graduated. The Danville, Illinois, native said his experience at TSU has prepared him to be a “leader in the world.”

“TSU has made me think on a different level,” Forman said. “I was challenged to not just think on a local or national scale, but on a global scale.”

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Congressman Jim Cooper urges TSU graduates to vote, give back to university

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Congressman Jim Cooper lauded Tennessee State University graduates for their hard work, and urged them to do two things: vote and support the university.

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TSU graduate students wait to receive their degrees. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Cooper, who represents Middle Tennessee in the U.S. Congress, gave the address at TSU’s graduate commencement on Friday in the Howard C. Gentry Complex on the university’s main campus.

TSU President Glenda Glover provided greetings to the graduates and their families and friends before Cooper spoke.

“This is your day,” she said. “Today we honor you for reaching this significant milestone.”

Cooper echoed President Glover’s sentiment.

“This is truly a special occasion,” Cooper said. “It’s the culmination of years of hard work; it’s the demonstration of true excellence. Our nation needs such excellence.”

Cooper also appealed to the graduates to vote and give back financially to TSU.

“These two things are basically free,” he said. “Voting doesn’t cost you anything. Giving a small sum to your alma mater doesn’t really cost very much at all. But participation in both are essential.”

Cooper said before the event that he was “excited to honor Tennessee State University’s graduate class,” and that the “world is ready for their knowledge and leadership.”

Taking Cooper’s words to heart, graduate George Davis will put his TSU education to work at the U.S. Department of Agriculture where he has secured employment. Davis received a master’s in agricultural science with a concentration in data analysis and business management.

He’s among a number of TSU graduates – both grad and undergrad – who have jobs lined up.

“You’ve got to seize every opportunity that you get,” said Davis, a Memphis native. “Having a job lined up just shows me how hard I’ve worked.”

Nationally syndicated radio host Tom Joyner will give the address at TSU’s undergraduate commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 6, at 8 a.m. in the William Jasper Hale Stadium, also on the university’s main campus.

“I’m so honored to speak to these graduates,” Joyner said in a statement. “I know these TSU Tigers have put in plenty of sweat – and yeah, tears – so they can go out and change the world.”

Altogether, 1,067 TSU graduates – 266 grad and 801 undergrad – will participate in Tennessee State’s spring commencement ceremonies. Of the undergrads, 128 will get degrees in nursing, 56 in criminal justice, 51 in business administration, and 50 in health sciences.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Receives $35,000 Grant to Provide Learning Support for Incoming Freshmen

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has received a $35,000 grant to help incoming freshmen who may need to do a little brushing up on math, reading and writing.

The one-week residential Summer Completion Academy is made possible through the Tennessee Board of Regents’ Student Engagement, Retention, and Success Grant. About 160 students in the academy will have the opportunity to satisfy learning support requirements prior to their first semester of enrollment.

The program will run over two sessions between June 25-30, and July 16-21, 2017. Students participating in the program have already been accepted to TSU.

“Our focus for the grant is to work with students who are at risk,” said Tiffany Bellafant Steward, interim director of Academic Success Services and Learning Support Centers. “These are students who are not prepared for college-level work who would go into our learning support areas of math, reading and writing.”

She said participants will receive learning support such as additional lab sessions, extra days in class, as well as “engagement activities,” including pre- and post-tests to measure their achievement level.

“We are thrilled to be in a position to offer a program like this to students, which could take up to three classes off their fall schedule,” Steward said.

Sabrina Brown, associate director of Academic Success, is the Project Director for the Summer Completion Academy.  She can be reached at 615-963-2144.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Grandmother of four to get TSU degree after 55 years

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Darlene Mullins always told her children to finish what they started. On May 6, the 72-year-old grandmother of four will do just that when she receives her degree from Tennessee State University after 55 years.

Mullins will be among more than 800 graduates from various disciplines at the undergraduate spring commencement in the William Jasper Hale Stadium on TSU’s main campus.

“I am really looking forward to this,” said Mullins, who is graduating with honors. “I am very excited and just overjoyed to see this day.”

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John and Darlene Mullins will celebrate their 54th wedding anniversary in August. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

For Mullins, the journey to earn a college degree began on TSU’s campus in 1962. But just as it started, it was cut short.

“Love got in the way,” said Mullins, who celebrates 54 years of marriage in August.

She met fellow student John Mullins, a senior from East St. Louis, Illinois, who she described as dashing, handsome and “everything to behold.”

Darlene, a former Miss New Jersey and Miss Glamour runner up, had an immediate crush.

“I thought he was the finest thing walking on the campus,” Darlene told Alumni Life, a campus magazine, in 2014.

She said a courtship developed and the two were married a short time later. John stayed on and completed his college work, graduating in 1964. Darlene took on the role of caring for their home and raising a family.

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Darlene Tucker “Miss New Jersey” (’63 TSU Yearbook Photo)

But in putting her education aside, Darlene also gave up on a dream of becoming an Olympic track star as a member of the famed Tigerbelles.

“I came to TSU because I ran track. I wanted to go to the 1964 Olympics,” Darlene said. “Wilma Rudolph was my idol and I was on my way. I get to TSU and meet the great coach (Ed) Temple, but we bumped heads, because I had to make a choice between his track team or Mr. John Mullins.”

More than a half-century and two children and several grandchildren later, John and Darlene have remained very supportive of each other, while living in six states over the course of their marriage.

As the children grew older and family care got less, Darlene embarked on a long and successful career in retail and cosmetology.

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John E. Mullins “Mr. Esquire” (’63 TSU Yearbook Photo)

All the while, John worked for a number of corporate and government agencies before starting his own business, Lions Group, Inc., a successful marketing and advertising agency in Dallas, Texas. He said his TSU education with a degree in business gave him a good foundation to be an entrepreneur.

“I always knew I wanted to own my own business,” John said.

But as the two moved around with success at every turn, Darlene never forgot her academic aspiration.

“Something kept nagging at me,” she said. “I always told my children to make sure they finish what they started and I kind of felt it was time to live up to my own advice.”

She decided it was time to go back to school to get her degree. “John did not hesitate for one bit; he said ‘let’s go,’” Darlene said.

“I love this woman so much and always told her whenever you are ready we will go because this is something I knew she always wanted and I will do nothing to hold her back,” John said.

In July 2013, the couple moved back to Nashville to allow Darlene to return to TSU and pursue a degree in interdisciplinary studies. At times, she took as many as 20 credit hours a semester, and maintained top grades.

“My goal was to come back and finish at Tennessee State.  I didn’t know at the time how long it was going to take, I just knew I had to do it,” she said.

With the 25 credits she had accumulated before dropping out in 1963, Darlene is completing her college work in four years. A member of three honor societies, she is graduating summa cum laude.

“My graduation from college, for me, confirms that I completed what I started more than 50 years ago,” Darlene said. “I am happy.”

The Mullins’ children are Dr. John E. Mullins Jr. of Baskin Ridge, New Jersey, and Darchele Mullins Erskine of Chicago. They are the proud grandparents of Amber Mullins, Sierra Mullins, John E. Mullins III, and Brandon Forney.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Late TSU Graduate Honored with $100,000 Scholarship Endowment for Business Majors

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Gloria Ross White graduated from Tennessee State University in 1976, but she never really left.

The former Miss ROTC remained involved with her alma mater through her Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, and helping students to stay in school until her death in a car accident in 1984.

Described as a fun-loving person with a kind heart who embraced everyone she came across, White’s family is determined to keep alive her legacy of helping others.

Her sister, Cathy Ross, of Germantown, Tennessee, has established a $100,000 endowment at TSU in her (White) honor.

The Gloria Ross White Endowed Scholarship in Business will benefit first-generation college students from underrepresented populations. Recipients must major in business with a minimum 2.5 grade point average. Students pursuing a master’s degree are also eligible.

“She would want to live on by encouraging education and supporting students at TSU,” said Ross, a retired FedEx executive. “I have always believed in the power and benefit of education that was instilled in me by my parents, and my sister also believed in that.”

Although Ross did not attend TSU, she said the university has been very good to her sister and her family. Many relatives attended TSU, she said.

“My sister and I know TSU’s legacy of helping needy students, so I thought of setting up this endowment in her memory. This is something that will be useful for them (students), as well as for the college and the rest of the world,” Ross said.

Betsy Jackson Mosley, executive director of the TSU Foundation, said the university is grateful to Cathy Ross for the endowment.

“As she honors her sister’s memory, she is giving the gift of education to deserving students,” Mosley said.  “The legacy of Mrs. Gloria Ross White will live on forever at TSU through the many students who will benefit from this generous scholarship fund.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Honors Top Researchers at 39th Annual University Wide Research Symposium

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University recognized its top student and faculty researchers during a ceremony in the Ferrell Westbrook Complex on the main campus on Friday.

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Awards Luncheon speaker Mark N. Russ engages students during his presentation at the Ferrell-Westbrook Complex. (Submitted Photo)

It was the Awards Luncheon culminating the weeklong 39th Annual University-Wide Research Symposium organized by the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

Awards were given for the top three winners in undergraduate and graduate oral and postal presentations.  Organizers received 155 student submissions in eight categories and 35 faculty submissions.

Mark N. Russ, executive assistant director of the National Security Directorate Naval Criminal Investigative Service, was the keynote speaker. He admonished the award winners to set high goals and stick with them if they want to be successful.

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Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, Dean of the College of Engineering, left, congratulates Kyra M. Bryant, a Ph.D. student in Computer Information Systems Engineering for winning first place award in Graduate Engineering II oral presentation. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

“By involving yourselves in award events like this you are stepping in the right direction, but it is not enough,” Russ said. “You have to continue to stick with it, continue to have your failures, successes and ultimately you will move in a direction where you are the only person with the background and experience to take it to the next level.”

Using Olympic champion Wilma Rudolph as an example of perseverance, Russ said no one thought she had a chance “because of things she had going against her.”

“She had medical issues and other health issues, but they did not stop her. She didn’t have to have someone tell her to keep working hard, she just didn’t quit and became one of the greatest athletes the world has ever seen,” Russ said.

Kyra M. Bryant, a Ph.D. student in Computer Information Systems Engineering, won first place in Graduate Engineering II oral presentation for her research on “Improved Bottom Friction, Surface Rachness, and Wind Stress in a Coupled Wave and Storm Surge Model.”

She said her study is aimed at developing a more accurate module for forecasting hurricanes.

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Dr. Margaret Mmbaga, took top award for faculty research. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

“Winning this award has been really very encouraging, pushing me to research even more on this topic,” Bryant said “We are trying to make the modeling more accurate and winning this award tells me that I am on the right path.”

In faculty research, Dr. Margaret Mmbaga won first place in the category of Faculty II for “Screening of Common Bean for Multiple Disease Resistance Under Natural Infection by Common Bacterial Blight and Charcoal Rot.”

Each year, an individual researcher is admitted into the “Million Dollar Club” during the awards ceremony. Individuals in this select group are recognized for receiving grant money of a million dollars or more in a single year.

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Dr. Marie Hammond, second from right, holds her award for becoming the newest Million Dollar Club member. She is congratulated by Phyllis Danner, Director of Research and Sponsored Programs, left, and research symposium co-chairs Dr. John Robinson, and Nannette Carter Martin. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

That recognition went to Dr. Marie Hammond, associate professor of psychology in the College of Education. In 2016, she received a $1.5 million National Science Foundation grant for basic research.

“I am honored, I am overwhelmed,” she said  “I am really grateful because I never would have gotten here without the support of people from across the university, who worked with me along the way.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Community Health and Wellness Fair at TSU promotes healthy lifestyle

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – More than 30 vendors from across the city participated in the Community Health and Wellness Fair at Tennessee State University on April 21.

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TSU President Glenda Glover (center) with health fair participants from Meharry Medical College and TSU’s Dental Hygiene Department. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

The event, which was free to the public, was a partnership between TSU, the DP Thomas Foundation for Obesity, Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s HIV Vaccine Program, and the Turnip Truck, a natural foods grocer in Nashville.

