Tennessee State University announces new student leaders for 2021-22 after second virtual election

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University‘s Student Government Association has a new group of officers for the 2021/2022 academic year, and for the second time in the institution’s history, the campaigning and elections were held virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Mister TSU Mark T. Davis, Jr., and Miss TSU Mallory Moore

The new student leadership, including a Mister TSU and a Miss TSU, was announced by the Student Election Commission earlier this month during Tiger Fest, after weeks of campaigning.  

TSU President Glenda Glover, along with staff from the Office of Student Affairs, congratulated the new officers when the election results were announced. 

Derrick Sanders, Jr., SGA Executive President

Derrick Sanders, Jr., a senior English major from Cincinnati, was elected executive president, while Jevaria Jefferson, a senior biology major from Memphis, Tennessee, was elected executive vice president. 

Birmingham, Alabama, native Mallory Moore, a senior health science major, won the coveted crown as the new Miss TSU. Mark Davis, as the new Mister TSU, will escort her. Davis, of Cincinnati, is a junior mass communications major. 

Frank Stevenson, associate vice president of student affairs and dean of students, described the new officers as a “dynamic group” of student leaders.

Jevaria Jefferson, SGA Executive Vice President

“They were each very strategic in sharing their platforms during the campaign,” Stevenson said. “Student leadership at TSU is not accidental but very intentional, and this group proves that in practice.” 

Sanders, who becomes the 81st administration executive president of the SGA, said he wants to be the “voice for the unheard, the eyes for the overlooked, and the heart for the discouraged.” He said his vision for the university embodies a “marketable TSU; academic excellence and affordability; recruitment, retention and resolution; community outreach; and honoring and highlighting all Tigers.”

“I want TSU to be the premier HBCU through proper planning and progressively developing the institution’s growth in enrollment and visibility,” said Sanders, who previously served as freshman class president, university ambassador, and a Tiger tour guide. His Generation of Educated Men student organization was among the first volunteer groups to help with the cleanup after the March 3, 2020 tornado that hit the TSU campus.

“With this vision, aligned with the passion of the Tigers who stand with me, we can take Tennessee State University to higher heights,” Sanders added.

Mallory, the new Miss TSU, said she sought the crown to do MOORE – Making Opportunities Open to Retain Excellence – for TSU. 

“It is our turn to continue the legacy of scholarship, leadership and service,” Mallory said. “Becoming Miss TSU is like a dream. I am so excited to put in the work for my illustrious institution.” 

Dr. Tobias R. Morgan, assistant dean of Student Engagement and Leadership, congratulated the new student leaders and thanked the Student Election Commission under the chairmanship of Akiliyiah Sumlin, for the very efficient way the process was conducted. Sumlin is a senior agricultural sciences major from Langston, Oklahoma. 

“Sumlin has been a true leader within SGA and the SEC branch since her freshman year,” Morgan said. “We are beyond thankful for her service and dedication.” 

Following is the list of the new Miss TSU court and other members of the SAG: 

Mister. Senior – Shaun Anderson 

Miss Senior – Destiny Pennington 

Senior Class President – Jayden Perry 

Senior Class Vice President – Cedrick Waters 

Senior Class Secretary – Dominique Wallace 

Mister Junior – Treveon Hayes 

Miss Junior – Sa’Mariah Harding 

Junior Class President – Coreyontez Martin 

Junior Class Treasurer – Johndylon Jeffrey 

Mister Sophomore – Alexander Brooks 

Miss Sophomore – Anasia Strickland 

Sophomore Class President – Aliyah Holmes 

Representatives-At-Large 

Kenneth Rolle 

Tanya McNeal 

Maya McClary 

Kassidy Johnson 

Jai Lewis 

Skye Green

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Top sports science grad aspires to become collegiate or pro strength conditioning coach

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Since he was 12 years old, Mason McIntosh has strived to be in the best physical condition. On April 30, the 23-year-old will graduate with a M. Ed. in human performance and sports science that will allow him to help others be their fittest.

Mason McIntosh in his element. (Submitted photo)

McIntosh will be among more than 900 graduates and undergraduates receiving degrees in various disciplines during Tennessee State University’s Spring Commencement ceremonies. Earlier this month, TSU officially announced the 2021 graduation exercises would return to campus following a year of virtual ceremonies because of the pandemic. The graduate ceremony, that will include McIntosh, will be Friday, April 30, at 4 p.m. in Hale Stadium. The undergraduate ceremony will be the next day at 8 a.m. in the stadium.

Growing up, McIntosh says his father encouraged him to stay in shape. He started lifting weights at age 12, and that sparked an interest in good conditioning.

“When I was looking for things to study in high school, I studied how to improve the body,” recalls McIntosh. “How the body works when it comes to the science behind it and how it functions at an athletic and sports level. I figured that’s what I’m passionate about, so why not study what you love? I like fitness. Why not master it and go to school for it?”

McIntosh, a Chicago native, played football for two Illinois high schools: Warren Township in Gurnee and Grayslake North in Grayslake. He played the positions of running back and safety at both schools. He would later attend Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin, where he played safety and outside linebacker.

However, his sophomore year at Carthage he suffered a knee injury during the last game of the season that ended his aspiration to play professional football. He began to re-evaluate his future.

McIntosh says he’d always explored the possibility of attending a historically-black institution. So, when his dad moved to Nashville, Tennessee in 2016, McIntosh followed him and set his sights on TSU. He transferred there his junior year and began to excel academically almost immediately.

In 2019, McIntosh earned a bachelor’s in HPSS with a concentration in exercise science, which will also be the case when he gets his M.Ed. He graduated with a 3.5 GPA when he got his BS, and he’s expecting a 3.8 or higher when he graduates April 30.

McIntosh’s instructors say he’s an exceptional student with a diligent work ethic.

“In 25 years as a department chair, no student has done better at the graduate level,” says Dr. James Heimdal, HPSS chairman. “First to arrive and last to leave every day; not afraid of hard work and long hours. Mason represents the best TSU has to offer.”

Dr. Robert Cochrum, an assistant HPSS professor and mentor to Mason, agrees.

Mason McIntosh. (Submitted photo)

“Most graduate students wait to be given a task, but Mason goes out of his way to ask if there is more he can do or more he can help you do,” says Cochrum. “I find this is a rare quality for people his age and/or younger students in a master’s program. I fully expect Mason to continue to grow and have a positive personal and professional influence on many people and organizations throughout his career.”

Mason credits TSU and his instructors for much of his success.

“TSU prepared me by getting me in front of the right people,” he said. “I’ve had great internship experiences because of TSU.

Mason plans to pursue a doctorate in Kinesiology at Auburn University, where he’s pretty much been given a full ride. He’s also received offers from two other schools with top Kinesiology programs. Mason would eventually like to become a strength conditioning coach at the collegiate or professional level.

CBS News anchor and reporter Michelle Miller will serve as the Friday evening commencement speaker for the graduate ceremony. Former New Orleans Mayor and National Urban League President and CEO Marc Morial will be the undergraduate guest speaker on Saturday. Those planning to attend the TSU 2021 Spring Commencement Ceremonies are required to wear a mask and practice social distancing. Adults are strongly encouraged to have been vaccinated. Tickets are also required to attend. For more information about commencement, visit https://www.tnstate.edu/records/commencement/. The university will also livestream both events on Friday and Saturday. Visit (www.tnstate.edu/youtube) to watch.

To learn more about the Department of Human Performance and Sports Science, visit https://www.tnstate.edu/hpss/.

For more information about TSU’s 2021 Spring Commencement, visit https://www.tnstate.edu/records/commencement/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU student says professors going the extra mile are behind her success as an upcoming graduate

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – When Christian Bond walks across the stage on May 1 to receive her biology degree, the determined future doctor says she will be thankful to some special professors at Tennessee State University who helped her reach this major milestone in her life. Bonds remembers a period where she struggled and needed guidance. She believes those tough times make receiving her degree even more rewarding. 

Christian Bond

“There was a period where I lacked motivation and considered dropping out,” says Bonds. “But professors in the classes that I was having difficulties assisted in getting me through the challenging time. They allowed me to make up work, helped me study, and made sure I understood the work.”

Bond will be among more than 900 graduates and undergraduates receiving degrees in various disciplines during Tennessee State University’s Spring Commencement ceremonies. Earlier this month, TSU officially announced the 2021 graduation exercises would return to campus following a year of virtual ceremonies because of the pandemic. The graduate ceremony will be Friday, April 30, at 4 p.m. in Hale Stadium. Bond will participate in the undergraduate ceremony the next day at 8 a.m. in the stadium.

The Nashville native and transfer student says TSU overall has prepared her to pursue her goal of becoming a doctor of osteopathic medicine, and that her professors were with her every step of the way as she juggled being a full-time working student and mom. 

One of those professors was Dr. Orville Bignall, associate professor of physics.  

“She indicated that she had the strongest desire to complete the course but would need additional help and this would be around her work schedule,” recalls Bignall. “I promised her that I would do all in my power to ensure that she got help and support for the course. She never disappointed me in holding up her end of the bargain. I am glad that she had the temerity to ask for help and the grit and perseverance to make this a successful outcome.” 

Dr. Michael Ivy, a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, says he was impressed with Bond’s “capability to multi-task regarding care for her son,” now two years old.  

“Undoubtedly, this TSU student has a commendable work ethic,” says Ivy. “In addition, she was undaunted by any science or health-related course undertaking compared to other students enrolled in my science classes.” 

In the case of her son, Khari, Bond says when he was younger one of her professors even assumed the role of babysitter to ensure she participated in a class assignment.   

“When Christian’s (babysitting) plans fell through she called me and told me she was afraid she would have to miss the presentation, but I told her it was okay if she brought him with her to class,” says Dr. Tyrone Miller, assistant professor in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences. “He was a joy to have in the class and several students took turns holding him before her presentation. When I held him, I started rocking him while I was listening and talking, and he ended up falling asleep in my arms.” 

Bond says her overall college experience has been a great one and strongly believes it’s because she attended TSU, an HBCU institution. During her time at TSU, she joined the Dr. Levi Watkins Jr Pre-Med Society, Sigma Alpha Pi-The National Society of Leadership and Success, Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society, Golden Key International Honour Society, Psi Chi-The International Honor Society in Psychology, and the Alpha Psi Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated.  

Christian Bond and her son, Khari

Following graduation, Bond says she intends to take a gap year to study for the MCAT and travel with her son. She plans to attend the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine in the 2022-2023 academic school year. Once completed, her new profession will allow her to work in partnership with patients to help them achieve a high level of wellness by focusing on health education, injury prevention, and disease prevention.

And for those coming behind her, Bond has this advice.  

“Class of 2025, enjoy your time at Tennessee State University, but remember your goals and stay the course. Don’t let anyone or anything get in the way of your dreams, because with God, family, and love, nothing can stop you! Take advantage of all the opportunities you are presented and make lifelong connections. You won’t regret it. Welcome to Big Blue!!” 

CBS News anchor and reporter Michelle Miller will serve as the Friday evening commencement speaker for the graduate ceremony. Former New Orleans Mayor and National Urban League President and CEO Marc Morial will be the undergraduate guest speaker on Saturday. Those planning to attend the TSU 2021 Spring Commencement Ceremonies are required to wear a mask and practice social distancing. Adults are strongly encouraged to have been vaccinated. Tickets are also required to attend. For more information about commencement, visit https://www.tnstate.edu/records/commencement/. The university will also livestream both events on Friday and Saturday. Visit (www.tnstate.edu/youtube) to watch.

To learn more about the Department of Biology Sciences and the Dr. Levi Watkins Institute, visit https://www.tnstate.edu/biology/ and https://www.tnstate.edu/watkins/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU students participate in Model United Nations conference, say forum gave insights on future careers

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Two Tennessee State University political science students with interests in law say a recent Model United Nations conference they attended gave them better insights for their future career goals. 

Kimora Reeves and Maya Weaver, both sophomores from Knoxville, Tennessee, participated in the Southern Regional Model UN conference March 26-28. They represented the nation of Jamaica. 

Kimora Reeves

Model UN is a simulation where students represent countries at the United Nations and attempt to solve global issues dealing with security, education, healthcare, and many other issues, said Dr. John Miglietta, a TSU professor of political science and student advisor. The conference builds research and public speaking skills, as well as negotiating skills. 

Reaves, who wants to become a civil rights attorney, attended the conference for the second time. She said she learned things that could be helpful in her future career goal. 

“I really appreciate these conferences because they help prepare me for engagements like the career I want to pursue,” said Reaves, who served on the commission on narcotic drugs, which dealt with issues on illegal narcotics, drug addiction and the impact on young people. 

“It is paramount to have confidence, great public speaking, and efficient writing in this field and the Model UN has given me the opportunity to put these skills to action.” 

Maya Weaver

For Weaver, who wants a career in international relations and law, she said preparing for this conference took a little more time because she wanted to make sure “I had educational and concrete ideas” that others could agree on. She served on the General Assembly Fourth Committee, which dealt with expanding access to relief programs for Palestine refugees in the Near East, and retraining peacekeepers to better adapt to their expanded mandates. 

“Both topics sparked strenuous, insightful, and difficult conversations and debates,” said Weaver. “The discussions were on what should be done and how it would be beneficial in the long run. So, Model UN is the best platform for me to begin learning and building the necessary skills to accomplish my career goals.”  

Reaves and Weaver credit their team advisor for getting them well prepared to participate at the highest level in the conference. 

“We appreciate Dr. Miglietta especially for taking his time to ensure that we, as delegates, were prepared and overall understood the process,” said Reaves.   

TSU has participated in the Model UN for nearly 20 years, but this was the first time it was held virtually because of the pandemic.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Tennessee State University names former All Pro TN Titan and Heisman Trophy winner Eddie George Head Football Coach

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Looking to take the program to the next level, Tennessee State University has named Eddie George as head football coach. TSU director of athletics Dr. Mikki Allen made the announcement Tuesday as George was introduced to the Tiger family. 

New TSU head football coach Eddie George (center) with President Glenda Glover and Athletics Director Mikki Allen. (Photo by Emanuel Roland)

“Eddie George has been a winner in every facet of the game, and we look forward to him bringing that same commitment to our players and having it translate into winning on and off the field,” said Allen. “We are excited to have him join us and lead the next chapter of our storied football program.” 

“I am excited about being named head coach at Tennessee State University,” said George. “I thank Dr. Glover, Dr. Allen, and each of you for the confidence you have placed in me.”

“All I have done has prepared me for this moment, whether that’s my football career, my entrepreneurial endeavors, my acting career.”

“Coaching is a full commitment, a duty of service. I take that seriously. I’ve done a lot of soul searching and due diligence. The more I thought about it, I got more and more excited about it. It was like picking up an old guitar or getting back on a bike, it’s familiar but in a different capacity.”

“It’s exciting. I’m going to be innovative, creative and fun.” 

President Glenda Glover called it a great day for the university and looks forward to working with Eddie George as he sustains a successful football program. 

“For decades, TSU has always made bold and strategic hires within our athletic programs that laid the foundation for our storied success in sports,” commented Glover. “Eddie George, with the resources he will bring to TSU, is the right choice and investment for the future of the TSU football program and the TSU community.” 

The celebrated former NFL star will make an announcement regarding his coaching staff in the coming days. 

George played college football for The Ohio State University and won the Heisman in 1995. That season, his senior year, George rushed for a school record 1,927 yards and 24 touchdowns, an average of 148.23 yards per game, while also catching 47 passes for 417 yards and another score. He left Ohio State second in school history in career rushing yards (3,768) and third in rushing touchdowns (44). The Philadelphia native finished with 4,284 all-purpose yards, 45 touchdowns, and a 5.5 yards per carry average. 

In 1996, George was the first-round draft selection of the then-Houston Oilers. He won the NFL Rookie of the Year award that same year and was the Oilers/Titans’ starting tailback through 2003, never missing a start. He made the Pro Bowl four consecutive years (1997–2000), and assisted the Titans to a championship appearance in Super Bowl XXXIV, where he scored two touchdowns in the loss to the St. Louis Rams 23-16. 

Eddie George addresses questions from media at Tuesday’s press conference. (Photo by Emanuel Roland)

George is only the second NFL running back to rush for 10,000 yards while never missing a start, joining Jim Brown. Only Walter Payton (170) started more consecutive regular season games than George’s 130. 

In 2004, George signed a one-year contract with the Dallas Cowboys where he started eight games and finished the season with 432 yards and four touchdowns. He officially retired in 2006. 

George’s career totals include 10,441 rushing yards, 268 receptions, 2,227 receiving yards, and 78 touchdowns (68 rushing and 10 receiving). 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

National Urban League President Marc Morial and journalist wife michelle miller to deliver TSU commencement addresses

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University spring commencement ceremonies will return to the campus as live events with National Urban League President Marc Morial, and CBS national correspondent Michelle Miller delivering the keynote addresses. 

The former New Orleans mayor is the guest speaker for the undergraduate ceremony on Saturday, May 1 at 8 a.m. He follows his award-winning journalist wife Miller who will speak on Friday, April 30 at the graduate event beginning at 4 p.m. Both graduations are scheduled for Hale Stadium. 

Dominique Davis, SGA President and Future Educator and Public Service Practitioner

Graduates are looking forward to hearing the speakers. But they are also excited that they will get to see them in-person. The 2020 spring and fall commencement ceremonies were held virtually because of the pandemic. 

“I am very excited and appreciative for the in-person commencement that will take place on the first of May 2021,” says Dominique Davis, president of the Student Government Association, who will receive her BS degree in business administration, with a concentration in supply chain management.  

“Although, I too will be walking the stage, this isn’t just about me. This specific in-person commencement symbolizes all our graduating seniors who have worked relentlessly to stick to the course this past year in every aspect. This moment should be celebrated, and I am most grateful administrators have remained open minded in the entirety of graduation planning.”  

Folusho E. Micah, Future Medical Doctor

Folusho E. Micah, who will receive his bachelor’s degree in biology with a concentration in cellular and molecular biology, says he feels blessed to be among those participating in an in-person graduation.  

“To have spent the past four years working so hard toward this moment and it be virtual would have been a huge let down,” says Micah. “Being able to walk across the stage in my cap and gown makes all those sleepless nights feel worth it.” 

University officials estimate nearly 1000 graduate and undergraduate students will receive degrees in various disciplines.  

Morial, president and CEO of the National Urban League, the nation’s largest historic civil rights and urban advocacy organization, is a leading voice on the national stage in the battle for jobs, education, housing, and voting rights equity. He is expected to inspire graduates on his stance on issues surrounding the direction of the nation amid the current political and social climate.  

Recognized as one of the 100 Most Influential Black Americans by Ebony Magazine, Morial served as a highly successful and popular mayor of New Orleans, as well as president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. He is a graduate of the Georgetown University Law Center, and the University of Pennsylvania.  

Miller, an Emmy award-winning journalist, joined “CBS This Morning: Saturday” in 2018. Her work regularly appears on the “CBS Evening News,” “CBS This Morning” and “CBS Sunday Morning.” She has also appeared as a correspondent on “48 Hours.”  

At CBS News since 2004, Miller has reported on many stories of national and international importance. She provided extensive coverage of protests surrounding police misconduct and indictments including: the deaths of George Floyd (and his funeral), Travyon Martin, Michael Brown and the trial of George Zimmerman.   

Miller’s many prestigious journalism awards include an Emmy for her series of reports on the National Guard’s Youth Challenge Academy, an Edward R Murrow Award for her coverage of a day care center stand-off in New Orleans, and the Alfred I. duPont – Columbia Award for her team coverage of the Newton, Connecticut, shooting. 

Officials say COVID-19 safety protocols will be strictly enforced on Friday and Saturday. Each graduate will be provided a total of six tickets for guests – 4 to Hale Stadium, and 2 to the Gentry Center, which will serve as the overflow destination. Individuals entering each location must present the appropriate ticket and successfully pass a temperature check.  On Saturday, each location will open at 6:30 a.m. Graduates and their guests are strongly encouraged to arrive early to go through the required protocols.

For updates on commencement, visit https://www.tnstate.edu/records/commencement/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Legislative committee says TSU could receive more than $540 million in unmet land-grant agreement

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service)– Tennessee State University could be due more than a half-billion dollars because of years of unpaid land-grant matches by the state. A joint legislative committee that met Monday to discuss the issue said the university could receive between $150 million and $544 million, dating back to the 1950s.  

“We are pleased with the findings of the land-grant study committee and excited about the possibilities of what this means for the University,” said TSU President Glenda Glover.  “TSU will be made stronger and more vibrant, which benefits all of Tennessee.”  

State Rep. Harold Love, Jr., a TSU alum, is chairman of the joint committee. It was under his leadership that the probe began with the goal of having the state calculate how much money was not given in accordance with the land grant and then try to make up for it.    

“Today’s meeting was a very crucial step in the committee’s work to investigate the funding arrearage amount for Tennessee State University,” said Love. “It is my hope that we can put a plan in place to address this in the very near future.” 

TSU and the University of Tennessee Knoxville are the two land-grant institutions in Tennessee and have agricultural programs that are funded largely by the federal government. The land-grant designation comes with the stipulation that the state would also match a yearly monetary grant from the federal government. In TSU’s case, the state did not match the funds dollar-for-dollar for decades. 

“This is not TSU versus UT, instead this is about rectifying a problem that has existed and persisted for decades where TSU, as an HBCU, did not receive funding from the state as directed by state and federal law,” added Glover. “Unfortunately, somewhere in the process our funding was channeled to other areas instead of coming to the university, while UT, the state’s other land grant institution received their funding and much more.”  

President Glover recalled a comment that was made to “let bygones be bygones” and said that cannot stand.  

“It’s never too late to do what’s right,” she said. “We’ve had students leave due to lack of funds, TSU was prevented from implementing innovative programs to be more competitive in recruiting, and not to mention the cost of lost opportunity.”

The committee is scheduled to continue meeting to determine the amount TSU will receive and how it will be dispersed.    

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Rapper, songwriter Moneybagg Yo endorses TSU on social media platform, promises to send his daughter to the HBCU

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The daughter of Demario DeWayne White Jr., the popular rapper and songwriter better known as Moneybagg Yo, is just 12 years old, but he already knows where he wants her to get a degree: Tennessee State University.

The Memphis, Tennessee, native recently endorsed the school on his social media platform, with more than six million followers, and promised to send D’Mya White to TSU, when she is ready for college. The first tweet about the artist’s endorsement and the announcement that his daughter is coming to TSU received nearly half a million views.  

Master P’s son, Hercy Miller, left, declined offers from notable division one schools to play basketball at TSU. (Black Enterprise)

The university also made headlines last week when another rapper, Master P, announced his son, Hercy Miller, was committing to play basketball at TSU. 

“This is great and exciting news for Tennessee State University,” says Miss TSU Mariah Rhodes, who forged a relationship with Moneybagg Yo when the celebrity endorsed her candidacy for the Miss TSU crown late last year.    

That relationship paid off in a big way recently when the TSU Office of Admissions and Recruitment considered hosting their first in-person open house – since the pandemic – and were looking for a celebrity to endorse their effort on social media. The team reached out to Moneybagg Yo, who did not only offer his endorsement, but agreed to meet the TSU group in his hometown.    

“We were just so elated that he agreed to actually meet our team in person,” says Dr. Carjamin Scott, TSU’s director of Admissions and Recruitment. “It’s one thing to get someone to host on social media, but quite another to be able to meet an artist in person.”     

The TSU team that met with Moneybagg Yo and his family included Miss TSU, the Aristocrat of Bands, and representatives from the Office of Admissions and Recruitment. (Submitted photo)

On March 19, the TSU recruitment team, accompanied by Miss TSU and members of the university’s Aristocrat of Bands – with gift items provided by TSU students – met with Moneybagg Yo and his family. It was his daughter’s birthday. The band performed for the family, including a happy birthday song for the artist’s daughter. The visit also included photo sessions with the rapper, a tour of his music studio, and lunch at Slim and Husky’s paid for by Moneybagg Yo.    

According to Scott, the interactions with the musician, best known for hit albums like, “Reset,” “43va Heartless,” and “Time Served,” was played on social media and immediately garnered nearly 3,000 shares.    

“His tweet, ‘I want her to go to the college, come to play happy birthday, #Big 12 Daddy luv u Myaaa!! Thank U TSU’ received an instant hit with 446,715 views,” says Scott.    

 “What this endorsement says to others is that if Moneybagg wants to send his daughter to Tennessee State University then that is a good school. That brings an increase in enrollment,” says Scott. “Mariah has been a great help with our recruitment effort since becoming Miss TSU. She has played her role very well, and we are thankful.”    

For Rhodes, she says engaging celebrities was part of fulfilling her agenda when she took on the crown with the goal to be different amid the pandemic, which curtailed or limited many traditional student activities and events.   

“When a celebrity endorses something, more people are prone to move in that direction,” says Rhodes. “It was a great thing for Moneybagg to endorse me as Miss TSU, but I think to endorse TSU is an amazing thing.”   

Moneybagg’s daughter is still a few years away from coming to TSU, but Dominique Davis, president of the Student Government Association, believes the land of golden sunshine is the place for her.   

“It made my heart smile knowing Moneybagg Yo‘s daughter has such a strong love for our beloved HBCU at a young age,” says Davis. “TSU is an institution designed to help cultivate and breed successful leaders. I have no doubt Miss De’Mya will flourish and make an impact when she decides to attend TSU in the near future.”    

For information on admission and recruitment at TSU, visit https://www.tnstate.edu/admissions/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU clinics give students opportunity to engage in real-world professional experience while serving the community

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The pandemic has not stopped Tennessee State University’s clinics from caring for people in the community and providing real career experience for those interested in healthcare as a profession.

The College of Health Sciences has three clinics that provide services free of charge or based on the ability to pay. They are the Tiger Community Rehabilitation Clinic, Dental Hygiene Clinic, and Speech Pathology and Audiology Clinic. All three are continuing to provide service to the campus community, as well as people in the surrounding Nashville community.

The Tiger Community Rehab. Ctr. is the first student-run PT/OT clinic at a historically black institution. (TSU Media Relations)

“The three clinics offered through the College of Health Sciences are platforms not only for students to immerse themselves in their professions through faculty-supervised clinical instruction, but also for students and faculty to provide no- or low-cost care to the various communities they serve,” said Dr. Ronald Barredo, dean of the College of Health Sciences.

Dr. Rick Clark is assistant professor of physical therapy at TSU and director of the Tiger Community Rehabilitation Clinic, the first student-run physical therapy/occupational therapy clinic at a historically black institution.

Clark said the services of the Rehabilitation Clinic, as well as the other clinics, is more important now than ever.

“I think what we’re doing is absolutely so very, very needed,” said Clark, who was in the military for 25 years and ran multiple clinics. “With COVID-19, people are kind of confined to their homes, not getting out and being as active. We’re able to get them in and start getting them on that path to recovery, better health.”

Clark said the clinic mainly handles cases like knee injuries, shoulder pain, and lower back pain. The more serious cases are referred out to physical and occupational therapy clinics in the area.

“We want to make a difference in the lives of our patients, which is really what our goal is,” said Clark.

All the clinics, like the university as a whole, adhere to strict protocols to make sure that everyone is safe amid COVID-19.

“We have adjusted how we operate to make sure everyone is safe during the pandemic, but have not changed our quality of care,” said Amber Oliveri, a first-year graduate student from Ellicott City, Maryland, in the Master’s of Occupational Therapy Program.

“It’s been a challenge, but we’ve managed to keep all of our students, faculty and staff safe during the pandemic,” said TSU Professor Gary-Lee Lewis, head of the Dental Hygiene Clinic.

The Dental Hygiene Clinic provides service to close to 600 patients a year. (TSU Media Relations)

The clinic recently restarted in-person patient visits and provides services like cleanings, cancer screenings, and general patient education about good hygiene.

Before the pandemic, the dental clinic provided service to nearly 600 patients a year, including faculty and students, as well as the Nashville community.

Dental Hygiene major Cleopatra Peden acknowledged the pandemic has caused some of her peers in the program to reconsider their major. But the senior from Gallatin, Tennessee, is unwavering.

“The pandemic is not going to affect me continuing in this career,” said Peden. “Yes, there are safety concerns right now. But people still need dental care, they need us. And it just makes me want to help them that much more.”

Dr. Tina Smith is head of the Speech Pathology and Audiology Clinic. She said the audiology part of the clinic is not seeing patients right now because of the pandemic. However, she said the Department of Speech Pathology is using telepractice, or teletherapy, which has allowed first-year graduate students to continue seeing patients since the pandemic first started last year.

Matthew Norcia is a first-year grad student from Owensboro, Kentucky, majoring in Speech and Language Pathology. He said the transition to teletherapy was challenging initially, “especially for those of us who are having clients for the first time.”

“But with an extreme work ethic, we have been able to handle the adversity and continue to address the needs of each client and further develop their speech and language skills,” said Norcia. “Overall, this experience has been enlightening and beneficial as teletherapy may become a normal form of treatment even after the pandemic is over. Being able to continuously provide for the community through these trying times has been such a rewarding experience and we look forward to continuing our work.”

Speech Pathology’s telepractice allows students to continue seeing patients during the pandemic. (TSU Media Relations.)

The Tiger Community Rehabilitation Clinic is now located in the university’s new state-of-the-art Health Sciences Building, which has classrooms, spaces for clinical simulations, labs and offices. The Speech Pathology and Audiology Clinic is on TSU’s Avon Williams Campus near downtown Nashville, and the Dental Hygiene Clinic is in Clement Hall on the main campus. Students usually get top jobs in their fields upon graduation because of the real-world experience they receive at the clinics

Averie Conn recently received therapy at the Tiger Clinic and is glad she did.

“I have been having some neck and upper back pain that was interrupting my function and participation in some of the activities I want and need to be able to do,” said Conn. “The students and their supervisor who treated me helped reduce not only the pain I was having on the day I visited the clinic, but the days following as well. They were very helpful in talking me through what clinical signs and decisions they were making, and broke down the next steps I should take in a logical and easy-to-understand way.”

Conn said the Tiger Clinic, as well as the others offered at TSU, are “invaluable to the community.”

“Some of the barriers to accessing healthcare are the lack of public knowledge about how and where it is accessible, and how much the service is going to cost,” she said. “Unfortunately, many people are willing to live in discomfort, pain, or with other clinical symptoms simply because healthcare is not easily accessible or affordable.”

Hours of operation for the Tiger Community Rehabilitation Clinic are Fridays 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (Health Sciences Building, Room 212). To make an appointment call: 615-815-4359, 615-963-7184 or email: TSUTigerClinic@gmail.com.

Services for the Speech Pathology and Audiology Clinic are currently being provided on Monday and Wednesday or Tuesday and Thursday 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. through telepractice. To make an appointment call: 615-963-7072.

The Dental Hygiene Clinic is open Monday through Friday 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Hours of operation during the pandemic: On-site – Mondays and Wednesdays 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.    
Remote: Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.
To make an appointment call: 615.963.5791 or email:DHClinic@tnstate.edu 

For more information about TSU’s College of Health Sciences, visit https://www.tnstate.edu/health_sciences/clinics.aspx.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Foundation selects six new board members

The Tennessee State University Foundation recently selected six individuals to be on its Board of Directors.

The new members are Robert Blalock, Valerie Love, Roosevelt Luster, Lesia Riddick, Reginald Shareef, and Laron Walker. All are alumni of TSU.

The mission of the Foundation is to promote and support literary, scientific, educational, scholarship, research, charitable and development purposes and goals at the university.

Established in 1970, the Foundation is the official 501©(3), non-profit charitable organization for Tennessee State University.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.