Upcoming TSU Gala More Than Glitz and Glamour

Annual event to raise scholarship dollars for students with real needs

 

 

Lauren Wiggins
Lauren Wiggins

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Lauren Wiggins says she learned a life lesson in high school that continues to follow her even today. That lesson: people aren’t concerned about your excuses. The Atlanta native recalls a high school teacher telling her, at age 14, that she displayed the actions of a criminal because she skipped classes or arrived late. Wiggins says her explanations fell on deaf ears.

“Whenever I was late or missed class, I would let the teachers know I had been up all night taking care of my brothers or in the emergency room with them,” explains Wiggins. “I have a 19-year-old brother who is severely disabled, and a 15-year-old brother who is diagnosed with Autism and ADHD [Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder]. I’m the oldest of three, and I have been changing diapers since I was five years old.”

Wiggins says her oldest brother has cerebral palsy, epilepsy and a cerebral shunt.

“My brother has the mind of a six-month-old. His body has continued to grow since birth, but his brain hasn’t. At times all I could do was just hold him when he cried. He’s unable to communicate and is completely immobile. My choice was easy in high school, family is first.”

Today, the 21-year-old Wiggins is a rising senior at Tennessee State University with a 3.8 GPA as a Public Health major. She received a full music scholarship to TSU following high school. However, after her sophomore year, she had to make another tough decision regarding her education and family. Wiggins decided to give up the scholarship.

“Dropping out [of college] was never an option, but I was needed at home. This conflicted with my commitment to the marching band and wind ensemble. I enjoyed being in the band, but my parents are older and needed help taking care of my brother. I had to rush home several times when my mom called and said her back was out from getting him in and out of bed or his wheelchair.”

2014 Scholarship Gala
Click to Buy tickets today!

Wiggins knew giving up the scholarship meant her family would have to struggle to pay tuition, but she was determined to stay at TSU. The University has been a part of her family for three generations. Through persistence, she found out about the TSU Foundation and was awarded a scholarship that covered nearly all her expenses for the upcoming fall semester.

“This scholarship has helped immensely, and heightened my desire to give back to Tennessee State, for other students who deserve a second chance.”

On Friday, Sept. 26, Tennessee State will hold its annual scholarship gala honoring long-time educators Drs. McDonald and Jamye Williams. Both have ties to some of TSU’s most notable alumni, including Oprah Winfrey. The event will also honor alumnus and former football player Claude Humphrey, one of the newest members inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Dr. Sharon Peters, Gala co-chairman, says while the event will honor these individuals, the primary mission is to raise funds to help students who need money to stay at the University. Students like Wiggins are one of many examples why the gala is so important.

“The gala provides the needed support for students to enroll at the University who may not otherwise have the funds to attend or who may fall short financially,” adds Peters, also director for TSU’s Community College Initiative Program. “A majority of our students need financial aid and without the help of many of our donors, these students would not have the opportunity to attend college.”

This will be TSU President Glenda Glover’s second scholarship gala while serving as the leader of one of the nation’s top HBCUs. Last year’s event had record attendance. According to University officials, more than 600 students were helped with $1.7 million worth of scholarships during the 2013-14 academic year. This represented a 76 percent increase in donations from the previous year and the University was able to award up to $965,000 in private scholarships.

“I am confident that our donors- employees, alumni, corporate partners, and friends of the University will continue to give and partner with us for this year’s scholarship gala,” says President Glover. “We have students with real needs, and the Foundation, along with the Office of Student Enrollment, has done a tremendous job in matching students with dollars. Every dollar counts and will make a difference in a student’s life. It begins with them receiving a quality education at Tennessee State.”

Wiggins says that’s exactly what she’s receiving at TSU – a quality education that has afforded her the opportunity to have internships with environmental watchdog Green Peace and the Centers for Disease Control. She beams with pride when asked what the future holds.

“I’ve lived my life around my brother’s health and wouldn’t change one single thing. I am happy to be alive and not a burden on my parents. I believe my future is bright and I owe it to my future alma mater TSU.”

Following graduation, Wiggins has her eyes set on Yale University where she plans on obtaining master’s degrees in Public Health and Environmental Science. Eventually, she hopes to pursue a Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology.

Call 615.963.5481 or visit www.tnstate.edu/scholarshipgala for more information on how you can help students like Lauren Wiggins through the 2014 Scholarship Gala. The gala takes place at Music City Center and tickets are available now to purchase.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

From St. Louis and Across the Globe, New Students Descend on TSU Campus During Freshmen Move-In

Sara Franklin (center) was joined by her parents Dr. Sharilyn (left) and Clifford Franklin (right) during Freshmen Move-In August 21. The Franklins traveled from St. Louis and joined more than 1,200 first-time freshmen and new students move onto the Nashville campus. (photos by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Sara Franklin (center) was joined by her parents Dr. Sharilyn (left) and Clifford Franklin (right) during Freshmen Move-In August 21. The Franklins traveled from St. Louis and joined more than 1,200 first-time freshmen and new students move onto the Nashville campus. (photos by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Sara Franklin visited quite a few colleges before deciding on the school that best fit her academic goals and aspirations. Out of the many choices, the 18-year-old from St. Louis selected Tennessee State University based on one recommendation; one that she said influenced her more than any campus visit—a recommendation from the University President, Glenda Glover.

Franklin met Dr. Glover for the first time in Montreal at a conference. She said she was inspired by the accomplishments of the president, including the fact that the alumna was now the leader of one of the top Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in the country.

“She told me about the great programs at the University and how the school was a wonderful place for me to start my academic career,” Franklin said. “I was impressed by her credentials as a CPA and lawyer, and that is something I aspire to as well. I think this will be a good fit.”

Franklin joined more than 1,200 first-time freshmen and new students who moved onto the Nashville campus as part of “Freshmen Move-In Day” Thursday, Aug. 21, in preparation for classes that begin on Monday for the fall term.

Her parents, Mr. Clifford and Dr. Sharilyn Franklin, couldn’t be more pleased with their daughter’s choice, saying Tennessee State University not only offered strong academic programs, but research opportunities, which add institutional value, and a vibrant alumni relations program.

“These types of programs and opportunities speak volumes for the university,” said Sharilyn Franklin. “The world is shrinking and is now a global society, so to be able to network with alumni across the country and the world is something that will be very important once she (Sara) graduates and begins her professional career.”

Both parents were also impressed by the accolades of the University, and while it is a mid-size campus with nearly 9,000 students, it is still small enough to provide a nurturing environment.

“I have a lot of respect for HBCUs and the quality of education and support they provide for students,” said Clifford Franklin. “Sara is a product of private schools and I know this will be a life-enriching experience for her. I know she will get a great education here and a nurturing atmosphere that will help her grow.”

Gerald Davis (left) helps during new student move- in Thursday, Aug. 21. More than 200 volunteers, including student organizations, alumni, staff and friends  helped move nearly 1,200 students into their rooms during the annual tradition of Freshmen Move-In.
Gerald Davis (left) helps during Freshman Move- In Day Thursday, Aug. 21. More than 200 volunteers, including student organizations, alumni, staff and friends, helped move nearly 1,200 students into their rooms during the annual tradition of Freshmen Move-In.

More than 200 volunteers made Move-In Day easier for students like Sara. Student organizations, alumni, staff and friends helped to move luggage, boxes of personal belongings and other items, while other volunteers assisted with providing directions and staffing water and refreshment stations for new residents.

While temperatures soared into the mid-90s, volunteers did not let that damper their enthusiasm and excitement as they helped new students settle into their new homes. Among those helping was Samantha Thomas, a senior Dental Hygiene major and reigning Miss TSU.

“I think it was great that we had so many volunteers, from administrators and staff to older students, to show we really are one big family,” Thomas said. “The upperclassmen were definitely excited to help and welcome our new ‘Big Blue’ family members to help with their transition.”

And that is just what Sharilyn Franklin is counting on as her only child is now on her own for the first time.

“I love the sense and feeling of family here on campus,” she said tearing up. “I know my daughter will be in good hands, plus when she gets homesick it’s only a few hours away.”

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University President Gives Upbeat Assessment of Institution as Faculty and Staff Return for New School Year

ribbon cutting
TSU President Glenda Glover (center) cuts the ribbon to the newly renovated student dining hall following the faculty/staff institute. Also pictured are (left to right) Derrick Seay, general manager for Aramark; Dr. Curtis Johnson, associate vice president for Administration; Dave Parsonage, Aramark district manager; and Dr. Jane Jackson, executive vice president for Administration. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – From new programs intended to improve recruitment, retention and graduation, to enhancements in campus safety and emergency management, Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover today told faculty and staff that the University was making tremendous progress.

University outreach and visibility through positive news media, and alumni, corporate and individual giving were also very encouraging, while the University’s endowment has seen a remarkable growth, the President said at the fall faculty/staff conference on the main campus to welcome faculty and staff for the opening of the new school year.

While the announcement of all of these achievements received thunderous applauses, the biggest buzz was around the University’s new Book Bundle Initiative, a digital cutting-edge program aimed at lowering the cost of traditional textbooks.

The plan will allow freshman and sophomore students to buy “e-books” (downloaded on a tablet) for general education classes, saving students up to $735 per semester.

According to the President, a large number of students enrolled in classes do not purchase text books due to lack of funds, delay in receiving funds, or simply hold back on buying them for weeks.

“Many of our students would go weeks before even purchasing a text book, which in turn hurts them in the classroom,” the President said. “This new program allows students to have books the first day of class and gives them the ability to be successful since they will have the required materials.”

“Take 15,” an initiative that encourages students to take at least 15 credits each semester to graduate in four years, as well as “3+1 Program,” a dual (college/high school) enrollment program, are among other efforts the University is promoting to improve retention and graduation, Dr. Glover said.

Although “Take 15,” launched in 2013, has seen an increase of students opting to take 15 or more hours to stay on course, it will take a while to gather enough data to gauge its success, the President added.

Dr. Glover also announced a TSU Community College Initiative aimed at creating a seamless transition of two-year degree holders to TSU, in the face of the new Tennessee Promise, Gov. Hasslam’s education initiative that offers two years of tuition-free community or technical college to Tennessee high-school graduates beginning with the Class of 2015.

Through its newly launched initiative, Dr. Glover announced, TSU is reaching out to all 13 community colleges around the state to develop long-lasting partnerships and relationships through “2+2” or dual enrollment efforts.

In other areas that also drew cheers from faculty and staff, the President disclosed that the University has raised more than $9.5 million in giving to the University since she arrived on campus about 18 months ago.

“Our corporate partners, community stakeholders, alumni, faculty, staff and individuals have been very generous and supportive of our plea for support,” said Dr. Glover, who presented a check for $50,000 to her alma mater as her “first order of business” when she became president in 2012, challenging other alumni to follow suit.

“Our alumni alone have contributed more than $1.4 million, and many chapters have met or exceeded that match. We recognize that our alumni are the life of the institution and they have demonstrated their commitment to TSU by their giving and support of our programs,” the President added.

Excellence billboard
On communications and public relations, the president touted a
reinvigorated media and public awareness campaign that has generated a more upbeat and positive image of the University. She pointed to more public engagement efforts such as the President’s Quarterly Media Brown Bag, that invites media professionals on campus to engage officials and staff on developments, and a litany of other endeavors that let the public know of “the good things that are happening at TSU.”

“We have billboards in strategic areas of town, including one in Memphis that tell of the quality of our education and our diverse offerings,” the President said.

She added that these are all part of a new public relations campaign that the University will soon officially kick off.

During a question and answer, where Dr. Glover and other administrators addressed faculty and staff concerns, the President reiterated her commitment to an open administration, where everyone has a voice.

“I applaud your support and contribution, and as we promised before, we will serve with fundamental fairness and openness. We will continue to seek your support and views in making decisions that move us ahead,” Dr. Glover said.

Following the President’s presentation, she invited administrators, faculty and staff to a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the newly renovated student dining facility in the Floyd-Payne Campus Center.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Holds Annual Tradition of Freshman Service Day Saturday, Aug. 23

TSU freshmen work at one of the community gardens in Nashville last year as part of the Annual  Freshman Service Day. This year's service day, The Big Blue Blitz, takes place Saturday, Aug. 23. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
TSU freshmen work at one of the community gardens in Nashville last year as part of the Annual Freshman Service Day. This year’s service day, The Big Blue Blitz, takes place Saturday, Aug. 23. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Incoming students at Tennessee State University will take part in an annual tradition Saturday, Aug. 23 that has become part of the freshman experience. Termed the “Big Blue Blitz,” more than 500 students will spread out over Nashville in an effort to give back to the community and build relationships with those in need.

According to Dr. Linda Guthrie, director of the Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement, the Day of Service is an opportunity for first-year students to get out into the community and experience its needs and culture beyond the TSU campus.

One of the goals is to help students connect with their new community and each other.

“This is basically neighbors helping neighbors,” said Guthrie. “This is a good way to introduce our new students to serving the community and become a part of their everyday life. We have a rich tradition of service at the University and try to instill in our students an strong ethic of caring and a sense of responsibility for making our community and world a better place.”

During the day, the University will see volunteers from around the campus including not only students, but also faculty, staff and alumni, pitch in at more than 20 different organizations that help needy, hungry and homeless people in the Greater Nashville area.

Volunteers will not only help at the University, but also Safe Haven, Project CURE and Nashville CARES, White’s Creek Community Garden, Earth Matters, and ThriftSmart in both Nashville and Franklin. Volunteers will also help out at the Nashville Food Project, Kirkpatrick Elementary School, Feed the Children and the Andrew Jackson Boys and Girls Clubs.

The service-day event takes place from 7 a.m. until 1 p.m. Volunteers will gather at the Gentry Center for transportation to area work sites, departing at approximately 7:30 a.m. and begin returning by noon. TSU officials encourage volunteers and students who are required to complete service learning hours aged to sign up at http://bit.ly/1sZ0Uty.

For more information, contact the Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement at 615.963.2920.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Welcomes Newly Appointed Board of Regents Leader on Student Affairs

IMG_5490
Dr. Heidi Leming, assistant vice chancellor of Student Affairs for the Tennessee Board of Regents, speaks with members of the TSU Student Affairs division about her new role and how she can be an advocate for the institutions she serves. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Making TSU her first stop at a system four-year institution, newly appointed assistant vice chancellor of Student Affairs for the Tennessee Board of Regents today met with University officials and toured student facilities on campus.

Dr. Heidi Leming, the first person to hold the newly created position in the TBR, was received by Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dr. Mark Hardy, and Dr. Cheryl Green, assistant vice president for Student Affairs. She also held brief talks with the Executive Vice President for Administration, Jane Jackson; the Interim Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Support Services, Dr. John Cade; and Cynthia Brooks, vice president for Business and Finance.

“We are particularly pleased that the Tennessee Board of Regents has seen the need to appoint someone with the special role to advocate for students,” said Dr. Hardy, as he welcomed the new TBR official on behalf of TSU President Glenda Glover, who was away on travel. “We have a very cordial and fine relationship with people at the TBR, and we are glad for the leadership you will provide that directly affects our students.”

Leming, who earned a doctorate in higher education from the University of Georgia, joined the TBR recently. Since then, she has been visiting community colleges in the system.

Prior to coming to the TBR, she served in student affairs roles at institutions across the nation, including stops at Austin Peay State University, the University of Memphis, Moorhead State University and Virginia Tech. She also worked in the office of student affairs with the University System of Georgia.

“Dr. Leming comes well prepared to advocate on our behalf,” said Green. “We are excited that she comes with so much understanding of what we do, and we are confident that her experience at the University System of Georgia will be valuable in her new role.”

Earlier, Leming, a native of Rapid City, North Dakota, met in Dr. Green’s office with the deans and directors of the Division of Student Affairs to acquaint them with her new role.

“I view my role as an advocate,” she said. “I want to be a resource and to make sure your views are heard. Our objective is to hear from you and know the challenges you face and what kind of support we can give you to meet those challenges.”

The TSU student affairs staff expressed many concerns, primarily the inconsistency in services and resources among TBR institutions and how it affects recruitment and student success.

For instance, the group addressed inadequate and poor services in student housing, recreational and wellness facilities compared to the same services at other system institutions.

“I understand your challenges and I am passionate about working with you through those challenges,” Leming said. “One of our major goals as I take on this role is to see how we can bring about consistency across all of our institutions when it comes to student services.”

In other areas, the group discussed issues involving the Complete College Tennessee Act, sexual harassment and assault on college campuses, diversity and globalization, grant initiatives that provide funding for some student services, and resources in developing and maintaining data on student activities, among others.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Earning Degree in Sociology Made Easy With Tennessee State University Online Classes

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Whether you are a deployed-military personnel or spouse, a non-traditional student, or just overwhelmed with life’s activities to complete that sociology degree that has eluded you for years, TSU has just the answer for you.

Yes…online!

“Our program is now completely online,” said Dr. Oscar Miller, professor and chair of the Department of Sociology, Social Work and Urban Professions.

He said with all of the general education courses also offered online, busy students can now earn their bachelor’s degree in sociology without sitting in a classroom.

“All you need is access to a computer and the Internet; it is that simple,” Miller said.

With the uncertainty that comes with a military deployment – when families don’t know when or where their next assignment will be – or a nontraditional student who can’t find the time to finish their degree in a traditional setting, the online program offers just the right opportunity.

Shaconya Freeman, 38, of Springfield, Tennessee, agrees.

Shaconya Freeman, with her children and godson following her graduation with an associate’s degree from Volunteer State Community College, has been admitted into the TSU online sociology program this fall. (courtesy photo)
Shaconya Freeman, with her children and godson following her graduation with an associate’s degree from Volunteer State Community College, has been admitted into the TSU online sociology program this fall. (courtesy photo)

“This just works better for me,” said Freeman, a transfer student from Volunteer State Community College, where she earned her associate’s degree in sociology almost entirely online.

The mother of three, including an 11-year-old daughter, said between a demanding full-time job as an office manager in a doctor’s office, caring for her young child, a babysitter, homework and studying, there is very little time left to sit in a classroom.

“I tried taking some of my courses on the (Volunteer State) campus once and that was just too hectic for me,” Freeman said.

According to Miller, the demand for people with background in sociology is on the rise and projected to grow even higher. The overall goal of the TSU online program, he said, is to target military personnel and their spouses, as well as nontraditional students and “degree completers” like Freeman to provide them with the skills they need to be successful.

“Federal, state, and local government agencies, non-profit human and social services organizations and private sector companies are hiring sociology majors for their competencies in critical thinking, research and data analysis, group/team behavior, and cultural diversity,” Miller said.

Dr. Oscar Miller, Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociology, Social Work and Urban Professions, right, congratulates Austin Wyatt after his (Wyatt) graduation with a B.S. degree in Sociology from TSU last May.  Wyatt, a nontraditional student and married father of two children, earned his degree entirely online. (courtesy photo)
Dr. Oscar Miller, Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociology, Social Work and Urban Professions, right, congratulates Austin Wyatt after his (Wyatt) graduation with a B.S. degree in Sociology from TSU last May. Wyatt, a nontraditional student and married father of two children, earned his degree entirely online. (courtesy photo)

Austin Wyatt, a May 2014 TSU graduate with a B.S. in sociology, said his degree, earned entirely online, has opened doors to him that would not have been possible otherwise.

“It has enabled me to move away from the manual laborer status into an area where I can now pursue my interest and help me to provide for my family in a more meaningful way,” said Wyatt, a married father of two, who will begin a master’s degree program in anthropology at the University of Memphis this fall.

Calling his TSU degree a launching pad for a successful future career, the Starkville, Mississippi native, who now calls Memphis, Tennessee home, said he made some bad choices earlier in life that got him “off course” and nearly caused him to lose his family.

“With a child and wife, and working menial jobs, it hit me that I needed to do something to be a better provider for my family,” Wyatt said. “I was fortunate to find out that I could keep my busy schedule of working and help with the home and take classes right at home.”

Wyatt’s goal, he said, is to be an inspiration to others who think there is no way out because of mistakes of the past, or just having too much to do to find the time to earn a degree.

“It’s either I was going to lose my family or make some quick decisions. I decided to enroll in the TSU sociology program, and that’s the best decision I ever made. I am glad I did,” Wyatt added.

“And these are just the kind of people the program is designed to help,” Miller said, describing Wyatt as a “TSU success story.”

He said sociology is helping the skilled workforce demand of the nation by supplying leaders, managers, workers, and entrepreneurs who use their expertise and competencies to help organizations and communities improve.

“Sociology skills help our majors successfully adapt within our ever changing organizations and the dynamic labor market,” Miller added.

The Tennessee Board of Regents approved the online degree in sociology in 2011 and completed final preparations to offer the degree in the fall 2012. The program, one of many degrees offered online at TSU, currently has 15 students, Miller said.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Highlights Degree Programs and Other Positive Initiatives as University Hosts Metro Guidance Counselors

Harris
Dr. Michael Harris, Dean of the College of Public Service and Urban Affairs, speaks to guidance counselors from the Metro Nashville Public Schools about offerings and programs in his college. Dr. Harris and his fellow deans took turns to present to the counselors during their (counselors) one-day in-service training on the Tennessee State University campus. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)


NASHVILLE, Tenn.
(TSU News Service) – The cost of quality education at Tennessee State University is affordable, nearly 85 percent of students get employment immediately after graduation, and a high number of graduates are accepted in graduate schools.

Those were some of the good news items TSU deans, admissions officials and staff shared with more than 90 Metro Nashville Public Schools guidance counselors during a meeting on campus Wednesday.

Since the counselors serve as a direct link between the schools and the University, the goal was to encourage them to steer their students and potential graduates toward post-secondary education at TSU, said Dr. John Cade, interim vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Support Services.

“We offer an affordable quality education that prepares our students with the necessary skills and competencies to be successful,” the deans said, as each gave brief descriptions and uniqueness of offerings and programs in their college.

Cade announced that starting this fall, TSU will offer incoming freshmen and sophomores block scheduling and the digital book bundle, initiatives, he said, that are intended to help with cost-cutting, retention and graduation.

He told the counselors that nearly 500 of potential incoming freshmen for the fall semester were from metro schools.

“We look forward to admitting all of them,” he said as he acquainted the counselors with University programs and processes from registration requirements, and tuition and fees to scholarship opportunities.

COE_Brief
Dwight Martin, right, of the College of Engineering at Tennessee State University, talks to visitors about offerings in his college during a meeting of high school guidance counselors on the TSU campus. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The architectural engineering program in the College of Engineering – one of only 20 in the nation – and a flight school program, one of only two in Tennessee, were among programs announced by the deans for their uniqueness.

Additionally, a global education offering that exposes students to the world around them through travel and study-abroad initiatives is just one of the many good reasons why “TSU is the go-to school,” the counselors were told.

With more than half of the counselors former TSU students and graduates in several disciplines, the message about the quality of the University’s education was easy to get across.

Dr. Barbara Mullins, school counselor for Freshman Academy at John Overton High School, who earned her doctorate from TSU, said the quality of a TSU education is comparable to the best anywhere.

“When I talk to students about TSU, I talk about the ‘TSU experience’ because I know about it first-hand,” Mullins said. “More than anything else, the personal care that comes with getting an education at TSU really stands out.”

Mullins also has a daughter who is a graduate of TSU.

In a brief remark, Dr. Nicole Cobb, MNPS director of Schools Counseling Services, lauded the long-standing relationship between TSU and the metro schools.

“We are really grateful for this partnership; we don’t take it for granted,” Cobb said, thanking Dr. Cade and Dr. Gregory Clark, director of Alumni Outreach and High School Relations for their support. “Dr. Clark and his admissions counselors, just as today, have always done a great job helping us during our training workshop here at TSU.”

“We have to support each other,” Gregory added about the relationship between TSU and MNPS. “We want them to send their students to us and we want them to continue hiring our graduates.”

This trend has taken roots in many ways, as TSU remains a key pipeline to recruiting metro and area teachers.  Recent reports show that for the past two years, TSU has been one of the top teacher preparation programs in the state, providing exceptionally qualified candidates for teaching positions not only across the state and the southern region, but right here in the University’s backyard with MNPS.

In 2012, 52 of the 553 new hires were from TSU, placing the University in the number one spot, with MTSU coming in a close second with 50 hires. Lipscomb, Trevecca and Vanderbilt came in at third, fourth and fifth, respectively.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, Rep. Harold Love Jr. to Host Community Back-to-School Fest August 2

BLOG_healthystartfinal1[1]

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – With the start of school less than two weeks away, organizers of a back-to-school festival want to make sure students and parents are prepared for the first full week of classes.

The 2nd Annual Love’s Healthy Start Festival presented by Tyson Foods KNOW Hunger Nashville Campaign, a back-to-school community event sponsored by Tennessee State Representative Harold Love Jr., will feature information from several local organizations including Tennessee State University, and provide supplies, resources and tips for those headed back to school. The event takes place Saturday, Aug. 2, at Hadley Park from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.

Called a day of free family fun, organizers say Love’s Healthy Start Fest is “a hands-on way for the community to rally around educational success, physical health and safe communities” for Nashville’s children and youth. It will include a health fair, free backpacks and school supply giveaways, free food and drinks, and a variety of live music and vocal performances by local entertainers of all ages.

According to State Representative Harold Love Jr., who is organizing the event, more than 500 children and their parents attended the festival last year and hopes this year’s event is even bigger.

“We had tremendous success last year due to the collaboration from all the participants,” said Rep. Love. “We distributed 1,000 backpacks with school supplies and will due the same this year.”

Love went onto say how important the Festival is to both school-age children and the community.

“Our students and their families need to have a great start to their school year and I believe that providing free school supplies helps,” he added. “Our families also need to get their health screenings as often as they can so that they can maintain healthy lifestyles. And finally, students and their families need to be informed about educational services that are available from both the public and private sector.”

The festival is part of the larger Children’s Sabbath/Weekend of Hope four-day event with Casey Family Programs, Children’s Defense Fund, and the Urban League of Middle Tennessee. A Weekend of Hope is a weekend of activities carried out by houses of worship, interfaith partnerships, civic organizations, philanthropic entities or community organizations, and the weekend includes a community dialogue, a day of service, and a day of honor and recognition. The purpose of these events is to have these organizations be a catalyst for community dialogue and action around strengthening families and making communities a safer place for families and children to live and prosper.

During the Healthy Start Festival, representatives from the TSU departments of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, including students, will conduct health screenings to include height and weight measurement, blood pressure check, glucose testing, dental screening, patient education on brushing and flossing, toothpaste and toothbrush giveaways, and coupons for free cleaning for children in the TSU Dental Hygiene Clinic.

Along with health screenings, the Center for Prevention Research will offer information on tobacco cessation, as well as the College of Agriculture, Natural and Human Sciences providing workshops and discussions on nutrition and agriculture and more.

Along with TSU, other sponsors and key collaborators in the Love’s Healthy Start Fest are Mount Carmel Baptist Church, the Urban League of Middle Tennessee, Jack and Jill of America, 3rd with Goals, and Tyson Foods’ KNOW Hunger Nashville.

For more information call 615.741.3831.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Admissions Staff, Deans, Administrators to Engage MNPS Guidance Counselors During 1-Day Campus Gathering

Unknown

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University admissions counselors, deans and administrators will have an opportunity Wednesday, July 23, to engage Metro Nashville Public Schools guidance counselors about offerings and programs at the University.

The MNPS high school counselors, about 90 of them, will meet on the TSU campus for their mandatory In-Service Training, which is held prior to the first day of school each year.

The training will be held from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. in the Ferrell-Westbrook Complex (The Barn) on the main campus.

admissions-19
TSU officials: Dr. Gregory Clark, Director of Alumni Outreach and High School Relations, left; President Glenda Glover; and Dr. John Cade, Interim Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Support Services, far right, meet with Dr. Nicole Cobb, MNPS Director of Schools Counseling Services, during the guidance counselors’ in-service training on the TSU campus last year. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

According to Dr. Gregory Clark, director of Alumni Outreach and High School Relations at TSU, the yearly meeting of the city’s guidance counselors provides the University an excellent opportunity to showcase its offerings and to help foster working relations between the guidance counselors and the Office of Admissions and Recruitment.

“We also see this gathering as a way to engage with the high school guidance counselors in a collaboration that exposes them to our offerings,” added Dr. John Cade, interim vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Support Services. “We find this to be very rewarding for Metro (Metro Nashville Public Schools) and Tennessee State University.”

During portions of the training, the various colleges at the University will display their academic programs, while deans will be given up to five minutes each to pitch their offerings.

For more information contact Dr. Clark at 615-963-5103 or gclark@tnstate.edu.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

2014 Small Farms Expo Highlights State’s Agricultural Diversity and Continuing Expansion of TSU’s Research and Cooperative Extension Program

 

smallfarmexpo
Dr. Chandra Reddy, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, left, along with Franklin County Extension Agent John Ferrell, far right, presents the Tennessee Small Farmer of the Year Award to John Ingle and his wife Bobbie at the 2014 Small Farms Expo at Tennessee State University. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – From beekeeping in Franklin County to crop growing in Williamson County, and 4-H and adult agriculture in Bledsoe County, the 2014 Tennessee State University Small Farms Expo Thursday highlighted the diversity in the state’s vast agricultural industry.

Participation in the Expo also showcased the University’s wide outreach initiatives through its Cooperative Extension Program, now covering more than 50 counties across Tennessee.

“This yearly Expo and TSU’s extension effort really give farmers an opportunity to educate the public about what we are doing out there,” said John Ingle, a Franklin County cattle breeder, who was this year’s Small Farmer of the Year Award winner. “Consumers only see the beef but it takes a lot more effort to get it to their dining room tables.”

As seasoned farmers, producers and University researchers, faculty and staff engaged the nearly 400 visitors with various displays and exhibitions, school children – from elementary to high school – considered potential future farmers of America, also got the opportunity to learn about agriculture.

Cierra Williams, a 10th grade student from Blackman High School in Murfreesboro, Tennessee and a 4-H volunteer in Rutherford County, participates with other students in teambuilding and leadership exercises at the 2014 Small Farms Expo at Tennessee State University on Thursday, July 17. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)
Cierra Williams, left, a 10th grade student from Blackman High School in Murfreesboro, Tennessee and a 4-H volunteer in Rutherford County, participates with other students in teambuilding and leadership exercises at the 2014 Small Farms Expo at Tennessee State University on Thursday, July 17. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Accompanied by chaperons and TSU staff, the children, who came in several busloads from the surrounding counties, took part in tours and educational workshops and hands-on activities including teamwork and leadership exercises, and demonstrations in alternative fuel production and technology.

“Coming here today was really eye-opening for me,” said future medical doctor Cierra Williams, a 10th grader from Murfreesboro, Tennessee, who wants to major in biology when she enters college.

Although Williams volunteers with the 4-H program in Rutherford County, through intermediate cooking and camp activities, she has never been on a farm before, and did not know TSU had a farm and a vast agricultural program.

“I am really excited to see this part of the university and to learn about these farm animals and plants,” she said. “Even though we might not think about it now, the team-building and leadership exercises today could be very helpful in the future in job interviews and other career efforts.”

The Expo, held at the Agricultural Research and Education Center on the main campus, also featured research and discussions on efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in corn croplands, enhancing sustainable production of bioenergy crops, pigeon pea production for limited resources farmers of Tennessee, and enhancing plant protection against fungal diseases and environmental stresses.

Workshops included organic vegetable production techniques, pesticide handling and safety, food preservation, new equipment technologies for small producers, and soil and plant tissue sampling, among others.

The highlight of the Expo was recognition of the state’s top four farmers for various awards. An overall winner was selected for the Small Farmer of the Year Award. That honor went to Ingle, of Cowan, Tennessee, who promotes a 100-percent green technology in cattle breeding and beef production. He was first recognized for “Best Management Practices.”

The other three award winners were Chris Hampton, a beef cattle farmer in Celina, Tenn., “Innovative Marketing,” for better recordkeeping that helps to meet customers’ need; Leigh Funderburk, of Franklin, Tennessee, “Innovative Marketing”; and Billy McCraw, of Clarksville, Tennessee, who received the award for “Alternative Enterprise.”

In presenting the awards, Dr. Chandra Reddy, Dean of the College of Agriculture, assisted by University officials, and Tennessee Agriculture Commissioner Julius Johnson, congratulated the honorees, and the institution and agency representatives for the support and cooperation in making the Expo a success.

“This could not have been possible without your partnership and cooperation,” Reddy told the packed luncheon on the TSU farm. He spoke about the “remarkable” growth in the college, especially its Extension program making special reference to head Expo organizer, Dr. Latif Lighari, Associate Dean for Extension, for “yet another” successful Expo.

Latif, who has headed the Expo since its inception 10 years ago, recognized his fellow organizers, the various farm managers and research leaders, small farmers, schools and students for their participation.

“Your input and participation made this event very successful,” Lighari said. “We thank you and especially the small farmers who are the lifeline of what we do.”

Other speakers included TSU Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dr. Alisa Mosley; State Sen. Thelma Harper, State Rep. Harold Love Jr., Agriculture Commissioner Johnson; and Dr. Tim Cross, Dean of Extension at the University of Tennessee.

Other TSU partners, Expo organizers, and agencies and sponsors present were the Tennessee Farm Bureau, U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Farm Service Agency, and the Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.