Marine Corps Leadership Seminar Teaches TSU Business Students Critical Skills for the Real World

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University business majors are taking notes from the U.S. military.

On Sept. 7, more than 40 students from the College of Business participated in a daylong leadership seminar conducted by a group of Marines.

The workshop was part of Marine Week, an annual event in which the Corps take over a major city to show the public the capabilities of the U.S. Marine. It includes displays of some of the military’s big guns and hard wares, as well as appearances at schools and veteran hospitals.

At the downtown Avon Williams Campus, students participated in the Marine Corps Leadership Seminar, which exposes business students to Marine Corps leadership principles that ensure success in the business world.

It emphasizes courage, tenacity and teamwork they say are needed to “help you stand out from the competition.”

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Lt. Gen. Ronald L. Bailey

“We really think that the same leadership traits and principles that are used in the Marine Corps, whether on the battlefield or whether at bases or stations, are the same type of leadership that is required and expected of business leaders,” Marine Lt. Gen. Ronald L. Bailey said.

A 39-year veteran of the U.S. military, Bailey is the Marine deputy commandant for Plans, Policies and Operations.

He said the seminar also provides an opportunity to expose Tennessee State University students to young Marines as they talk about their experiences in the Corps.

“The leadership traits and principles that they have lived through in the Marine Corps are the same ones that the students can gain from, such as integrity and initiative, to be successful in the business world,” Bailey said.

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Darien Munroe

Derrien Munroe is a senior business administration major with concentration in marketing. His future goal is to own a marketing firm. He said the seminar was very timely and taught him skills that could be critical in his future.

“What I take away from this seminar is how to be a better leader using ethics and morals to problem solve and develop better decision-making to better cope in life,” Munroe said. “I learned snippets and tools to correlate in the business world.”

The Dean of the College of Business, Dr. Millicent Lownes-Jackson, said the Marine Corps Leadership Seminar was in line with the goal of the college to equip business students with a “strong portfolio of valuable leadership skills” that attract potential employers.

“That is why this leadership seminar was so vastly important, as it afforded our students the opportunity to learn the Marine’s world-renowned principles that form the traits and values that define character as a leader,” Lownes-Jackson said.

This marks the first year of the College’s involvement with Marine Week Nashville. 

For more information about U.S. Marine Week events, visit www.usmarineweek.comDepartment of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Professor Receives State, National Recognitions for Works in Extension and Outreach

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A Tennessee State University professor, known for his work with farmers and Extension agents throughout Tennessee, has received multiple awards from the Tennessee Association of Agricultural Agents and Specialists, and the National Association of County Agricultural Agents.

Official photo
Dr. Jason de Koff

Jason de Koff, associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, received the Early Career Award, Achievement Award, and Communication Award from TAAA&S. The awards were presented in May at the organization’s annual meeting in Sevierville, Tennessee.

In July, de Koff, now in his sixth year at TSU, was given the NACAA Achievement Award and the Search for Excellence in Crop Production Award at the group’s annual meeting in Little Rock, Arkansas.

“I am quite honored by these awards,” de Koff said. “I plan to continue to represent TSU and Tennessee by providing my research and experiences to those who need them.”

The Early Career Award is the second for de Koff. In 2015, he won the prestigious American Society of Agronomy Early Career Professional Award for his contribution to the field of agronomy in education and research.

A professor of agronomy and soil science, de Koff’s primary area of research is on bioenergy crop production, with specific emphasis on crops like switchgrass and winter canola.

His extension program provides educational training opportunities to Extension agents as well as demonstration workshops on biodiesel production to youth and farmers.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

For the Third Year Straight a TSU Student Has been Selected White House HBCU All-Star

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Jeneisha Harris is a national all-star.

The TSU junior double major was among 73 students from across the nation who were named 2016 HBCU All-Stars by the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities on August 19.

This is the third consecutive year that a TSU student has been selected for this prestigious honor.

