TSU’s Covington Named All-Star Game MVP

Robert Covington
Robert Covington

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service)  – Former Tennessee State men’s basketball student-athlete and current Rio Grande Valley Viper Robert Covington was named Most Valuable Player of the NBA D- League All-Star Game presented by Kumho Tire.

The Chicago native scored 33 points and added six rebounds and three steals in leading the Prospects over the Futures 145-142 at Sprint Arena at NBA All-Star Jam Session on Saturday night.

Covington, who signed a contract with the Houston Rockets prior to this season, has spent most of his rookie campaign with the Vipers, averaging 21.4 points in 23 games. He’s appeared in five games with the Rockets, averaging 3.8 minutes.

“It’s a great feeling being able to play well in this game in front of our GM Daryl Morey and all these others scouts and NBA people,” said Covington, whose 33 points set a new NBA D-League All-Star Game record. “I feel like I’ve gotten better during my time with Rio Grande Valley, and it’s good to see the hard work paying off in a game like this.”

Covington made 12 of 23 shots in the game, including 4 of 8 3-pointers to set the record and earn the game’s MVP.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Presents “Faces of Success” with Former Freedom Riders Feb. 20

FACES-OF-SUCCESS-001NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Pre-Alumni Council at Tennessee State University will present The TSU Faces of Success: Then and Now Thursday, Feb. 20 in conjunction with Black History Month.

The seminar begins at 7 p.m. in the Forum in the Floyd Payne Campus Center, and is free and open to the public.

Panelists include former Freedom Riders Dr. Ernest Patton, Dr. Mary Jean Smith, and Patricia Jenkins-Armstrong, who will share their experiences during the Freedom Riders Movement of the early 1960s. Additionally, former and current TSU students Trehon Cockrell-Coleman, Jasmin Garmon, Olivia Buford, and Khamaria Wright, will share their personal and professional experiences. Lauren Thomas, Miss Pre-Alumni Council, will serve as moderator.

Sponsored by the Office of Alumni Relations, the Pre-Alumni Council is a students’ first exposure to alumni activities. The primary purpose of the council is to stimulate the interest and participation of students enrolled at the University in alumni activities prior to and after graduation.

For more information on the seminar, call Seanne Wilson, Alumni Relations and Annual Giving Coordinator at 615.963.5831.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Same Goals, Different Roles……More than 40 Corporations, Business Partners to Attend TSU Reverse Career Fair Feb. 20

Reverse Career Fair_FlyerNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Representatives from more than 40 corporations and business partners will be on campus Thursday, Feb. 20 when the Tennessee State University Career Development Center hosts its third Reverse Career Fair in Kean Hall.

According to the Center, the potential employers and recruiters will visit booths and displays by student organizations and colleges, to review student presentations and discuss possible employment or career opportunities.

Built on the success of the past two years, the reverse career fair is intended to give students the opportunity to showcase their work and talents for potential employers and business partners.

Under the theme, “Directed to Excellence,” the career fair is open to current students and alumni who are in the process of looking for an internship, co-op and other career opportunities. Tables will be set up for students to represent themselves through one of the seven colleges or student organizations.

For opportunities to win cash prizes, student organizations and colleges are encouraged to ensure professional excellence in their displays, and decorate their tables or booths to reflect the theme of the fair.

Among some of the major corporations and business partners expected at the fair this year are Honda Manufacturing of Alabama, General Electric, Regions Bank, the Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Dot Foods, BJC Healthcare, LG&E KU-Kentucky Utilities, and Laclede Gas Co., and Teach for America.

The fair is free and open to the public. It starts at 1 p.m. For more information, contact Tina Reed at 615.963.7527 or visit http://www.tnstate.edu/careers.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Communications Chair Wins National Broadcast Education Award

Likes 2010
Dr. Terry Likes is the recipient of 43 awards during his career including other honors from the National Broadcasting Society and the National Press Club.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The national awards among faculty competing in the Broadcast Education Association have been released and the Chair of the Department of Communications at Tennessee State University, Dr. Terry Likes, has won the “Best of Competition” award in the Faculty Audio Competition category.

Likes won for his report, “It Was 50 Years Ago…The Beatles:  Legacy,” which documents how it has been 50 years since the Beatles first arrived in the United States.

The report, aired on the Tennessee Radio Network in October, looks back at the music of the Beatles, the impact, their significance here in Music City, and their legacy.  The report may be found online at http://youtu.be/bjBVGSKBFeY.

“Creative activity aids what we do in the classroom,” said Likes.   “When students can see professors remain active in the industry and achieve at a high level, professors can, in turn, encourage students to seek excellence in their own student competitions.”

The BEA Festival of Media Arts is an international exhibition of award-winning faculty and student works.  This year’s winners will receive recognition and exhibition of their works during the BEA’s annual convention in Las Vegas in April.

This is the 10th BEA award for Likes.  He won the Award of Excellence in 2012 and 2013, the Best of Competition in 2005 and 2010, and the Best of Festival in 2003 and 2008, which followed his second place winning in 2007 for the same award. In 2005, Likes won his first Best of Competition award, as well as two BEA First Place awards in 1999. He has also won six regional Edward R.  Murrow awards and 17 KY/TN Associated Press awards.  He is the recipient of 43 awards during his career including other honors from the National Broadcasting Society and the National Press Club.

Since joining TSU in 2008, Likes has won 29 awards or honors while his students have won 36 awards from the TN Associated Press, Society of Professional Journalists, Southeast Journalism Conference and National Broadcasting Society.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

White House Initiative Names TSU Student 2014 HBCU All-Star For Academics, Leadership

Jeremiah T. Cooper, a junior Computer Science major from Nashville, has been named a 2014 HBCU All-Star by the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, for his accomplishments in academics, leadership and civic engagement. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Jeremiah T. Cooper, a sophomore Computer Science major from Nashville, has been named a 2014 HBCU All-Star by the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, for his accomplishments in academics, leadership and civic engagement. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A Tennessee State University student has been named a 2014 HBCU All-Star by the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, for his accomplishments in academics, leadership and civic engagement.

Jeremiah T. Cooper, a sophomore Computer Science major from Nashville, will serve as an ambassador of the White House Initiative by providing outreach and communication with his fellow students about the value of education and the Initiative as a networking resource.

Cooper was among 75 All-Stars selected from 445 undergraduate, graduate and professional students who submitted completed applications including transcripts, resumes, essays and recommendations. The students represent 64 HBCUs from across the nation.

In announcing Cooper and his fellow all-stars’ selection, the White House Initiative said “engaging with this next generation of leaders” who will go on to make meaningful contributions to society is crucial to the success of the community and global competitiveness of the United States.

“It is a privilege to announce these 75 students who have demonstrated a commitment to both their own academic achievement and making a difference in their communities,” said George Cooper, executive director of the WHIHBCUs. “We look forward to working with them as partners in advancing President Obama’s college completion goal.”

Cooper, a very active and community-oriented student, is on full academic scholarship at TSU with a 3.74 GPA. He is a member of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars, and a former historian and e-board member of Collegiate 100, where he mentors young people. He is a youth leader and advocate with the Mt. Nebo Baptist Church Youth Council, where among other activities, he monitors and mentors children ages 3-14.

“I feel very blessed and humbled to be selected for this very prestigious recognition,” Cooper said about his selection as an HBCU all-star, adding that a cousin and his parents encouraged him to apply. “I was ecstatic to hear the news. When I applied I was confident of my ability but I wasn’t sure I would be selected. I am thankful that I did.”

In a letter congratulating Cooper for his selection, the White House Initiative noted his outstanding credentials.

“Your superb achievements in academics, leadership and civic engagement have once again set you apart from other applicants. The White House Initiatives on Historically Black Colleges and Universities is delighted that you will represent your school and the initiative as an all-star student who will graduate as a leader from one of the nation’s finest HBCUs,” the letter stated.

Cooper’s (Computer Science) department head and advisor, did not mince words when he heard about his student’s selection as an HBCU all-star.

“Jeremiah is an exceptional student with a strong academic background who is actively involved in NASA-funded research activities in our department,” said Dr. Ali Sekmen.”

He described Cooper as a team player and a mentor who is involved in projects that require not only technical but also “very critical soft skills” such as working in teams and effective communication.

“Jeremiah sometimes assists our faculty in teaching some of our computer programming classes, while also serving as a mentor to some of our freshmen. He is an active member of our Game Programming Group,” Sekmen added.

According to the White House Initiative’s announcement, over the course of the next year, Cooper and his fellow all-stars, using social media and their relationships with community-based organizations, will share “promising and proven” practices that support opportunities for all young people to achieve their educational and career potential.

In addition, the 45 female and 30 male All-Stars will participate in regional events and web chats with the deputy director of the WHIHBCUs, other Initiative staff and professionals from a wide range of disciplines.  They will also have opportunities to engage with other scholars to showcase individual and collective talent across the HBCU community.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Forensics Team Finishes Fourth At Weekend Tournament

The TSU Forensics Team captured fourth place in the Large Entry Sweepstakes of the MSU Ruby Krider and Alumni Swing Invitational Tournaments Feb. 7-9. The team also captured 18 individual awards during the two-day tournament. Team members included: (Left to Right) Delvakio Brown, Barbra Dudley, Tyler Kinloch, Artrisa Fulton, Janet Jordan, and Michael Thomas (courtesy photo)
The TSU Forensics Team captured fourth place in the Large Entry Sweepstakes of the MSU Ruby Krider and Alumni Swing Invitational Tournaments Feb. 7-9. The team also captured 18 individual awards during the two-day tournament. Team members included: (Left to Right) Delvakio Brown, Barbra Dudley, Tyler Kinloch, Artrisa Fulton, Janet Jordan, and Michael Thomas (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Members of the TSU Forensics Team traveled to Murray State University and talked their way into a fourth place finishes in the Large Entry Sweepstakes of the MSU Ruby Krider and Alumni Swing Invitational Tournaments Feb. 7-9. The team also captured 18 individual awards.

“This is an amazing win, especially with so many new members on the team,” said Shaunté Caraballo, director of Forensics. “We couldn’t be more thrilled.”

Results from “Ruby Krider” Swing, Saturday, Feb. 8:

  • First year team member, senior, Michael Thomas won third place in the Pentathalon, a special award for individuals who compete in five or more events. This is the most difficult category to win. Thomas also won third place in Radio Broadcasting, first place in Novice Impromptu, and first place in Novice Persuasive Speaking.
  • Sophomore Mass Communications major, Delvakio Brown won fourth place in Radio Broadcasting, third place in Novice Impromptu, and fourth place in Novice Prose Interpretation.
  • Freshman Accounting major, Janet Jordan took second place in Novice Poetry.

Results from the Alumni Swing, Sunday, Feb. 9:

  • Michael Thomas won first place in Radio Broadcasting, second place in Novice Impromptu, second place in Novice Persuasive, and sixth place in Varsity Programmed Oral Interpretation.
  • Delvakio Brown won third place in Radio Broadcasting and third place in Novice Prose Interpretation.
  • Freshman Economics major, Barbra Dudley, won seventh place in Novice Impromptu.
  • Janet Jordan won third place in Novice Poetry Interpretation.
  • Junior Aeronautical Engineering major, Tyler Kinloch not only served as coach for Radio Broadcasting, but also won sixth place in Varsity Prose Interpretation.

The Forensics team will now head to East Tennessee State University to compete in the Tennessee Intercollegiate Forensics Association Championships Feb. 14-16.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Four TSU Students Set Sight on “Gold” in Honda Campus All-Star Challenge Trials

hcasc-logo-2012NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – While America’s athletes are going for the gold in Sochi, Russia, a team of four Tennessee State University students will be competing Saturday, Feb. 15 in Montgomery, Ala., in trials for the “Olympics of the mind,” the Honda Campus All‐Star Challenge. Tennessee State is a former National Champion.

Forty-eight teams from the qualifying tournaments will advance to the National Championship Tournament in Los Angeles in April. The teams will be announced on Feb. 20.

More than $300,000 is at stake this year. And the TSU team is making every preparation possible to repeat as champions and bring home the “gold,” a $50,000 grant to the winning institution.

“Tennessee State is excited about participating in the National Qualifying Tournament at Alabama State University in Montgomery,” said Dr. John P. Miglietta, professor of Political Science and coach of the TSU team.  “This is an excellent opportunity for our team to compete against other HBCUs, and great training for our possible participation in the National Championship Tournament.”

The Honda Campus All‐Star Challenge is a “knowledge game of quick recall” that engages the best and brightest students at HBCUs in an annual academic quiz championship . The Challenge, sponsored by Honda, is now in its 25th year. During that time Honda has awarded more than $7 million in grants to participating HBCUs, and nearly 100,000 students in 22 states have taken part.

Representing TSU this year are: Adriann N. Wilson, a junior Mechanical Engineering major from Albany, Ga.; Brandon Cantrel Bartee, junior Mechanical Engineering major from Manchester, Tenn.; Aurora Garvin, a sophomore Art major from Nashville, Tenn.; and Joseph Edward Patrick II, a junior Electrical Engineering major also from Nashville.

In a congratulatory statement, the Assistant Vice President for Corporate Community Relations of American Honda, Stephan Morikawa, noted the long hours of hard work, practice and study, in addition to regular academic course load that participants must endure to prepare for the Challenge.

“Honda would like to wish good luck to all the HCASC teams attempting to qualify for the National Championship tournament this weekend,” Morikawa said. “We look forward to greeting the ‘Great 48’ in April.”

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Ten TSU Students Named Finalists for Regional Journalism Awards

Dept of CommNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The 2014 finalists have been announced for the best in broadcast, print and online journalism by the Southeast Journalism Conference, with Tennessee State University students capturing finalist slots in 10 of the 23 individual categories.  College finalists in categories such as Best Website, Best Newspaper and Best Radio or TV Newscast were not released early.

Award winners will be announced at the SEJC conference, Friday Feb. 21, hosted by the University of Louisiana-Lafayette.

Tennessee State University finalists include:

*Best Opinion-Editorial Writer: Patrick Lewis
*Best Magazine Page Layout Designer: Brittney Bodden
*Best Radio Hard News Reporter: Brandi Giles
*Best Television News Feature Reporter: Quinn Panganiban
*Best Radio News Feature Reporter: Kelli Volk
*Best Radio Journalist: Chantell Copeland
*Best Advertising Staff Member: Ashli Beverley
*Best Journalism Research Paper: Jer’Mykeal McCoy
*College Journalist of the Year: Ce’Dra Jackson
*Best Multimedia Journalist: Alicia Bailey

According to Dr. Terry Likes, Chair of the Department of Communications, this is a testament to the commitment to excellence of students, faculty and the administration.

“Teaching students to work across media platforms, and an enhanced partnership with the student newspaper, The Meter, means we have improved the quality of our student media to the point where we now have more entries and more finalists in SEJC than we have had in recent years,” said Likes.

The Southeast Journalism Conference is a vibrant learning community of journalists honing their craft through professional development and the Best of the South Collegiate Journalism Competition. An organization comprised of more than 45 member colleges and universities in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee, SEJC was created to encourage greater interest in student journalism and to form closer ties among journalism schools in the Southeast United States.

The Best of the South competition recognizes individual student journalists and university publications. The competition consists of 23 individual and eight university categories.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU’s Mobile Biodiesel Education Demonstration Announces Spring Tour Dates

Dr. Jason de Koff (center), assistant professor of agronomy and soil sciences at TSU, shares bioenergy research with visitors recently. The mobile demonstration lab will be on display throughout the year beginning February 17. (courtesy photo)
Dr. Jason de Koff (center), assistant professor of agronomy and soil sciences at TSU, shares bioenergy research with visitors recently. The mobile demonstration lab will be on display throughout the year beginning February 17. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Mobile Biodiesel Education Demonstration is going on tour. Live biodiesel production demonstrations will be held at five locations this spring, providing people across the state with an up-close look at the biodiesel production process and educational information on real-world production scenarios.

According to TSU assistant professor of agronomy and soil sciences Dr. Jason de Koff who will be leading the tour, the production of biodiesel fuel from vegetable oil is a viable process that can replace traditional fuel used in existing diesel engines.

“This process can go a long way toward helping ease the financial burden of fuel costs,” he said. “It is possible [farmers] could become totally self-sufficient in diesel fuel use.”

The five dates on the Spring 2014 tour are:

Date

City

Location

Monday, Feb. 17th Winchester, Tenn. Franklin County Extension Office
Wednesday, Feb. 26th Covington, Tenn. Tipton County Extension Office
Thursday, March 6th Dyersburg, Tenn. Dyer County Extension Office
Thursday, March 13th Wartburgh, Tenn. Morgan County Extension Office
Tuesday, June 17th Nashville, Tenn. Tennessee State University

For more information, visit the Mobile Biodiesel Education Demonstration website or follow the TSU bioenergy program on Twitter at @TSUBioenergy or on Facebook at Biodiesel Production Tour. To register to attend, contact Dr. Jason de Koff at 615.963.4929 or jdekoff@tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU receives $10,000 award for minority youth to attend 4-H Youth summer development program

PrintNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service)  – Tennessee State University Cooperative Extension’s 4-H/Youth Development Program, housed in the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences has been selected as the recipient of $10,000 in funding to be distributed through scholarships for minority youths to attend the 2014 Citizenship Washington Focus program this summer in Washington, D.C.

The award, supported by Farm Credit and distributed through the National 4-H Council, will pay for the registration, lodging, meals and travel arrangements for six minority youth participants and one adult chaperone.

The CWF program, attended by several thousand young people from across the country, is held every summer and provides youth ages 14-19 with an opportunity to improve their communication and leadership skills through various hands-on activities and programs that teach civic and social responsibility. Students participating in CWF also get an up-close look at the nation’s Capitol and meet members of Congress.

“Citizenship Washington Focus is one of the best leadership opportunities for youth in this country,” said Dr. Latif Lighari, associate dean for Extension in the CAHNS. “We are extremely excited to have this opportunity to provide scholarships to minority youth who may not otherwise have had the chance to participate.”

Dr. Thomas Broyles, Extension Program Leader for 4-H/Youth Development at TSU, will coordinate the selection and participation of scholarship recipients.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.