Category Archives: SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

Career and finance event prepares TSU students for post-college

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Career development, financial literacy, and personal growth were the focus of the “Secure the Bag” tour recently held at Tennessee State University. Hosted by the TSU Career Development Center in collaboration with HBCU Heroes, the event featured panelists who engaged with students on financial awareness and their next steps after college.

Jeff Brown, the director of the Career Development Center

The event unfolded in three segments. The first segment featured discussions on entrepreneurship, business strategy, and launching, while the second focused on career preparation and generational wealth. The third segment comprised a financial health workshop, specifically addressing credit and debt management for college students. A portion of the event also centered around NIL and sports industry careers, featuring insights from TSU’s head football Coach Eddie George and former NBA player George Lynch.

Jalen Mask, a biology student from Memphis, highlighted the theme of “knowing your why” and the importance of financial awareness. “TSU is an HBCU that is underfunded,” Mask said. “Being that we live in a marginalized community, it is important to have events like this to understand finances because it does affect everything.”

Quentesha White, a junior studying criminal justice from Alabama, appreciated the guidance provided, especially as upperclassmen prepare to step into the real world. She found inspiration in the panelists’ journeys toward success.

Lawson Wright

“Hearing their (panelists’) backstories and the backgrounds of entrepreneurs ourselves is very inspiring and motivating for me,” White said. “I know when I was listening to what they did and the history of how they became who they are today, it pushed me a little more and gave me more motivation.”

Vice President of Student Affairs, Dean Frank Stevenson, kicked off the event, emphasizing the importance of grasping knowledge and hands-on opportunities.

“We are so excited that you all are here sharing information and pouring it into our students,” Stevenson said to the panelists. “I am excited about the collaboration, highlighting the significance of financial literacy, especially within the HBCU community.”

Jeff Brown, the director of the Career Development Center, said the center’s mission is to provide connections and opportunities to help students realize their purpose and future dreams. “The goal of the Career Development Center is to provide connections and opportunities to help each student realize their purpose and the future of their dreams,” Brown said. “We want them to be strong as students and grow as students, but also think about professional development as they approach graduation. But then also be clear about what financial empowerment looks like.”

Hosted by the TSU Career Development Center in collaboration with HBCU Heroes, the event featured panelists who engaged with students on financial awareness and their next steps after college. Panelist for the first segment of the event from left to right: Alex Sanders, Delfine Fox, Harold Simpson, Derrick J. Hill (on screen) moderated by “CDK On the Mic.”

Lawson Wright, a sophomore studying computer sciences, attended the event to enhance his networking and interpersonal skills. “Progress is progress,” Wright said. “My objective is to get better every day, and that event did just that.”

The collaboration with HBCU Heroes, co-founded by Tracey Penywell, brought in panelists and sponsoring companies. This also included business strategists, entrepreneurs, Chief Technology Officers, and representatives from JP Morgan Chase and Amazon, among others.

Angela Davis, the Career Development Center associate director, said the event was essential as TSU students are graduating and earning entry-level salaries larger than ever before and will need guidance on responsible financial management.

“They’re able to give students an inside look, and also coming from an HBCU perspective, they understand some of the things that our students go through in making the transition from college into the workplace,” Davis said about the panelists connecting with the students. “I think it’s of great benefit that they’re able to share their experiences and some do’s and don’ts and different expectations that our students may not be aware of.”

Kimya Savage applauds during the “Secure The Bag” event as panelists share invaluable insights and resources, empowering attendees with knowledge for achieving financial stability.

Davis added that she believed the event offered valuable insights, connections, and inspiration for TSU students. The goal of the HBCU Heroes Tour was to share real-life experiences with students in preparation for the next steps following graduation and their professional journeys. To learn more about the Career Development Center resources, visit  https://www.tnstate.edu/careers/

TSU kicks off spring semester with orientation for nearly 200 freshmen

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The spring semester at Tennessee State University began with a successful freshman orientation, which helped to prepare over 200 incoming students for life at TSU. The orientation, held a week prior to the start of classes, provided a platform for the new students and their parents to interact with enrollment and recruitment officials.  In the packed Forum on the main campus, discussions covered a wide range of topics, including financial aid, academic advising, class scheduling, residence life, and student activities.

Incoming freshman Amoree Alexander and her family tour campus during Freshman Orientation. From left are, grandmother Donna Alexander, Amoree, sister Phoenix Alexander, and mother Makalea Alexander.

