Category Archives: EVENTS

University’s Honors Program Celebrates 50 Years of Excellence

Former CNN news anchor and award-winning journalist Soledad O’Brien featured speaker March 26 during Honors Program Convocation

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – This academic year the Honors Program at Tennessee State University will celebrate 50 years of positive and life-long learning, scholarly inquiry, and a commitment to service.

Award-winning journalist Soledad O'Brien will be the featured speaker March 26 during the Honors program Convocation.
Award-winning journalist Soledad O’Brien will be the featured speaker March 26 during the Honors program Convocation.

The yearlong celebration will commemorate the program’s journey throughout the years, and will be capped by a visit to campus on March 26 by award-winning broadcast journalist Soledad O’Brien. The former CNN anchor will be the featured speaker at the Honors Anniversary Luncheon at 11 a.m. that will honor Dr. McDonald Williams, the first Director of the Honors Program. O’Brien will also be the featured keynote speaker during the Honors Day Convocation beginning at 1 p.m.

The Honors Convocation in Kean Hall is free and open to the public. The Honors Anniversary Luncheon is $50 per person and takes place in the Gentry Center.

O’Brien’s appearance is sponsored by the Office of Student Affairs as part of the Distinguished Lecture Speaker series.

At the convocation, notable Honors alumni will address the student body, Honors societies, Honors alumni and community members.

According to Dr. Coreen Jackson, director of the Honors Program, the primary goal of the program is to create and maintain a community of academically bright and talented students who serve as campus leaders and role models.

“The key objective is the academic enrichment of our students and working with them to achieve their goals,” she added. “We have the opportunity to teach students who are excited about learning and have the freedom to explore issues from multiple points of view. The program not only impacts the students but also the entire University.”

Other events planned for the celebration include an Honors Research Symposium to coincide with the University-wide Research Symposium March 31 through April 5. During the fall, the celebration will culminate with a special 50th Anniversary cake-cutting ceremony and an Honors Week observance.

Jackson added that the jubilee celebration kicks off with an “Honors 50 for 50” campaign to raise funds to help the program transition to an Honors College. The new college, she said, will encourage interdisciplinary programs, enhance undergraduate research in all disciplines, advising for prestigious fellowships and scholarships, develop a mentoring program to make our students more competitive, encourage lifelong learning, including a global perspective through study abroad.

“We are attempting to raise $500,000 to offset the cost of transitioning the program to a full-fledge Honors College,” added Jackson. “As a College, we will be able to highlight the importance of offering an enriched honors curriculum and to increase the University’s ability to recruit and retain high-ability students. We have a program that has a national reputation that has exceeded the basic characteristics of honors program and already meets the characteristics of an Honors College, as recommended by the National Collegiate Honors Council, the recognized leader in undergraduate honor education.”

In 1963, Dr. Walter S. Davis, then President of Tennessee State University, appointed a committee that was charged with studying honors programs and determining the feasibility of establishing one at the University. The committee recommended that TSU keep pace with other institutions throughout the country. As a result, an honors program for freshman students started in the fall of 1964. Sophomore through senior level course work was added yearly throughout 1968.

During the years since 1964, the Honors Program has continued to develop and grow, moving from a converted classroom in the Agricultural Building to the present Honors Center, located on the first floor of the Student Success Center. The center includes study areas, a computer room, conference room, classroom, multipurpose /lounge, and offices of director, associate director and the administrative assistant. Phi Kappa Phi, Golden Key and Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Societies are also housed in the Honors Center.

More important than the physical changes that have taken place, according to Jackson, are the increasingly large number of students entering the program and the achievements they are making.

“They come from many different states and countries and have a variety of majors,” she said. “Consistent with honors objectives, honors students continue to be admitted to prestigious graduate and professional schools.”

For more information on the anniversary activities or Honors Convocation featuring Soledad O’Brien, contact the Honors Program at 615.963.5731.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Same Goals, Different Roles……More than 40 Corporations, Business Partners to Attend TSU Reverse Career Fair Feb. 20

Reverse Career Fair_FlyerNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Representatives from more than 40 corporations and business partners will be on campus Thursday, Feb. 20 when the Tennessee State University Career Development Center hosts its third Reverse Career Fair in Kean Hall.

According to the Center, the potential employers and recruiters will visit booths and displays by student organizations and colleges, to review student presentations and discuss possible employment or career opportunities.

Built on the success of the past two years, the reverse career fair is intended to give students the opportunity to showcase their work and talents for potential employers and business partners.

Under the theme, “Directed to Excellence,” the career fair is open to current students and alumni who are in the process of looking for an internship, co-op and other career opportunities. Tables will be set up for students to represent themselves through one of the seven colleges or student organizations.

For opportunities to win cash prizes, student organizations and colleges are encouraged to ensure professional excellence in their displays, and decorate their tables or booths to reflect the theme of the fair.

Among some of the major corporations and business partners expected at the fair this year are Honda Manufacturing of Alabama, General Electric, Regions Bank, the Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Dot Foods, BJC Healthcare, LG&E KU-Kentucky Utilities, and Laclede Gas Co., and Teach for America.

The fair is free and open to the public. It starts at 1 p.m. For more information, contact Tina Reed at 615.963.7527 or visit http://www.tnstate.edu/careers.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University to Host National African American Read-In Feb. 2

aari_430x207NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – The 25th annual celebration of National African American Read-In is on Sunday, Feb. 2. Tennessee State University will join schools, churches, libraries, book clubs and professional organizations across the country and the world to participate in programs marking the event.

The event at TSU will be held in the Humanities Building Room 113, from 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Endorsed by the International Reading Association and the National Council of Teachers of English, the goal of the event is to celebrate African and African-American literary art, and to make literacy a traditional part of Black History Month activities.

Organizers are inviting  the public and asking teachers and professors to find “creative ways” to inspire their students to attend the one-hour read-in.

The 2014 African American Read-In events at TSU are sponsored by the Department of Languages, Literature and Philosophy in the College of Liberal Arts.

To ensure participants do not miss out on the Super Bowl game on Sunday, organizers guarantee that the event will end “long before” kick-off time.

According to organizers, the University has participated in the read-in every year. Last year more than 40 students took part in the event, which is held every February during Black History Month to urge organizations and citizens to make literacy a significant part of the month, by hosting and coordinating read-ins in their communities.

During the past 24 years, more than a million readers of all ethnic groups from the United States, the West Indies, African countries and more have participated in the event. The goal is to make the celebration of African American literacy a traditional part of Black History Month activities.

The Read-In is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Dr. Luke Powers at 615.963.5716 or lpowers@tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

U.S. Deputy Secretary of Agriculture to Visit Tennessee State University Jan. 21

Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Krysta Harden
Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Krysta Harden

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The United States Deputy Secretary of Agriculture, Krysta Harden, will visit TSU on Tuesday, Jan. 21, during which she will meet with senior University officials, tour on-going USDA-funded projects, as well as hold talks with the dean, faculty and students in the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences.

According to a CAHNS release, representatives from several state and federal USDA agencies, including Tennessee Commissioner of Agriculture, Julius Johnson, and Tennessee Farm Bureau President, Lacy Upchurch are expected to accompany Harden.

As part of her visit, the Deputy Secretary will participate in a meet-and-greet with students, faculty, and stakeholders in the Ferrell-Westbrook Complex, and tour the new 25,000 square-foot state-of-the-art Agricultural Biotechnology Research Building in the College, the release said.

The visit will begin at 10:15 a.m., with a “Welcome and Introductions” reception in the Dean’s Conference Room in the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, followed by tour of the new research building, and the meet-and-greet and stakeholders’ meeting. See agenda below.

10:15 – 10:30 Welcome & Introductions (Dean’s Conference Room)

10:30 – 10:55 Tour of new Agricultural Biotechnology Research Building

11:00 – 11:30 Meet & Greet with students, stakeholders, and faculty (Ferrell-Westbrook Complex/Barn Auditorium)

11:45 – 12:15 Lunch & Conversation in President’s Dining Area

The Deputy Secretary’s visit Tuesday coincides with the kick-off of several activities in the college including the “Third Tuesday TSU Field Days and Educational Workshops,” featuring presentations, seminars, demonstrations, field visits, and hands-on activities from scientists, extension agents, and other helpful authorities on subjects related to food and agriculture.

The inaugural program on “Insect Control in the Field and the Home” will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Room 118 of the Farrell-Westbrook Complex.

An organic strawberry workshop, “Developing the Logistics for Producing Human Pathogens-Free Organic Strawberries in the State of Tennessee,” sponsored by Wal-Mart, Tennessee State University and the University of Arkansas, will take place simultaneously from 8:30 a.m. – noon in the Agricultural Industrial Technology Center Auditorium on the main campus.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Ag College to Begin “Third Tuesday” Workshop Series on Food, Agriculture

Pest ManagementNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences and the Cooperative Extension Program have announced a new series of informative workshops to be held on the third Tuesday of each month.

Called the “Third Tuesday TSU Field Days and Educational Workshops,” the series will feature presentations, seminars, demonstrations, field visits, and hands-on activities from scientists, extension agents, and other helpful authorities on subjects related to food and agriculture.

The inaugural program on “Insect Control in the Field and the Home” will be held on Tuesday, Jan. 21 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Room 118 of the Farrell-Westbrook Complex on the main campus.

Below are the schedule and titles for the remainder of 2014:

Feb. 18           “Pruning and Care for Fruit Trees and Small Fruits”

March 18       “Local Foods and Gardening Basics”

April 15          “Hive Splitting for Beekeepers”

May 20           “Goat Production and Local Meat Producers”

June 17          “On-farm or At-home Biodiesel Production”

Aug. 19           “Fall Vegetable Production Using High Tunnel Greenhouses”

Sept. 16          “Turf Establishment and Maintenance”

Oct. 21                “Eating for Wellness”

The times and locations for future workshops are to be announced prior to each session. However, all Third Tuesday TSU Field Days and Educational Workshops will be held at one of the following locations: Room 118 Farrell-Westbrook Complex (main campus), Nashville AREC (1521 Ed Temple Blvd., Nashville, TN), or the Ashland City AREC (3101 River Rd., Ashland City, TN).

Due to the Thanksgiving and winter holidays, no workshops will be held in November or December.

A $10 registration fee, including lunch, is required for each workshop. To register or request more information, please contact Dr. Jason de Koff at (615) 963-4929 or jdekoff@tnstate.edu, or go to www.tnstate.edu/agriculture.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

African-American History and Culture Conference to Open Feb. 14

LCAAHClogo2NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Room) – The 33rd annual Nashville Conference of African-American History and Culture will take place Friday, Feb. 14, 2014 at the Tennessee State University Avon Williams campus.

Co-sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts at Tennessee State University, and the Metropolitan Historical Commission, the conference will focus on the educational and musical legacies of Nashville’s African-American community. For more than 30 years, the award-winning conference has brought together historians, students, educators, community leaders and others interested in African-American history and culture.

During the conference, Dr. Sonya Ramsey, of the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, will speak on the legacy of African-American schoolteachers in Nashville, the subject of her recent book, Reading, Writing, and Segregation: A Century of Black Women Schoolteachers in Nashville.

Additionally, Dr. Don Cusic, professor of Music Business at Belmont University, will speak on educator, poet and activist James Weldon Johnson. Dr. Janet Walsh, coordinator at the TSU Avon Williams Campus library, Beverly Robertson with the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, will highlight the research and interpretation of the African-American experience at their institutions.

In commemoration of the Sesquicentennial year of the Battle of Nashville in the American Civil War, Norm Hill will join Dr. Tim Johnson to discuss the Civil War experiences of Nashville’s African Americans during the Battle of Nashville.

For more information, contact Tara Mielnik, Metropolitan Historical Commission, at 615.862.7970, or Linda Wynn at 615.532.1550.

For more than 30 years, the Metropolitan Historical Commission and Tennessee State University have celebrated the contributions of African-Americans to Nashville and Tennessee through the Nashville Conference on African-American History and Culture. Each February, Nashvillians come together to honor these individuals through historical and cultural presentations by historians, artists, students, dramatists, musicians, genealogists, and others interested in the history of our city and state. The long-running series, Profiles of African Americans in Tennessee, a collection of almost 200 short publications, makes the Conference research available to the public.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Do not Settle for Average, TSU Commencement Speaker Tells more than 700 Graduates

Kayla Arroyo (left), Academic Excellence Award recipient, shares a candid moment with TSU President, Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover during the commencement ceremony Dec. 14 in the Gentry Center.
Kayla Arroyo (left), Academic Excellence Award recipient, shares a candid moment with TSU President, Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover during the commencement ceremony Dec. 14 in the Gentry Center. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn., (TSU News Service) – Saying that average breeds mediocrity, Tennessee State University’s fall commencement speaker told nearly 700 graduates on Saturday to be part of a world that demands excellence.

“Don’t be a victim of a world that settles for average,” said Bishop Joseph W. Walker III, pastor of Nashville’s Mt. Zion Baptist Church. “Many settle for average because average is easy. As you enter the next chapter of life, you are about to enter a world that will challenge you at every turn and you must be ready to make the hard choices to be at the top of what you aspire to be.”

Walker, recognized by EBONY on the magazine’s “Power 100” list as one of the nation’s most influential African-American leaders, applauded the graduates for their determination to complete their university journey, urging them to “use that same determination” to be the best.

Bishop Joseph W. Walker III (left) , pastor of Nashville’s Mt. Zion Baptist Church, receives a plaque of appreciation from TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover. Walker provided the commencement address for the Fall 2013 graduation ceremony. (photo by John Cross, TSU Creative Services)
Bishop Joseph W. Walker III (left) , pastor of Nashville’s Mt. Zion Baptist Church, receives a plaque of appreciation from TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover. Walker provided the commencement address for the Fall 2013 graduation ceremony. (photo by John Cross, TSU Creative Services)

“Press your way until you can be at the top of the world. It didn’t matter how you got here or where you came from. It is your determination to defeat average that has you graduating today,” said Walker, leader of the 28,000-member Mount Zion Baptist Church, which he started pastoring in 1992 with 174 members.

Among those who graduated on Saturday were 440 who received undergraduate degrees, 219 received graduate degree, while 45 received doctoral degrees. Nine graduate students received education specialist degrees, and eight received graduate certificates.

Reflecting on his own climb through the education ladder and professional life, Walker, who holds a Doctorate of Ministry from Princeton University, told the graduates to watch out for skeptics along the way, pointing to many who doubted he would amount to anything.

“In high school because I was an overactive kid, they said I had attention deficit, but I went on and not only finished high school, but I completed my college work at Southern University in three years, earned my master’s degree at Vanderbilt, and went on to become the youngest in my class to get a doctorate at Princeton.

“Don’t allow anyone to hold you back. You can accomplish anything you set your mind to. If I can do it, you can do the same,” Walker, a Baton Rouge, La., native, who has authored and co-authored eight books, told the graduates, to repeated thunderous applauses. “Do not forget to say thank you to those who were there with you along the way,” he added.

TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover, presiding at only her second commencement since taking the helm about a year ago, congratulated the graduates on their accomplishment, and also applauded them for their determination.

“You have endured and prepared yourself to reach this goal which may have seemed unattainable, but you stuck with it,” Dr. Glover said. “You must always remember that you did not accomplish this goal all by yourself. There were parents, relatives, friends and mentors who helped you along the way. Remember to thank them.”

Later, Dr. Glover thanked Bishop Walker for a “wonderful and inspiring” speech.

“You have certainly inspired not only these graduates but all of us here today are encouraged and moved by your words. We thank you,” Dr. Glover added.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

A promise fulfilled: Mother Follows Daughter’s Footsteps to College Degree

Janet-Holly_Blakemore
Janet Blakemore (left) made a promise to daughter, Holly (right) that she would finish her degree once Holly obtained her graduate degree from Tennessee State University. It is a promise Janet will fulfill when she graduates from the University Saturday, Dec. 14. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) –Janet Blakemore always wanted to get her college degree. But sometimes life throws you a curve and your personal aspirations are put on hold while you take care of the things that are most important.

Such as family.

Janet was a single mom to daughter Holly, who grew up in a home where education was important, especially since some of her relatives attended Tennessee State University, and she witnessed first hand all that the University had to offer.

“She would hear all the stories that my mom and her sister would tell about their experience,” said Janet. “She basically grew up on campus attending parades and football games, and she just knew it was the school for her.”

Janet, who works for the State of Tennessee Secretary of State’s office, would do anything to make sure her daughter had the opportunity to attend TSU. Divorced when her daughter was just a year old, she worked more than one job, taking on modeling assignments at locations around Tennessee.

“I wanted Holly to have the opportunities I never had,” she added. “I tried to instill in her a strong work ethic, that anything was possible if you put your mind to it. I told her I would work so she could get work.”

Because of the nature of their relationship, Janet and Holly became extremely close said Janet, so close in fact, even though they were mother and daughter, they were also like best friends.  “It was almost a oneness of spirit that was made of deep devotion, sacrifice and pain,” she beamed.

Holly eventually was accepted, and graduated from TSU in 2003 from the College of Health Sciences with a degree in Speech Language Pathology. She decided to pursue her graduate degree almost immediately.

Janet was extremely supportive of her daughter as Holly worked her way through graduate school. But she always had a nagging feeling that she wished she had completed her degree.

“I had gone to business school but it wasn’t the same,” she said. “Something was just missing.”

At one point Holly became frustrated and stressed while completing the last few classes on her master’s degree in Speech Pathology. Janet made a promise to her daughter that she never thought Holly would remember.

“I told her to finish what she started and if she did, I would go back to school and finish my degree,” Janet added, chuckling. “I never in a million years thought she would remember.”

But she did, and a promise is a promise.

“We have come from a long line of women who have been successful, and I was determined to make sure she had the same opportunity she provided for me,” said Holly. “On graduation day in 2006, I looked at her and told her, ‘your turn.’”

Janet enrolled in 2009 in the Urban Studies program in the College of Public Service and Urban Affairs, and found herself in an unfamiliar position…back in the classroom with “kids” half her age.

“I walked mom to class the first day,” said Holly. “It was a such a role reversal. She didn’t want to admit to it, but she was really nervous and I wanted to be there for her just as she had been for me. It was one of my proudest moments with my mom.”

The past four years have not always been easy, Janet said. She has dealt with personal set backs, finding the time to be a full-time student, and dealing with the demands of work. Everywhere she went she was loaded down with books so she could study, including her second job and the beauty shop.

“I’ll admit, at 55 years old it has been a tough journey,” Janet remarked. “I started out slow taking six hours and eventually built up to 12-18 hours, which was really tough. But I’ve loved every minute of it. Without the support of my daughter, the faculty at the University, and my supervisor at work, this would not have been possible.”

According to Janet, when she graduates on Saturday, Dec. 14, it will validate all her hard work, the negative criticism she received, and most importantly, that she keeps her word.

‘This has been such a blessing to me,” she said. “By obtaining this degree, it validates me in a family that believes in education. I will now be a part of the TSU family.”

But more importantly, Janet added, it validates her relationship with her daughter.

“It’s all about promises made and promise kept, she added. “There is nothing more important than that.”

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

University to Hold Fall 2013 Commencement Ceremony December 14

commencementNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will confer more than 700 degrees Saturday, Dec. 14 during the University’s Fall 2013 commencement ceremony beginning at 9 a.m. in the Gentry Complex.

Candidates eligible for degree include 440 students earning undergraduate degrees, 219 receiving graduate degrees and 45 doctoral candidates. Nine graduate students will receive education specialist degrees, while eight students will receive graduate certificates. The number of graduates includes those students completing degree requirements in the Summer 2013 semester who are participating in the fall ceremony.

Also notable are 68 students eligible to graduate with honors, including 11 earning summa cum laude (GPA of at least 3.75), 18 magna cum laude (GPA of at least 3.50) and 39 earning cum laude (GPA of at least 3.25).

Bishop Joseph W. Walker III, the charismatic pastor of Mt. Zion Baptist Church, will deliver the keynote address. Walker, described as a teacher, humanitarian, philanthropist, businessman and community volunteer, has been the pastor at Mt Zion since 1992. Under his leadership, the church membership has grown from 175 when he started to 28,000. During that time, the church, considered one of the largest in the city, has expanded beyond its original location in the historic Jefferson Street corridor to seven weekly services in three locations, as well as online and through social media outlets.

Currently the Bishop of Senior Pastors in the Full Gospel Baptist Church Fellowship International, Walker’s leadership at Mt. Zion has also expanded to Jackson, Tenn., where the church has adopted the Zion Church.

A prolific writer, the Baton Rouge, La., native has authored eight books, including his latest, “Becoming A Couple of Destiny: Living, Loving and Creating a Life that Matters,” which he co-wrote with his wife, Dr. Stephanie Walker, assistant professor of Pediatrics and Neonatology at Vanderbilt University.

He holds a bachelor’s degree from Southern University, a Master of Divinity degree from Vanderbilt University, and a Doctor of Ministry from Princeton University. Walker is a member of the Board of Directors of the American Red Cross, and holds a governor-appointed post on the Tennessee Human Rights Commission.

For more information about commencement, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/records/commencement/

Questions about graduation may be directed to the Office of the Registrar at 615-963-5300.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.