TSU Announces Homecoming, Inaugural Week Events

Homecoming2013University ushers in a New Century, New Direction for Excellence

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will hold a week full of exciting events October 20-26 as community members, alumni and friends of the University come to Nashville to celebrate Homecoming 2013 and the Investiture of the University’s eight president, Dr. Glenda Glover.

Inspired by last year’s centennial and moving forward into its next 100 years, TSU will celebrate a New Century, New Direction for Excellence for 2013 with a week full of events.

“Homecoming at Tennessee State University is unlike any other,” said Cassandra Griggs, Director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving. “It’s a time to reconnect with old friends, classmates, and reminisce about the days they walked the campus as a student. The positive changes and growth are remarkable. Although there has been much expansion, the traditions of Tennessee State A&I remain sound.”

While TSU has cherished and maintained certain Homecoming traditions, it has also moved forward across the century, finding new ways to celebrate pride in the institution, its students and alumni. Innovations that have sprung up over the years include the parade, pep rally, Homecoming Court, tent parties and many additional campus activities.

This year sees the return of the Homecoming Parade back to Jefferson Street. The parade route will begin at 14th Avenue and Jefferson Street, and proceed two miles to 33rd Avenue and Albion Street. Last year, the route was moved for the Centennial celebration only to accommodate large floats and a large influx in crowd size. This year’s parade begins at 8 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26.

The annual Robert Murrell Oratorical Contest will officially kick off homecoming week on Sunday, Oct. 20 beginning at 3 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center. The Gospel Explosion rounds out the evening, beginning at 6 p.m. also in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

Student events highlight Monday, Oct. 21 when the Courtyard Show takes place in Welton Plaza starting at 11 a.m., followed by the Battle of the Residence Halls at 7 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

The Blue Sapphire Awards will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 22 in the Walter S. Davis Humanities Building in the Poag Auditorium beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Presidential Inaugural events kick off Wednesday, Oct. 23 in conjunction with Homecoming starting with the Presidential Processional at 11 a.m., and the Mr. and Miss TSU Coronation and Ball at 7 p.m. in Kean Hall.

Events continue on Thursday, Oct. 24 with the Inaugural Ecumenical Prayer Breakfast at 7:30 a.m., a service of fellowship bringing together leaders of the faith community to impart well wishes and solidarity to President Glenda Glover and the TSU community. The day continues with the Inaugural Symposium on the Common Core State Standards at 10 a.m. at the Avon Williams campus Auditorium, and Homecoming Concert at 7 p.m. in Kean Hall.  A special “From the Rough,” movie premiere and reception round out the evening beginning at 5:30 p.m., and is an exclusive invite only presentation of the inspiring film based on the true story of Dr. Catana Starks, a former Tennessee State University swim coach, who became the first woman ever to coach a college men’s golf team.

Friday, Oct. 25 begins with the Investiture of President Glenda Baskin Glover as 8th President of the University beginning at 9 a.m. in the Howard Gentry Complex. Homecoming events include the Charles Campbell Fish Fry on the President’s Lawn at 11 a.m., the annual Pep Rally at 11:45 a.m. in Hale Stadium, and the TSU Pan-Hellenic Step Show at 5 p.m. in the Gentry Complex. Tickets are $10 for students in advance, $15 at the door. The night ends with the Inaugural Reception and Scholarship Gala beginning at 6 p.m. at the Gaylord Opryland Resort.

Saturday, Oct. 26 begins with the Homecoming Parade beginning at 8 a.m., followed by the Showcase of Bands at 2 p.m. at LP Field. The Homecoming football game between TSU and Eastern Illinois kicks off at 4 p.m. at LP Field. Fans attending the game are asked to review the tailgating guidelines.

View the complete list of alumni, student, reunion and inaugural events.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University
With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Holds Common Core State Standards Symposium Oct. 24

TNCORE logoNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will hold an Inaugural Symposium, addressing the Common Core State Standards. The symposium, titled, “The Common Core Standards and Tennessee Higher Education: Challenges, Opportunities, Resources, Equity (CORE)” will feature panelists from the federal, state and local levels.

The symposium takes place Thursday, Oct. 24 at the Avon Williams Campus auditorium beginning at 10 a.m., and is free and open to the public. Discussions will focus on the standards’ deployment, teacher preparation, curriculum development and impact on higher education in Tennessee.

The topic, selected by TSU President Glenda Glover for the academic symposium on the occasion of her inauguration, is an expression of a focus on teacher education that began with Tennessee State University’s founding and remains central to its mission today.  The Common Core State Standards aspire to the vision of providing an internationally competitive, career and college-focused, quality education for all students in the state of Tennessee.

“Meaningful steps toward this vision have never been easy, but the faculty, staff, administration, students and alumni of Tennessee State University have significantly reduced the distance toward this goal since 1912,” said Dr. Evelyn Nettles, associate vice president of Academic Affairs and symposium committee co-chair.  “The primary purpose of this symposium is to communicate – to teachers, parents, and all members of our educational community – the University’s ongoing dedication to this mission as we begin our second century.”

The symposium’s discussion will focus on the national conversation regarding the standards and the following themes: the challenges of moving toward higher-level skills and deeper learning and the new opportunities for collaboration offered by a common educational effort across most of the country.

“In addressing these themes, the symposium adds a practical focus on resources at the federal, state and local level,” added Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering and symposium committee co-chair, “including the commitment of the University’s College of Education to serve as an ongoing resource for Tennessee educators in implementing the standards and realizing their benefits for students.”

According to Nettles, the symposium’s fourth theme of equity expresses the ideal of the Common Core State Standards – an educational system in which all students can move between schools, between states, or into college without surmounting enormous shifts in expectations – as well as an ethical commitment necessary in at least some measure for their success.

To accompany the symposium, a common core module will be available on-line for practicing educators and pre-selected teacher candidates that focuses on developing effective lesson plans using differentiated instruction. The module will be self-paced and offers 1 CEU for 10 hours of online contact.

“The module will provide teachers the tools to create lesson plans based on different backgrounds of the students in their classroom,” said Dr. Heraldo Richards, associate dean of the College of Education. “This will allow teachers to help students reach their potential while addressing the Common Core State Standards.”

The symposium moderator and featured panelists include:

Moderator:

Vicki Yates, News Channel 5 Anchor

Panelists:

Dr. Peggy Carr
Associate Commissioner, Assessment Division
National Center for Education Statistics

Kevin S. Huffman, J.D.
Commissioner
Tennessee Department of Education

Jamie Woodson, J.D.
President and Chief Executive Officer
Tennessee State Collaborative on Reforming Education (SCORE)

For more information, contact Nettles or Hargrove at 615.963.7001.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Lecture Series Presents The Allies and the Holocaust Oct. 17

10 April 2013, Headshot of Joseph White, Research Assistant
Dr. Joseph White

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University and the Samuel Shannon Distinguished Lecture Series presents, “The Allies and the Holocaust,” Thursday, Oct. 17 at 2:40 p.m. in room 163 in the Research and Sponsored Programs building. The lecture is free and open to the public.

During the lecture, Dr. Joseph White, research assistant with the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, will share his expertise on the Holocaust, and discuss what the Allies knew and when they knew it, and will outline what intelligence on the Holocaust was available to the Western Allies and when. In the process, White distinguishes between information and knowledge on how the Allies reacted to the intelligence.

White is a contributor to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos, and edits Volume 3, The Camps and Ghettos of European Regimes aligned with Nazi Germany. He has published numerous articles on Nazi camps in Holocaust and Genocide Studies; Journal of Jewish Identities; PRISM: An Interdisciplinary Journal for Holocaust Educators; and Evoking Genocide: Researchers and Activists Describe the Works of Art and Media that Changed Their Lives.

He holds a Ph.D. in Modern European history from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and a B.A. and M.A. in history from Georgia State University.

The Samuel Shannon Lecture Series is named in honor of Dr. Samuel H. Shannon who served on the TSU history faculty for more than 30 years. Shannon was an accomplished scholar and contributed to the intellectual life of the University by regularly inviting distinguished colleagues to campus to provide guest lectures for students and faculty. Under his leadership, the department’s lecture series evolved from a voluntary effort to a funded program of the University.

The goal of the series is to bring to the University scholars who exemplify excellence in teaching and scholarship in the fields of history, geography and political science.

For more information, contact Dr. Gashawbeza W. Bekele, assistant professor of Geography, at 615.963.5499.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Faculty Members Selected as Top Professors at Affordable Colleges

Historically-Black-CollegesNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Two faculty members at Tennessee State University have been recognized as two of the top professors for national and international recognition for their work in research – and in the classroom.

Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Natural and Human Sciences; and Dr. Terry Likes, chair of the Department of Communications, have been singled out as the best in their field as top professors at affordable Historically Black Colleges by Affordable Colleges Online.

