Admissions Office Steps Up Recruitment Drive, Hosts State-wide Forums with Guidance Counselors

admissions-19NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Office of Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment has stepped up its efforts to ensure that all potential high school graduates in the state see Tennessee State University as their first choice for post-secondary education.

In a series of gatherings sponsored across the state in the last month, administrators and staff of the Admissions office have been holding talks with key high school “gatekeepers” or guidance counselors to expose them to programs at TSU, in the hope of counselors steering their students to seek admission at the University.

In just August alone, luncheons were held with nearly 160 high-school guidance counselors in Nashville, Memphis and Chattanooga.

“The purpose of these luncheons was to foster working relations with guidance counselors across the state,” said Dr. Sedric Griffin, director of Admissions and Recruitment. “They were also intended to enhance the Admissions office’s ability to communicate with counselors to discuss strategies, build relationships, and move prospective students through the admission funnel as quickly as possible.”

At the Nashville luncheon on Aug. 23, during which TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover, welcomed more than 90 guidance counselors to the campus, Admissions officials reminded the visitors about programs and services that make TSU the go-to university for prospective high school graduates.

“Students coming to Tennessee State University get personal attention, outstanding scholarship and career opportunities, not to mention good return on investment because of the type of programs we offer to ensure on-time or early graduation, using the least amount of money,” Griffin told the guidance counselors.

He also spoke about the University’s service-to-learning program, as a key component for college completion at TSU.

“This exposes students to community engagement activities, while earning credits, such as the annual Day of Service when student volunteers gather at sites across the city to paint, cleanup or help needy, hungry and homeless people in the Greater Nashville area.”

At each gathering across the state, the guidance counselors were introduced to TSU admission counselors assigned to their individual schools or districts, followed by one-on-one meetings.

“The goal here is to ensure adequate line of open communication, and for guidance counselors to get information about our various programs directly from the right source,” said Dr. Gregory Clark, director of Alumni Outreach and High School Relations.

“We also see this gathering as a way to engage with the high school guidance counselors in a collaboration that exposes them to our offerings,” added Dr. John Cade, associate vice president for Enrollment, shortly before the Nashville meeting. “We find this to be very rewarding for Metro (Metro Nashville Public Schools) and Tennessee State University.”

In another recruitment effort, the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment on Aug. 28 sponsored an “application party” for seniors at LEAD Academy High School in Nashville, the first in the school’s history. More than 65 percent of the students participated in the party, by completing and handing in application packets to attend Tennessee State University, according to Darrius Brooks, TSU admissions counselor assigned to LEAD.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations 
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

College of Engineering Names New Head of Civil and Architectural Engineering

Dr. Gouranga Banik
Dr. Gouranga Banik

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The College of Engineering at Tennessee State University recently named Dr. Gouranga Banik as head of civil and architectural engineering. He assumed his current position August 15.

Most recently, Banik served as President and CEO for Bencons LLC, a private engineering services company. His previous experience also includes serving as professor of construction management at Southern Polytechnic State University from 1998 until 2012.

While at SPSU, Banik helped the department to increase student enrollment and graduation, research and scholarship. In the academic arena, he had significant experience of leading graduate programs, starting new academic programs, and faculty development and governance issues. He led the architectural engineering division as Division and Program Chair, and the Construction Engineering Division as Program Chair for the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), where he served as proceeding editor besides other leadership responsibilities. Banik served the continuing education committee of American Society of Civil Engineering (ASCE) as Chair, and on the editorial board of Leadership and Management in Engineering. In addition, he received the Teacher of the Year award for 2007 and Outstanding Faculty award by SPSU for his excellence in the classroom, and also received the National Teaching award by the Associated School of Construction (ASC).

“Dr. Banik brings with him a wealth of leadership experience and the entrepreneurial skills necessary for building partnerships and developing strong educational programs,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, Dean of the College of Engineering. “Additionally, he brings a broad and distinct interdisciplinary perspective to the Department. These attributes are essential to position the Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering for regional and national recognition as a leader in engineering and science education, research and technology innovation.”

Banik’s research focuses on sustainability, infrastructure systems and engineering education. He has ideas on how to infuse the undergraduate curriculum with interdisciplinary and project-based learning; promoting innovative research in critical areas of the built environment and developing cooperative relationships with leaders in the region’s engineering and construction industry to help promote an adaptive, sustainability-conscious industry framework. Being a certified project manager and professional engineer, Banik developed qualities and competencies to plan, manage, lead programs and projects to a successful end.

“I am excited about the possibilities at the University,” Banik said. “We want to be known for addressing the grand challenges facing us, creating excellent educational infrastructure, experiences and programs for our students who will be recognized in the industry as leaders, problem solvers, innovators and entrepreneurs.”

Banik earned a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Iowa State University, an M.S. in Project Management from University of Manchester-Institute of Science & Technology (United Kingdom), and a B.S. and M.S. in Civil Engineering from the Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology. As a registered professional engineer, he is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Construction Institute, Transportation Research Board, and the American Society for Engineering Education.

 

Department of Media Relations 

 

Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

University Welcomes 2nd Annual Kurdish Arts Festival Sept 6-8

2nd KAFNASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – A weekend of traditional Kurdish music, dance, art and food will take place at the Performing Arts Center and Kean Hall on the Tennessee State University campus, Friday, Sept. 6 through Sunday, Sept. 8.

The 2nd Annual Kurdish Arts Festival, sponsored by the Kurdish Cultural Institute, and Tennessee State University, will be one of the most exciting Kurdish showcases in Nashville and North America. Kurdish artists and creative talents from the U.S. and from countries around the world including Turkey, Iraq, Europe and Canada, are scheduled to perform and present the rich history of the Kurdish heritage.

The Festival kicks off Friday from 5-10 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center. There will be a reception, Kurdish dance show and music during the opening night festivities. Ticket prices for Friday’s opening night events are $10 per person.

Saturday’s events begin at 10 a.m. with an educational seminar. The events take place until 8 p.m. and include music, short films, theater, guest speakers and award presentations. Admission is $10. Lunch consisting of traditional Kurdish food will also be available for purchase.

The three-day event wraps up Sunday with a Festival Celebration beginning at 6 p.m. until 11:30 p.m. in Kean Hall. Admission is $15 and will include a night of traditional dance and music.

Ticket prices for children 6-10 are $5 with children under 6 admitted free. TSU students, faculty and staff admitted free with University ID.

According to organizers, the annual festival is the premier Kurdish artistic and cultural networking event in the States, and one of the most exciting Kurdish showcases in North America, and is expected to draw thousands of guests to Nashville and Tennessee State University. Proceeds from the Festival will assist in building a scholarship foundation for Kurdish students, both in the United States and abroad who are in need of financial assistance, and to allow them the opportunity to study and further their education in the areas of arts and music at Tennessee State University.

For more information, email kci@kci-usa.org or visit kurdishartsfestival.org.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations  

 

Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

Students Help Fellow Students Stay in School at TSU

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – While educators are praising President Obama’s recently announced blueprint for making college more affordable, that announcement was not an immediate music to Dimetrius James II’s ears.

The junior Mass Communications major at Tennessee State University had just hours to come up with nearly $5,000 left on his fees and tuition or he would be dropped from his classes and sent home packing.

“I have never been so concerned, worried and almost frustrated,” said the St. Louis native, as he was about to be purged by the registrar’s office. “I had no where to turn; time was running out; and I couldn’t call my parents because they are both unemployed.”

As the cost to attend college continues to spiral upward, James and many students like him who yearn for an education but lack the means to support their dream, face an unlikely future.

But then it does not have to be this way, according to a group of other TSU students.

“To see our fellow students come this far and only to be turned away and cut short their dream for an education is just not fair,” said Devonte Johnson, president of the Student Government Association.

In what has been described as a “students helping students” initiative, and for the second year in a row, the SGA set aside funds from its institutional appropriation to help students like James who cannot meet their full fees.

At a gathering on campus this morning, the SGA president, accompanied by other officers of the student group, presented a check for $17,000 to TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover to cover the extra expenses for 75 students who had a 4:30 p.m. deadline to come up with their balances or be dropped.

“I am very proud of our students to see the need to come to the aid of their fellow students,” said Dr. Glover, a TSU alumna, who recalled being nearly purged as a student because she did not have her full fees. “I know the feeling of coming this far and being told you are going to be dropped, but thanks to an organization, I was able to stay in school.”

Surrounded by other senior University administrators, the President thanked the SGA and TSU students, who she said, could have spent their funds for other activities, but felt helping their fellow students was a better use for the money.

Now James, who said he only heard about the SGA assistance this morning, can sit easy.

“This is a major help and very thoughtful of our student leadership,” James said. “I am very thankful to them and our financial aid office for all the help that is going to help me stay in school.”

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations 

 

Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Scientist Collaborates with Johns Hopkins Researchers on Brain Disorder Study

Dr. Brenda S. McAdory, a cell and neurobiologist at TSU, prepares beta 2 chimaerin samples in her lab to be injected into mice, as part of her study with Johns Hopkins scientists on “axon pruning” or the removal of excess nerve cells on the brain. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)
Dr. Brenda S. McAdory, a cell and neurobiologist at TSU, prepares beta 2 chimaerin samples in her lab to be injected into mice, as part of her study with Johns Hopkins scientists on “axon pruning” or the removal of excess nerve cells on the brain. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are two major diseases that affect millions of Americans. Studies show nearly 2.4 million American adults have schizophrenia, according to the National Institute of Mental Health, while 8 to 10 percent of all school-aged children born in the United States suffer from ADHD, a common behavioral disorder.

But understanding the exact causes of diseases like these, which affect the nerve cells in the brain, have been debated for nearly a century. Scientists think they may finally be closing in on answers.

A Tennessee State University scientist, working with other researchers at Johns Hopkins Medical Institute in Baltimore, said through a normal process called “axon pruning,” which is the removal of “excess” nerve cells in the brain, the causes of these diseases could be eliminated.

Dr. Brenda S. McAdory
Dr. Brenda S. McAdory

Dr. Brenda S. McAdory, a cell and neurobiologist and associate professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, explained that, during development, nerve cells make more connections with each other than are needed, therefore, some connections must be removed for the brain to function or communicate efficiently.

“If these connections are not removed, then a human may display certain brain disorders such as Schizophrenia and/or attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder,” said McAdory, who for the second year in a row, has been awarded a summer visiting professorship at Johns Hopkins, under the sponsorship of the American Society of Cell Biology.

Working in the lab of Dr. Alex Kolodkin, a renowned Howard Hughes Professor of Neuroscience, McAdory and her fellow scientists studied the role of the protein beta 2 chimaerin in axon pruning that occurs in mice during postnatal development.

“The results of our studies indicate that beta 2 chimaerin does indeed play a role in axon pruning, the lack of which has been linked to diseases such as schizophrenia and ADHD. Our task now is to determine how beta 2 chimaerin leads to axon pruning,” said McAdory. “Once we understand the molecules inherent in causing this disorder, then we can begin to work for a cure or treatment.”

She said, as part of the relationship with the Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, a portion of the cutting-edge research will be continued at TSU involving biology students.

“This collaboration will give our students resources at Johns Hopkins that could lead to opportunities for graduate studies, as well as grant opportunities for funding at TSU in other areas of molecular biology,” McAdory added.

The TSU professor was one of only four chosen nationwide in a competitive selection process for the nearly nine-week (June 3 – Aug. 9), $17,500 ASCB visiting professorship award. Results of the nine-week visiting professorship will be presented in an oral mini-symposium at the annual meeting of ASCB in New Orleans in December.

 

 

Department of Media Relations

 

Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

SiriusXm Radio Shares TSU Radio Programs Starting in November

Beginning in November, SiriusXM subscribers will be able to hear programing from Tennessee State University on the satellite provider’s Channel 142 as part of the HBCU Network, including the Black Docs. They are (L-R) Drs. Iris Johnson Arnold, Heather O’Hara-Rand, Tameka Winston, Crystal deGregory and Keisha Bean. (courtesy photo)
Beginning in November, SiriusXM subscribers will be able to hear programing from Tennessee State University on the satellite provider’s Channel 142 as part of the HBCU Network, including the Black Docs. They are (L-R) Drs. Iris Johnson Arnold, Heather O’Hara-Rand, Tameka Winston, Crystal deGregory and Keisha Bean. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Subscribers to SiriusXM satellite radio will soon be able to listen to programming originating from Tennessee State University.

Beginning in November, Tennessee State Talk and Black Docs will be broadcast over the airwaves, online and through mobile devices on Channel 142 by the satellite radio provider.

Tennessee State Talk is an upbeat yet informative program that provides an in-depth look at University news, accomplishments and more, all while displaying the talents of the TSU community.

Black Docs features a panel of five African American trailblazing female doctors from different fields who will share their opinions on numerous subjects important to the community including HBCU history, mental health, healthy living, and much more. The program currently airs Thursdays at 10 a.m. on the University’s radio station, WTST.

Dr. Tameka Winston, assistant professor in the Department of Communications at TSU, as well as creator and executive producer of both shows, felt it was time for a show such as Black Docs.

“Each host and co-host brings her own unique experiences, which leads to informative yet fun and witty discussions,” explained Winston. “Whether you’re looking for information about education, relationships, health or current events, we’ve got a doctor for you. I think listeners are sure to connect with the five doctors right from the start.”

Along with Winston, co-hosts include Drs. Crystal deGregory, faculty member at TSU, and founder and executive editor of HBCUSTORY Inc., a nonprofit advocacy initiative preserving, presenting and promoting inspiring stories of the historically black colleges and universities; and Iris Johnson Arnold, associate professor with the Department of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology at TSU. Her areas of study include speech and language development and disorders with collateral areas in multicultural and psychosocial variables affecting communication.

Other co-hosts include Drs. Keisha Bean, a licensed psychologist for the state of Tennessee with a Health Service Provider designation, working as a psychologist for Deberry Special Needs Prison for incarcerated men, and sole proprietor of Bean Counseling and Consulting Services; and Heather O’Hara-Rand, a board certified physician in Occupational Medicine and board eligible in Preventive Medicine, and assistant professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at Meharry Medical College.

Winston rounds out the panel, who teaches a variety of undergraduate level courses at TSU including newswriting, social media practices, multimedia storytelling, public speaking and introduction to mass communications. She recently won the College of Liberal Arts faculty award, and researched and developed the department’s new print curriculum. Winston has also authored and published a public speaking textbook, Understanding the Speechmaking Process, which is used by all students at the University.

In addition to teaching and scholarly research, Winston is also the creator, executive producer and host for both programs, and serves as the Director of TSU News Network. Joe Richie, radio operation manager for the Department of Communications, serves as the advisor for both programs.

The programs will debut on the HBCU Radio Network, one of the two channels leased to Howard University from SiriusXM radio December 2011. The HBCU Network will provide music and talk programs from historically black colleges and universities, including Tennessee State University.

 

 

Department of Media Relations   

 

Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Receives $1.2 Million NSF Grant to Inspire Students to Teach Math, Science in Schools

NSF_logoNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Math and Science teachers are desperately needed in schools in Nashville and across the state to help prepare the country’s youth for a labor market dominated by jobs in science and technology.

Tennessee State University will now be doing its part to inspire students to teach in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, when it was recently announced that the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences was awarded $1.2 million to support and prepare STEM majors to become K-12 teachers.

Dr. Elaine Martin, associate professor of Biology, College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences. Martin and her team of professors and instructors won a $1.2 million National Science Foundation grant to encourage students to teach science and math to elementary, middle and high school students in high-need districts. (courtesy photo)
Dr. Elaine Martin, associate professor of Biology, College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences. Martin and her team of professors and instructors won a $1.2 million National Science Foundation grant to encourage students to teach science and math to elementary, middle and high school students in high-need districts. (courtesy photo)

Funded through the National Science Foundation’s Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program, the grant will support “Project Tiger Teach,” a new program designed to help train students majoring in biology, chemistry or mathematics receive their teacher certification, who will in turn, land jobs teaching in high-need school districts.

The program, according to Dr. Elaine Martin, associate professor of Biology and director of the project, will be a collaborative partnership between the University and the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools System. The goals of the partnership are to increase the number of highly-qualified certified, high school STEM teachers in high-need schools in the Nashville area, increase teacher diversity with emphasis on recruiting African-American male STEM teachers, and provide four years of mentoring and professional development opportunities to graduates.

“This is a great opportunity for TSU to recruit and support students with strong science and math backgrounds into higher education,” added Martin. “Over the next four years, the Noyce grant will allow us to recruit individuals into the program with strong STEM backgrounds who might otherwise not have considered a career in K-12 teaching.”

Another outcome of the project will be to place teachers from underrepresented groups such as African Americans, Hispanics and Native Americans into the same type classroom category and increase the student-to-teacher ratio of both groups.

“A recent survey of students enrolled in biology and mathematics courses at TSU revealed that 30 percent are interested in considering teaching math or science in K-12 schools,” said Martin, “while 40 percent would consider obtaining teacher licensure in math or science if they could obtain it within their four-year college program.

“Additionally, an overwhelming 66 percent of participants surveyed would consider obtaining a teaching license and teach at least five years in K-12 schools if full tuition and a summer internship were provided. Through this program, we anticipate an increase in high school and post-secondary graduation rates that will address Tennessee’s and the nation’s shortage of STEM professionals.”

When the program kicks off, scholarship money will support a total of 40 undergraduate students over the next four years to go through Project Tiger Teach. Each year, three students majoring in biology, two in chemistry and five in mathematics will be assisted by the program.

Students wishing to apply for the program must have completed 60 credit hours with a minimum GPA of 3.0.  The Noyce grant provides scholarships in the amount of $12,000 per year for a period of two years for the future classroom leaders to complete their degrees with teacher certification.  They must agree to teach two years for each year of scholarship support in a “high needs” school district in Tennessee and the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools.

Participants will also take part in summer institutes that include tutoring high school students in the Regents Math Academy and Tennessee State University’s Math and Science Center. By the end of their sophomore year, Noyce Scholars are admitted to the teacher certification program in biology, chemistry or mathematics.

Before their senior year, students must then complete four educational courses and all required content courses in preparation for the MNPS high school-based Residency I and Residency II.

“The extended residency will produce highly-qualified teachers who have mastered content knowledge, and understand the learning process and application of assessment results to improve instruction,” added Martin.

Along with Martin, the grant was awarded to co-directors Dr. Jeanetta Jackson, Department of Mathematics; Dr. Heraldo Richards, College of Education; and Dr. Artenzia Young-Seigler, Department of Biological Sciences.

“This project will be a boost to the College’s STEM education and teacher preparation efforts, particularly for minority populations,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences. “This is a prestigious grant our faculty received that will give us the opportunity to work together with Metro School system in preparing and in serving their STEM teacher needs. It is a win-win project for TSU and the community.”

The Noyce scholarship is named for Robert Noyce, co-founder of Intel Corp and the scientist awarded the 1961 patent for the integrated semiconductor. The scholarship was funded through the NSF Authorization Act of 2002 in response to a critical need for teachers in science and math.

 

 

Department of Media Relations  

 

Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

National Magazine Ranks TSU Among Top 6 Percent in 2013 College Ranking

 

Students take part in the University's Annual Fall Day of Service recently at McGruder Family Resource Center community garden. Tennessee State University has received a top 6 percent ranking of the country's universities from Washington Monthly Magazine based on social mobility, research and service. (photos by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Students take part in the University’s Annual Fall Day of Service recently at McGruder Family Resource Center community garden. Tennessee State University has received a top 6 percent ranking of the country’s universities from Washington Monthly Magazine based on social mobility, research and service. (photos by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University, listed just few steps from Harvard and MIT, is one of the top universities in the nation, according to Washington Monthly, in its 2013 College Rankings. Of 284 institutions in the Best National Universities category, TSU was ranked in the top 6 percent at number 17 in the country. This is a big jump for the University, which came in at number 87 in last year’s ranking.

“This is good news for Tennessee State University,” said TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover. “This shows that our students are performing and exceling, while the faculty and staff are doing everything possible to ensure an outstanding learning environment for our students. It is quite an honor for our institution to be recognized by such a prestigious publication.”

The Washington Monthly, an independent magazine, which for years has argued that conventional measures of college prestige are far less important than what colleges do for the country, bases its ranking on social mobility, research and service.

WM_2013_Best_Colleges_Natl“Instead of lauding colleges for closing their doors to all but an elite few, we give high marks to institutions that enroll low-income students, help them graduate, and don’t charge them an arm and a leg to attend. Universities that bring in research dollars are rewarded by our standards; as are those whose undergraduates go on to earn Ph.D.s. And we recognize institutions that are committed to public service, both in the way they teach and in encouraging students to enter service-focused careers,” the magazine said in its introduction to the rankings.

“Tennessee State University and the University of Texas at El Paso are both among our highest-ranked universities despite the fact that they usually rate much lower on other national lists of elite institutions. These universities enroll large numbers of low-income students and graduate more of them than the economic and academic profiles of their students would predict, while charging the kind of affordable tuition that is increasingly rare,” Washington Monthly wrote.

Last week, in a speech at the University of Buffalo, President Obama said colleges should be rated on value and performance, adding that his administration will begin evaluating colleges on measures such as the average tuition they charge, and the share of low-income students they enroll.

“Higher education should not be a luxury. It is an economic imperative that every family in America should be able to afford,” Obama said.

According to Washington Monthly, 80 percent of TSU students receive Pell Grants, a high indication of students in need of assistance. While research has always been a key component of learning at TSU, service is an imperative at the institution for college completion.

TSU offered 93 service-learning courses last year, while more than 2,000 students performed 20,000 community service hours at an estimated value of $400,000 through partnership with the community, according to the Center for Service Learning. Just recently, TSU was named for the fifth year in a row to the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, the highest federal recognition a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning, and civic engagement.

On Aug. 24, more than 700 volunteers took part in this year’s Day of Service, under the theme,  “A New Century: Moving Forward in Service,” to give back to the community at 33 different work sites around Nashville. The workers completed more than 2,100 hours of volunteer hours at an estimated value of $46,494.

And, the Washington Monthly’s ranking does agree with other reports that TSU, listed at number 1 in Tennessee in the ranking, is the most affordable in terms of tuition cost when compared to all other four-year institutions in the state.

The College Database, a free, non-commercial website that provides future and post-secondary students and their families with “accurate and valuable” college and career-related information, recently gave TSU a top ranking among colleges and universities in Tennessee with tuition rates below $20,000. It reported that TSU offers the best return on financial investment when compared to other post-secondary institutions in the state.

In fact, the database reported that TSU graduates enter the workforce earning an average $42,000 per year, the best among the other Tennessee institutions.

In the Washington Monthly ranking, the only Tennessee institution listed in the top 20 with TSU was Vanderbilt, which came in at number 20. Other Tennessee universities making the Best National Universities list were the University of Memphis at number 37, Middle Tennessee State University number 105, University of Tennessee number 124, and Travecca Nazarene at number 224.

In 2011, out of 258 universities, TSU was ranked in the top 15 percent in the country at number 40, its best showing in many years.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations 

 

Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

TSU Mobile Biodiesel Education Lab on Display September 6-15 at Tennessee State Fair

Dr. Jason de Koff (center), assistant professor of agronomy and soil sciences at TSU, shares bioenergy research with visitors recently. The mobile demonstration lab will be on display at the Tennessee State Fair Sept 6-15. (courtesy photo)
Dr. Jason de Koff (center), assistant professor of agronomy and soil sciences at TSU, shares bioenergy research with visitors recently. The mobile demonstration lab will be on display at the Tennessee State Fair Sept 6-15. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service)  – Tennessee State University’s College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences’ Mobile Biodiesel Education Demo will be on display at the Tennessee State Fair as part of the Green Collar Exhibit from Sept. 6 – 15.

Throughout the week, informational fact sheets about bioenergy and biodiesel production will be available as part of the demo and the mobile biodiesel production trailer will be open to attendees between noon and 2 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays throughout the exhibit.

Dr. Jason de Koff, TSU Extension Assistant Professor and Mr. Chris Robbins, TSU Extension Associate, Farm Operations will be available when the trailer is open to answer questions about biodiesel production.

“Being invited to participate in the Tennessee State Fair is a great opportunity to talk to all kinds of people about bioenergy and the bioenergy program we have in the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences,” said de Koff. “It’s also a way to showcase one of the many great things we have going on at TSU.”

The eye-catching mobile lab is the showpiece of the University’s pioneering alternative fuels program. Funded with $250,000 from the USDA Capacity Building Grant program, the mobile lab takes biodiesel fuel education right to working farmers, and has all the equipment necessary for producing the alternate fuel.

For more information, contact Dr. de Koff at (615) 963-4929 or jdekoff@tnstate.edu. The TSU bioenergy program and the Mobile Biodiesel Education Demo can be followed on Twitter at @TSUBioenergy or on Facebook at Biodiesel Production Tour.

The Tennessee State Fair takes place September 6-15 at the fairgrounds located at 500 Wedgewood Ave., in Nashville.

Department of Media Relations 

 

Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu

More than 900 Take Up Residence on Freshmen Move-In Day at TSU

Jacea Jones (Left) helps her long-time friend Caterria Newsom move into her room in Wilson Hall recently. Jones and Newsome were among the 900 new freshmen who moved onto campus Wednesday, August 21. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)
Jacea Jones (Left) helps her long-time friend Caterria Newsom move into her room in Wilson Hall recently. Jones and Newsome were among the 900 new freshmen who moved onto campus Wednesday, August 21. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Jacea Jones and Caterria Newsom have been friends since the eighth grade. They were determined to go to college and pledged to stick together, study hard and enter the same university.

They did!

Today, even though their parents could not make the trip, the two recent graduates of Memphis’ Booker T. Washington High School checked themselves in residence halls at Tennessee State University, where, for the next fours years they have again pledged to persevere and graduate on time.

“We have been good friends, like sisters, and we both believe in hard work, and plan to make our parents proud,” said Jones, who will major in communications. “We decided in our junior year (of high school) to come to TSU, and from everything we have heard and seen, we made a good choice.”

So are nearly 900 other first-time freshmen and new students who, along with Jones and Newsom, received keys to their rooms as part of “Freshmen Move-In Day.”

Hundreds of relatives, including parents, grandparents and other siblings were on hand to help their children and loved ones settle in their new homes.

The transition was made much easier, as more than 200 volunteers including student organizations, alumni, staff and friends helped to move luggage, boxes of personal belongings and other items, while others pointed out directions and manned water and refreshment stations for the new residents.

Leading in the move-in effort was TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover, who made the rounds to all new student residence halls to greet, welcome and ensure adequate support was being provide to make the newcomers’ transition comfortable.

“This is really going well and I am very impressed,” the President said. “I appreciate the commitment and dedication of our staff, students and volunteers. Everybody is busy and making sure our new students settle in well. That’s really impressive.”

But while all the celebration and adult activities were going on, 7-year-old Jacaia Anderson, of Memphis, was not doing too well.

“I am sad to see my brother go,” said Jacaia, as she helped her father James, mother Mary and older brother Jarrius arrange things in the room belonging to Jamarian, her (Jacaia’s) oldest brother, a first-time freshman, who will study business at TSU.

But parents James and Mary Anderson are not worried. They know their firstborn will do well.

“He is a good kid, a no-problem child,” said James. “I am sure he will progress well,” added Mary.

Retired Air Force veteran John W. Jones, of Blytheville, Ark., is just as optimistic about his granddaughter, Essence Terry’s chances in college.

“She was an all-A’s student in high school, and a very good child,” said John W. Jones about his granddaughter, who will study nursing at TSU. “She will do very well. She has no choice but to do well if she must cope in this world.”

And coping is just what friends Jacea Jones and Caterria Newsome plan to do at TSU, although they already face a slight set back. Their plan to live in the same residence hall did not materialize. Newsom is in Wilson Hall, while Jones is in Rudolph.

“That’s not going to separate us,” said Newsome, who will major in nursing. “It’s just a matter time before I am either in her (Jones) room or she in my room.”

TSU will welcome returning and transfer students to campus on Friday, Aug. 23.

Department of Media Relations

 

Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu