TSU’s College of Agriculture adds new program in Biotechnology

biotechnologyNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences has received approval from the Tennessee Board of Regents to begin offering a concentration in Biotechnology within the Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Sciences.

The Biotechnology concentration will join Agribusiness, Agricultural and Extension Education, Animal Sciences/Pre-Veterinary Medicine, Applied Geospatial Information Systems (GIS), Food Technology, and Plant and Soil Sciences within the B.S. degree.

“Biotechnology is a field with vast potential for crop improvement that can achieve resistance to drought, disease and pests,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences. “This field and this improvement are necessary to achieve worldwide food security.”

The new concentration will provide hands-on training and first-rate knowledge to students in what, according to the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, is one of the job fields with the most demand for employment.

“This concentration will help train our students in the modern field of biotechnology using the latest gene sequencers and other state-of-the-art equipment,” Reddy added.  “Our goal at TSU is to train our students in these modern agricultural technologies so that they find gainful employment and become future leaders in these high-demand fields.”

A concentration in Agricultural Biotechnology can lead to a variety of challenging careers, including Biomedical Engineering, Epidemiology, Forensic DNA Analysis, Microbiology, and many more.

To help accommodate this and other new programs in high-demand scientific fields, the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences has been focused on strategic expansion.

“To make sure that our students get the best training, we have been hiring first-class geneticists, equipping our labs with modern equipment, and constructing a 25,000 sq. ft., 8-million dollar Agricultural Biotechnology Building which will be ready along with the new concentration in January 2014,” Reddy said. “We are quite excited about the future of agricultural biotechnology at TSU.”

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Research Team receives $2 million Air Force grant to study strategic initiatives

Capt. Jason Simmons and Staff Sgt. Clinton Tips update anti-virus software for Air Force units to assist in the prevention of cyberspace hackers  at Barksdale Air Force Base, La. Tennessee State University was recently awarded a grant from the Air Force Research Laboratory to help the study adopting cloud-computing model for soldiers equipped with smartphones and how its effects on cybersecurity.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)
Capt. Jason Simmons and Staff Sgt. Clinton Tips update anti-virus software for Air Force units to assist in the prevention of cyberspace hackers at Barksdale Air Force Base, La. Tennessee State University was recently awarded a grant from the Air Force Research Laboratory to study the adoption of a cloud-computing model for soldiers equipped with smartphones and their effects on cybersecurity. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo)

AFRLNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A team of researchers at Tennessee State University has received a multimillion dollar grant to study the development, discovery and integration of warfighting technologies to support air, space and cyberspace forces with the Department of Defense.

The U. S. Air Force Research Laboratory awarded the College of Engineering a multiyear grant worth nearly $2 million to study power sources for air and space vehicles, and to study how to intelligently adapt communications and networks to provide friendly forces unfettered and reliable communications during joint forces operations. During the five-year term of the grant, five graduate and 10 undergraduate students will work side-by-side faculty members in their research efforts.

“The College of Engineering continues to compete in this highly competitive field of advanced research that supports the mission of the Air Force Research Laboratory,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College. “For more than a decade, we have conducted research in advanced sensors for military surveillance, aircraft electronics (avionics), and product reliability.”

The $1.93 million funding from the Air Force Research Laboratory, which comes from the, Materials and Sensors Directorates, will be used to fund five separate projects.

The one Materials project will focus on lithium Ion batteries used to power aerospace platforms, such as the F-35 Lightning II jet fighter, satellites and remotely piloted vehicles, with researchers developing analytical models for behavior, performance, reliability and cost of the batteries. The research team includes Drs. Hargrove, Landon Onyebueke and Lizhi Ouyang.

Three Sensors projects will include research in communication in congested electromagnetic environments; layered sensing exploitation and fusion in contested environments; and cross layers decision-making and fusion models for automated sensor exploitation in layered sensing. A fourth project will cover cyber security and will look at how to adopt a cloud-computing model needed for soldiers equipped with smartphones to enhance mission outcomes.