According to the award, schools and professors on the list have an honored tradition of providing high quality education in the arts and sciences, and in recent years, creating programs that match the evolving career and academic aspirations of their students.

 

 

Dr. Chandra Reddy
Dr. Chandra Reddy

Reddy was recognized for the House Joint Resolution recognizing scholarly achievement from the Tennessee State Legislature in 2012. He has been serving as the dean of the College at TSU since 2008, and is the former dean of the School of Graduate Studies at Alabama A&M University.

 

Dr. Terry Likes
Dr. Terry Likes

Likes was recognized for the 2013 Journalism Educator of the Year award from the Southeast Journalism Conference he received earlier this year. He has captured 25 journalism awards at the national, regional, and state levels, including the 2013 National Association of Television Program Executives Fellowship.

Affordable Colleges Online helps students find affordable college options and provides information about financial aid and college rankings. All colleges and universities in the Affordable HBCU category, including TSU, are fully accredited institutions with annual tuition costs of less than $12,000, according to the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System.

Dean Reddy and Dr. Likes join the list of who’s who of top professors, including a professor/author in Fayetteville, Ark., renowned for her creations in children’s literature; a chemistry professor at a Maryland school who has received back-to-back awards from the Board of Regents or the Pine Bluff researcher who investigates the origins of the genetic code for NASA. Professors on the list have earned Golden Mike awards in broadcasting, American Association of Cancer Research awards, top honors in music performance, and awards from Departments of Homeland Security, and Agriculture. All demonstrate that students don’t have to sacrifice academic excellence in the name of affordability.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University
With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

Art Exhibit Displays Works of Mother, Daughter Duo

A Mirrored Creation of Life on Display at Avon Williams Campus Library through November 15

Mutually inspired by each other, Shea Moore’s photographs have inspired her mother, Cassandra Bennett to share her interpretation on canvas. The mother of this duo states that her daughter has the ability to capture on camera what is seen through the eyes of an artist. The art exhibit, A Mirrored Creation of Life: in Photographs and Oil, is on display at the Avon Williams campus library through November 15.

Mutually inspired by each other, Shea Moore’s photographs have inspired her mother, Cassandra Bennett to share her interpretation on canvas. The mother of this duo states that her daughter has the ability to capture on camera what is seen through the eyes of an artist. The art exhibit, A Mirrored Creation of Life: in Photographs and Oil, is on display at the Avon Williams campus library through November 15.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A new art exhibit is currently on display at the Tennessee State University Avon Williams campus library that features a mother and daughter duo.

Titled, A Mirrored Creation of Life: in Photographs and Oil, the exhibit is a collaboration of mother, Cassandra Bennett and daughter, Shea Moore, and features more than 20 original works of photography and oil paintings.

Nashville natives Bennett and Moore bring their love of art, design, fashion, family, music and makeup into this fascinating creation. Mutually inspired by each other, Moore’s photographs have inspired her mother, Bennett to share her interpretation on canvas. The mother of this duo states that her daughter has the ability to capture on camera what is seen through the eyes of an artist.

Bennett, the mother of five children, always encouraged her children to follow their dreams and their special gifts and talents. She started oil painting again in 2006 after placing it aside for many years. Bennett is a member of “The Society of Artist” at Artists on Main in Goodlettsville, Tenn., under the direction of David Gillihan, Art Instructor. Her work has been displayed at several galleries locally and nationally.

Trained as a fashion designer at Bauder College in Atlanta, Moore decided to leave to the corporate world two years ago to pursue her passion as a freelance makeup artist and photographer. Born and raised in Nashville, she was exposed to various aspects of art, design, fashion and music. She enjoys sharing experiences with others through her photos and allowing the viewer to create their own stories, emotions, and connections with each photo.

The exhibit is free and open to the public, and runs through November 15. The library is open Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. until 10 pm, Friday-Saturday 9 a.m. until 5:30 p.m., and Sunday noon until 8:30 p.m. For more information, call 615.963.7383.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Hosts Entertainment Outreach Program Conference Oct. 29

“Leveraging Up!” workshop provides opportunity for students to meet, network with industry professionals

entertainment career fair

NASHVILLE, Tenn.  (TSU News Service) — Tennessee State University will host an entertainment industry college career conference and symposium Tuesday, Oct. 29, from 1:30 until 5 p.m. in The Forum, located in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

The conference will bring entertainment industry leaders and professionals to the University in order to expose a diverse group of students to the industry while closing the gap between students and recruiters.