For many participants, the orientation served as the starting point for their college journey. Amoree Alexander, from Clarksville, Tennessee, was one of those students. Alexander is majoring in civil engineering and is eager to continue the family legacy at TSU. She expressed her enthusiasm for the faculty and students following orientations.

“The faculty is super nice, and the students are very welcoming.  Besides, my grandmother came here. So, I am also here to get that HBCU experience.”

Davieon Moss’ mother, Dr. Effua Ampadu, right, holds two degrees from TSU. (Photo by Aaron Grayson)

Davieon Moss, a native of Columbus, Ohio, was drawn to TSU due to the positive experiences his mother had at the university while earning her master’s and doctorate degrees. Moss, a music major, was particularly enticed by TSU’s world renowned music program and the Grammy award-winning Aristocrat of Bands marching band.

“I am no stranger to TSU. With a great music program that has two Grammys to its name, this is the place I want to be.”

Davieon’s mother, Dr. Effua Ampadu, a former TSU instructor, praised the thoroughness of the orientation process and the institution’s commitment to taking care of its students. Recalling her personal experience as a graduate and former student, Ampadu said, “This institution was good to me, and I am sure it will be good to him as well.”

Chelsea Morgan, Assistant Director of Undergraduate Admissions, urges the new students to make sure all of their questions are answered.

Chelsea Morgan, assistant director of Undergraduate Admissions and Transfer Enrollment, kicked off the orientation with a comprehensive slide presentation on various topics and advised students on how to navigate college life seamlessly. Morgan stressed the availability of support resources.

“We are here for you, so make sure you get your questions answered before you leave,” Morgan told students.

“Whether it’s selecting the right classes, understanding student conduct, or utilizing disability services, we are here to assist you.”

Dr. Brent Dukhie, left, Assistant Dean for Student Services, and Dr. Tasha A. Carson, Assistant Vice President of First-Year Students, give the new Tigers tips on seamlessly navigating campus life. (photo by Aaron Grayson)

Others speaking at the student orientation included Chief Operating Officer Jason T. Evans and LaMar Octavious-Scott, the director of Admissions. Evans extended a warm welcome to students and their families and encouraged them to make the most of the orientation by asking questions and seeking answers. Octavious-Scott coordinated the program and said the event was organized to effectively address the needs of the incoming freshmen.

For more information on admissions at Tennessee State University, visit www.tnstate.edu/admissions.

TSU nursing director elected to Tennessee Nurses Association board

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s School of Nursing Executive Director and Professor, Dr. Courtney Nyange, has been elected to the Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) Board of Directors.

Nyange will serve as the Director of Practice for the Tennessee Nurses Association. As the Director of Practice, she will have general oversight for the review and analysis of practice trends, scope of practice, and environmental issues for Tennessee nurses. The purpose is to establish task forces to develop actions to address identified issues and make recommendations to the Government Affairs committee.

“I’m very excited about this opportunity and I’m honored to serve my community, the nursing profession, and the State of Tennessee in this role,” Nyange said. “My intent is to better the practice environment for current and future nurses in Tennessee by promoting evidence-informed practice actions.”

Nyange said serving in her role at TSU has afforded her the opportunity to be at the forefront of not only nursing education but also nursing practice in Tennessee. Nyange was also selected as a participant in the Leadership Tennessee Next Class VIII. Her accolades don’t stop there.

Last year, Nyange was also selected as the first at TSU to receive this honorable recognition as a Rising Star by the TNA, the Tennessee Hospital Association, and the Tennessee Action Coalition for her outstanding leadership in the nursing profession. She noted that these achievements are complementary to one another. “Participating in the Leadership Tennessee NEXT program affords me an opportunity to create cross-state, cross-sector networks, learn about Tennessee’s strengths and challenges, and prepare to serve my local and professional communities,” she said.

Given that minority nurses are underrepresented in Tennessee and in the nursing profession, Nyange talked about the magnitude of this role, serving the community all while being a representation for HBCUs.

“I am able to bring the minority nurse perspective into this role and be a voice and advocate for minority nurses in Tennessee, and I am thrilled to be able to do so,” she said.

Nursing is the nation’s largest healthcare profession, with nearly 5.2 million registered nurses nationwide, according to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

According to the association, the racial breakdown in 2022 shows that 80% of registered nurses are Caucasian, while 6.3% are African American across the country.

College of Health Sciences Dean Ronald Barredo, expressed appreciation for Dr. Nyange’s unwavering support for both the university and the industry. “The College of Health Sciences is proud of Dr. Nyange’s appointment to the Board of Directors of the Tennessee Nurses Association as its Director of Practice,” Barredo said. “TNA is pivotal not only in the regulation of nursing practice, but also the protection of the citizens of the state. Her appointment to this esteemed position exemplifies the University’s motto: “Think, Work, Serve.”

By serving as the Director of Practice, Nyange looks forward to influencing policy and promoting positive changes that will better the practice environment for current and future nurses in Tennessee.

Influencing policy will help alleviate the nursing shortage and help retain them, she said. “My motivation for seeking this leadership position is the desire to recruit and retain high-quality nurses who will help advance and improve the health of Tennesseans.”

Nyange is one of 11 to serve on the TNA board of directors. 

TSU mourns the loss of alumna and former trustee Dr. Edith P. Mitchell

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University extends condolences to the family of alumna Dr. Edith Peterson Mitchell, who served on the TSU Board of Trustees from 2017 to 2019. In addition to her distinguished service at TSU, Dr. Mitchell’s legacy resonates through her remarkable achievements in the U.S. Air Force and the healthcare profession.

“Dr. Edith Peterson Mitchell was a close friend and a staunch supporter of TSU,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “Dr. Mitchell always made herself available whenever I called upon her to serve in any capacity for the university. She exemplified our institution’s motto of think, work, serve as a trailblazer, civil rights leader, and healthcare advocate. Her family is in our thoughts and prayers.”

Dr. Mitchell’s commitment to making individuals in underserved communities a priority is a testament to the legacy she leaves behind. She was the first woman physician to attain the rank of U.S. Air Force Brigadier General and completed 36 years in the armed forces, earning more than 15 military service medals and ribbons, including the Legion of Merit.

Dr. Mitchell served as the Enterprise Vice President for Cancer Disparities at Jefferson Health’s Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center in Philadelphia and as the 116th president of the National Medical Association. She also chaired the advisory board for the Dr. Levi Watkins, Jr. Institute at TSU. She attended and spoke at each white coat ceremony to encourage and support the program and its scholars. Due to her position at Sidney Kimmel Medical School at Jefferson University, she even made it possible for two TSU scholars to receive admission and support from the institution annually.

Barbara Murrell, chair of the Dr. Levi Watkins, Jr. Institute, has cherished a lifelong friendship with Mitchell since 1965 when she met her as a student at TSU.

“We are devastated to hear of the passing of Dr. Edith Mitchell,” Murrell said. “She was an individual extraordinaire who broke the glass ceiling and opened the pathway in so many ways, always overcoming the barriers set to prevent access for advancement. She was a brilliant woman who was loved and respected.”

Dr. Mitchell received a Bachelor of Science in biochemistry from Tennessee State University and her medical degree from the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond.

Murrell talked about the love and passion Dr. Mitchell had for her alma mater and the Dr. Levi Watkins, Jr. Institute. “She worked diligently to impact the lives of young deserving students, sharing her expertise, counsel, and influence to advance the Institute Team and Scholars. She will be missed.”

Since she began her journey at Jefferson University in 1995, along with serving as the Enterprise Vice President for Cancer Disparities, Dr. Mitchell was a clinical professor in medicine and medical oncology. During this time, she took on various leadership positions, including the role of director at the Center to Eliminate Cancer Disparities and the Associate Director for Diversity Affairs at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center. Her dedication to addressing healthcare disparities was evident not only through her administrative roles but also in her hands-on work as a clinical professor, further emphasizing her commitment to advancing healthcare equality.

Throughout her academic medical career, Dr. Mitchell, MD, MACP, FCCP, FRCP (London), prioritized individuals in medically underserved communities, making a lasting impact on the landscape of healthcare equality and access.

TSU professor designs Black History Month jersey for NHL Nashville Predators

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – When the Nashville Predators entered Bridgestone Arena this week to observe Black History Month, the NHL team wore a jersey designed by a Tennessee State University professor. Kaleena Sales, department chair and associate professor of art and design, revealed her design at the Predators Black History Celebration game on Wednesday, Jan. 31. Sales says the design offers a duality that bridges historical and contemporary Black culture.

I’m excited and honored to have the opportunity to represent TSU and Nashville as a Black designer,” Sales said.

A look at the front design for the Predators jerseys and T-shirts for the Black History Celebration game at Bridgestone Arena. (Photo submitted)

“To be celebrated professionally in such a public way means something to me. It speaks to the growth that we’ve had, and it honors what Black History Month celebration should really be about.”

This is the second consecutive year the Predators have chosen a TSU professor to design cultural jerseys and T-shirts for hockey players and fans, honoring Black History Month (BHM). The jerseys and T-shirts, designed by Sales and co-created with Predators graphic designer Tayshaun Hassell, were worn by players upon their arrival at the arena prior to game time. These items will be signed and auctioned off through the Nashville Predators’ Foundation at a later date.

Amy Bratten, the Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion for the Nashville Predators, said the organization anticipated showcasing the artistry in honor of the historical celebration.

“It is such a gift to have Kaleena Sales contribute to our Black History Celebration,” Bratten said.

“What Kaleena Sales and Preds Graphic Designer, Tayshaun Hassell, created is educational and dynamic. Our players and staff were excited to showcase the artwork on January 31. We’re excited to have the logo displayed all over Smashville!”

The black and gold jerseys and T-shirts, according to Sales, feature custom lively West African patterns symbolizing purity, wisdom, love, harmony, and more. The unique design was also showcased on lanyards distributed to the first 5,000 fans in attendance.

“The symbols were designed by the Akan people from Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana during the early 1800s and have a rich and beautiful history,” explained Sales.

“The geometric pattern used alongside the Adinkra symbols is meant to represent the vibrancy of contemporary Black culture.” 

Sales noted that the designs aim to honor the past by connecting it to the present. With over 20 years of experience as a graphic designer, Sales expressed the significance of this opportunity, emphasizing its importance not only for herself but also for the community she represents.

“This exposure is expected to bring increased visibility to TSU and the surrounding HBCUs.”

The Predator’s annual Black History celebration night recognized all four of Nashville’s HBCUs, featuring a battle of the bands with three local high schools, and included the National Anthem and in-game performances by Africa-American musical artists.

In 2023, the Nashville Predators selected Eric Jackson, TSU assistant professor of graphic design, to create the players jersey designs worn during the Black History Celebration game day warm-ups. Jackson expressed his appreciation for the continuous partnership between the organization and TSU, highlighting the ongoing acknowledgment of Black creatives.

“We are service providers, and we are mostly behind the scenes, so it’s great to be acknowledged,” Jackson said.

As a hockey fan, Jackson is especially excited about this year’s annual celebration, coinciding with TSU being the first HBCU to offer men’s ice hockey at the collegiate level. TSU hockey is set to commence its inaugural season this fall.

Dr. Samantha Morgan Curtis, dean of TSU’s College of Liberal Arts, said the selection of two of her professors speaks to the quality of the University’s art programs.

“We are grateful that the Predators recognize the brilliance of our faculty,” added Morgan-Curtis.

“The College of Liberal Arts is excited about the Predators partnership and all the possibilities it affords our students and faculty. This project specifically highlights the quality of our graphic design program. We are thankful to the hockey team for this opportunity.”

Morgan Curtis also shared that TSU will be the first HBCU to host the upcoming State of Black Design Conference in March, another testament to the program and faculty.

To learn more about the Predators Black History celebration and to purchase Professor’s Sales custom design T-shirt, click here.

TSU President Glover says institution will get to the “promised land” of equal funding

By Alexis Clark, Kelli Sharpe

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Days before the nation celebrated the MLK Day of Service, Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover shared her own mountain top experience at the annual presidential prayer service held January 10. Stating that TSU will get to the “promised land” of equal funding, President Glover delivered a powerful, spirit-filled keynote address to mark her final presidential prayer service. The near capacity crowd filled the sanctuary, at the historic Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church, to hear from TSU’s first female president and alumna to lead the institution.

Many stood to their feet as President Glover declared how thankful she is to have been chosen to lead her alma mater and that her calling is to bring HBCUs and TSU to their rightful place of equal funding, rights, and fairness. In a ‘preacher-like’ tone reminiscent of the clergy members joining her in pulpit, the crowd hung on her every word and one point encouraged her to stay on as president.

The near capacity crowd filled the sanctuary at the historic Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church to hear from President Glenda Glover at her final presidential prayer service.

“I’m thankful that God entrusted me with the leadership of such a significant university,” Glover said as the crowd erupted with applause.

“We will get to our ‘promise land’ for TSU. I may have finished my course, but I have not finished my calling. A course ends, but a calling lasts forever. My calling is to change the lives of students.”

With the crowd on their feet, Dr. Glover told them she was speaking from the scripture that applies to her assignment at TSU.

 “I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith.”  She asked the crowd to please receive her retirement as she nears the end of her TSU journey.

President Glover expressed pride in the university’s increased national platform, as she reflected on her journey from a girl in poverty stricken South Memphis to leading TSU for 11 years. She spoke of her challenges and successes.

President Glenda Glover

An impressive list of accomplishments was shared in the event’s program book. This included record enrollment, successfully navigating the institution through the pandemic, record $100 million plus in research awards and another $100 million in the TSU endowment, several new buildings, including two new residence halls, and securing $250 million from the State of Tennessee, the largest one-time appropriation from a state to a historically black college or university (HBCU).

She also spoke passionately about the ongoing “good fight” for TSU and for HBCUs nationwide, advocating for equal opportunities for students with equitable funding.

Last fall, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Education announced that 16 of the nation’s governors collectively owed their respective land-grant HBCUs $13 billion. Tennessee State University was identified as the HBCU with the largest underfunding owed amount by a state, totaling $2.1 billion.

President Glover shared that she is committed to supporting her successor, and will forever ‘bleed blue’ for TSU to the crowd at Jefferson Street Baptist church.

 “My legacy is that I fought for TSU. It is a fight worth fighting,” Glover said.

Prominent clergy members, community leaders, and individuals from all denominations gathered at the annual event, representing the diversity of the Nashville community. Alongside members of the clergy and supporters from nearby HBCUs, elected officials also attended in support of TSU and Glover. Mayor Freddie O’Connell, State Reps. Dr. Harold Love Jr., and Sam McKenzie, former Metro Council member Sharon Hurt, and former senator Brenda Gilmore, were among the crowd.

The newly elected mayor took the podium and spoke about his favorite prayers, gratitude, and Glover’s longevity as a pillar in the community.

“Her tenure as TSU’s leader does begin right here with themes of unity and inclusion,” O’Connell said.

“She knew how important it was for TSU to connect with the community and vice versa. It was Dr. Glover’s ideal way of connecting TSU with the churches and neighborhoods faith-based institutions.”

This years’ service included newcomers on the front pew, like TSU student leaders SGA President Derrell Taylor, Vice President Chrishonda O’Quinn, Mister and Miss TSU Davin Latiker and Victoria McCrae, along with TSU Board of Trustee student representative Shaun Wimberly, Jr. O’Quinn, a Chicago native, described the setting and President Glover’s message as a powerful experience.

“Knowing that she led with her faith being first really made me feel empowered,” O’Quinn said.

TSU student leaders present during Dr. Glover’s final presidential prayer service.

“It made me want to apply it to my personal journey. It really shows that TSU has strong ties within the community. It’s not just within TSU alumni, but the community in Nashville and beyond.”

Rev. Aaron X. Marble, pastor of Jefferson Street, presided over the program as his church has hosted the event since its conception in 2013. Pastor Marble asked everyone to stand on their feet to thank the president for her tenure and commitment to TSU. She received a rousing applause and standing ovation.

“God has used her to navigate and steer our beloved institution to tremendous heights in incredible ways,” Marble said.

“We take the time to say thank you for your leadership, thank you for your service, and thank you for your commitment to prayer.”

President Glover shared that she is committed to supporting her successor, and will forever ‘bleed blue’ for TSU. The crowd stood and cheered during her closing remarks as she talked about her efforts and what she hoped her legacy will reveal about presidency.

“I tried to help students, keep students in school, and raise money to get them off the purge list.

I tried to meet with parents, work in the community, and I tried to love when it was difficult.

I tried to serve God with all I had. Every time I did a speech, in every delivery, every seminar, and in every testimony, I tried to lift up the name of Jesus.”

President Glover will have served for 11 and a half years when she retires at the end of the semester. A Salute to Excellence Gala is planned for April 13, 2024, in her honor.

TSU kicks off semester focused on continued excellence and underfunding

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Highlighting major accomplishments, headline grabbing news, and historic underfunding, Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover delivered her final address to faculty and staff.

President Glover took the stage in front of over 200 employees and reflected on the remarkable achievements and pride she felt for the university and its dedicated staff. After leading the institution for eleven years, President Glover will retire following the 2023-2024 academic year.

Over 200 faculty and staff members applauds Dr. Glover after highlighting the university’s 2023 accomplishments and achievements.

“TSU will continue to be a great university,” Glover said. “We will continue to win. This is more than a full-circle moment for me,” she said due to graduating from TSU in 1974. “This is a 50-year blessing. Serving as TSU president has been an honor of a lifetime. I am forever grateful for the love and support.”

President Glover covered an array of topics during her State of the University address, including expectations for the semester and TSU’s strategic plan to receive $2.1 billion in underfunding.  

She began by highlighting some of the university’s most significant accomplishments this past year. Kean Hall was filled with pride as she reiterated that TSU had surpassed the monumental milestone of $100 million in endowments and $100 million in research funding, setting a new TSU record. The president also highlighted that this academic year was set as the second-highest year of enrollment with over 8,100 students.

President Glover said the plan for the university is to continue charting a strategic path toward reaching R1 research status and establishing new degree programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

The new proposed academic programs consist of a Ph.D. in public health, Ph.D. in executive leadership in urban education, Master of Science in business data analytics, Master of Science in nutrition and wellness, and a Bachelor of Science in Africana studies.

Faculty and staff join hands to sing the university alma mater to conclude this semester’s FSI.

“We have also revamped the entire health and wellness plan to meet the needs of our students,” Glover said, noting the focus on increasing the emphasis on mental health and counseling.

The president’s address continued, highlighting the significant improvements in campus infrastructure and buildings, including ceiling and flooring upgrades, interior design, electrical and HVAC systems updates in several campus academic buildings, and the main student cafeteria.

Glover then took a dive deep into the different levels of underfunding calculated by the state and federal government.  TSU is only one of two land-grant institutions in the State of Tennessee, and this has been the source of the underfunding.

In 2019 a state legislative committee revealed it shorted TSU over $544 million dollars in land-grand funding over several decades. In 2022, Gov. Bill Lee and lawmakers allocated $250 million to TSU, as the largest one-time investment to a historically Black university by a state. President Glover shared how the funds were being used for much needed capital improvement infrastructure projects, as outlined by the State. The biggest lump sum is an early childhood education building price at $35.7 million, an electrical master plan, at $33.3 million, and the entrepreneurship and industry partnerships at $30 million. This money will also be utilized for roofing the Gentry Center Complex, library infrastructure and more. TSU also received additional, separate funding of $68 million for an engineering building.

AOB Director Dr. Reginald McDonald delivers a surprise performance, serenading President Glover with a saxophone tribute to conclude her final FSI meeting as president.

Last Fall, it was then announced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Education stating that 16 of the nation’s governors collectively owed their respective land-grant HBCUs $13 billion. Tennessee State University was listed as having the largest underfunding owed amount by a state at $2,147,784,704. President Glover noted that she met with the US Department of Agriculture and Department of Education officials to determine how the $2.1 billion was calculated over a period of 33 years, from 1987 to 2020. 

President Glover continued by sharing TSU’s comprehensive 5-year underfunding restoration plan on how the $2.1 billion could be phased to fund projects. The first year is slated for $285 million, followed by $450 million for three consecutive years, followed by $512 million to close out year five.

President Glover finished her address with hopeful words to the listening ears of the faculty and staff.

“TSU is such an extraordinary place. Everyone at TSU matters,” she said. “We will continue to succeed and advance our university. We had less to work with, but we still got there. We saw unfair treatment, but we are still here.”

Laurence Pendleton provide updates on the president’s search at FSI.

Prior to President Glover’s state of the university address, there were remarks from Interim Vice President of Academic Affairs Dr. Robbie Melton, the Chair of the Faculty Senate Dr. Artenzia Young-Seigler, Staff Senate Chair Reginald Cannon, and General Counsel and Secretary to the Board of Trustees Laurence Pendleton. Glover asked Pendleton to provide an update on the president’s search.

“The number one thing we can do to honor her legacy is to make sure we have a great search for the next president of TSU,” Pendleton said during FSI.

Pendleton noted that the search process involves not only the board of trustees but the entire community, as there is a search committee in place as of September 2023. TSU’s search committee is set to commence its evaluation process of candidates. Ultimately, on-campus interviews of finalist candidates followed by the board appointing a new president by April.

FSI concluded with a surprise performance from Dr. Reginald McDonald, director of the Aristocrat of Bands. He serenaded President Glover with a saxophone tribute to end her last FSI meeting as president.

President Glover then thanked everyone and said, “Stay strong. We are unshakable. This is our university. As we move forward, we will take TSU higher and higher. We are TSU, TSU forever.”

 Glover will have served as TSU’s first female and alumna president for 11 and a half years when she retires at the end of the semester. A Salute to Excellence Gala is planned for April 13, 2024, in her honor.

TSU honors students win national HBCU research competition

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University Honors students are champions once again, securing the first and second places in scholarly research at the National Association of African American Honors Programs (NAAAHP) Conference for the second consecutive year.

The 32nd annual NAAAHP conference took place in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during the fall semester, where TSU honors college students competed against students from 10 other HBCUs nationwide in various categories. Hosted by Southern University, the competition featured TSU honors students excelling in the research poster category, the quiz bowl category, and Honors Got Talent.

Meaghan Lewis, a senior honors biology major, claimed the first-place victory for her cancer research presentation.

Meaghan Lewis claimed first-place victory for her cancer research presentation at the NAAAHP conference. (Photo submitted)

“I was shocked,” Lewis said reflecting on her achievement. “I worked very hard, and I was very happy. I felt achieved that all my hard work paid off.” The previous year, Lewis secured second place in the same research category and expressed pride in reentering the competition and clinching the first-place victory.

Her research, titled “The Role of Toll-Like Receptors 3, 4, and 8 in Tributyltin Stimulation of Tumor Necrosis Factor a Production by Human Immune Cells,” won accolades for content, in depth research, presentation, and quality.

Currently working in the laboratory of Dr. Margaret Whalen in the department of chemistry, Lewis initiated her cancer research during her freshman year at TSU.

“It shows TSU students that if you put in the work and get into these research opportunities presented around campus, you will gain the knowledge and show that you can be one of the best.”

Eseoghene Ogaga, a senior studying honors biology, won second place in her poster presentation titled “The Role of IL-17R Signaling in the Stomach Epithelium During H. pylori infection.” Ogaga is TSU representative collaborating with Vanderbilt University and the Department of Veteran’s Affairs Hospital in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Quiz Bowl team of five won the trophy for second place. The team consists of Tyler Vazquez, Morgan Gill, Kaitlin Skates, Kara Simmons, and Jada Womack. Skates earned third place in the Honors Got Talent category. All participating students received monetary awards.

Dr. Coreen Jackson, the dean of the Honors College, said she is proud of the achievements of TSU honors students, highlighting their academic and scholarly excellence. Dr. Jackson, a past president of the NAAAHP, said, “TSU is known to produce outstanding researchers among our peer institutions. We returned to defend our research title and won the coveted first and second place winners. These students are products of our world-class faculty.”

Dr. John Miglietta, a professor of political science and the Honda Campus All-Star Challenge (HCASC) coach, prepared the TSU Honors students for the quiz bowl competition. Last spring, the team earned a spot in the top eight teams at the National Tournament held in Torrance, California.

Dr. Tyrone Miller, Associate Director of the Honors College, served as the Honorary coach at the conference.

The three categories were part of NAAAHP’s annual national conference, where HBCU students engage in a Model African Union, debate, research presentations, and quiz bowl competitions. This marked TSU’s second-ever championship in the NAAAHP quiz bowl tournament.

The National Association of African American Honors Programs, founded in 1990, is a national consortium of HBCU honors programs promoting scholarship, professional development, community service, and an appreciation of African-American culture. For more information, visit www.naaahp.org.

Fall Preview Day gives students glimpse of HBCU experience

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – More than 500 high school juniors and seniors, accompanied by their families, filled Kean Hall for Tennessee State University’s Fall Preview Day. The annual event, held during the first week in December, is considered the university’s premier open house, which allows prospective students to explore TSU’s offerings, admission processes, and campus life. Among the enthusiastic attendees were McKenzie Nichole Brittingham, Kamdyn Marie Thomas, and Tavus Wright Jr., and their parents, who, despite the bad weather, were determined to learn more about TSU.

LaMar Octavious-Scott, right, Director of Admissions, presents Kamdyn Marie Thomas her certificate of admission, as her mother, Mekisha, and father, Timothy look on.

For Brittingham, of Memphis, Tennessee, choosing TSU was an easy decision. “I want to major in mass communication, and I want that HBCU experience. I can get both here,” she said confidently, with the support of her mother, Cheryl Rhea, who emphasized that it had always been her daughter’s dream to attend an HBCU, especially TSU.

Wright Jr., accompanied by his parents, Crystal and Tavus Wright Sr., made the journey from Macon, Georgia to visit TSU. Wright had already experienced TSU once before during a football camp, which left a lasting impression. “I was really impressed with what I saw and decided then that this is where I want to spend my college years,” he said. Wright has his sights set on a healthcare major and found TSU to be the perfect fit for his aspirations.

Dr. Portia Johnson, Director of Recruitment and Campus Visits, gives the visiting students and their parents a passionate welcome, as COO Jason T. Evans cheers her on.

COO Jason T. Evans welcomed students and highlighted the exceptional programs TSU offers and introduced key staff to guide attendees through the admissions process and to answer questions. 

“Today, you get to meet our outstanding faculty members and advisors who will tell you about our offerings, scholarships, other programs, and the benefit of a TSU education,” Evans said.

Brenda Collier, left, Coordinator of Undergraduate Recruitment and Advisement in the College of Health Sciences, speaks with Tavus Wright, Jr., and his family about programs in the college. Along with Wright, Jr., are his mother, Crystal, younger brother Elijah, and his father Tavus Wright, Sr.

Prospective students also had the opportunity to interact with current students and gain insight into campus culture and the supportive learning environment.

Timothy and Mekisha Thomas, proud HBCU graduates themselves, were delighted with their daughter Kamdyn Marie Thomas’ decision to choose TSU. Kamdyn, graduating high school with a remarkable 4.0 grade point average, plans to major in biology, with a particular interest in the renowned Dr. Levi Watkins, Jr. Institute, and the Honors College at TSU.

“We are very excited for our daughter and the choice she has made to come to TSU,” Timothy said. Kamdyn added, “Tennessee State is the best choice for me. It is closer to home, and I like the programs.”

McKenzie Nichole Brittingham, middle, who is already admitted, along with her mother, Cheryl Rhea, receives a ‘TSU Bound’ welcome from Denise Carpenter-Hulbert, Senior Academic Enrichment Coordinator in the Office of Student Success.

Participants were not only impressed by the wealth of information and engaging activities offered during Fall Preview Day, but they also expressed their admiration for the exceptional organization and seamless processes that characterized the event.

Fall Preview Day, coordinated by Dr. Portia Johnson, Director of Recruitment and Campus Visits, and LaMar Octavious-Scott, Director of Admissions, brought participants from over 15 states, including California, Illinois, and Michigan. Johnson emphasized the significance of Fall Preview Day, stating, “This event is an ideal opportunity for these prospective students to see firsthand how TSU can shape their academic and personal growth.”

Registration is open for spring and fall 2024 classes. For more information on admissions at TSU, visithttps://www.tnstate.edu/admissions/.

TSU joins campaign highlighting value of 4-year education

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is participating in the “Four The Future” campaign, a consortium of 10 public universities in Tennessee. This collaborative effort aims to raise awareness about the value of higher education from a public university perspective.

President Glenda Glover

The “Four The Future” campaign will engage community and business leaders, prospective students, and citizens in a multi-year effort to emphasize the importance of a four-year degree. The focus will be on workforce development, training, and economic growth, highlighting the essential role that higher education plays in these areas.

President Glenda Glover commented on TSU’s involvement and its contributions to the campaign, saying, “At TSU, we are committed to providing a world-class education, engaging in impactful community outreach, promoting excellence, and molding young minds. As a Carnegie Designated Research Two institution, we play a significant role in supplying graduates in high demand careers for education, health care, business, agricultural sciences, engineering and many more. Securing employment is the best return on your investment.”

COO Jason T. Evans

TSU’s Chief Operating Officer, Jason T. Evans, will serve as the university’s liaison with “Four The Future.” Evans expressed his excitement about the campaign. “We are delighted to join forces with other Tennessee universities to showcase the value of a four-year degree,” Evans said. “TSU has a rich history of transforming lives through education, and this collaboration allows us to further highlight the impact our institution and others in the consortium have on the state.”

In addition to its commitment to higher education and workforce development, TSU has established numerous partnerships with major corporations and entities that are in line with the vision of Four The Future. These collaborations aim to enhance the skills and knowledge of employees, further contributing to workforce development efforts.

For instance, the university recently entered into a groundbreaking agreement with Amazon, the global e-commerce and technology company. The partnership enables Amazon’s hourly employees to take college courses as part of the company’s Career Choice program, a $1.2 billion commitment to upskill over 300,000 employees by 2025. Through Four The Future, TSU remains committed to providing innovative solutions for workforce development, enhancing the educational experiences of students and Tennesseans alike.

The other participating institutions in the “Four The Future” campaign are Austin Peay University, East Tennessee State University, Middle Tennessee State University, Tennessee Technological University, University of Tennessee Chattanooga, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, University of Tennessee Knoxville, University of Tennessee Martin, and University of Tennessee Southern.

Visit https://fourthefuturetn.com for more information on the “Four The Future” campaign.