Researchers include Drs. Liang Hong, Wei Chen, Amir Shirkhodaie, Saleh Zein-Sabatto, Fenghui Yao, Sachin Shetty, and Tamara Rogers.

According to Hargrove, the funding supports faculty and students in research activities, and partners the College of Engineering with Clarkson Aerospace, a minority-owned business, and United Technologies Corporation.

“We are targeting our research activities relevant to key strategic initiatives advocated by the National Academy of Engineering, and we want to collaborate with local industry to advance these technologies that will benefit the consumer and military within the next decade,” Hargrove added.

The College of Engineering has been awarded multiple grants from the Department of Defense throughout the year, including a $334,000 grant from the U.S. Army Research Office to research automated surveillance systems.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

‘Race’ comes to Tennessee State University Nov. 7-10

Play tackles controversial issues of rape, sex and race

   

race-poster-3-biggerNashville, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – “Race,” the latest play from Pulitzer and Tony Award-winning playwright David Mamet, makes it debut Nov. 7-10 at Tennessee State University, and will explore the questions of rape, sex and race.

Produced by the Theatre Department at TSU, the play will take place in the Cox-Lewis Theatre of the Performing Arts Center. Admission is free, however, “Race” contains adult language and is recommended for mature audiences.

Mamet’s play, which opened in December 2009 on Broadway and ran for just under 300 performances, tackles America’s most controversial topic in a provocative tale of sex, guilt and bold accusations. The story focuses on three attorneys, two black and one white, who grapple with evidence to defend a white man charged with a crime against a black woman, as well as their own personal feelings about race. The play features ethnic one-liners about guilt and shame that will provide fuel for the post-performance discussions.

“Race” playwright David Mamet is a two-time Oscar nominee, director, essayist, novelist and poet who has been a force in American theater since 1976. His works include “American Buffalo,” “Glengarry Glen Ross,” “Speed-the-Plow” and “Oleanna.” Mamet has also won acclaim for numerous screenplays, including “The Verdict” and “Wag the Dog” (both nominated for the Academy Award for Best Screenplay), as well as “The Postman Always Rings Twice” and “The Untouchables.”

The play premiered in the Ethel Barrymore Theatre in 2009, featuring renowned actors Kerry Washington, James Spader, David Alan Grier and Richard Thomas. “We decided to bring this shocking play home to our campus to give our community an opportunity to discuss the continual issues of race in the U.S.,” said play director, Marc Payne.

Performances take place Nov. 7-9, at 7 p.m., and Sunday, Nov. 10, at 3 p.m. Discussions will be held immediately following each performance and reservations should be made in advance by visiting eventbrite.com (Go to “Race” – the play at Tennessee State University, and register for each night with e-mail addresses).

For more information, contact Arianna Petty at pettya@goldmail.etsu.edu.  

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU College of Ag to Conduct Good Agricultural Practices Workshop Nov. 7-8

The GAP workshop on Nov. 7-8 will teach growers the guidelines stipulated by the USDA and FDA in order to comply with the Food Safety Management Act.
The GAP workshop on Nov. 7-8 will teach growers the guidelines stipulated by the USDA and FDA in order to comply with the Food Safety Management Act.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Sustainable Food Safety and Security starts with the producers. As such, growers play a vital role in the supply chain of safe, fresh produce production, harvesting, cleaning, handling, packaging and delivery. To address this important step in the process, the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences will conduct a Good Agricultural Practices Workshop on Nov. 7 and 8 in the Farrell-Westbrook Complex on the main campus. The workshop will start at 8:45 a.m. on Nov. 7, and at 8 a.m. on Nov. 8.

Experts from TSU, the University of California, Davis; The University of Illinois; and the U.S. Department of Agriculture will conduct the workshop.

According to organizers from CAHNS, growers attending this workshop will learn to follow the “stringent and specific guidelines” of the USDA and the Food and Drug Administration in complying with the conditions of the Food Safety Modernization Act to minimize the risk of serious health consequences or death. Technical training will be provided to empower participants to meet the consumer demand for safe produce and ensure competitiveness in the fresh produce industry.

This project is funded by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

For more information, contact Dr. Agnes Kilonzo-Nthenge at (615) 963 5437 or akilonzontheng@tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Students Present Research at National Honors Conference

Students from TSU's Honor Program recently presented their research projects at the National Association of African American Honors Program and shared their it with peers, professors and administrators during the conference in early November. Students included (L-R) Derien Rivers, Kamaria Wright, Dr. Coreen Jackson, Director of the Honors Program, Carla Gibbs, and Erin Malone. (courtesy photo)
Students from TSU’s Honor Program recently presented their research projects at the National Association of African American Honors Program and shared  it with peers, professors and administrators during the conference in early November. Students included (L-R) Derien Rivers, Kamaria Wright, Dr. Coreen Jackson, Director of the Honors Program, Carla Gibbs, and Erin Malone. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Students from Tennessee State University’s Honor Program had the opportunity to present their works of scholarly inquiry recently at the National Association of African American Honors program and share their research with peers, professors and administrators during the conference in early November.

naahpHeld Oct. 31 through Nov. 2 at Bethune-Cookman University in Daytona Beach, Fla., the five students were selected to present from among the top research papers from undergraduate scholars who attend the nation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Predominately Black Colleges and Universities across the nation.

According to Dr. Coreen Jackson, director of the University’s honor program, this was the first time these students had the opportunity to present their findings at a national conference.

“We are very proud to recognize the outstanding achievement of the students selected from our honors program,” said Jackson. “We want to provide more opportunities such as this for our students to present their research, engage in community service, and provide a forum for training and leadership.”

Students worked on several scientific research projects over the summer and compiled their findings and data for the presentations this fall.  The following students were selected to present:

  • Erin Malone, a junior biology major from Hendersonville, Tenn., and president of the Honors Student Council, presented his findings on “Search for Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 Dependent Cell Lines and Protein Inhibitors.”  Malone conducted his summer cancer research under the supervision of a team of Vanderbilt University researchers in the Department of biochemistry.
  • Carla Gibbs, a junior biology major from Miami, Fla., and Miss Honors, presented her research on breast cancer. The title of Gibbs’ research presentation was Aurora kinase inhibitor & TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) or DR5 receptor agonist reduce proliferation and increase apoptosis in breast cancer cells.” Research was conducted at the Ingram Cancer Center at Vanderbilt University under the supervision of Drs. Ann Richmond, Yan Liu, and Anna Vilgelm.
  • Derien Rivers, a senior Psychology major from Memphis, Tenn., and the Community Service Chair for the Student Honors Council, presented his research on multiple sclerosis. His presentation was entitled Therapeutic Laquinimod Treatment Attenuates and Reverses Cortical and Hippocampal Pathology In A Chronic Mouse Model Of Multiple Sclerosis.” He conducted his research under the supervision of Dr. Seema Tiwari-Woodruff in the Department of Neurology, UCLA School of Medicine in Los Angeles, Calif.
  • Khamaria Wright, a junior Biology major teamed up with Kelli Huff, a senior Criminal Justice major and Derien Rivers, to present their research entitled, “Why Americans Have A Negative Savings Plan.”  Research was conducted in Dr. D. Lee McGahey’s Honors Special Topics Course at TSU.

Also during the conference, Jackson was selected by the NAAHP to serve as the vice president for the remainder of this year, and as president-elect.   She’ll assume the national office of president in 2014-2015.

The NAAAHP was founded In May 1990 by a group of Honors Directors from approximately 20 Historically and Predominantly Black Colleges and Universities at Morehouse College in Atlanta. The group came together to address plans for a national organization of honors programs designed to address the specific needs of honors education for African-American students.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Director Inducted into Alumni Hall of Achievement

Dr. Jame'l Hodges
Dr. Jame’l Hodges

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The director of Student Activities at Tennessee State University has been recognized for his contributions to the community and society when he was recently inducted into the Copiague Board of Education Hall of Achievement.

Dr. Jame’l Hodges, a member of the class of 1992 at Copiague High School, was admitted into the select group Friday, Oct. 18 with two other inductees from the school in Copiague, N.Y. With the induction of the three newest members, the Hall of Achievement now boasts 85 members.

Now in its 17th year, the Copiague School District hosts the induction ceremony for its Hall of Achievement annually. The induction, which serves as the culmination of the district’s homecoming celebrations, recognizes graduates of Copiague High School who have succeeded in their lives and careers, or who may have distinguished themselves by virtue of their contributions to community and society.

Dr. Jame'l Hodges (left) and fellow Hall of Achievement inductee, Marina Katherine (Tsakis) Skea, took part in the Homecoming parade during the Induction weekend. (courtesy photo)
Dr. Jame’l Hodges (left) and fellow Hall of Achievement inductee, Marina Katherine (Tsakis) Skea, took part in the Homecoming parade during the Induction weekend. (courtesy photo)

“Copiague – a very diverse community with people from around the world; Copiague – a school district where more than 4,000 students pass through the hallways each year; Copiague – a place where the school district won national honors for Advanced Placement; Copiague – a town and school district that produced so many graduates that went on to do amazing things throughout the town, the country and the world,” said Board of Education President Michael L. Greb. “Tonight, we have many of those alumni present. I am humbled by your presence.”

The goal of the District’s Hall of Achievement is to introduce positive role models to the school community. By their very nature, inductees to the Hall inspire students to adopt high aspirations.

Along with Hodges, other inductees included Mark A. Rosenberg, class of 1990, and Marina Katherine (Tsakis) Skea, class of 1973.

Hodges has been in his current position with TSU since Sept 2012. He has served as a staff associate with the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, the director of Multicultural Affairs at Lehigh University, and coordinator of Residential Education and Leadership, and coordinator of Greek Life and Education at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Welcomes Honors Program Founder

University Honors Program founder, Dr. McDonald Williams (third from left) recently returned to campus to attend the Presidential Inauguration and to meet with current honors students. Joining his visit was (L-R) Dr. Sandra Holt, the fourth director of the program, Williams' wife, Dr. Jaime Williams, and Dr. Coreen Jackson, current director of the program. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
University Honors Program founder, Dr. McDonald Williams (third from left) recently returned to campus to attend the Presidential Inauguration and to meet with current honors students. Joining his visit was (L-R) Dr. Sandra Holt, the fourth director of the program, Williams’ wife, Dr. Jaime Williams, and Dr. Coreen Jackson, current director of the program. (photos by Dr. Lee McGahey, associate director, TSU Honors Program)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – In her recent inaugural address, Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover welcomed many of the special people in her life that helped her become the person she is today and obtain the position as the first female president of the University.

One of those in attendance was Dr. McDonald Williams, the first director of the University Honors Program, who she credited with helping to keep her in school.

Williams stood to a round of applause as Dr. Glover told the crowd that he was one of the many people who gave her “roots and wings.” Dr. Glover, a graduate of the Honors Program, was a student during Williams’ tenure as director from 1966 to 1988.

“Roots and wings are the greatest gift a university can give to its students,” Dr. Glover said, adding that roots can help a student lay the foundation of success, while wings can help them to soar as high as possible.

Williams is credited with helping develop the program after the University saw the need in 1964 to keep up with other institutions, and to offer a rich and challenging set of academic offerings to talented and highly motivated students through special courses, research and a vigorous intellectual community. In 1995, the honors center was named the McDonald Williams Honors Center due to his dedication and commitment to the program.

Following the presidential inauguration ceremony, Dr. Coreen Jackson, the current director of the program, hosted a Meet & Greet reception in Williams’ honor. Those attending the special reception included honors alumni, former director, Dr. Sandra Holt and current honor students. Also attending was Williams’ wife, Dr. Jaime Williams, former TSU Communications Chair, and their daughter, Donna.