The HBCU All-Stars comprise undergraduate, graduate and professional students who are being recognized for their accomplishments in academics, leadership, and civic engagement.

A White House release said over the next year, Harris and her fellow all-stars will serve as ambassadors of the White House Initiative, providing outreach and communication with fellow students about the value of education and networking resources.

Through social media and relationships with community-based organizations, the students will also share “proven practices” that support opportunities for young people to achieve their education and career potential.

“This honor means a lot to me,” said Harris, a combined biology and psychology major with a 3.4 GPA from Memphis, Tennessee. “Being an HBCU All-Star also honors my university, which I intend to use to engage in and promote educational programs to benefit young people in the community especially in my hometown.”

In announcing the 2016 cohorts, Kim Hunter Reed, the acting executive director of the White House Initiative on HBCUs, said the initiative is looking forward to working with the new class of HBCU All-Stars to promote opportunities for all young people.

“Our goal is to provide a unique opportunity for these talented students that exposes them to critical national conversations and thought leaders,” Reed said. “No doubt they will make their mark and represent their campuses well.”

Previous TSU HBCU All-Stars include Lauren Wigging, in 2015; and Jeremiah T. Cooper, in 2014.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

First-semester freshmen get new ties, good advice

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is making sure its students are prepared for success – or better yet, “tied” to it.

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TSU First-semester freshmen receive guidance on tie tying. (photo by Lucas Johnson, TSU Media Relations)

On August 23, first-semester male freshmen packed the Forum in TSU’s Campus Center for the second annual “Tied to Success” program. All of the young men were given reflex blue colored ties with the name of the university in white letters at the base of the tie.

And for those individuals who needed assistance tying just the right knot, university officials and community leaders were on hand to provide assistance.

“Many of them will be going into professional arenas, and some have never even worn a tie,” said Frank Stevenson, TSU’s dean of students. “And so this is kind of our right of passage into that professional world; we’re preparing them now.”

State Rep. Harold Love, Jr., an alumnus of TSU, agreed. In addition to the ties, he applauded the program for helping the new students assimilate into the collegiate culture. Following the tie tying and male bonding, TSU officials talked to the freshmen about how they should behave on campus, and in general.

“I’ve always appreciated my alma mater because it took young men and made them better,” said Love, who attended the program. “When we talk about African-American males going into their freshman year, it’s important for them to understand that wearing of the tie is essential because they will need one for job interviews. And they may end up with a job one day like mine, where they’ll be wearing one almost everyday.”

Orlandis Timmons of Huntsville, Alabama, said he appreciated the orientation, and that the tie provides a “better look for TSU.”

“It’s great representation at the school, and for us as individuals, as young men,” said Timmons, who plans to major in psychology.

More than 1,200 first-time freshmen are enrolled at TSU this fall.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

First-time Freshmen Take up Residence at Tennessee State University

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) -Tennessee State University has some new tenants: the Class of 2020.

On Wednesday, August 17, more than 1,200 first-time freshmen received keys to their residence halls, along with identification cards and passes to dining facilities, mail boxes, and classrooms. Upperclassmen began moving in the next day.

Hundreds of parents and other family members accompanied their children as volunteers – including staff, alumni and fellow students – helped the newcomers settle in their residence halls.

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Morganne Norwood, of Woodbridge, Virginia, was among nearly 1,200 first-time freshmen who moved in for the 2016 fall semester at TSU. She was accompanied by her parents, from left, step father Patrick Thomas, Windy Norwood, mother; Morganne; Don Norwood, father; and Debra Norwood, step mother. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The ease of transition caught the attention of Don Norwood, of Woodbridge, Virginia. He made the trek over night to drop off his daughter Morganne, who will be majoring in political science.

“It was like clockwork,” he said about the welcome they received at Wilson Hall, where Morganne will stay. “Folks were in line to help us unload and pack stuff, while others waited with refreshments and gifts. My daughter is going to love it here.”

Kim Grant of Milwaukee shared that sentiment. She said she believes her daughter, Aaliyah, is also going to enjoy college life at TSU.

“She looked at a couple (of colleges), but once she got the acceptance letter from TSU, all that went out the window,” Grant said. “She didn’t care about anything else. So I said, ‘if that’s what you really want, that’s what I’m going to make happen.'”

Aaliyah Grant said attending an HBCU provides a unique experience, and she’s looking forward to that more than anything. She said she also can’t wait to see TSU’s band.

“I don’t know how to play anything, but I know how to listen,” she said.

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Jordan Gossett, of Memphis, Tennessee, was accompanied by his mother, Erika Stokes. He plans to major in business administration. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Jordan Gossett of Memphis, Tennessee, said he visited TSU several times and fell in love with it.

“I just love the atmosphere; it just feels like a good HBCU experience,” said Gossett, who plans to major in business administration. “I am the first to attend an HBCU in my immediate family. Maybe I can be the start of a tradition in my family.”

TSU officials hope some new initiatives they’ve put in place will allow all students attending the university to have a good experience.

The initiatives include an “All Day Dining Plan” with 10 guest passes for each student who participates; an online specialty store for TSU paraphernalia; expanded parking access; enhanced parking permits to curb losses: and a personal alert system with Bluetooth capability that works with cell phones on and off campus.

“We are excited about our new students and the services we have put in place to make them comfortable,” said Dr. Curtis Johnson, associate vice president for administration.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

TSU President Glenda Glover says student success remains a priority

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU President Glenda Glover says the university has several priorities which include improving retention and graduation rates, and creating new residence halls for students.

Glover addressed the Faculty and Staff Institute for the fall 2016 semester on Monday, August 15. While the university has its challenges, she said they must not overshadow the well-being of TSU’s most important customers: its students.

“We must never forget that we’re here because of the students,” Glover said. “We’re here for the purpose of enhancing their lives and their well-being, and ensuring the quality of their future.”

The president outlined steps TSU is taking to help students be more successful in college. They include the creation of a completion committee, block scheduling, and the formation of a consortium of advisors who will make sure that students stay on track to graduate.

Before Glover spoke, TSU Student Government president Aarian Forman addressed the crowd and said the Student Government Association is also committed to doing what it can to help students be successful.

Forman said the association is spearheading an initiative called START (Stimulating Transformative Academic Routines at TSU) that will have an academic achievement task force comprised of students, faculty and staff.

“We, as a TSU family – faculty, staff and students – have to continue to work together to make sure that we are successful as individuals and as a university,” he said.

Glover also discussed construction plans for building new student residence halls over several phases, the construction of a new football stadium, as well as acquiring land to build a transdisciplinary research center.

Other plans include: the development of higher admission standards; pay raises for faculty and staff; enhanced campus security; and implementation of the state’s new higher education governing structure, or the FOCUS Act.

Glover said regardless of the changes, and the challenges the university faces, she’s confident TSU will persevere.

“We’ve covered a lot of territory; we have a lot more to pursue,” she said. “This is an exciting time for us. The history of TSU is still being written.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU among several participants in back-to-school festival

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is doing its part to help area youngsters have a “healthy start” back to school.

The university partnered with several organizations on August 13 to sponsor Love’s Healthy Start Festival, an event started by State Rep. Harold Love, Jr.

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TSU nursing students provide free screenings at Love’s Healthy Start Festival. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

The festival at Hadley Park near TSU was once again a success. TSU President Glenda Glover and Nashville Mayor Megan Barry stopped by to show their support.

“I’m so grateful for the participation in today’s event,” Love said. “We should all feel good about the number of students and families who will benefit. This will definitely give them a healthy start.”

Love said the event is a way for the community to support educational success, physical health and safe communities for Nashville’s children and youth.

“It’s our hope that the festival always meets some of the needs of the community,” said Love, who graduated from TSU.

This was the fourth year of the festival, which provided free backpacks and other school supply giveaways. One of the main sponsors of the event, Tyson Foods, Inc., has been a participant for three years.

“We know that getting ready for back to school is something that everyone should be able to do and have the appropriate resources to do so,” said Anna Kimble-Roberson, community relations manager at Springdale, Ark.-based Tyson Foods. “We very much appreciate Rep. Love in terms of his efforts to coordinate so many community partners to offer different resources to make it easier for families to have the tools that they need to get off to a good start.”

In addition to giving away school supplies, the festival had a health fair, as well as free food and live entertainment.

Tennessee State University’s Ralph H. Boston Wellness Center was one of several departments from the university that participated in the festival.

“It’s a good opportunity to enlighten and make people more aware of what they’re eating, what they’re doing,” said Gerald Davis, director of the Wellness Center. “We want them to do things a little bit better than they have been; to live a better lifestyle, physically and mentally.”

TSU’s College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, and the Office of Enrollment Management also participated in the festival.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Tennessee State University has rich Olympic history

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – No matter what history is made at the Olympics in Rio this year, Tennessee State University will always have a place in the record books when it comes to the Games.

In 1948, TSU alumna Audrey Patterson became the first African-American woman to win an Olympic medal when she took home the bronze in the 200-meter dash at the London Games.

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TSU Olympians Ralph Boston and Wilma Rudolph with then-Cassius Clay, whom they met at the 1960 Rome Games and remained good friends. (TSU archives)

Over a span of nearly four decades, TSU went on to win more than 20 Olympic medals, including 13 gold medals. Just about all the Olympic medals were won by the world famous TSU Tigerbelles, led by legendary track and field coach Ed Temple, who produced 40 Olympians.

Probably the most memorable Olympic moment was at the 1960 Rome Games, when Wilma Rudolph became the first American woman to win three gold medals in track and field.

Other Tigerbelles who won Olympic medals include: Madeline Manning Mims, Edith McGuire, Wyomia Tyus, Willye White, Margaret Matthews Wilburn and Chandra Cheeseborough-Guice, who is currently TSU’s track and field director, and still holds the Olympic trial record in the 400-meter race.

“They are an inspiration to everybody,” Temple said in a recent interview.

Dwight Lewis, who is co-authoring a book about the Tigerbelles, said they “paved the way for other women in various sports.”

“They opened the door,” Lewis said.

1959-60 Tigerbells with Coach Temple
1959-60 TSU Tigerbelles and track and field coach Ed Temple. (TSU archives)

Tennessee State University’s Olympic success is part of its rich athletic history. Earlier this year, the university received an award for the number of TSU football players who went on to play in Super Bowls.

Everett Glenn, a sports attorney and organizer of the awards ceremony that recognized TSU, said he hopes the university’s athletic success will attract high school graduates to it and other historically black colleges and universities that have much to offer athletically – and academically.

“I can’t wait for the day that our young people understand the rich history that HBCUs have,” Glenn said.

In the case of athletics, TSU is hoping to continue its winning tradition in the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio.

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TSU alumnus Markeith Price to compete in 2016 Paralympics in Rio. (Submitted photo)

TSU alumnus Markeith Price, who is visually impaired, will represent Team USA in track and field.

Price will make his second straight appearance in the Paralympics. He was a member of the 2012 London games, where he finished sixth in the long jump and eighth in the 400-meter dash.

“I am extremely honored and blessed for this opportunity,” Price said. “I have dedicated the last four years to training to run the best race to bring home the gold for the U.S.”

Cheeseborough-Guice, who coached Price while he was at TSU, believes he has a good shot.

“He was an excellent athlete who worked very hard,” she said. “I have no doubt that he will perform well.”

TSU Olympian Ralph Boston said he’s pulling for Price. But regardless of how he performs, he just wants the Paralympian to enjoy the moment, because he said Price became a part of history when he was selected to participate in the Games.

“It is a very exciting feeling to be selected to represent your country,” said Boston, who won a gold medal in the long jump at the 1960 Rome Games.

The Paralympic Games start September 7.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University receives three 2016 HBCU Digest Awards

Tennessee State University was recognized with three honors at the 2016 Historically Black Colleges and Universities’ Digest Awards.

The winners were announced at the sixth annual HBCU Awards ceremony on July 15 at the University of District of Columbia.

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TSU Track and Field Director Chandra Cheeseborough-Guice with 2016 HBCU Digest Award for “Female Coach of the Year.” (Submitted photo)

Those receiving awards were: Dr. Edith Mitchell, “Alumna of the Year”; TSU Track and Field Director Chandra Cheeseborough-Guice, “Female Coach of the Year”; and RaCia Poston, “Female Student of the Year.”

There were more than 600 submissions from colleges and individuals from around the country based on media exposure and impact on institutional progress made during the 2015-16 academic year.

Winners were selected by a panel of previous HBCU Award winners, presidents and chancellors, media members who cover HBCU programs, and alumni and students.

“The HBCU Digest Awards is the first national awards event to recognize the influence and impact of HBCUs on American culture,” said HBCU Digest Founding Editor Jarrett L. Carter Sr., who created the event in 2011. “The awards seek to recognize and crown winners in the fields of leadership, arts, athletics, research, and community engagement.”

Last year, TSU received two honors at the HBCU Awards. Its women’s basketball team, which won the 2015 Ohio Valley Conference Tournament Championship, was recognized as the “Female Team of the Year.” The university’s Nashville Student Organizing Committee got “Best Student Organization.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

International conference at TSU to focus on ancient crop once grown by Aztecs

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Amaranth is a pseudocereal that researchers say is a food of the future because of its easy cultivation. (Submitted Photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU New Service) – Tennessee State University’s College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences and the Amaranth Institute are hosting a conference August 3-5 to study amaranth, an ancient crop once grown by the Aztecs.

The three-day event titled “State of the Art in Amaranth Research, Food Utilization and Development,” allows farmers, researchers, educators, health food professionals and industry experts to share the latest research findings and new information about the pseudocereal, which is actually seed from a flowering plant known for its nutrition.

Researchers say the seeds are an excellent source of protein, dietary fiber and minerals. In addition, they are gluten-free but can be milled into flour that will increase the amino acid and vitamin content of baked goods. The grain species of cultivated amaranths are native to Latin America, but vegetable amaranth species can be found in India, China and Africa, especially in places where comparable spinach, collards or lettuce will not grow. The United States started growing grain amaranths in the 1970s and popped amaranth has become a popular cereal in health food stores.

Because of amaranth’s rapid growth, ease of cultivation, and high nutritional value, it has been deemed a “crop of the future,” said TSU Professor Matthew Blair, who organized the event on campus along with Amaranth Institute President Mary Beth Wilson and board members from America to Zimbabwe.

“TSU will be reporting on germplasm screening and the first incidence of root pathogens,” Blair said. “A one-acre field of germplasm will be on display on the TSU farm at its peak-of-growth cycle showing the high yield potential per plant of this amazing C4 crop species.”

Attendees will tour TSU’s germplasm field at 11:30 a.m. Friday, August 5, at the Agricultural Research and Education Center.

“We are pleased to host this timely conference at a time when climate change is real and the world’s temperature rise is felt everywhere,” said TSU-CAHNS Dean Chandra Reddy.

Blair’s graduate, undergraduate, and interning students will speak at the event, including Ranjita Thapa, a fellowship awarded graduate of the University of Bangalore and of TSU. Attendees are also coming from as far away as China, Haiti and Pakistan.

The conference is open to the public. To register, please visit the Amaranth Institute: http://www.amaranthinstitute.org.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.