Tag Archives: TSU President Glenda Glover

Virtual TSU Financial Aid Workshops Help New College Students Tap into Funding Resources

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – If you need money for college, one of the most important forms to complete is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. Tennessee State University is making the process easier for prospective students and their parents.

President Glenda Glover speaks via Zoom to students and parents participating in the Virtual FAFSA Hour. (TSU Media Relations)

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the university is holding a series of virtual workshops to meet students where they are and walk them through what can sometimes be an overwhelming task.

“Virtual FAFSA Hour” allows new admitted students who have not done a FAFSA, and those who have not completed their financial aid file, to directly interact with financial aid counselors for assistance. The virtual workshop is also open to continuing students who have not renewed their FAFSA.

“This was really nice and different,” said Nicole Reese, who joined the call from her living room in Park Ford, Illinois, with her incoming freshman son, Gabriel Reese. Nicole has been through financial aid offices before with an older son, but “the experience was nothing like TSU.”

Tyeisha Weeks, who wants to study physical therapy, calls with a question from her bedroom in Chicago. (TSU Media Relations)

“We got a chance to sit face-to-face with these wonderful people, they were patient and knew what they were doing, we got all of our questions answered, and we got a chance to hear the president of the university. I am ready for my child to come to TSU.”

Gabriel agreed. “I do like TSU,” said the graduating senior from Rich East High School, who visited TSU several times when a cousin attended the university. “I thought their answers were very thorough and they were extremely helpful. I am very excited.”

Dr. Angela Bryant, Assistant Vice President for Financial Aid, responds to calls on the Virtual FAFSA Hour. (TSU Media Relations)

With a goal of reaching about 3,000 prospective students about completing their financial aid requirements, organizers say a stream of students and parents are calling in and taking advantage of the Virtual FAFSA Hour, which is held for one hour twice a day over four days.

“Welcome to TSU, and good afternoon. I am thrilled and just so happy to greet all of you new TSU students who plan on coming this fall,” said TSU President Glenda Glover, who spoke via Zoom. “We just can’t wait to receive you with open arms. Right now, we are coming to you virtually. I know that there are some issues or questions concerning FAFSA. We are here to answer those questions.”

Financial aid officials said the Virtual FAFSA Hour, first of its kind at TSU, is intended to ensure that qualified students have access to all available funding sources, while remaining safe and secure in their home with their families amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

“In our efforts to keep everyone safe and adhering to the call to social distancing, it is a benefit for all of us to participate in the virtual opportunities TSU is offering,” said Dr. Angela Bryant, assistant vice president for financial aid. “With regard to financial aid specifically, what better way to  secure funding for fall 2021 than to take advantage of the FAFSA Hour. We are here to help these students meet their financial needs for school.”

 In addition to federal loan and assistance programs, TSU offers many different avenues of financial help to prospective students, including state, local and institutional grants or scholarship opportunities. These include the 250-Mile Radius Tuition Rate for students from high schools in surrounding states, the HOPE scholarship for Tennessee residents, the Academic High Achiever Scholarship, the TSU Academic Work Scholarship, the TSU Building Bridge Grant, and several others.

Diamond Parish, of Nashville, is an architectural engineering major and a returning freshman. She called in from her bedroom to resolve issues with her “TSU account.”

“In no time my issued was resolved, I got the answer I wanted,” said Parish, adding that she saw “very little” difference between her in-person experience in the financial aid office and the virtual call-in. “The way they were doing it, it felt like I was right next to them.”

Like Parish, Tyeisha Weeks, from Chicago, who wants to study physical therapy, also called in to the Virtual FAFSA Hour from her bedroom.  She had already sent in her form but was following up to make sure everything was in order. She was not disappointed.

“They were just so helpful,” said Weeks, a graduating senior from John Marshall Metropolitan High School in Chicago, who heard about TSU from alumni and from newspapers. “Everybody was very nice. They took us through the steps and they were very patient.”

Terrance Izzard, associate vice president for admissions and recruitment, said the series of virtual FAFSA workshops was intended to make it easy for students in the midst of travel restrictions.

“We are excited about you coming to Tennessee State University,” he told callers. “Our team in enrollment and financial aid work closely together to make sure we are here so you don’t get stuck in the process. We want to let you know that you are our priority.”

The Offices of Enrollment Management and Financial Aid have planned several other virtual workshops to help ease students’ transition during this pandemic.

For more information on financial aid at TSU, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/financial_aid/

Featured Photo: Nicole Reese, left, and her son Gabriel Reese call in from Park Ford, Illinois.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU and Mt. Zion cut hunger for 10,000 Nashville families hit hardest by COVID-19 with grant from Oprah Winfrey Charitable Foundation

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Over 10,000 Nashville families can put more food on their tables today because of a generous grant donation from the Oprah Winfrey Charitable Foundation. The funds were made available through a partnership between Tennessee State University and Mt. Zion Baptist Church that grew out of Ms. Winfrey’s strong desire to help Nashville. 

Ms. Winfrey, a Big Blue alum, said TSU President Glenda Glover and Bishop Joseph Warren Walker III of Mt. Zion were recommended to her because of their great work in the community. Particularly in the case of President Glover, Ms. Winfrey said representatives with Apple suggested she connect with Glover and TSU, which has a successful coding partnership with Apple.

The tech giant is also in partnership with Ms. Winfrey, who recently spoke with local and national print outlets during a Zoom meeting to announce the $2 million grant to TSU and Mt. Zion to help the families in need.

“Everybody was already connected. I felt like I was in good hands,” said Ms. Winfrey, adding that she brainstormed with Glover and Walker on how to get help “directly to the people.”

“I was honored to receive Ms. Winfrey’s call, and even more touched by her concern for underserved communities in her home city of Nashville deeply impacted by COVID-19,” said Glover, who was a classmate of Ms. Winfrey. “A vast majority of the families benefitting are single heads of households experiencing job loss or a substantial cut in hours. The university, along with Mt. Zion, is extremely proud to have assisted with such a monumental humanitarian effort with our alumna, Ms. Winfrey.” 

“We are deeply grateful to Ms. Winfrey, who has such a heart for Nashville and asked us to help her develop a method for getting relief to the most vulnerable people as fast as possible,” said Walker. “In response, we convened an extensive network of religious, civic and business leaders who have direct knowledge of individuals and families in this city whose lives have been devastated by the confluence of disasters that have hit Nashville in 2020.” 

NashvilleNurtures, the collaboration between TSU and Mt. Zion, brought together a coalition of African-American churches and community organizations to assist in helping the city’s most at need individuals. In addition to the coronavirus, a tornado that struck parts of Nashville near TSU in early March left many families homeless. 

One beneficiary is LaWanda Jackson. She said the gift card was “truly a blessing” because her work hours had been reduced and she was still displaced by the tornado. “I honestly did not know what my next meal was going to be,” said Jackson. “The card was right on time. I’m thankful to everyone who played a part in me getting it.” 

Single mom Janice Easley was overjoyed to receive the $200 Kroger gift card. The mom of six and housekeeper said her hours had been cut as well, and she worried about having enough food available with her children out of school. 

“I was down to my last food and didn’t have anything,” said Easley. “I thank Ms. Oprah Winfrey. She didn’t have to do it but you came through. It’s a blessing.” 

Glover said, “The gratitude and appreciation expressed to Ms. Winfrey, TSU and Mt. Zion has been overwhelming. Along with single parents, we’ve been able to help people who are crucial to the city’s tourism industry; the men and women that wait tables, hotel check-in, and small business owners suffering financial loss. As a college president, I see first-hand how this virus has affected every aspect of daily living, financial, operational and of course educational.” 

Ms. Winfrey said she was compelled to help because of how African-American communities are being disproportionally affected by the virus. She voiced her concern about the lack of access to healthcare, leading to a larger number of deaths and the economic toll on communities of color.

“The reason I’m talking about it is because there is going to be a need for people of means to step up, and you got those people right here in Nashville,” said Ms. Winfrey. “I mean, this thing is not going away. Even when the virus is gone.”

Agreeing with Winfrey, Glover said it was important that TSU continue to help families as they face uncertain futures due to the devastating impact of the virus and that’s being done with the newly created COVID-19 Academy at the university.

“TSU has established the COVID-19 Academy to continue outreach to the Nashville community as it recovers from the pandemic,” said Glover. “The academy will work to bridge the health care disparity for people of color that experts say will have a lasting impact for generations to come through a holistic approach combining access to care, human services and education.” 

The grant to NashvilleNurtures was a part of the Oprah Winfrey Charitable Foundation’s $12 million COVID-19 Relief Fund. The grants support organizations in Ms. Winfrey’s “home cities” of Nashville, TN; Chicago, IL; Milwaukee, WI; Baltimore; and Kosciusko, MS that are helping underserved communities currently experiencing a disproportionate impact from the pandemic.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Launches Nation’s first COVID-19 Academy to continue support and recovery for Nashville families

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) –  Tennessee State University has long-term plans to continue outreach to Nashville families, especially underserved communities hit hardest from the novel coronavirus with the newly established COVID-19 Academy.  

President Glenda Glover

“TSU has established the COVID-19 Academy to continue efforts to help the Nashville community as it recovers from the pandemic,” says TSU President Glenda Glover. “The academy will work to bridge the health care disparity for people of color that experts say will have a lasting impact for generations to come. This is being done through a holistic approach combining access to care, human services and education.” 

Glover says the academy will connect residents with health services, such as telehealth and telemedicine providers, food banks and pantries, as well as employment and educational resources. For its online and certificate learning component, the COVID-19 Academy will conduct webinars on outreach, community gardening and preparedness, workforce development, entrepreneurship and small business development, and continuing education for healthcare individuals. 

The Academy will also maintain a strong link with Nashville Nurtures, a food resources partnership between TSU and Mount Zion Baptist Church, under the auspices of the Oprah Winfrey Foundation, to serve the needs of the community.

Dr. Ronald Barredo

TSU alumna Oprah Winfrey recently awarded a $2 million grant to NashvilleNurtures through her charitable foundation to provide immediate relief to families needing food.

Ms. Winfrey said she was compelled to help because of how African-American communities are being disproportionally affected by the virus. She voiced her concern about the lack of access to healthcare, leading to a larger number of deaths and the economic toll on communities of color.

“The reason I’m talking about it is because there is going to be a need for people of means to step up, and you got those people right here in Nashville,” said Ms. Winfrey. “I mean, this thing is not going away. Even when the virus is gone.”

Agreeing with Winfrey, Glover said it was important that TSU continue to help families as they face uncertain futures due to the devastating impact of the virus and that’s being done with the newly created COVID-19 Academy at the university.

Dr. Ronald Barredo, dean of the College of Health Sciences and a member of the university’s task force on COVID-19, says the academy, which was launched recently, serves as an institutional response to the current pandemic.

“Among its various components, the Academy provides up-to-date information about the coronavirus and links not only to the metropolitan and Tennessee state governments, but also to pandemic-related information from recognized authorities and national agencies,” says Barredo.

Dr. Veronica Oates

Through the Department of Human Sciences in the College of Agriculture, the Academy provides links to resources in nutrition education and food safety, child development and parenting, emergency preparedness, youth development, community gardening and faith-based initiatives.

According to Dr. Veronica Oates, interim chair of the Department of Human Sciences and a member of the task force, in addition to child development and family care, food handling and management is another key area of emphasis for the Academy. 

“The idea is for restaurants and people who are in food service to actually be able to implement some of the new post-COVID-19 requirements and suggestions,” says Oates. “We could provide the type of expertise or consultation to help them with how they can actually run their businesses and make sure that they are safeguarding their employees and the public.”

Rita Fleming, assistant professor and extension specialist, adds that at a time when many Americans are worried about their ability to afford food or groceries due to the pandemic, the academy, through the TSU extension services, can help people stretch their food budget.

“Tennessee State Cooperative Extension has always been dedicated to serving current and future needs of Tennesseans by providing educational information and programs that safeguard health, increase livelihood, and enhance the well-being of community needs, “ says Fleming, a task force member.

Workforce development, another key part of the COVID-19 Academy’s certificate learning component, will use available resources at the university, such as the Career Development Center, and in the community to help meet the skills and employment needs of the people.

“The Career Development Center recognizes the unique employment needs of all individuals,” says Antoinette Hargrove Duke, associate director of the center.  “We will serve as a gateway to offer career service resources to help assist in exploring different career options during these challenging and uncertain times.”

For more information on the COVID-19 Academy at Tennessee State University, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/covid19academy/educationalresources.aspx

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Congratulations Class of 2020

Congratulations to the nearly 700 Tennessee State University undergraduates and graduates! Wishing you continued success as you showcase TSU’s Big Blue excellence to the world. Class of 2020: 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Virtual Spring Preview Day Gives Prospective Students Innovative Look at University Offerings, Programs

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – When Jelani Nash of Fort Worth, Texas, received his certificate of admission to Tennessee State University, the usually quiet and shy Nash was emotional. The screen on his laptop revealed the certificate welcoming him to TSU.

TSU President Glenda Glover zooms in to welcome prospective students and parents to the university’s first virtual Spring Preview Day. (Photo by TSU Media Relations)

“It just felt good and I was very excited,” said the high school graduating senior, as he and his family gathered in their living room in Fort Wort to participate in TSU’s first live virtual Spring Preview Day on April 9.

Like many prospective TSU students observing travel restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Nash was among hundreds of other incoming first-year freshmen who had to make their college commitment or receive acceptance letters without having visited the TSU campus.

In all, organizers said more than 300 users, mainly students and parents, connected to the event with questions to admissions recruiters. Many TSU administrators, student leaders, faculty, staff and alumni joined the conversation.

“Welcome to Tennessee State University and our very first virtual Spring Preview Day,” said President Glenda Glover, as she kicked off the live broadcast zoomed from the TV studio in TSU’s Performing Arts Center.

“Good afternoon to our students and to our parents! We are using this virtual format of programming to announce this wonderful spring preview day because of where we are in America today. We have banded together to fight this coronavirus that has gripped our nation. So, the health and safety of you as students and parents on our campus is paramount. As you prepare to start your college careers, we have some exciting things planned for you this fall. We thank you and we are happy to greet you as you take your first step to becoming a TSU Tiger.”

Ashley Janae Edgar, left, an incoming freshman, receives her certificate of admission from Associate Vice President for Admission Terrance Izzarance, during a visit on campus. (Submitted photo)

The virtual spring preview, termed “Vision 2020: I see You at TSU,” gave potential students a new and innovative way to learn about the institution, said officials. They included a virtual tour of the campus, student interviews about campus life, meeting academic demands, and what it takes to apply and enroll at TSU.   Also, in response to the global pandemic and the closure of various testing sites, viewers learned that TSU is considering waiving the ACT for students applying for the Fall 2020 semester. Officials say the university wants to ensure that all interested and capable students have an opportunity to be evaluated for admission. However, applicants must still have a minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA and an official transcript to be considered for admission.

Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dr. Alisa Mosley, was among university officials who joined in to tell the audience about TSU’s many outstanding programs, its diverse faculty, as well as opportunities for students to engage in internships, study abroad and service learning programs.

A viewer watches the virtual Spring Preview Day on her cell phone. (Photo by TSU Media Relations)

“So, there is really something for everyone here at TSU,” Mosley said. “When you go through those kinds of opportunities you come out stronger and your passion fortified and you are prepared to engage on the local, national and international levels.”

Terrence Izzard, associate vice president for Admissions and Recruitment, described the virtual preview as “a different platform, but the same brand of TSU excellence.”

“We are really trying to expand our reach to those who may not be able to come to us,” he said. “So, this virtual preview day is an exciting opportunity for us to reach thousands for the cause of TSU.”

Ashley Janae Edgar, of Atlanta, who has committed to coming to TSU in the fall, also watched preview day with her family. She said the exchange with the recruitment staff was “amazing.”

“It was extremely helpful and very informative,” said Edgar, who plans to major in criminal justice. She received her admission certificate during a visit on campus in November.

Dr. Carjamin Scott, Director of Admissions and Recruitment, helps to answer students and parents’ questions during the virtual preview day. (Photo by TSU Media relations)

 For Jelani Nash and his parents, they think TSU is the perfect fit for the incoming freshman.

“We are definitely comfortable with him going to Tennessee State University,” said Jelani’s father, Omar Nash, who added that his whole family enjoyed watching the virtual spring preview.

“Although we wanted him to stay close to home, we have a nice family connection in Nashville. Also, my wife enjoyed seeing the president of the university because she is a sorority sister, and my daughter said the campus was beautiful. This virtual preview is a definite plus for you guys.”

You can watch Virtual Spring Preview Day on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Jz98el-MZo

 For more information on admission to TSU, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/admissions/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU President Glover, administrators stress ‘meeting needs’ of students amid the COVID-19 pandemic in virtual meeting

 NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover assured students that TSU is dedicated to accommodating them while they finish the semester remotely as a result of the coronavirus (COVID-19). Dr. Glover and other TSU administrators held a live meeting via Zoom with over 200 student leaders on April 2.

“I wanted to take this opportunity to just stop and make sure that we are meeting your needs,” Glover said. “We are going to do everything humanly possible to accommodate you to ensure that you succeed in spite of this very daunting challenge. It is tough for everyone across the world as we face the daily uncertainties and dangers that this virus presents. We’re going to do whatever we can to ensure that you remain whole.”

Students submitted their questions via the chat component. Topics included student refunds or credits, graduation, summer classes, and campus preparations for returning students in the fall. TSU registration opens tomorrow, and students may apply for housing now. 

Student Government Association President Katelyn Thompson of Memphis, Tennessee, said she was pleased with what she heard from Dr. Glover and other top staff.

“I’m proud of the university and student body coming together,” said Thompson, a graduating senior double majoring in criminal justice and psychology. “At the end of the day, excellence is our habit. We can’t get anywhere unless we come together.”

Charlie Green Jr., a senior from Jackson, Tennessee, agreed.

TSU President Glenda Glover addresses students in virtual meeting.

“This is a lesson for all of us,” said Green, a double major in architectural engineering and urban studies. “But Dr. Glover showed students that she’s about the business of making sure that we are taken care of and that our needs are being met.”

On March 16, TSU was the first public university in Tennessee to transition to all online classes as a precaution to contracting COVID-19. The university also canceled all campus events where large crowds are expected, and suspended all international travel through the end of April to minimize exposure to the disease. On March 23, the university ceased normal operations, allowing most employees to work remotely.

 Miss Junior Maya Howard, a business administration major, said she’s comfortable that when she returns to the university from Cincinnati, Ohio, that the campus will be thoroughly sanitized.

“I noticed as I was moving out that they were on top of making sure that everything was clean,” said Howard.

The university has continued a complete wipe down to protect the campus from COVID-19 and other diseases. TSU is using professional cleaning companies with disinfectants and sanitizing equipment to wipe down its main campus and downtown location. 

SGA President Katelyn Thompson talks to students in virtual meeting.

President Glover told students the virtual meeting will be the first of several she will hold to keep students updated on campus operations during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Since transitioning to all online instruction and telework for faculty and staff, the university has hosted several virtual student events, such as this. Last week, TSU made history by establishing a chapter of the National Music Honor Society, Pi Kappa Lambda, and inducting its first members. 

For more on campus operations affected by the coronavirus, and student information, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/covid19

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Continues Campus Wipe Down Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

NASAHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – With nearly all students away and classes online, Tennessee State University is continuing a complete wipe down to protect the campus from the COVID-19 and other diseases.

In the TSU campus wipe down, workers are using equipment and products that are extremely effective in killing the coronavirus. (Photo by TSU Media Relations)

The university is using professional cleaning companies with disinfectants and sanitizing equipment to wipe down its main campus and downtown location. Cleaning crews are using protective equipment including gloves, body suits, and products that are “extremely effective” in killing the virus, company representatives say.

Interim Associate Vice President for Facilities Management Albert Hill says the goal is to keep the campuses clean and less susceptible to the spread of infectious illnesses, such as the coronavirus.

“We just want to make sure that when our students and employees return, they feel comfortable going into the classrooms, residence halls, and work places,” says Hill. “We also want to assure parents that their children are safe.”

On March 16, TSU was the first public university in Tennessee to transition to all online classes as a precaution to contracting and spreading coronavirus (COVID-19). The university also canceled all campus events where large crowds are expected, and suspended all international travel through the end of April to minimize exposure to the disease. On Monday, March 23, the university ceased normal operations, allowing most employees to work remotely.

Lecture halls are also receiving thorough cleaning in the campus-wide wipe down at TSU. (Phopto by TSU Media Relations)

 “These decisions were made in the best interest of the university, as both the federal government and State of Tennessee have declared a state of emergency,” says TSU President Glenda Glover.

 “In following directives from the Governor and Mayor, we have adjusted the traditional manner in which we serve our students and operate the university and will continue to take every precaution necessary to minimize the spread of the virus.   Most importantly, we are ensuring that students continue to learn and excel academically by providing all the resources needed to successfully engage and complete online courses.” 

  TSU has one confirmed case of a student testing positive for COVID-19. The individual, who did not live on campus, has been at home in self-isolation for a number of days while receiving the necessary care to treat their condition.

Dr. Joseph Perry, TSU’s director of sustainability, says the cleaning crews are doing an “excellent job” of making sure chemicals they are using are safe for humans and the environment.

“We are going to do this until we get to the point where we feel it is safe for people to come back into the buildings,” says Perry. “Essential staff and faculty who occasionally come on campus are safe because they are allowed to go in only certain areas.”

The U.S. Department of Education recently launched a COVID-19 (Coronavirus) information and resources web page for schools and school personnel.

For more information on campus operations and student information, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/covid19.

NOTE: Kelli Sharpe contributed to this story.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU employees begin teleworking to ward off spread of COVID-19

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University employees began working remotely on Monday to help prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).  University officials said the move is in-line with directives from the Mayor and Governor in an effort to curtail the spread of the virus. TSU employees were told last week and began making arrangements for teleworking on Thursday and Friday.

“TSU’s modified operations plan, which includes employees teleworking, is in-line with the Mayor and Governor’s directive for individuals to stay home when possible,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. 

Employees with Campus Police, Emergency Management and Facilities Maintenance will continue working on campus. All individuals on campus or coming to TSU should self-quarantine and contact their healthcare provider if they feel sick.

The University has enhanced its cleaning and sanitizing process and will continue a campus wide wipe down of academic buildings and residence halls. TSU began online instruction for all students on March 16, almost all students have left the campus.

The University recently learned that a student has tested positive for COVID-19. 

The individual, who did not live on campus, has been at home in self-isolation for a number of days while receiving the necessary care to treat their condition. No further information is being given about the individual for privacy reasons.

The University has compiled a list of individuals who were in contact with the student, and is in the process of notifying them. 

For more information on campus operations and student information, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/covid19.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Students Express Mixed Feelings About Leaving Campus in Wake of Coronavirus

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Like many Tennessee State University students, Trenton Jones says he understands why TSU is asking them to go home, but many have mixed feelings about leaving their campus environment.  Students must vacate the campus by Saturday, March 21.

“The coronavirus is a big deal right now and this move is to help us stay healthy,” said Jones, a freshman agricultural science major, as he and his parents emptied out his dorm room in Watson Hall on Wednesday to head back home to Northport, Alabama.

Tyrani Randolph, left, a freshman dental hygiene major from Memphis, helps classmate Trenton Jones, second from right, move out of Watson Hall. Jones’ parents, Malcolm and Rhonda Skinner, travelled from Northport, Alabama, to pick up their son. (Photo by TSU Media Relations)

“Students need to stay functional and campus offers that,” added Jones. “Being on our own, and to do class online, you are missing that interaction with teachers and fellow students. Face-to-face is the best interaction for learning.” 

 Parents Ronda Skinner and her husband Malcolm, who travelled from Northport, Alabama, to pick up their son, Trenton, said the trip was inconvenient, “but worth it.”

“Due to the circumstances of the coronavirus, an epidemic that has hit our nation severely, it is understandable that the school would have to make this decision,” Rhonda Skinner said. “The fact that schools around the country had to make this decision, I do believe that it is in the best interest of the students, and comforting for parents.”

TSU President Glenda Glover said the decision was in the best interest of the university, as both the federal government and State of Tennessee have declared a state of emergency.

On March 16, TSU went online with all classes as a precaution to contracting and spreading coronavirus (COVID-19).

“While we have adjusted the traditional manner in which we serve our students, we are ensuring that they continue to learn and excel academically,” stated President Glover. “We are taking every precaution necessary to minimize the spread of the virus.” 

The university will soon serve as a mobile testing site. As further precaution, the university has canceled all campus events where large crowds are expected, as well as suspended all international travel through the end of April to minimize exposure to the disease. Also, beginning Monday, March 23, the university will cease normal operations, allowing most employees to work remotely.

Tyrani Randolph, a freshman dental hygiene major from Memphis, Tennessee, who moved out of Wilson Hall, agreed with her fellow classmate.

“I believe everything is for a reason, and I believe this is a safety precaution,” she said.

 Frank Stevenson, associate vice president for student affairs and dean of students, said the university understands the “anxiety that this change causes for students.”

“It is an interruption into their ‘normal’ way of doing things as students,” he said. “We are trying to mitigate the situation and help them work through those feelings.”

Stevenson said the university is following the Centers for Disease Control and Infections guidelines, and best practices recommendations, in accordance with instructions from the governor’s office.

On Monday, the University will begin a campus wide wipe down of academic buildings and residence halls.

 For more information on campus operations and student information, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/covid19/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU allowing students to go home and finish semester online as a precaution to COVID-19

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is allowing students to return home and finish the semester online as a precaution to the spreading coronavirus (COVID-19). Online classes started Monday.

University officials announced last Thursday that TSU was transitioning to online learning. In a correspondence to students, TSU President Glenda Glover stated the decision was in the best interest of the university, as both the federal government and State of Tennessee have declared a state of emergency.

“Concerns pertaining to the coronavirus COVID-19 are affecting all of us and continues to worsen,” said Dr. Glover. “Within the last 48-hours, the country has changed drastically, as the number of U.S cases continue to be confirmed.”   

TSU will close all residence halls and apartments on Saturday, March 21. The university will evaluate requests from students with extenuating circumstances that need more time to make arrangements. Housing officials said those requests will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Students will continue their classes in an online format and there is no requirement to live on campus.

As further precaution, the University has canceled all campus events where large crowds are expected, as well as suspended all international travel through the end of April to minimize exposure to the disease. TSU has made these decisions to ensure the safety and health of the campus family. 

The university will provide more information on campus operations as decisions are made.     

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.