Leveraging UP, an entertainment organization dedicated to educating, recruiting and developing the next generation of industry leaders, innovators and visionaries of tomorrow will host a student prep workshop as well as bring some of the world’s leading media, entertainment and communication companies to the University.

Companies scheduled to be in attendance include DreamWorks Animation SKG, Sony, CBS Corporate, the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, Clear Channel and others.

According to organizers, this is an exceptional opportunity for students to meet and network with industry professionals. For students who desire to work in one of the many areas of the entertainment industry or who want to explore the possibilities that the entertainment industry offers, this conference is a must attend.

Students from all majors and backgrounds are invited to participate.  Industry leaders are seeking students from business, mass communications, engineering, technology, music, history, architecture, computer science, and art as well as other academic majors and disciplines.  The conference is for both undergraduates and graduate students.

The conference is free and open to students, and registration is advised. For more information, contact the TSU Career Development Center at 615.963.7527.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

Distinguished Lecture Series Welcomes Keith Boykin to Campus October 9

Keith Boykin
Keith Boykin

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Fighting Words will be the topic of discussion, Wednesday, Oct. 9 when Tennessee State University welcomes Keith Boykin to campus.

The event, part of the Distinguished Lecture Series sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs, will take place in Kean Hall beginning at 1 p.m. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Boykin is a CNBC contributor, MSNBC commentator, BET columnist, and New York Times best-selling author. Each of Boykin’s four books has been nominated for a Lambda Literary Award, including his most recent book, For Colored Boys Who Have Considered Suicide When The Rainbow Is Still Not Enough, which also won the American Library Association Stonewall Award for Nonfiction in 2013.

Educated at Dartmouth and Harvard, Boykin attended law school with President Barack Obama, and served in the White House as a special assistant to President Bill Clinton, where he was once the highest-ranking openly gay person in the Clinton White House. He also helped organize and participated in the nation’s first ever meeting between a sitting president and leaders of the LGBT community.

Boykin has been actively involved in progressive causes since he worked on his first congressional campaign while still a student in high school. He is a veteran of six political campaigns, including two presidential campaigns, and was named one of the top instructors when he taught political science at American University in Washington, D.C.

He has traveled extensively across four continents, and in 1997, was appointed by President Clinton to the U.S. presidential trade delegation to Zimbabwe, along with Coretta Scott King and the Reverend Jesse Jackson.

After starring on the 2004 Showtime television series American Candidate, Boykin has since appeared on numerous national media programs, including Anderson Cooper 360, The O’Reilly Factor, The Tyra Banks Show, The Montel Williams Show, Judge Hatchett and The Tom Joyner Morning Show.

A founder and first board president of the National Black Justice Coalition, Boykin has spoken to audiences, large and small, across the world. He delivered a landmark speech to more than 200,000 people at the Millennium March on Washington, and gave a stirring speech about the AIDS epidemic in front of 40,000 people in Chicago’s Soldier Field in July 2006.

Born and raised in St. Louis, Boykin lives in New York City and Miami.

Former Lecture Series guests have included actress Tasha Smith, actor and author Hill Harper, actress Robin Givens, and four-time Olympic athlete Jackie Joyner-Kersee.

For more information on the Distinguished Lecture Series, contact the Office of Student Affairs at 615.963.5621 or the Office of Media Relations at 615.963.5331.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Announces Homecoming Week Activities

Members of the Aristocrat of Bands march up Ed Temple Boulevard during the 2012 Homecoming Parade. This year the parade returns to its original route beginning at 14th Avenue and Jefferson Street to 33rd Avenue and Albion Street. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Members of the Aristocrat of Bands march up Ed Temple Boulevard during the 2012 Homecoming Parade. This year the parade returns to its original route beginning at 14th Avenue and Jefferson Street to 33rd Avenue and Albion Street. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

University ushers in a New Century, New Direction for Excellence

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will hold a week full of exciting events October 20-26 as community members, alumni and friends of the University come to Nashville to celebrate Homecoming 2013.

Inspired by last year’s centennial and moving forward into its next 100 years, TSU will celebrate a New Century, New Direction for Excellence for 2013 with a week full of events.

“Homecoming at Tennessee State University is unlike any other,” said Sandra Griggs, Director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving. “It’s a time to reconnect with old friends, classmates, and reminisce about the days they walked the campus as a student. The positive changes and growth are remarkable. Although there has been much expansion, the traditions of Tennessee State A&I remain sound.”

