Category Archives: Uncategorized

TSU among select HBCUs going to space with Boeing, items representing schools part of cargo

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s excellence is recognized globally, now its name is about to be out of this world – literally.

The legacy of TSU and 13 other historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) will be onboard Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner on Friday, July 30, as it embarks on its second mission to orbit for NASA’s Commercial Crew Program.

The launch is scheduled for 2:53 p.m. Eastern/1:53 p.m. Central. To view the launch, visit https://bit.ly/3kXM2zT.

Flags, small pennants and other items representing select HBCUs from throughout the U.S. will be part of the hundreds of pounds of cargo inside the unmanned spacecraft for Orbital Flight Test-2 (OFT-2).

“Tennessee State University is proud to be among the 14 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) that Boeing is recognizing on the second space flight of its CST-100 Starliner with flags, pennants, and other items,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “We are proud of our partnership with Boeing, which has led to internships and other opportunities that have propelled many of our students to successful careers. This recognition shows Boeing’s commitment to equity and inclusion, and highlights, once again, the importance of HBCUs.” 

Said Boeing President and CEO David Calhoun, “closing representation gaps in our company and our industry is a priority for Boeing, and inspiring diverse students to pursue careers in aerospace is an important part of that effort. By representing HBCUs on our Starliner mission, we are demonstrating our commitment to working with these institutions to advance equity and inclusion and help ensure a bright future for their students.”

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering at TSU, said the university is fortunate to have Boeing’s continued investment.

“Boeing continues to invest in the students and the academic programs in the College of Engineering,” he said. “Their recent contribution will identify high achieving students to receive scholarships as recognized Boeing Scholars.  In addition, funding will help support the student’s professional development in preparing for the workforce.  This includes attending the national NSBE Conference, BEYA Conference, and ongoing campus activities.  Faculty will also use funds to help with course and curriculum development in topics relevant to the aircraft industry.”

Mister TSU Mark Davis said he’s glad to see HBCUs, in general, continue to be in the spotlight.

“It’s awesome,” said Davis, a senior mass communications major from Cincinnati, Ohio. “Including TSU in this speaks a lot about not only our institution, but highlights the national recognition HBCUs are continuing to receive.”

The higher education mementos will be part of the approximately 760 pounds of cargo flying inside the Starliner’s crew module when it launches to the International Space Station for OFT-2. The end-to-end test is a critical developmental milestone on the company’s path toward flying crew missions for NASA.

Besides Tennessee State University, the represented universities with which Boeing also has a recruiting relationship, are Clark Atlanta University, Morehouse College and Spelman College, part of the Atlanta University Center Consortium; Alabama A&M University; Florida A&M University; Howard University in Washington, D.C.; Morgan State University in Maryland; North Carolina A&T; Prairie View A&M University in Texas; Southern University and A&M College in Louisiana; South Carolina State University; and Tuskegee University in Alabama.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU President Emeritus Dr. Frederick S. Humphries remembered as a man who inspired others to be ‘extraordinary’

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Many turned out for a memorial service in honor of Dr. Frederick Stephen Humphries, a stalwart of higher education and President Emeritus of Tennessee State University and Florida A&M University, who inspired the “ordinary to become extraordinary.”

Dr. Frederick S. Humphries

Dr. Humphries, who was TSU’s fourth president, passed away on June 24 at the age of 85. The memorial service on July 18 was held at TSU’s Avon Williams Campus near downtown.

A number of those who attended recalled his leadership and staunch support of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). But they also talked about his role in helping to win the landmark court case that merged Tennessee State University and the University of Tennessee at Nashville, with TSU becoming the surviving institution. The campus where the memorial was held was once a part of UTN.

Historians have said the posture and eloquence of Humphries in court is largely held as being responsible for the court decision, along with the presentation of attorney Avon Williams, and the efforts of Tennesseans for Justice in Higher Education. Between 1980 and 1985, Humphries and his staff gave leadership to the merged TSU, and began serving an increasingly larger portion of the Nashville community.