All the vendors set up in Kean Hall on the university’s main campus had some connection to health care and wellness.

“It’s important that vendors from around the area come here and show what it means to participate in healthy lifestyles,” TSU President Glenda Glover said. “We want to go over some of the preventive measures; precautionary actions. Prevention is the heart of public health.”

Among its offerings, the fair provided information on weight loss management and nutrition, as well as fitness demonstrations and health screenings, including hypertension, glucose and cholesterol. There was also an opportunity for attendees to sign up for insurance.

William Ligon and his niece, Jada Smith, drove from Gallatin, Tennessee to attend the health fair. Smith, who is currently attending a community college, plans to enroll in Tennessee State’s nursing program next year.

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William Ligon and his niece, Jada Smith (left), drove from Gallatin, Tennessee, to attend health fair. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

“I’ve always liked to be able to help out people in need,” Smith said. “I like to care for people.”

Both Ligon and Smith said they enjoyed the health fair.

“This is great,” Ligon said. “We need more of this.”

Along with the Nashville vendors, several Tennessee State programs and departments participated. They included the TSU Nursing School, the Agriculture Department, the TSU Center for Aging, the TSU Wellness Center, and TSU’s Dental Hygiene Department, which has a full service campus clinic that averages about 600 patients a year, many of whom are from the surrounding community.

Dr. Gary-Lee A. Lewis, head of TSU’s Dental Hygiene Department, said he hopes the fair will help increase that number “with the linkages that we make with the community.”

“It’s a mutually beneficial experience for both our students and value for the community,” Lewis said. “It showcases all aspects of health to the community.”

Vic Sorrell is the community engagement coordinator for the Vanderbilt HIV vaccine program, which provided HIV testing and HIV prevention education and information at the fair.

“This is an ideal way for our community to collaborate on reaching the goal of zero new HIV transmissions by the year 2020, according to the National HIV/AIDS Strategy,” Sorrell said.

Ivan Davis Sr., director of Student Health Services at TSU, said the university plans to host many more health fairs.

“We’re just trying to give people access,” Davis said. “Some people don’t know where to begin to get health access.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TSU Aristocrat of Bands to perform at 54th Annual State of Metro Address

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Nashville Mayor Megan Barry will include a lively performance by Tennessee State University’s Aristocrat of Bands when she delivers the “54th Annual State of Metro Address”  on April 26 at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville.

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The TSU Aristocrat of Bands was the first HBCU band to perform at a presidential inauguration. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Known for high quality musical performances, innovative arrangements and precision marching, the Aristocrat of Bands was the first historically black college or university band to appear on national television in 1955, the first HBCU band to perform at a presidential inauguration, and the first HBCU band named as an official band for an NFL team – the Tennessee Titans in 2002. In September 2016, the band was invited to Washington, D.C. to celebrate the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture on the lawn of the White House.

“We are extremely honored for this invitation to perform at the Mayor’s State of Metro Address,” said Dr. Reginald McDonald, TSU’s director of Bands. “We see this as another opportunity to showcase the talents in the Aristocrat of Bands as well as let other people see what’s good and outstanding about Tennessee State University.”

The mayor’s State of Metro Address will include important details about the mayor’s budget proposal, which will be presented to the Metro Council following the event, according to the mayor’s office.

Members of the public are encouraged to attend the State of Metro Address, which begins at 10 a.m. For counting purposes only, attendees can RSVP at 54som.eventbrite.com. Seating will be on a first-come, first-serve basis. Anyone requesting accommodations due to disabilities should contact Jerry Hall, ADA Coordinator, at 615-862-8960 or Jerry.Hall@nashville.gov.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU students graduating with jobs say university has prepared them to succeed

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – When Maya Davis and Cametria Weatherspoon receive their degrees and head to Lockheed Martin to begin their careers, they will be aiming for success because of preparation received at Tennessee State University.

Career Development Center
TSU’s Career Development Center gives students tools they need for success. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Davis and Weatherspoon will be among more than 800 graduates from various disciplines on May 6 at the undergraduate commencement in the William Jasper Hale Stadium on TSU’s main campus.