While TSU has cherished and maintained certain Homecoming traditions, it has also moved forward across the century, finding new ways to celebrate pride in the institution, its students and alumni. Innovations that have sprung up over the years include the parade, pep rally, Homecoming Court, tent parties and many additional campus activities.

This year sees the return of the Homecoming Parade back to Jefferson Street. The parade route will begin at 14th Avenue and Jefferson Street, and proceed two miles to 33rd Avenue and Albion Street. Last year, the route was moved for the Centennial celebration only to accommodate large floats and a large influx in crowd size. This year’s parade begins at 8 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26.

The annual Robert Murrell Oratorical Contest will officially kick off homecoming week on Sunday, Oct. 20 beginning at 3 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center. The Gospel Explosion rounds out the evening, beginning at 6 p.m. also in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

Student events highlight Monday, Oct. 21 when the Courtyard Show takes place in Welton Plaza starting at 11 a.m., followed by the Battle of the Residence Halls at 7 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

The Blue Sapphire Awards will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 22 in the Walter S. Davis Humanities Building in the Poag Auditorium beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Presidential Inaugural events kick off Wednesday, Oct. 23 in conjunction with Homecoming starting with the Presidential Processional at 11 a.m., and the Mr. and Miss TSU Coronation and Ball at 7 p.m. in Kean Hall.

Events continue on Thursday, Oct. 24 with the Inaugural Symposium at 10 a.m. at the Avon Williams campus Auditorium, and Homecoming Concert at 7 p.m. in Kean Hall.

Friday, Oct. 25 begins with the Investiture of President Glenda Baskin Glover as 8th President of the University beginning at 9 a.m. in the Howard Gentry Complex. Homecoming events include the Charles Campbell Fish Fry on the President’s Lawn at 11 a.m., the annual Pep Rally at 11:45 a.m. in Hale Stadium, and the TSU Pan-Hellenic Step Show at 5 p.m. in the Gentry Complex. Tickets are $10 for students in advance, $15 at the door. The night ends with the Inaugural Reception and Scholarship Gala beginning at 6 p.m. at the Gaylord Opryland Resort.

Saturday, Oct. 26 begins with the Homecoming Parade beginning at 8 a.m., followed by the Showcase of Bands at 2 p.m. at LP Field. The Homecoming football game between TSU and Eastern Illinois kicks off at 4 p.m. at LP Field.

View the complete list of alumni, student, reunion and inaugural events.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Adds Tree Campus USA Designation to List of Accolades

Students from Tennessee State University plant a red maple tree on campus as part of a celebration recognizing the University as a leader in conservation and sustainability. TSU received the Tree Campus USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation, a national program created in 2008 to honor colleges and universities for effective forest management and engaging staff and students in conservation goals. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Students from Tennessee State University plant a red maple tree on campus as part of a celebration recognizing the University as a leader in conservation and sustainability. TSU received the Tree Campus USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation, a national program created in 2008 to honor colleges and universities for effective forest management and engaging staff and students in conservation goals. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Rain showers, wind and cooler temperatures could not keep students from Tennessee State University along with community volunteers from planting more than 30 trees around campus Sunday afternoon as part of a celebration recognizing the University as a leader in conservation and sustainability.

Prior to planting Crepe Myrtles, Red Maple and Oak trees around campus, TSU received the Tree Campus USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation, a national program created in 2008 to honor colleges and universities for effective forest management and engaging staff and students in conservation goals.

TSU, along with Trevecca Nazarene University, were recognized as the first universities to receive the special designation in 2013, bringing the total to 194 institutions taking part in the national program.

“How fitting that today we recognize these two universities in Nashville, who, for the past 18 years, has received its own designation as a Tree City USA by the foundation,” said Mary Sweeny, program manager for the Arbor Day Foundation’s Tree Campus USA. “College campuses have some of the largest urban forests in the country, and we need to protect and become good stewards of these natural woodlands.”

TPrintSU achieved the designation by meeting Tree Campus USA’s five standards, which include creating a tree advisory committee, a campus tree-care plan, dedicated annual expenditures toward trees, an Arbor Day observance, and student service-learning projects.

Dr. Chandra Reddy, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, called the designation “great news” for the campus since it is the result of a lot of planning and hard work by faculty, staff and students. But, he said, future leaders, such as the students in attendance at the ceremony, have the responsibility to maintain the health and vitality of not only the campus urban forest, but also woodlands across the country.