“This was history in the making,” said Jackson. “We may never have this awesome opportunity again to have our Honors students celebrate and be inspired by the first director of the Honors program as he recounted history, achievement and success.”

During his visit to campus, Williams and his wife, Dr. Jaime Williams, former TSU Communications Chair, met with current honors program students.
During his visit to campus, Williams and his wife, Dr. Jaime Williams, former TSU Communications Chair, met with current Honors Program students.

Williams shared what life was like as the first director of the University Honors Program with the eager crowd. He recounted the small beginnings, the tenacity of his students, the successes and achievements accomplished.

“He told the current students to appreciate all the opportunities they have today because during his time they did not have the space and excellent facilities they are enjoying today,” added Jackson.

After motivating the students and congratulating the Honors Alumni, his wife, Dr. Jaime Williams, recounted her time at TSU, and shared a unique story about Oprah Winfrey, who at the time was only three hours away from graduating from the Speech & Theatre Department.

“Oprah was offered a job with a TV station in Baltimore which later led to another television job in Chicago,” added Jamie Williams.  “I later contacted Oprah and invited her to be the commencement speaker but told her she needed to complete a documentary to satisfy her three hours so that she could graduate, which she did. The day of the commencement she flew in a private jet to deliver her commencement address and to graduate.”

Jackson also recognized and invited Dr. Sandra Holt, the fourth director of the Honors Program the opportunity to address students and Alumni. Holt, who retired from the program the beginning of the year, expressed her appreciation to Drs. Williams, Dr. Jackson, and encouraged the current students to continue to strive towards excellence.

“I am very happy to know that the Honors Program is in good hands,” McDonald Williams told Jackson as they walked later to the Inaugural luncheon. “I know Dr. Glover will take good care of you and the program. I am very pleased to see the beautiful facility Dr. Glover has given you.”

With a note of assurance in his voice, a twinkle in his eyes and a smile on his lips, Dr. Williams remarked, “the future for Honors is bright.”

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

College of Ag Executive Council Receives Prestigious USDA Partnership Award

Members of the College of Agriculture Executive Council are Front row (from left): Dr. Jan Emerson, Dr. Gearldean Johnson, Ms. Rhonda Moore Back row (from left): Dr. Surendra Singh, Dr. Muhammad Karim, Dr. Carter Catlin, Dr. Chandra Reddy, Mr. William Hayslett, Dr. Latif Lighari Members of the CAHNS EC not pictured: Mr. Sam Comer, Dr. Nick Gawel, Dr. Terrance Johnson, Dr. Roger Sauve. (courtesy photo)
Members of the College of Agriculture Executive Council are Front row (from left): Dr. Jan Emerson, Dr. Gearldean Johnson, Ms. Rhonda Moore
Back row (from left): Dr. Surendra Singh, Dr. Mohammad Karim, Dr. Carter Catlin, Dr. Chandra Reddy, Mr. William Hayslett, Dr. Latif Lighari
Members of the CAHNS EC not pictured: Mr. Sam Comer, Dr. Nick Gawel, Dr. Terrance Johnson, Dr. Roger Sauve. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences has received the prestigious National Institute of Food and Agriculture Partnership Award for Effective and Efficient Use of Resources.

The award, directed at the CAHNS Executive Council, recognized the group for its “exemplary work and outstanding contribution” in support of the mission of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and for its positive impact on agriculture.

“NIFA recognizes that there are many outstanding contributions that our partners in the land-grant universities and other cooperating institutions and organizations achieve,” said Dr. Sonny Ramaswamy, director of NIFA. “[We] want to recognize them through this awards program.”

The award will be presented in Washington, D.C., Nov. 10 at the annual meeting of the Association of Public Land-Grant Universities.

“We are quite ecstatic about this recognition as it validates our restructuring effort and recognizes our growth and leadership success,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of CAHNS,” under whose leadership the Executive Council worked to identify and execute strategies to boost enrollment and graduation rates, enhance outreach activities and improve research efforts.

The Council, which comprises associate deans, department heads, and research center directors, among others, was established in 2008 by Dr. Reddy to serve as a policy-making and program-coordinating arm of the college.

Under the Council’ guidance, the College has doubled its student enrollment in agricultural and family and consumer sciences, tripled its research portfolio in five years, and expanded its outreach efforts to 46 counties from 12 counties in 2008, while graduate enrollment in Agricultural and Environmental Sciences has grown to more than 100 students from 11 students in the same year.

NIFA, one of the four research, education and economics agencies of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, also recognized the CAHNS Executive Council’s help in governing and integrating the academics, research and outreach of the College, as well as helping the College secure funds to improve its physical facilities, including a 25,000-square-foot agricultural biotechnology building, a new open-roof greenhouse range, a state-of-the-art landscape studio, and a 4,800-square-foot. agriculture teaching/research facility.

“The NIFA partnership award provides positive feedback for the hard work of the Executive Committee,” added Dr. Reddy, who was recently recognized as one of the top professors at Historically Black Colleges, by Affordable Colleges Online.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University
With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Journey Goes Full Circle for New Tennessee State University President

investiture2
John Morgan, the Chancellor of the Tennessee Board of Regents (left), places the presidential “Chain of Office” around the neck of Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover during her Inauguration ceremony, Friday, Oct. 25 in the Gentry Complex. Dr. Glover becomes the eighth president of TSU and the first female to lead the institution. (photo by by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover Officially Accepts Position to Lead Her Alma Mater

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – “It is an exciting privilege to stand before you today to accept the presidency of Tennessee State University and I look forward to the opportunities and challenges ahead.”

With that statement, Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover officially became the eighth president of Tennessee State University, with thousands watching including family members, state and local dignitaries, alumni, faculty, students and delegates representing more than 50 institutions of higher learning.

The Chancellor of the Tennessee Board of Regents, John Morgan, performed the investiture of Dr. Glover, giving her the oath and Chain of Office, which made her the first African-American female to fully lead a TBR institution.

Among other dignitaries participating in the investiture of Dr. Glover were several former TSU presidents, including Dr. Frederick Humphries, Dr. James Hefner, and Dr. Charles B. Fancher, who served briefly as interim president. Also participating in the ceremony was Mayor Karl Dean, of Nashville.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, by way of a video, congratulated Dr. Glover, calling the inauguration “a proud and momentous occasion and an extraordinary milestone” for the state.

“Dr. Glover is well respected by her colleagues and is well suited to oversee this historic institution,” the Governor said. “She has demonstrated professionalism and integrity through her distinguished career and will be a tremendous asset to higher education in her new capacity.”

Dr. Glover, accompanied by Chancellor Morgan (center), and Emily Reynolds, Vice Chair, Tennessee Board of Regents, recess the inaugural ceremony at the Gentry Complex Oct. 25. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Dr. Glover, accompanied by Chancellor Morgan (center), and Emily Reynolds, Vice Chair, Tennessee Board of Regents, recess the inaugural ceremony at the Gentry Complex Oct. 25. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Giving her inaugural address on the theme, “Roots and Wings,” Dr. Glover spoke about the possibilities that come with getting a good education.

“Roots and wings are the greatest gift a university can give to its students,” Dr. Glover said, adding that roots can help a student lay the foundation of success, while wings can help them to soar as high as possible.

She recounted her own humble beginning and her experience as a student at TSU, and thanked the University “for giving me the wings and the roots to be the person I am.”

Saying that she grew up in a house with no running water or indoor facilities, the 1974 TSU graduate with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics said it does not matter where you come from, it’s how determined one is to succeed that counts.

“I’m living witness that God can do exceedingly abundantly above all you could ever ask, ever hope or imagine”, Glover said. “Here I am today a university president.”

While emphasizing academic excellence, Dr. Glover, who has been in office since Jan. 2, recounted successes, partnerships and collaborations formed since arriving at TSU. For the first time, the President said, no students was turned away for lack of funding, pointing to the “overwhelming” response of community and business partners, alumni, student and staff to an SOS sent out that raised more than $500,000 in just six days and saved 350 students from being turned away or purged for lack of funding.

“Alumni giving has doubled from this this time last year, we are forming more partnerships with the community and businesses not just for fundraising but also to be great academic partners,” the president added.

Meeting and celebrating with hundreds of family members and well wishers amid the buzz immediately following her investiture, Dr. Glover minced at the tasked ahead, but said she was ready for the challenge.

“It is an awesome responsibility to lead the institution that gave me my foundation. I am humbled by the oath I have taken, and take my responsibility very seriously with God’s help to lead this great institution to its highest,” Dr. Glover said.

Support for the new president was infectious.

Dr. Bobby Jones (’59), gospel great, and a platform guest, was one of the first to congratulate Dr. Glover: “This is my alma mater, to come here and to have the honor of sitting on the platform with my new president is a humbling experience. She is a great president.”

State Sen. Thelma Harper, a TSU graduate and a major supporter, who was so excited and could not immediately remember her year of graduation, said: “She (Glover) is ready for the job and TSU is ready for her. We will support her fully.”

Gwendolyn Oatis Neal (’69, ’71): “She (Glover) is on point and just the right person for the job. I know she will move TSU to its highest.”

Dr. Glover, whose inauguration ceremonies coincided with Homecoming, crowned out her celebration with the Inaugural and Scholarship Ball at the Opryland Hotel, the parade along Jefferson Street, and the Homecoming football game.

In a thank-you message to the University Community, Dr. Glover expressed gratitude to students, faculty and staff for a “well done” job.  She said, “The Inauguration and Homecoming activities were superb. We give thanks to God for blessing all of our efforts. This shows what happens when everyone pulls together and strives for a common goal.  Our collaborative spirit helped us to overcome any difficulties. The campus is ‘buzzing’ and the community is proud. Thank you so much for your participation, and all that you did to make the Inauguration and Homecoming a wonderful success!”

Also READ an  op-ed written by Dr. Michael Benson, President, Eastern Kentucky University, on the occasion of the Inauguration of Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover Oct. 25. The article is reposted from the Huffington Post: College

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University
With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

CBS Executive to Offer Career Advice to Students During Workshop Oct. 29

Entertainment workshop to provide network opportunity for students with industry professionals

 

Tiffany Smith-Anoa’i
Tiffany Smith-Anoa’i

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tiffany Smith-Anoa’i, Vice President of Entertainment Diversity and Communications with CBS Television, will be the featured speaker Tuesday, Oct. 29 during Tennessee State University’s entertainment diversity career conference and symposium.

The symposium takes place from 1:30 until 5 p.m. in The Forum, located in the Floyd Payne Campus Center, and is open to students and the community.

Smith-Anoa’i will speak at 11:30 a.m. during the faculty reception and again at 1:30 p.m. during the student symposium. Smith-Anoa’i is charged with the development and execution of communications strategies for diversity initiatives and programs for CBS Television. Acting as a liaison, she works with national multi-ethnic media coalitions, creative executives and casting directors from the CBS Network & Studio to insure diverse talent is represented both in front of and behind the camera.

The appearance by the CBS executive is part of the larger symposium and conference that will bring entertainment industry leaders and professionals to the University in order to expose a diverse group of students to the industry while closing the gap between students and recruiters.

Companies scheduled to be in attendance include DreamWorks Animation SKG, Sony, CBS Corporate, the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, Clear Channel and others.

According to organizers, this is an exceptional opportunity for students to meet and network with industry professionals. For students who desire to work in one of the many areas of the entertainment industry or who want to explore the possibilities that the entertainment industry offers, this conference is a must attend.

Students from all majors and backgrounds are invited to participate.  Industry leaders are seeking students from business, mass communications, engineering, technology, music, history, architecture, computer science, and art as well as other academic majors and disciplines.  The conference is for both undergraduates and graduate students.

The conference is free and open to students, and registration is advised. For more information, contact the TSU Career Development Center at 615.963.7527.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University
With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu