TSU Aristocrat of Bands to perform at 54th Annual State of Metro Address

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Nashville Mayor Megan Barry will include a lively performance by Tennessee State University’s Aristocrat of Bands when she delivers the “54th Annual State of Metro Address”  on April 26 at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville.

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The TSU Aristocrat of Bands was the first HBCU band to perform at a presidential inauguration. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Known for high quality musical performances, innovative arrangements and precision marching, the Aristocrat of Bands was the first historically black college or university band to appear on national television in 1955, the first HBCU band to perform at a presidential inauguration, and the first HBCU band named as an official band for an NFL team – the Tennessee Titans in 2002. In September 2016, the band was invited to Washington, D.C. to celebrate the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture on the lawn of the White House.

“We are extremely honored for this invitation to perform at the Mayor’s State of Metro Address,” said Dr. Reginald McDonald, TSU’s director of Bands. “We see this as another opportunity to showcase the talents in the Aristocrat of Bands as well as let other people see what’s good and outstanding about Tennessee State University.”

The mayor’s State of Metro Address will include important details about the mayor’s budget proposal, which will be presented to the Metro Council following the event, according to the mayor’s office.

Members of the public are encouraged to attend the State of Metro Address, which begins at 10 a.m. For counting purposes only, attendees can RSVP at 54som.eventbrite.com. Seating will be on a first-come, first-serve basis. Anyone requesting accommodations due to disabilities should contact Jerry Hall, ADA Coordinator, at 615-862-8960 or Jerry.Hall@nashville.gov.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Economic Development Center to Hold 3rd Annual Financial Literacy Conference

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development will hold its 3rd Annual Financial Literacy Conference on Friday, April 21.

Fin LItFlyerfor instaThe one-day conference at the Avon Williams Campus is expected to bring together banking and economic development experts, tax planners, and the mayor’s Office of Economic Opportunity and Empowerment.

They will discuss alternative financing, understanding credit, budgeting, student loan management, steps to buying a home, and causes of bankruptcy, among other topics.

Organizers say the conference will benefit people from all walks of life, including students, people looking for business ideas, retirees and those approaching retirement.

“From saving for a college education, retirement planning, many people feel extreme financial anxiety and are looking for guidance and actionable plans,” said Dr. Ruthie Reynolds, executive director of CEED. “This conference will help to identify and explore some of those answers.”

The conference, which begins at 8 a.m. in the Atrium, is free and open to the public.

Sponsors include Capstar, Fifth Third Bank, Regions Bank, United Way, Suntrust, NAFI, Woodbine and the Small Business Development Center. They will set up tents and displays with giveaways.

For more information and how to register for the conference, go to https://2017financialliteracyconference.eventbrite.com or call 615-963-7130.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU graduate students receive invitation to publish in UNC-Charlotte UERPA Journal

By K. Dawn Rutledge

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service)  – Tennessee State University graduate students received some sound advice on how to become better writers from two top scholars regarded as leaders in their fields, and received the gift of a major opportunity to get a jump-start on their publishing careers.

Dr. Chance Lewis
Dr. Chance Lewis

University of North Carolina at Charlotte professors, Dr. Chance Lewis, a Carol Grotnes Belk Distinguished Professor and Endowed Chair of Urban Education and director of the UNC-Charlotte Urban Education Collaborative, and Dr. Stephen Hancock, associate professor of Multicultural Education with the Urban Education Collaborative, were invited to TSU as part of Title III’s Graduate Student Speaker and Workshop Series created by Dr. Andrea Tyler, director of Graduate Student Services.

Lewis and Hancock have crafted highly efficient research programs that tap into the writing strengths of graduate students to maximize their publication output. They shared their expertise March 28 and 29 with graduate students, undergraduate students and faculty revealing strategies on how to find passion, eliminate distractions, practice self-discipline, and reduce stress in the writing process.

“You have to understand the why related to becoming a strong and prolific writer,” Lewis said, adding that students should discover what they are passionate about. “Something must bother you so much that your why is focused on solving that issue. You must have a takeover mentality, a desire to be a key contributor in your field and be the best at it.”

During the presentation, Lewis, founder and editor of the Urban Education Research & Policy Annuals (UERPA), a graduate student journal published annually by the Urban Education Collaborative UNC-Charlotte, spontaneously offered TSU an entire special edition journal for master and doctoral-level TSU students to submit empirical and theoretical research in areas related to urban education. Founded in 2012, the UERPA is a double-blind peer-reviewed journal published once a year, and includes original articles, brief reports, and book reviews in the areas of educational reform, educational equity for underrepresented groups, racially diverse perspectives, multiculturalism, teacher education models, student achievement, urban school populations, and academic and social needs for urban students, among other topics related to research, policy, or practice in urban education.

TSU’s Dr. Andrea L. Tyler, director of Graduate Student Services and Research Associate, will oversee the process.

“This TSU special themed issue will provide an in-depth analysis of the educational issues in urban settings and how K-12 and higher education professionals and stakeholders can work to promote student success, academic achievement, and increase access to higher education to improve the academic achievement of students in urban educational settings,” said Tyler, who has already established a pilot research writing group for TSU graduate students.

“The pilot writing group is for graduate students who can make a serious commitment to writing and publishing in their respective fields,” she added. “The goal of the program is to help strengthen students’ writing abilities, provide a structural environment to refine skills and, most importantly, publish.”

Erin Carney, a first-year Ph.D. student in the Counseling Program, said the writing seminar helped to rekindle her interest in publishing as a graduate student.

Dr. Stephen Hancock
Dr. Stephen Hancock

“Like most higher education programs, Ph.D. programs at TSU are demanding on your time and energy,” said the West Lafayette, Indiana native. “Drs. Lewis and Hancock gave practical advice on how students can balance being productive with the other aspects of our lives. They reminded us that, when we are overwhelmed with school obligations, we have to stay focused on what we came here to do – change our field for the better.”

Academia is highly competitive, and publishing often determines which doctoral students stand out and separate themselves when seeking academic positions and advancing in their respective fields. TSU offers doctoral degrees in seven areas: biological sciences, psychology, public administration, curriculum and instruction, educational leadership, computer information systems engineering, and physical therapy.

“[In academia] You will only be known by what you produce,” Lewis said. “You have to build a brand of your scholarly work.”

The Graduate Student Speaker and Workshop Series also focused on faculty engagement with a session for faculty advisors centered on increasing the efficiency of publishing by using the writing strengths of students.

Dr. Clara Young, chair of the TSU Department of Teaching and Learning in the College of Education, said she thoroughly enjoyed the concepts and ideas shared by the presenters.

“One of the major challenges in a graduate program is scholarly writing,” Young said. “Many graduate students enter graduate studies with limited experience in scholarly writing. As such, it becomes the responsibility of faculty to help students develop scholarly writing skills. I believe the Graduate Writing Seminar provided perspective on how faculty can begin to facilitate the scholarly writing process with graduate students.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

 

TSU to host Community Health and Wellness Fair

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is hosting a Community Health and Wellness Fair on April 21 that organizers hope will motivate people to live healthier lives.

The event, which is free to the public, is a partnership between TSU, the DP Thomas Foundation for Obesity, Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s HIV Vaccine Program, and the Turnip Truck, a natural foods grocer in Nashville.

The fair is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. in the university’s Kean Hall on the main campus. More than 30 vendors with some connection to health care and wellness are expected to participate.

Among its offerings, the fair will provide information on weight loss management and nutrition, as well as fitness demonstrations and health screenings, including hypertension, glucose and cholesterol.

One of the main participants is TSU’s Dental Hygiene Department, which has a full service campus clinic that averages about 600 patients a year, many of whom are from the surrounding community.

Dr. Gary-Lee A. Lewis, head of TSU’s Dental Hygiene Department, said he hopes the fair will help increase that number “with the linkages that we make with the community.”

“It’s a mutually beneficial experience for both our students and value for the community,” Lewis said. “It showcases all aspects of health to the community.”

Vic Sorrell is the community engagement coordinator for the Vanderbilt HIV vaccine program, which he said will offer HIV testing and HIV prevention education and information at the health fair.

“This is an ideal way for our community to collaborate on reaching the goal of zero new HIV transmissions by the year 2020, according to the National HIV/AIDS Strategy,” Sorrell said.

For more information about the Community Health and Wellness Fair, call 615-474-1286, or email: dpthomasfoundation@gmail.com.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Winston wins prestigious ATHENA Young Professional Award

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) — Dr. Tameka Winston, interim chair of Tennessee State’s Communications Department, recently received the 2017 ATHENA Young Professional Leadership Award.

The Nashville ATHENA Awards and Scholarship Program announced its 2017 award recipients last month at OZ Arts Nashville. Mayor Megan Barry was a special guest at the event, which also recognized eight students who received $17,000 in scholarships.

The Nashville Athena Award Program recognizes professional women for their business success, community service and encouragement of other women.

Winston was chosen from among 25 nominees selected this year by Middle Tennessee organizations and associations. The nominees were under the age 40 and making significant contributions in the Nashville community. Winston was nominated by Women in Higher Education in Tennessee.

An author and Sirius XM radio show host, Winston uses her platforms to serve as a mentor to, advocate for and inspire students and young adults in Nashville and nationally. She also received the 2017 Nashville Business Journal’s Women of Influence Award earlier this year.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Board of Trustees holds first meeting

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Board of Trustees held its first meeting since being confirmed by State lawmakers.

The meeting, organizational in nature, was held Thursday, April 13, on the main campus in Hankal Hall, and was open to the public.

TSU President Glenda Glover provided opening remarks and welcomed the new trustees along with Governor Bill Haslam and members of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC).

“This is an exciting time for the TSU family as we begin this new phase in the life of the University,” said President Glover. “On behalf of all of our stakeholders, we thank this esteemed group of individuals for their commitment and dedication to serve as trustees of our institution.”

Action items included selecting the board leadership and the student trustee. Dr. Joseph W. Walker III, pastor of Mt. Zion Baptist Church of Nashville and presiding Bishop of the Full Gospel Baptist Church Fellowship, International, was selected as chair and corporate executive Dr. Deborah A. Cole as vice chair. Cole is president and CEO of Citizens Savings Bank and Trust Company in Nashville. Nashville native Sydnie Davis was appointed as the student trustee to round out the mandated 10-member board.

TSU’s board is part of the governor’s Focus on College and University Success (FOCUS) Act, which requires the state’s six public four-year universities to be governed by local boards.

“This is an historic day for Tennessee State University and is something that we as a state have talked about and thought about for a long time,” said Governor Bill Haslam. “The TSU Board of Trustees is a group of highly accomplished individuals who are completely focused on the perspectives of the students, faculty and alumni and are committed to moving the university forward,” Haslam added.

Members also adopted bylaws and formed the following committees: executive, audit, academic affairs and student affairs, and finance and budget.

The board meeting’s agenda and materials are posted as they are available at http://www.tnstate.edu/board/meetings.aspx. To see bios of the board members, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/board/trustees.aspx.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU children’s day event attracts more than 250 kids

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – More than 250 kids converged on Tennessee State University’s indoor practice facility to participate in activities leading up to the Week of the Young Child.

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Four-year-old Gavin Winfrey listens to TSU nursing student Megan Tomlin talk about cleanliness. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Three to 5-year-olds from several local schools and day cares participated in the April 12 event hosted by TSU’s Department of Family and Consumer Sciences and the Center for Learning Sciences.

Each April, the National Association for the Education of Young Children designates a week to focus on children. This year April 24-28 is designated.

Dr. Margaret Machara, who is in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, was the coordinator of TSU’s event, which involved participation from 16 of the university’s departments.

She said students and faculty in each department were asked to develop activities for the children related to their respective areas of study. Organizers said the event provided a learning experience for both kids and college students, particularly those in a program like early childhood.

“The little kids are learning, but the big kids are learning too,” Machara said.

Stacey Nieman, program manager of the Tennessee Early Childhood Training Alliance at TSU, agreed.

“The older students at TSU, what we’re getting them to see is being part of the community, and reaching out to the schools, preschools that are in our neighborhood,” Nieman said. “And the children, we just want them to get a feel of the university. It’s great if we can make an impression at an early age.”

She said research shows that most of the brain’s development happens when children are under the age of 8.

“So, those children in the ages of 3 to 5, it’s a primary time to have optimal brain development, and that’s done through experiences,” like the event here at TSU, she said.

Activities included a tractor simulator that allowed kids to virtually experience harvesting and baling hay, and exercising with some of the physical therapy students.

The kids also learned about safety and health care, such as making sure they always wash their hands.

“We’re teaching kids how to cover their cough, and how to wash their hands,” said nursing student Megan Tomlin, who will be graduating in May from TSU’s BSN program. “It really helps in preventing illness.”

Parents at the event were given a booklet on activities they can do to help their children continue to learn.

Natasha Winfrey attended with her four-year-old son, Gavin. She believes the activities made a positive impression on the kids.

“I think it’s good to get the kids started early, to see all the specialties that are available to them when they get older,” she said.

As he was leaving, Gavin was a little more succinct about his visit.

“I had fun!”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

TSU Student Government Association Announces New Officers for 2017/2018 Academic Year

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University‘s Student Government Association has a new group of officers for the 2017/2018 academic year.

The new student leadership, including a Mr. TSU and a Miss TSU, was announced by the Student Election Commission Friday, April 7, during a ceremony in the university’s Amphitheater.

TSU Campus
President Glenda Glover and reigning Miss TSU Alicia Jones, right, congratulate incoming Miss TSU Kayla Smith. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

TSU President Glenda Glover, along with staff from the Office of Student Affairs, was on hand to congratulate the new officers when the election results were announced.

JerMilton Woods, of Memphis, a rising senior majoring in Performance and Sports Sciences, was elected the new SGA president, while Justus Watson, a senior Agricultural Science major from Atlanta, is the new SGA vice president.

Memphis native Kayla Smith, a rising senior Health Sciences major, is Miss. TSU. Alec Forrest, as the new Mr. TSU, will escort her. Forrest is a senior accounting major from Jackson, Tennessee.

“We are excited about the potential for these new student leaders and the impact they will be making on the student body,” said Alex Atkinson, assistant dean of Student Engagement and Life.

Following is the list of the new Miss TSU court and other members of the SGA. 

Mr. Senior – Andrew Crawford from Nashville – a rising senior Health Science major

Mrs. Senior – Daniellle Perry from Stone Mountain, Georgia – a rising senior, Child Development major

Senior Class President – Marquis Austin from Cincinnati, Ohio – a rising senior Business Administration major

Junior Class President – Prudencio Logan from Stone Mountain, Georgia – a rising junior Mass Communication major

Junior Class Secretary – Elyse Long from Harrison Township, Michigan – a rising sophomore Biology: Pre-Med major

Mr. Junior – Darien McGhee from Memphis, Tennessee – a rising Junior Mechanical Engineering major

Miss. Junior – Brandi BeCoats from Brentwood, Tennessee – a rising Junior Health Science major

Sophomore Class President – Makayla McCree from Detroit, Michigan – a rising sophomore Political Science major

Sophomore Class Vice President – Donald Thompson from Cincinnati, Ohio – a rising sophomore Finance and Economics major

Sophomore Class Treasurer – Ryan Smith from Atlanta, Georgia – a rising sophomore Economics and Finance major

Mr. Sophomore – Jonathon Hammock from Anderson, Indiana – a rising sophomore Finance major

Miss Sophomore – Sierra Holmes from Orlando, Florida – a rising sophomore Fashion Merchandising major

Representative At Large

  1. Shelby Davis from Waldorf, Maryland – a rising sophomore Biology: Pre-Med major
  1. Denisha Adewole from Nashville – a rising senior Biology major
  1. Sunnisha Stephenson from St. Thomas, United States Virgin Islands – a rising Junior Criminal Justice major.
  1. Darren Evans from St. Thomas, United States Virgin Islands – a rising Junior Civil Engineering major
    Department of Media RelationsTennessee State University
    3500 John Merritt Boulevard
    Nashville, Tennessee 37209
    615.963.5331About Tennessee State UniversityWith more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Nearly 800 Students, Parents Attend 2017 Spring Preview Day at Tennessee State University

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Spring Preview Day 2017 at Tennessee State University was a huge success.

17884194_1281258825245250_3457956651042581469_n (1)
A TSU staffer talks to visiting parents and students about admission opportunities at the university. (Submitted photo)

The Office of Admissions and Recruitment organized the one-day event on Saturday, April 8, to give high school juniors and seniors from across the nation an opportunity to see the campus during springtime, as well as acquaint them with the university’s offerings and admission processes.

Nearly 800 students, parents and family members from 15 states — including Michigan, Texas, Wisconsin, Illinois, Missouri and Indiana — attended Spring Preview Day.

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Hundreds of parents and students attending Spring Preview Day also toured the campus and met with academic departments. (Submitted photo)

TSU President Glenda Glover, accompanied by recruitment staff, welcomed the visitors in Kean Hall, where the various colleges and academic departments set up tents and tables displaying materials from their various departments.

According to organizers, visitors later toured the campus, met with academic departments, and received informational materials.

“We had high expectations for Spring Preview 2017 and we were not disappointed,” said Everett D. Jolley, director of recruitment. “It was a busy day for the admissions staff and representatives from the colleges. Several students who had turned in all their information were admitted on the spot.”

Jolley said Spring Preview was started several years ago as a “junior preview day,” to give juniors a jumpstart on recruitment, but it has “slowly turned into a day for seniors as well to complete their admission requirement.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Multimillionaire Entrepreneur Lectures TSU Students on Success, Establishes Endowed Scholarship

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Multimillionaire entrepreneur Dr. Bill Pickard has a message for TSU students: “Anybody, from anywhere, can accomplish anything.”

“But to do so, ‘you gotta put the work in,’” Pickard said, quoting a line from Grammy-Award winning singer Drake.

Pickard, chairman of Global Automotive Alliance and co-managing partner of MGM Grand Detroit Casino, was the guest lecturer at the Distinguished Lecture Series in the Forum on Monday, April 10.

Following his lecture, the LaGrange, Georgia, native, who is also CEO of Bearwood Management Company and co-owner of five Black-owned newspapers, established an endowed scholarship in the name of Kevin Williams, a TSU alumnus, Foundation Board member and retired president of General Motors of Canada.

He said the endowment was in appreciation of a long friendship, and credited Williams with helping to expand his (Pickard) GAA conglomerate of logistics and manufacturing companies with more than $1.5 billion in sales.

“When I met Kevin we were doing about $100 million, and when he left, we were doing about half a billion, that’s relationship,” Pickard told the packed auditorium with mostly students from the College of Business.

On his own life story, Pickard, who earned a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University, said he started off at a community college after high school, because of poor grades. Many did not give him much chance for success, he said.

“I completed college, earned a master’s degree, became a social worker, and life was good,” said Pickard, who credits a “strong” faith in God for his success “I had an opportunity to earn my Ph.D. and I did.”

According to his bio, Pickard’s entrepreneurial career began with a McDonald’s franchisee in Detroit, becoming one of the top-10 Blacks in America to have a McDonald’s franchise.

“It is not where you start but where you go,” said Pickard, reminding the students of his “Seven Proven Principles of Entrepreneurship,” outlined in his book Millionaire Moves – vision, opportunity, finance, relationships, talent and skillset, failure, faith.

“To be successful you must have vision. Your vision must be greater than the window you are looking through. What that means is that you will never be what you cannot see,” Pickard said.

Williams, in whose name Pickard established the scholarship endowment, said he is glad many will benefit from Pickard’s gift.

“This recognition goes to a lot of people beyond myself,” he said, as he recognized his wife, Arlene, who “makes the machine go.”

Maya Moore, a junior finance major, was part of a panel of Business College students who listened to Pickard. She was very impressed by the speaker’s very simple and encouraging presentation.

“I encourage students to read his book, because just as he spoke, the book lays it down in layman terms for our generation to understand,” Moore said. “Like he said, if you put the work in, with a clear vision, you can accomplish anything.”

Earlier, Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, vice president for Research and Institutional Advancement, welcomed Pickard on behalf of President Glenda Glover, who was traveling on business.

“President Glover and the entire TSU family are glad and honored to welcome Dr. Pickard.” Crumpton-Young said. “Certainly, we are excited to hear him and learn from his great wealth of knowledge.”

The Dean of the College of Business, Dr. Millicent Lownes-Jackson, thanked Dr. Pickard for the scholarship endowment.

“This is a very, very special day for the College of Business and for me particularly, since Kevin was my former student,” Lownes-Jackson said. “The College of Business is just so thankful for this donation, and everyone who receives that scholarship will have the challenge to emulate the character and success of two phenomenal business icons – Kevin Williams and Dr. Bill Pickard.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.