The duo continues the university’s legacy of students who have received job offers and are ready to move right into the workforce.

Weatherspoon, 24, who majored in electrical engineering, will take an electrical engineering associate position. She will work in programming at Lockheed Martin’s Space Systems Company in Littleton, Colorado.

Lockheed Martin recently received a $100 million contract from the U.S. Air Force to support efforts related to the Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile, or JASSM.

“Having a job after I graduate is a blessing,” said Weatherspoon, a Memphis, Tennessee native. “I’m very excited.”

Davis, a 23-year-old computer science major from Nashville, will head to Lockheed Martin’s Orlando, Florida, location where she will work on a logistics system for one of the company’s fighter jets.

Davis said she is nervous about relocating, but shares Weatherspoon’s sentiment about already having a job: “It’s exciting.”

Both students, and others, credit faculty at TSU and programs like the university’s Career Development Center with motivating them and providing the tools they needed to not only get their jobs, but be successful.

“The professors at TSU were reliable and very helpful,” said 22-year–old Mathew Smith of Nashville. The agricultural education major is currently a high school student teacher, and plans to teach full time after he graduates in May.

“It’s been quite rewarding,” Smith said of student teaching. “And honestly, the most influential and experience learning I’ve had throughout TSU.”

Meghan Lambert, a nursing major from Bolivar, Tennessee, has a job lined up with Methodist University Hospital, which has also agreed to pay for her post-graduate degree.

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The TSU Women’s Center’s Link to Success program connects students with professionals in the workforce. (photo by Lucas Johnson, TSU Media Relations)

She said Linked to Excellence, a program in TSU’s Women’s Center that connects students with professionals in their field, was very helpful.

“It put me in contact with employers,” Lambert said. “I feel like my hard work at Tennessee State University really paid off.”

Jamal Coleman is coordinator of marketing, technology and communications at the Career Development Center, which helps students with their resumes, and provides tips on interviewing techniques, among other things.

“Our main goal is to help them get a foot in the door,” Coleman said. “It’s a great satisfaction when I hear about students getting these opportunities.”

Along with Lockheed Martin and Methodist, other companies where TSU students are going, and are currently working include Bank of America, Boeing, BMW, Raytheon and Rolls-Royce.

Dr. Bethany King Wilkes is director of student services in TSU’s College of Engineering. She said each semester students in the department “consistently receive lucrative job offers from top companies across the nation.”

“I frequently get calls from companies wanting to recruit our students because they know we have a pool of highly skilled individuals qualified for technical jobs that are hard to fill,” Wilkes sad.

TSU’s undergraduate commencement will begin at 8 a.m. Nationally-syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner will be the keynote speaker.

Graduate commencement service will be on May 5 at 5 p.m. in the Howard C. Gentry Complex. Congressman Jim Cooper will deliver the address.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

TSU Economic Development Center to Hold 3rd Annual Financial Literacy Conference

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development will hold its 3rd Annual Financial Literacy Conference on Friday, April 21.

Fin LItFlyerfor instaThe one-day conference at the Avon Williams Campus is expected to bring together banking and economic development experts, tax planners, and the mayor’s Office of Economic Opportunity and Empowerment.

They will discuss alternative financing, understanding credit, budgeting, student loan management, steps to buying a home, and causes of bankruptcy, among other topics.

Organizers say the conference will benefit people from all walks of life, including students, people looking for business ideas, retirees and those approaching retirement.

“From saving for a college education, retirement planning, many people feel extreme financial anxiety and are looking for guidance and actionable plans,” said Dr. Ruthie Reynolds, executive director of CEED. “This conference will help to identify and explore some of those answers.”

The conference, which begins at 8 a.m. in the Atrium, is free and open to the public.

Sponsors include Capstar, Fifth Third Bank, Regions Bank, United Way, Suntrust, NAFI, Woodbine and the Small Business Development Center. They will set up tents and displays with giveaways.

For more information and how to register for the conference, go to https://2017financialliteracyconference.eventbrite.com or call 615-963-7130.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.