TSU President Dr. Glenda Glover and FAMU President Dr. Larry Robinson (Photo by Andre Bean)

Georgette Dixon attended Sunday’s memorial. Dixon, who became TSU’s first female student government association president (’82-’83) during Humphries’ 11 years (1974-1975) at TSU, was among the grand marshals when Humphries received a Special Presidential Award at TSU’s 2017 Homecoming.

“Dr. Humphries reached the goal of preserving the legacy of Tennessee state university and other HBCUs across the nation that have faced similar challenges of potential merger and hostile takeover when he led the fight and won the landmark court decision resulting in the merger of the University of Tennessee Nashville with Tennessee State University, and we maintained our TSU legacy,” said Dixon, who is currently an executive vice president and head of external engagement for diverse segments representation and inclusion at Wells Fargo.

Dr. Frederick Humphries and TSU alum Georgette Dixon at the 2017 Homecoming celebration at TSU. (TSU Media Relations)

While at TSU, Humphries’ excellent administration skills resulted in recruitment of top faculty, better academic programs, increased enrollment and quality of students, and expanded scholarships and support activities.  

In 1985, Humphries became president of Florida A&M University, where he excelled for six years, gaining increased recognition on the state, national, and international levels. Florida A&M later conferred upon him the President Emeritus title.  

Regardless of where he was, Dixon said Humphries made a difference.

“Every living soul that Dr. Humphries has touched over his lifetime is better today for having been in his midst and benefitted from his legacy,” she said. “Dr. Humphries paved the way for all of us, his family, his friends, and all whom he influenced and inspired, to rise above the ordinary, to become extraordinary, in life and in the pursuit of excellence.”

Bryan Williams, who was also an SGA president (’77-’78) during Humphries’ tenure, agreed. The New York attorney could not attend the memorial service, but he sent a letter to be read, as did others.

“He was absolutely inspirational,” said Williams. “I think he inspired a lot of folks to know just how much they could stand up, and be aggressive, in a way that got things done. I know he inspired me, as a young man looking to the kinds of people that you can be later on in life. He was one of my heroes.”

Humphries was a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., the American Association of Higher Education, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemical Society, and the American Association of Minority Research Universities, just to name a few.  

His honors and awards include the Drum Major for Justice Award in Education by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; President’s Award for Excellence in Higher Education by 100 Black Men of America, Inc.; Leadership Grant by the Prudential Life Insurance Company of America Foundation; and many others. Among Humphries’ most memorable awards are the Distinguished Alumnus Award presented by the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh; the United Bicentennial Medal of Distinction by the University of Pittsburgh on its 200th anniversary; the Thurgood Marshall Educational Achievement Award by Johnson Publishing Company for the most outstanding contributions to education; and “Floridian of the Year” by the Orlando Sentinel, the first African American to be honored with the award. 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU to share $1.2M from Baxter to support students pursuing health and sciences at HBCUs

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will receive part of $1.2 million from Baxter International Inc., a leading global medical products company, to support Black students pursuing health and science degrees and ultimately help expand the pipeline of Black healthcare professionals.

Baxter recently announced the introduction of three scholarship and grant programs. Over a three-year period, the funds will be distributed to TSU and two other historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs): Meharry Medical College and Morehouse School of Medicine.

Last year, TSU and Meharry Medical College announced a new partnership focused on establishing a pipeline of African-American doctors and dentists who will provide essential care to underserved communities. The initiative is named after one of TSU’s most distinguished graduates, Dr. Levi Watkins Jr., an internationally renowned cardiac surgeon who holds an honorary degree from Meharry. 

The accelerated pipeline program prepares qualified TSU students for early acceptance to Meharry, where students will spend three years in pre-medical courses of study at TSU before being admitted to and enrolling at Meharry to study medicine or dentistry. The Pathway Program participants will complete their undergraduate and medical school studies in seven years, instead of the customary eight years.

“The Dr. Levi Watkins, Jr. Institute is grateful to Baxter for its support and participation in this journey to increase the number of African American physicians and dentists, to assist young outstanding students in pursuing their dreams, and to invest in the communities we serve,” said Ms. Barbara Murrell, chair of the Institute. “This is an exciting time!”

The new scholarships are part of Baxter’s Activating Change Today initiative to advance inclusion and racial justice.

“The lack of diversity in healthcare is a longstanding and multifaceted problem, one that we are focused on helping to address,” said Verónica Arroyave, senior director of Global Community Relations at Baxter. “Creating opportunities that support and empower Black students to pursue medical and scientific careers is one way we can help drive positive change, and we are proud to partner with respected organizations like Meharry, Morehouse, and Tennessee State to expand this effort.”

To learn more about the Dr. Levi Watkins, Jr. Institute at TSU, visit https://www.tnstate.edu/watkins/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, US Space Force discuss partnership that would benefit students in STEM

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University officials recently met with United States Space Force officers to discuss a possible partnership that would benefit TSU students.

The meeting with Gen. John Raymond, chief of space operations, and Brig. Gen. Shawn Campbell, assistant deputy chief of space operations, took place late last month at TSU. Dr. Michael Harris, interim provost and vice president for Academic Affairs at TSU, welcomed the men on behalf of TSU President Glenda Glover.

The US Space Force is in the exploratory stages of starting an office of university partnerships. This includes designing a program that has military and civilian placements, as well as potential placements with NASA and commercial space corporations. They are specifically looking in the areas of ROTC interest in space, cyber security, STEM, intelligence capacity, analytical abilities, and overall minority talent.

Harris expressed TSU’s interest to be among the founding universities in the partnership and its value to both sides.

“TSU is a natural potential partner in the areas of workforce development, student pathways, internships, and research/grants,” said Harris.

Lt. Col. Nick Callaway, commander of the university’s AFROTC Detachment 790, said students would benefit the most from such a partnership.

“A partnership between TSU and the U.S. Space Force has great potential to bring opportunities to TSU students,” said Callaway. “Opportunities such as internships and various research projects are possible outcomes. With the Space Force’s emphasis on diversity and STEM education, a partnership could result in unique and very rewarding experiences for TSU students.”

TSU AFROTC Cadet Christopher Renaud was recently awarded a scholarship from Space Force. The junior aerospace major agreed a partnership with Space Force would be beneficial.

“Having a Space Force presence will allow more extracurricular opportunities in unique fields we don’t always experience,” said Renaud.

To learn more about US Space Force, visit https://www.spaceforce.mil/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU staying competitive in booming gaming industry with establishment of Academic eSports Center

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is continuing to make its presence known in the billion-dollar industry of competitive video game playing, or eSports, with the establishment of an Academic eSports Center set to open on the main campus this fall.

Dr. Robbie Melton

TSU’s SMART Innovation Technology Center will oversee the new center, which seeks to promote pathways and increase diversity in STEM and STEAM programs for underserved students.

“eSports is a chance to attract underserved students into our STEAM programs for opportunities to design, code, compose, coach, manage, market, produce, and become innovators and game entrepreneurs,” says Dr. Robbie Melton, associate vice president of the SMART Innovation Technology Center and dean of Graduate and Professional Studies at TSU.

“eSports also complements our TSU-HBCU-C2 National Center’s mission in promoting ‘Everyone Can Code and Create’ partnership with Apple, Inc. for empowering underserved students and communities with technological knowledge, skills, and opportunities for the global digital workplace.“

Mena Azzoz

Leaders at historically black colleges and universities say it’s not all about fun and games, and believe eSports is a steppingstone to jobs and internships for students. TSU has launched eSports classes, and joined eSports organizations and leagues that allow students to improve their gaming skills, as well as network with tech companies. A starting salary in eSports management is around $67,000.

However, there are some students who want to become professional gamers, like TSU’s Mena Azzoz, winner of the FIFA national championship in April.

“There are a lot of opportunities out there,” says Azzoz, a senior computer science major who lives in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. “For me personally, I’m hoping that I can land a job in eSports as a FIFA player and play for a team that pays their players like a lot of FIFA pros. Winning the FIFA tournament was a step closer for me to do so.”

Henry Logan, Jr. is a sophomore English major at TSU and co-captain of the university’s eSports team. He says the new center will be game-changing.

Henry Logan Jr.

‘It’s a great expansion and investment for TSU,” says Logan. “It puts us one step closer to the goal of being successful in something we can make a long-term career in. This can draw attention to those who are interested in competitive gaming and who want to make a career in doing what they love.”

Classes that will be offered this fall through TSU’s new Academic eSports Center include “Academic eSports Pathways to STEAM” and “The Rise of eSports and Gamification in PreK-Higher Education”. Also offered will be current eSports Team programs such as FIFA, Call of Duty, Fortnite, NBA 2K, and Madden. Launching new this fall will be NHL, Rocket League, Track and Field, Valorant, Golf, Hockey, and iRacing.

For more information about eSports and TSU’s Technology Centers, contact Dr. Robbie Melton at rmelton@tnstate.edu.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU offering residents 12 years and up a chance to receive COVID-19 vaccination

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University, in collaboration with the Metro Public Health Department, is offering residents 12 years old and up an opportunity to receive a COVID-19 vaccination.

The shots will be offered at TSU’s Avon Williams Campus near downtown from 9 a.m. to 12 noon CDT on June 15, with a second dose to be given on July 6. To register, visit www.signupgenious.com/go/TSU.

Dr. Wendolyn Inman is an infectious disease expert and professor and director of public health programs in the College of Health Sciences at TSU. She encourages people to take advantage of the opportunity to get a vaccination, particularly African Americans.

“African Americans have the lowest vaccination rate, therefore they have the greatest chance of getting COVID-19,” says Inman.

She adds that COVID-19 infections are highest in the age group 18 to 34, and that those individuals risk infecting others over age 65.

“So, if you are African American, not immunized, and between the ages of 18-34 years, you are more likely to transmit the disease to an African American over the age of 65 years,” says Inman.  “Would you want to be the transmission for a loved one who dies? Get immunized!”

Junior Mark Davis, a mass communications major and Mister TSU, says he doesn’t want to put anyone’s life at risk which is why he has gotten vaccinated. He is urging his peers who haven’t gotten the COVID-19 vaccine to do so.

“I have a two-year-old nephew and a grandmother,” says Davis, who is from Cincinnati, Ohio. “If I go around my grandmother, who is a breast cancer survivor, she may not survive COVID. You never know what other peoples’ health issues are.”

TSU will be fully operational in the fall, with continued safety measures.  Officials say the decision to resume in-person classes is in line with the reduction in COVID-19 restrictions by the City of Nashville, recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and state health experts.    

“We are excited about returning to a robust in-person collegiate experience,” said Frank Stevenson, associate vice president of student affairs and dean of students. “But we know that students should be vaccinated for that to be fully appreciated. That’s why we’re creating easy access for all of our students to get vaccinated.”   

To learn more about the university’s fall return plan, visit https://www.tnstate.edu/return/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Former TSU trustee Bill Freeman donates $300,000 to support the university’s football program

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Former Tennessee State University Trustee Bill Freeman has donated $300,000 toward the university’s football program. The donation comes on the heels of former all pro Tennessee Titan Eddie George recently being named TSU’s new head football coach. 

Bill Freeman

Freeman, chairman of Freeman Webb Company, said he is excited about everything TSU is doing under President Glenda Glover to elevate the football program at the university. A member of the initial reconstituted TSU Board of Trustees, Freeman served two terms before stepping down about a year ago. In 2015 and 2016, Freeman and his family donated a total of $275,000 to various programs at TSU.  

“I am excited about everything Dr. Glover is doing at Tennessee State University,” Freeman said. “I am equally excited about Eddie George. This is a great time for the university going forward. I am happy to assist with the continued growth and development of the university. Babs and my decades long commitment to TSU is evident. ” 

Dr. Mikki Allen, TSU’s director of athletics, said the university is “extremely grateful to Mr. Freeman for his generosity” to the school, especially the football program.  

“This type of leadership gift shows Mr. Freeman’s commitment for making an impact in the lives of our student-athletes,” Allen said. “This transformational gift will continue the momentum that we have in our football program and move us forward in our pursuit of winning the Ohio Valley Conference and FCS national championships.”  

George, who was appointed head football coach on April 13, said Freeman’s gift will “help transform our football student-athlete spaces and enhance the value of the players’ experience in the football program.”  

“Our players and staff are thankful for Mr. Freeman’s financial commitment to Tiger Football, and we are looking forward to finishing these spaces for our student-athletes,” George added.  

Jamie Isabel, TSU’s associate vice president of Institutional Advancement, Corporate Relations and Foundation, and a friend of Freeman, received the gift from the Nashville businessman.   

“I am excited to have received this large donation from Freeman Webb and its chairman, my friend, Bill Freeman,” Isabel said. “Bill, his company, and his family are the first to make such a large donation to the new era of TSU football. As a former TSU board member, Bill’s interest is very much noted in his gift.”  

To donate to the TSU Foundation, visit https://www.tnstate.edu/foundation/  

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU crossing international waters to bridge digital divide, offers STEM course to underserved high school students in Africa

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University announced Wednesday a dual enrollment partnership that gives students in west and southern Africa access to digital resources to develop their technology skills. The partnership with the African Methodist Episcopal Church will allow high school students to take a coding course at TSU to introduce or expand digital literacy on the continent. Eligible high school sophomores, juniors and seniors will have the opportunity to earn both university and high school graduation credits that will start them on the pathway to degrees in STEM.

Students participate in program at TSU’s national coding center. (TSU Media Relations)

“Tennessee State University is proud to be a part of this initiative that seeks to reach across international borders and give students an opportunity to expand their knowledge, and gain important career development skills,” said President Glenda Glover. “Coding and app design are a large part of the global workforce, and we want to help make sure people of color, everywhere, are equipped with the knowledge and skills to be competitive, and successful. These are largely high school students that have the potential to become a part of the TSU student body.”

Bishop E. Earl McCloud, Jr., of the 14th and 19th Episcopal Districts of the AME Church, presides over the partnering institutions in Africa: African Methodist Episcopal University and Monrovia College, both in Monrovia, Liberia, and Wilberforce Community College in Evaton, South Africa.

Bishop McCloud said the partnership brings hope to students and their families that see education as a better way of life, and most importantly for those with the greatest need.

“Years ago, the late President of the Republic of South Africa (The Honorable Nelson Mandela) said in his autobiography, ‘for Africans it is not a lack of ability, rather a lack of opportunity,’ when addressing the needs of African students,” said McCloud. “Tennessee State University has answered our clarion call to help provide more opportunities globally. This learning extension provides hope. It awakens the eyes of those often left out and left behind.”

President Glover and Bishop McCloud’s message of hope and the importance of access to digital literacy immediately resonated with families. In a collective statement, the partners described the reaction of one of the parents during the recruiting process.

“She walked in our office, with tear-filled eyes, telling us of how her son has always wanted to learn the computer and that his dream is to become a computer specialist, but she had never thought it would be possible because she is just a petite trader selling in one of our local markets. But she now sees it will be a dream come true. This is just one of the many dreams this program will make a reality. This is just one of the many lives this partnership has impacted.”

Participating students must be at least a sophomore in high school or in college. The online coding course is scheduled to start in the fall. Other related courses will be available provided students’ desire to continue with their educational studies through TSU.

“This partnership acknowledges TSU as a global education leader in empowering underserved populations around the world with education opportunities, the knowledge of digital literacies, the basic technical concepts and skills of coding, and the inspiration to innovate in order to be international competitors in the digital workplace,” said Dr. Robbie Melton, Vice President of the Smart Technology Innovation Center at TSU.

Dr. Johnnie C. Smith is executive director of Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment Partnerships at TSU and head of the Africa project. She said students will be provided with learning equipment and resources to ensure success.

“This is a great opportunity for international students to study at Tennessee State University,” said Smith. “I am pleased that President Glover and Bishop McCloud agreed to make this happen, and I am looking forward to expanding the TSU Dual Enrollment experience in other countries as well.”

The TSU-Africa partnership is part of the Smart Technology Innovation Center’s growing dual enrollment coding program that offers high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors the opportunity to earn college credits while enrolled in high school.

Tennessee school districts currently participating in the program include: Clarksville-Montgomery County, Cheatham County, Hamilton County, Haywood County, Jackson-Madison County, Lauderdale County, Metro Nashville Public Schools (MNPS), and Shelby County. Students also come from the states of Georgia, Maryland, Texas, Virginia and Washington.

The coding class is available to anyone interested in this field of study or as a one-time course. All high school students are welcome to be a part of the TSU Dual Enrollment program with course offerings from the Language Arts, STEM, and Liberal Arts. Please visit (https://bit.ly/3vnMFoO) for more information and to sign up for a class during the 2021 fall semester.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU named ‘HBCU Institutional Leader’ by prestigious Fulbright Program

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has been named a Fulbright Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Institutional Leader for the 2019-2020 academic year. For the second consecutive year, the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) is recognizing the noteworthy engagement that selected HBCUs have achieved with the Fulbright Program, the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program. TSU has been named one of 20 HBCUs to receive this distinction.

Fulbright HBCU Institutional Leader status has been conferred on this group of 20 HBCUs, including TSU, because they have demonstrated noteworthy support for Fulbright exchange participants during the 2019-2020 academic year and have promoted Fulbright program opportunities on campus.

ECA established the HBCU Institutional Leader designation in 2019 to recognize the strong partnerships between the Fulbright Program and HBCUs, and to encourage the entire network of HBCUs to increase its engagement with Fulbright. This initiative is part of the U.S. Department of State’s long-standing commitment to build diversity and inclusion within the Fulbright Program and within all of the Bureau’s international exchange programs.

“TSU is honored to be recognized as a Fulbright HBCU Institutional Leader. Our exceptional students, staff, and faculty are key contributors to the program,” said Dr. Michael Harris, Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at TSU.  

“The University values the exchange of cultural, educational, and practical experiences gained from engaging in the Fulbright programs. In our increasingly global society, our students and faculty are enriched with opportunities to increase and enhance the curricular and co-curricular benefits of the program and the core values it builds upon at TSU. The historic legacy of TSU and its international partners continues to guide our academic excellence across campus.” 

Acting Assistant Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs Matthew Lussenhop praised the designated institutions, stating, “Congratulations to this year’s 20 Fulbright Historically Black College and University Institutional Leaders. We salute you and your institutions for your engagement with the Fulbright Program, and for your commitment to providing life-changing opportunities to students, faculty, and administrators. HBCU participation is critical to fully representing the diversity of the United States through the Fulbright Program. Fulbrighters from HBCUs carry their identities and school pride with them abroad, allowing people from other countries to learn about these accomplished individuals and about this dynamic group of American institutions and their distinguished legacy. Foreign Fulbrighters hosted by an HBCU return home with new knowledge, an appreciation of the United States, and a broadened perspective on America.”

TSU Professors Janice Williams and John Miglietta are recent Fulbright Scholar Award recipients and will be representing the University abroad. Williams will use the award to continue lecturing in the dental therapy program at the University of KwaZulu-Natal and University of the Western Cape in South Africa as part of a project to teach students and train faculty on the integration of hybrid and online learning curriculum. Miglietta will be teaching political science at the University of Central Asia, Khorog campus in Khorog, Tajikistan.

The Fulbright Exchange Program is the U.S. Government’s premier international academic exchange program. A hallmark of the Fulbright Program has been its longstanding commitment to diversity, striving to ensure that its participants reflect U.S. society and societies abroad. The Program’s robust diversity strategies and initiatives have included collaboration with a host of diversity-related associations and organizations such as the White House Initiative on HBCUs, the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, the National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange, the American Association of Community Colleges, Diversity Abroad, as well as a host of others. The Fulbright Program also works with diversity-focused media and is engaged with hundreds of minority serving institutions and other diverse colleges and universities. The Program is keenly aware that its efforts to increase and enhance diversity must be coupled with inclusion and has taken various measures to help ensure that its diverse grantees have successful and rewarding exchange experiences abroad.

Fulbright is active in more than 160 countries worldwide and partners with participating governments, host institutions, corporations, and foundations in foreign countries and in the United States. Many of these organizations also provide direct and indirect support. ECA sponsors the Fulbright program, and several non-profit, cooperative partners implement and support the program on the Bureau’s behalf.

For further information about the Fulbright Program or the U.S. Department of State, please visit http://eca.state.gov/fulbright or contact the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs Press Office by e-mail ECA-Press@state.gov.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Feasibility study explores possibility of TSU becoming first HBCU to have men’s, women’s hockey teams

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University could become the first historically-black institution to have varsity men’s and women’s ice hockey teams. A feasibility study is exploring the possibility that would also make the university the first in the state to establish a program in Tennessee. TSU, in partnership with the National Hockey League, Nashville Predators and College Hockey Inc., is hoping the study will be a favorable one, leading to the historic expansion of intercollegiate athletics.

“The idea of establishing a collegiate hockey program at TSU is a tremendous opportunity as the nation’s first HBCU to take on this endeavor,” said President Glenda Glover. “This allows us to expand the sport, increase diversity, and introduce a new fan base.”

“Our partnership with the Nashville Predators and Sean Henry continues to cultivate groundbreaking programs that will have a lasting impact on the University and our students. We are appreciative for the leadership from the National Hockey League and NCAA College Hockey Inc. in helping to lay the foundation for this process with hopes of bringing college hockey to TSU.”

Since 2017, the National Hockey League and National Hockey League Players’ Association have sponsored feasibility studies to U.S. colleges and universities that are interested in exploring the addition of NCAA D-I Men’s and Women’s Ice Hockey to their athletic offerings. The study helps guide the schools through the planning, processes, and requisites for establishing a varsity hockey program. This project was launched to aid the development of high-level hockey across the United States, which will provide more opportunities for elite players, access and exposure to new families, and new facilities.

The feasibility study will answer questions about how viable is hockey at TSU, and what needs to happen to put teams on the ice.

“Despite the absence of a Division-I Hockey program, the state is filled with talented prospective student-athletes that could build a winning program at Tennessee State University,” said Director of Athletics Dr. Mikki Allen.

“We are extremely excited about the prospect of adding men’s and women’s ice hockey to our athletics programs. Having the support of the Nashville Predators and the NHL is truly phenomenal and it speaks to the commitment that these two organizations have to growing the game of hockey.”

Over the last decade, Middle Tennessee has seen the second-highest percentage increase in youth hockey in the United States. In the past six years alone, there have been four new facilities – and seven sheets of ice – that have been built or are in the process of being built in Middle Tennessee.

“Taking this initial step with Tennessee State University, led by their ambitious and visionary leadership, awakens thought on potential playing opportunities, new facilities, and new avenues to watch live hockey, all driven by an HBCU and NHL club in the heart of Nashville. This could be a game-changer.” said Kevin Westgarth, Vice President Hockey Development and Strategic Collaboration at NHL.

“The passion and vision of President Glover, Dr. Allen and all of Tennessee State University’s leadership in pushing to make hockey a more diverse and inclusive sport through this feasibility study is both inspiring and humbling,” said Nashville Predators President and CEO Sean Henry.

“Through their passion and track record they will be able to create another success story for other schools and communities to chase and ideally emulate. Pair that with our incredible community, our fan base and wealth of community corporate partners and we will collectively take SMASHVILLE and our sport to new heights because of their pursuit of excellence on all fronts.”

Last year, TSU and the Predators partnered to promote student success through scholarships for retention, along with educational and employment opportunities. Jamie Isabel, TSU’s associate vice president of Institutional Advancement, Corporate Relations and Foundations, facilitated the partnership. Isabel said the college hockey teams would benefit the city of Nashville.

“This relationship is certainly indicative of the commitment to the city of Nashville and support of the community by Mr. Herb Fritch, board chair and its members, and Sean Henry, President and CEO and staff,” said Isabel. The former metro councilman added, “Each and every time we called the Predators they showed up.”

The Predators’ partnership with TSU falls in line with the National Hockey League’s “Hockey Is For Everyone” initiative, and the Predators’ effort to create positive change with their GUIDER (Growth, Understanding, Inclusion, Diversity, Equality and Representation) initiative, founded with the objective of diminishing the prevalence of social injustice.

Results from the feasibility study are expected late fall.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.