Tag Archives: Regions Bank

TSU using $50,000 grant from Regions to continue helping students succeed during pandemic

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is using a $50,000 grant from Regions Bank to purchase additional digital devices to ensure students have the tools they need to complete their coursework as a result of COVID-19.

TSU President Glenda Glover

In March, TSU students had to transition to remote learning because of the coronavirus. The University purchased laptops and tablets for those students who needed them. TSU is planning to resume classes on campus in the fall, but has an alternate plan that includes students continuing to learn remotely if there’s a surge in COVID-19 cases.

“TSU is grateful to Regions Bank for their continued support of the institution and our students,” says President Glenda Glover. “We committed to students that the University would ensure quality of student learning and their academic success during our transition to online instruction because of COVID-19. This gift from Regions helps us keep that promise by using the funds to provide much needed devices for students as we prepare for the fall.”

Tim Warren, head of information technology at TSU, says the Regions grant provides much needed relief to students facing hardships as a result of the virus.

“TSU has a large amount of technology on campus for students, but some of them don’t have internet access or computers at home,” says Warren. “These laptops and hotspots allow the students to stay connected and complete assignments like they were on campus.”

TSU freshman Nakailah Shields-Robinson says the laptop she received has been very useful. She says she wasn’t sure what she was going to do when her computer crashed. 

“I have an iPad, but that’s not really good either,” says Shields-Robinson, a criminal justice major from St. Louis, Missouri. “So, when the laptop came, it’s been helping me write my papers.

TSU junior Joyvon Dickerson, a human performance and sports science major from Chicago, says she’s grateful for the laptop the university gave her. 

“It’s kind of hard trying to write a five-page paper off your phone,” says Dickerson. “It’s nice to be at a school that cares about its students in this way.” 

Latrisha Jemison, a senior vice president at Regions Bank, says the company is committed to helping students succeed.

Sterlin Sanders, director of user services at TSU, examines laptop to go to student. (Submitted photo)

“Regions Bank is a longtime community partner with Tennessee State University, and, together, we are determined to build on the progress that TSU students have made toward earning their degrees and reaching their goals,” says Jemison, a Regional Community Development and Partnership manager. “The pandemic is creating a tremendous challenge, and there’s no denying this is a very difficult time. But by working together, we can help education move forward, and TSU will continue to connect students with opportunities to build a better tomorrow.”

Jamie Isabel with advancement and university relations at TSU says the grant from Regions is an example of the bank’s commitment to the University, and the “value of corporate partners to students and the University.”

For more on TSU operations affected by the coronavirus, and student information, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/covid19.

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, Regions, AKA launch financial empowerment initiative for college students and underserved communities

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is partnering with Regions Bank and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated to help college students and underserved communities build financial wealth.

TSU President Glenda Glover receives $25K check from Latrisha Jemison, Regional Community Development and Partnership Manager for Regions Bank. (TSU Media Relations)

The groups officially announced the agreement during the Financial Education and Empowerment workshop on Wednesday at Tennessee State.

Before the workshop, which was sponsored by the Alpha Psi Undergraduate Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha, TSU President Glenda Glover received a $25,000 check from Regions Bank that will be used for student scholarships. Glover is also the international president of AKA.

TSU students joined leaders from Regions and AKA for the event.

“TSU is extremely proud to have Regions Bank as a partner to provide the tools and resources to promote financial stability for our students, and our communities,” Glover said.

“Alpha Psi, along with all AKA chapters, will serve as a network to host financial education workshops with Regions to promote and engage students and underserved communities on best practices when it comes to spending, saving and credit building.”

TSU senior Morgan Courtney of Detroit said she appreciated the workshop, particularly discussion about maintaining a good credit score, and managing finances.

Student Trustee Braxton Simpson talks to students attending workshop. (TSU Media Relations)

“Building your credit now is very helpful for your future, and understanding financial literacy is also very important for college students; all people, actually,” Courtney said.

Organizers said the workshops will begin locally on college campuses and increase to encompass underserved neighborhoods in cities across the country. As part of the program, financial professionals from Regions will work with Alpha Kappa Alpha to deliver high-quality, cost-free financial training through interactive workshops for students and the community. The goal is to help more people achieve financial security and build savings.

“Financial education leads to financial empowerment,” said Latrisha Jemison, Regional Community Development and Partnerships Manager for Regions Bank. “No matter what stage of life you are in, the time to prepare for your financial future is now. And no matter how much, or how little, you have to begin with, we want this program to offer a place where you can find the insights, tools, compassion, understanding and resources that can help you save more, spend wisely and reach your goals.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, Regions, AKA to launch financial empowerment initiative for college students and underserved communities

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is partnering with Regions Bank and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated to help college students and underserved communities build financial wealth.

The groups will officially announce the agreement during a financial education workshop on Wednesday, Oct. 10, at Tennessee State. The workshop is sponsored by the Alpha Psi Undergraduate Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha and will begin at 3 p.m. in the TSU Faculty Dining Lounge in the Floyd-Payne Campus Center.

TSU President Glenda Glover, who is also AKA’s international president, and TSU students will join leaders from Regions and AKA for the announcement, followed by the Financial Education and Empowerment workshop.

“TSU is extremely proud to have Regions Bank as a partner to provide the tools and resources to promote financial stability for our students, and our communities,” said President Glover.

“Alpha Psi, along with all AKA chapters, will serve as a network to host financial education workshops with Regions to promote and engage students and underserved communities on best practices when it comes to spending, saving and investing.”

The workshops will begin locally on college campuses and increase to encompass underserved neighborhoods in cities across the country. As part of the program, financial professionals from Regions will work with Alpha Kappa Alpha to deliver high-quality, cost-free financial training through interactive workshops for students and the community. The goal is to help more people achieve financial security and build savings.

Wednesday’s workshop will include Regions’ financial professionals illustrating how financial education leads to financial empowerment.  Interviews will be available immediately following the announcement.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Former NBA Star Antoine Walker Talks Money Matters at TSU

Antoine Walker, former University of Kentucky and NBA All-Star visited Tennessee State University Thursday to share his story of financial mistakes over the years in hopes of helping students avoid the same pitfalls. (photo by Rick Delahaya, TSU Media Relations)
Antoine Walker, former University of Kentucky and NBA All-Star visited Tennessee State University Thursday to share his story of financial mistakes over the years in hopes of helping students avoid the same pitfalls. (photo by Rick Delahaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – It was truly a rags-to-riches story. As a 19-year-old rookie with the Boston Celtics, Antoine Walker was one of the highest paid athletes under the age of 20. He signed a three-year $5.5 million contract and eventually during his 12 year career, earned $110 million.

And one day, it was all gone and Walker was forced into bankruptcy losing millions of dollars in the process.

On Thursday, the former University of Kentucky and NBA All-Star visited Tennessee State University to share his story of financial mistakes over the years in hopes of helping students.

“I’m telling students what I wish I had known several years ago,” said Walker. “I lived a lavish lifestyle, but before long, the money was gone. And those friends were gone. I want the students to learn from that and to know how to make the right choices moving forward.”

Even though the University was on spring break, students, many of them athletes, filled the Floyd Payne Campus Center to listen to Walker’s brutally honest tale of his success and how he lost it all.

Walker, 38, made national headlines when the All-Star was forced to claim bankruptcy after losing $110 million throughout his NBA career. Paid more than four times the average player in the league, Walker’s problems started during his rookie year in 1996 and spiraled out of control, hitting rock bottom in 2010 when he declared bankruptcy, citing $12.74 million in liabilities with $4.2 million in assets.

“I lived a very lavish lifestyle,” Walker told the more than 100 students gathered. “If I saw something I wanted, I bought it. And I took care of those around me. I figured I was the one traveling up and down the court working for the money so why not get what I wanted.”

The oldest of six children of a single mother, Walker told those gathered that it was exciting when he was drafted by the NBA in the sixth round after the University of Kentucky won the National Championship in 1996. Instead of finishing his education he started his professional career at age 19 and was awarded a $5.5 million contract.

“If I saw it, I got it,” he recalled. “I had very expensive tastes and never wore the same suit twice. I had 82 custom made suits, one for each game of the season. I had tons of watches, jewelry, three homes and six cars.”

But his lifestyle came at a price, one that forced him into bankruptcy. He estimates he lost $4 million from gambling and $20 million in a failed real estate venture when the recession hit. As a full guarantor of the investment, Walker was responsible for the debt.

“It was an eye-opening experience,” he said. “It was a process going through it and learning the value of a sound financial plan and education. I wish I knew then what I know today.”

It took Walker two years to get out of bankruptcy and was discharged from his debt in 2012. Today Walker has since downsized every aspect of his life and is working to rebuild his life and hopes to make a difference by helping others avoid the same financial pitfalls.

Now Walker is teaming with Regions Bank to share his story with college students around the country in hopes they will learn from his mistakes and show them that no matter how much they earn, they should have a sound financial plan.

“What we hope is students will understand is it is not how much money you make, it’s what you do with the money you make,” said Latrisha Jemison, senior vice president of Community Affairs for Regions Bank. “They need to learn you have to make wise decisions.”

Walker recommended students embrace moderation, plan for the future and take time to learn the basics of managing money.

He went on to say that he might not ever make $110 million again but whatever he does earn will be financially protected.

“It is the little things you do to protect yourself and your money,” he added. “I’ve experienced a life that many will never know. But now, life is about lessons. I make the money, the money doesn’t make me.”

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Regions Bank and Former NBA Star Antoine Walker To Discuss Financial Education with Student Athletes March 12

Nashville, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Former NBA star Antoine Walker, will visit Tennessee State University and speak to student-athletes from around the area on financial education and the importance of learning the basics of managing money.

The event takes place at the Floyd Payne Campus Center, March 12, beginning at 4 p.m.

TN SW150224 Antoine Walker Event.inddSponsored by Regions Bank, the goal of the event is to encourage students to plan ahead, get an education, and learn how to manage their money today, whether they enter professional sports or not.

Walker, 38, made national headlines when the All-Star was forced to claim bankruptcy after losing $110 million throughout his NBA career. Paid more than four times the average player in the league, Walker’s problems started during his rookie year in 1996 and spiraled out of control, hitting rock bottom in 2010 when he declared bankruptcy, citing $12.74 million in liabilities with $4.2 million in assets.

Discharged from his debt in 2012, Walker has since downsized every aspect of his life. He is working to rebuild his life and hopes to make a difference by helping others avoid the same financial pitfalls.

“I’m telling students what I wish I had known several years ago,” said Walker. “I lived a lavish lifestyle, cars…friends…clothes…jewelry…but before long, the money was gone. And those friends were gone. I want the students to learn from that and to know how to make the right choices moving forward.”

Walker added that he wants to reach as many students as possible, that he has a story to tell, and appreciates Regions for giving him a platform to tell it.

“Regions was already supporting financial education in colleges and high schools,” said Walker. “As I began sharing my story publicly, Regions heard it and said, ‘Let’s find a way to share this with student athletes.’”

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.