“We have denuded forests in the name of progress, along with creating large urban areas void of trees and natural plants,” added Reddy. “We are honored to be part of the program and hope to educate our students on the importance of being good stewards of the environment. We thank the Arbor Day Foundation for making this a priority and to help educate the youth of our nation.”

Getting the campus the designation was the brainchild of Dr. De’Etra Young, extension assistant professor of Urban Forestry. During an interview for a position with the University, she stated it was a goal of hers to get the Tree Campus USA designation for TSU, along with her passion for maintaining the urban forest on the campus. That was in February, and in eight short months, the University fast-tracked its application and became the newest member of the program.

“I didn’t expect this to happen so quickly,” said a smiling Young. “We are going to use this recognition to show that the University is devoted to the environment and knows the importance of sustainability.

The next step, according to Young, is to have the campus designated as a Level 1 Arboretum. To achieve that designation requires that at least 30 varieties of trees be labeled and available for a self-guided tour.

“I think as we move forward and the Tree Campus USA award becomes more recognizable nationally, it will demonstrate that TSU has a long commitment to maintaining our urban forest and the infrastructure of the land,” said Young. “Our plan emphasizes the importance of trees for their aesthetic and social value, as well as for their environmental impact to the campus ecosystem.”

Now in its fifth year, Tree Campus USA recognizes the best practices in campus forestry throughout the United States.  The goal of the program is to honor college campuses and leaders of their surrounding communities for promoting healthy urban forest management and engaging the campus community in environmental stewardship.

The Arbor Day Foundation and Toyota have helped campuses throughout the country plant hundred of thousands of trees, and Tree Campus USA colleges and universities $23 million in campus forest management last year.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Students Use Latest Cellphone Apps and Technology to Identify Tree Species on Campus

Raphael Smith (left) a junior Agriculture major, and Kyreshia Brown, a junior Agriculture science major, take a photo of a holly leaf during a recent field exercise. The duo was taking part in a Geographic Information Systems class in Urban Forestry that uses technology to identify and locate tree species around campus. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Raphael Smith (left) a junior Agriculture major, and Kyreshia Brown, a junior Agriculture science major, take a photo of a holly leaf during a recent field exercise. The duo was taking part in a Geographic Information Systems class in Urban Forestry that uses technology to identify and locate tree species around campus. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Planning and managing vegetation in urban areas can be a complex process, especially when it comes to identifying and locating trees around a 500-acre campus the size of Tennessee State University.

Now students at TSU are using the latest cellphone and GPS technology to inventory and catalogue the multiple species across the University’s urban forest.

Using Leafsnap, an application designed by Columbia University, the University of Maryland and the Smithsonian Institution, students can simply take a photo of a leaf from one of the many trees around campus, and the recognition software will provide a high-resolution identification of the tree species.

“This is a great hands-on tool for many of our students who come from different backgrounds and majors to help identify the different species here on campus,” said Dr. De’Etra Young, extension assistant professor of Urban Forestry. “It really is the perfect application for providing an electronic guide to take out in the field for research purposes.”

(Video courtesy of The Tennessean)

The students are all in Young’s Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems class, that explains the computer-based tool used to create, store, manage, analyze and display data that correspond to unique locations in space. According to Young, the tool allows users to analyze and visualize information based on location.

“Many of our students are in various agriculture programs and have had no previous exposure to these types of programs and tools,” added Young. “The free applications, such as Leafsnap, give them the tools to be able to go out into the field and be comfortable conducting research.”

Kyreshia Brown, a junior planning to attend veterinary school and couldn’t tell the difference between a maple or oak tree, loved that she could use her cell phone to help her easily identify different species.

“This really is a good compliment to what we are learning in class,” said the agriculture science major. “We are using high-tech applications that fit right in the palm of our hands.”

Once the students identify the trees, they then use hand-held GPS systems to locate the trees. Eventually, the descriptions and locations will be fed into a database that will map every tree on campus.

The map will then provide a visual representation of the University’s urban forest and its overall inventory.

“This is all part of our green initiative here on campus,” added Young. “Our students are learning about the health and diversity of our urban forest by using these simple high-tech tools to gather the information. The students seem to be really excited about the project.”

TSU will receive the Tree Campus USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation Sunday, Oct. 6 for its part in promoting healthy trees and engaging staff and students in conservation efforts. Tennessee State will become one of only 190 universities and colleges across the country to receive the special designation. The program, funded by the Arbor Day Foundation and Toyota, has helped campuses throughout the country plant hundreds of thousands of trees since the program began five years ago.

 

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Tennessee State University
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About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu