All posts by Lucas Johnson

Grammy awarding-winning artist Howard Hewett, rapper Chief Keef to headline TSU 2021 Homecoming ‘The Return’

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Legendary R&B crooner Howard Hewett and rapper Chief Keef will headline Tennessee State University’s 2021 Homecoming, the first in-person celebration in over a year.

TSU President Glenda Glover

The COVID-19 pandemic forced TSU to have a non-traditional virtual homecoming last year. But, appropriately themed “The Return,” this year’s celebration Oct.24-31 is pretty much back to normal.

“This is an exciting and special time at Tennessee State University. After a year without a homecoming because of the pandemic, we have returned!” says TSU President Glenda Glover. “This homecoming is extra special because of what we have all endured over the last two years. This is a time for us to come together, and celebrate, as one big family. So, it’s with extra enthusiasm that I salute this year’s honorees, grand marshals, and special presidential grand marshal. May this homecoming be spectacular!”  

This year’s honorees are: Herman Brady, educator and U.S. Army veteran; Dr. Dorothy Granberry, higher ed. administrator and columnist; Dr. James Haney, retired history professor; and Dr. Sandra Holt, educator and ordained elder.  

Tennessee Rep. Harold Love, Jr. is this year’s Special Presidential Grand Marshal. Other grand marshals are: Dr. Alvin Crawford, a world-renowned orthopaedic surgeon and U.S. Navy veteran; Celestine Lowe, educator; and Alvin Marley, CPA.

Grant Winrow, Homecoming chair

Homecoming organizers say while they are excited to once again gather in-person, safety remains a priority amid the pandemic.

“The excitement to reunite again this year has been overwhelming, and for good reason, after having to make the difficult decision to cancel our in-person homecoming last year,” says homecoming chairman Grant Winrow. “However, we have modified a few of our events as we are committed to adhering to all safety protocols. We will have temperature check stations, as well as disposable masks for those who may need them.”

Student Government Association President Derrick Sanders says he’s glad the university is keeping safety in mind, and hopes homecoming participants will be responsible.

“We want everybody to stay safe; to wear a mask, protect one another,” says Sanders, a senior English major from Cincinnati, Ohio. “This is going to be a homecoming to remember.”

Besides the big game against Murray State at Nissan Stadium on Oct. 30 and the parade that morning, another major highlight of TSU’s homecoming is the Annual Scholarship Gala, TSU’s signature fundraising event. It will take place on Oct. 29 at the Music City Center. This year, the gala welcomes Grammy award-winning artist Howard Hewett, and for masters of ceremony, award-winning radio personality Jasmine Sanders and comedian and actor Rodney Perry.

Howard Hewett

“The Gala provides the critical funds necessary to meet the significant need for student scholarships, as well as ensure students have access to relevant academic programs that prepares them for an innovative and global marketplace,” says gala chairwoman Iris Ramey, who is assisted by co-chairs Debbi Howard and Marie Sueing. “We are very fortunate to have a community of donors and friends who have given of their time, energy, and personal resources to invest in Tennessee State University.”

Other homecoming activities this year include the Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Contest on Oct. 24; the Coronation of Mr. TSU and Miss TSU on Oct. 27; the homecoming concert featuring rappers Chief Keef, Sada Baby, Dreezy, and Big Scarr on Oct. 28; the Breakfast of Champions, the Charles Campbell Fish Fry, and the National Pan-Hellenic Step Show on Oct. 29; and the legendary Homecoming Parade on Oct. 30.

The parade will be from 14th and Jefferson Street to 33rd and John Merritt Boulevard.

For more information about TSU’s 2021 Homecoming, visit https://bit.ly/3aBoV7M.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Funding renewed for TSU, Meharry, Vanderbilt-Ingram partnership on cancer disparities

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Meharry Medical College/Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center/Tennessee State University Partnership (MVTCP) has received renewed funding for the next five years to continue long-standing collaborations to eliminate cancer health disparities. The news comes during the annual campaign to raise awareness about the impact of breast cancer.  

Dr. Margaret Whalen, professor of Chemistry at TSU

The National Cancer Institute, a division of the National Institutes of Health, awarded the grant through the U54 Comprehensive Partnerships to Advance Cancer Health Equity (CPACHE) program. The MVTCP is the longest-standing partnership in the United States through this program, entering into its 22nd consecutive year of funding in September of 2021. The partnership was formed in 1999 between Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) and Meharry Medical College, and a year later, successfully competed for one of only two funded CPACHE grants. Tennessee State University (TSU) joined the partnership in 2011.

The MVTCP’s goals include strengthening the infrastructure and capabilities of Meharry and TSU to engage in cancer research and expanding cancer health disparities research at VICC. Six principal investigators lead the MVTCP from the three partner institutions: Samuel Evans Adunyah, PhD, and Duane Smoot, MD, of Meharry, Tuya Pal, MD, and Ann Richmond, PhD, of VICC; and Margaret Whalen, PhD, and Venkataswarup Tiriveedhi, MD, PhD, of TSU.

“This partnership is also crucial in providing opportunities for our undergraduate and graduate students to participate in cancer research and in increasing the ability of our faculty to garner support for their cancer research projects,” said Whalen, professor of Chemistry at TSU.

“At Meharry, this new award will support one full project in prostate cancer, one pilot project on cancer immunology and several cores, including the PRACTICE CORE, which includes Oncology Clinical Trials to enhance recruitment of minorities to cancer clinical trials, Translational Pathology Core and Research Education Core.  Moreover, it will provide support for at least three PhD trainees and 15 first year medical students in Meharry,” said Adunyah, chair and professor of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology at Meharry.

VICC will continue to engage with Meharry and TSU researchers and students by sharing its state-of-the-art resources, focusing on probing the reasons for cancer health disparities and investigating interventions to address these inequities.

“While we are proud of what our partnership has accomplished over the past 20 years, we still have much to do. We will continue to build capacity for cancer disparities research while engaging the community that we are so honored to serve,” said Pal, associate director for Cancer Health Disparities at VICC, Ingram Professor of Cancer Research and professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt.

“This grant will further ongoing opportunities to continue to grow funding for cancer research at Meharry Medical College and Tennessee State University and to further cancer disparities research with the VICC. The impact and outcomes of the MVTCP cancer research education activities result in the building of a more diverse population of cancer researchers,” said Ann Richmond, PhD, Ingram Professor of Cancer Biology and director of the Graduate Program in Cancer Biology at Vanderbilt.

TSU offers experience and expertise in reaching minority populations in a culturally appropriate manner. It can extend the impact of the MVTCP’s shared goals and serve as a pipeline for future cancer researchers. The university enrolls over 8,000 students each year and offers both graduate and undergraduate health science degrees.

“Through the MVTCP, TSU will continue to engage in critically important community outreach efforts regarding cancer. The partnership has been and will continue to be vital to the development of cancer research and outreach capacity at TSU,” said Whalen.

While the grant will support overarching research goals, it will also fund three special projects to address cancers that disproportionately affect African Americans either by incidence or mortality.

· The BRAVE Strategy (Breast Cancer Risk Assessment, achieving Equity) project will conduct a clinical trial focused on developing and testing strategies to reduce racial disparities in breast cancer mortality. According to the latest statistics, African American women have a 31 percent breast cancer mortality rate – the highest of any U.S. racial or ethnic group. Lucy Spalluto, MD, of VICC, Maureen Sanderson, PhD, of Meharry, and Rebecca Selove, PhD, MPH, of TSU, lead the initiative.

· The “Role of Fetuin-A in Prostate Cancer Progression and Prevention” project will address the significant need to identify biomarkers that can differentiate between prostate cancers that stop responding to hormone therapy and prostate cancers that are more indolent and don’t require aggressive treatment. Josiah Ochieng, PhD, of Meharry, Zhenbang Chen, PhD, of Meharry and Robert Matusik, PhD, of VICC lead the initiative.

· The “Developing Immune Checkpoint Controlled-release Biomaterials for Cancer” project will test whether immunotherapy response can be improved in ovarian cancer patients by optimizing controlled and sustained local release of checkpoint ligands. Anil Shanker, PhD, of Meharry, Todd Giorgio, PhD, of VICC, and Richard Mu, PhD, of TSU, lead the initiative.

The MVTCP has achieved numerous goals throughout its history. During the five years of its prior funding cycle, the partnership increased its research productivity, invested in collaborative infrastructure, advanced cancer research education, recruited new investigators and engaged with community partners to better inform research.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU opens newly expanded and relocated on-campus food pantry to support students facing food insecurity

Nashville, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University and Kroger celebrated the grand opening of the newly expanded and relocated Tiger Food Pantry on Oct. 7 with a ribbon-cutting ceremony outside Wilson Hall where the pantry is located.

Ribbon-cutting ceremony for newly expanded Tiger Food Pantry. (TSU Media Relations)

The pantry, which is on the lower level of the dormitory, is the result of a partnership between Kroger and TSU to help continue to address food insecurity on campus. The College and University Food Bank Alliance estimates that 30 percent of college students in the United States are food insecure. The pantry will offer TSU students in need access to shelf stable food items, frozen meals, and fresh product at no cost. The pantry will be open Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 11am – 3pm, and will be staffed in part by student volunteers.

“We are extremely grateful to have this partnership with Kroger that will allow us to do even more to meet the needs of our students,” said Frank Stevenson, associate vice president of Student Affairs and dean of students at TSU. “The last thing they need to worry about is what they’re going to eat. Partnerships like this between the business community and TSU show the concern companies like Kroger have for the well-being of our students. Together, we can make a difference.”

As the presenting partner of the Tiger Pantry, Kroger contributed $25,000 in cash, as well as equipment to TSU to help establish the new pantry inside Wilson Hall.

“Through our Zero Hunger | Zero Waste plan, we are committed to ending hunger in the communities we call home and eliminating waste in our company,” said Melissa Eads, corporate affairs manager for the Kroger Nashville division. “It is through partnerships like this one with TSU and the Tiger Pantry that we can address food insecurity while helping students succeed.”

While some of the Fresh Food for the pantry will come from Kroger, most of the food for the Tiger Pantry will come through Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee. As a Second Harvest Partner Agency, TSU will have access to food through the food bank to select the items best suited for the students’ needs.

Student Government Association President Derrick Sanders said the pantry removes a concern a student should not have.

“It cost a lot to go to college,” said Sanders, a senior English major from Cincinnati, Ohio. “Some students are paying off loans, balances, and dealing with other things. The last thing they need to worry about is food.”

Nancy Keil, president and CEO of Second Harvest, agreed.

“Students facing hunger don’t always have access to the foods they need to reach their full potential even as they enter college,” said Keil. “We are proud to partner with TSU and Kroger to provide greater access to food directly on campus so students can focus on achieving their goals instead of wondering where their next meal will come from.”

The Tiger Pantry will officially open to students on Oct. 8.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU President Glenda Glover testifies at congressional hearing, asks lawmakers to continue supporting HBCUs

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover testified on Oct. 6 at a virtual congressional hearing about the importance of historically black colleges and universities and urged lawmakers to continue supporting them.

TSU President Glenda Glover

The hearing before the House Committee on Education and Labor examined the essential contributions that HBCUs have made, the history that sets these institutions apart, and the enduring challenges and financial needs that they and their students face.  

“HBCUs have stood the test of time and managed to succeed in spite of the difficulties,” said President Glover. “Now, we need your assistance – your financial assistance. We seek funding.”

She thanked lawmakers for legislation that provided financial support amid the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly to HBCUs, but she said more is needed.

“The emergency funding was significant because it assisted students as they faced this sudden crisis,” Glover said. “Today we ask you to continue that financial support of HBCUs, not just on the emergency basis as the CARES Act and other emergency funding has done in the past. We ask you to assist HBCUs as they seek to grow, develop, become more competitive and sustainable for years to come.”

She outlined three specific areas that HBCUs need funding: infrastructure and deferred maintenance; technology; new academic programs; and research.

Particularly in the case of infrastructure and maintenance, Glover said some HBCU presidents have deferred maintenance as much as $100 million or $200 million. At TSU, she said it’s around $300 million.

The hearing comes as TSU continues to work to get more than $500 million owed the institution because of years of unpaid land-grant matches by the state, dating back to the 1950s. A Tennessee joint legislative committee has said the university could receive between $150 million and $544 million. 

“When matching funds were required, many times the states did not provide the proper match,” Glover said in prepared remarks. “This type of short changing with matching funds has continued for generations.”

Despite their continued challenges and limited resources, Glover and others who testified noted the success HBCUs have had. For example, they account for just 3% of colleges in the United States, but produce: 22% of bachelor’s degrees earned by African Americans; 25% of African Americans with STEM degrees; 50% of African American public school teachers; 60% of African American health professionals; 50% of African American lawyers; 50% of African American doctors; and 83% of African American judges. Additionally, 24% of Ph.Ds earned each year by African Americans are conferred by 24 of the more than 100 HBCUs.

Congresswoman Frederica S. Wilson, chair of the Education and Labor Committee’s Higher Education and Workforce Investment (HEWI) Subcommittee, led the hearing. She noted that several members of the Congressional Black Caucus are graduates of HBCUs, “including myself, a proud graduate of Fisk University, which was founded in 1866.”

“These historic institutions have nurtured and prepared generations of African Americans for success in a broad range of fields,” said Congresswoman Wilson.

For more information about HBCUs, visit https://bit.ly/3uOJZkH.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU College of Engineering receives $70K grant from Lockheed Martin for student scholarships, other support

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s College of Engineering has been awarded a $70,000 grant from Lockheed Martin Corporation for student scholarships and other support.

Nagee Clowney

The funds will be used to support four students with scholarships of $3,000 each. The grant will also support the Pre-College programs in the College of Engineering, including the Engineering Concepts Institute (ECI) for incoming engineering students (residential four-week program), and the Pre-Experience Program to Stimulate Interests in Engineering (PEPSIE), a program for 9th-11th grade students for one-week.

“The Lockheed Martin Corporation continues to be a strong advocate for investing in a more diverse workforce in STEM,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering. “This grant will allow the College of Engineering to conduct our successful pre-college program for incoming engineering students, and support undergraduate research experiences in areas of interests to Lockheed. As a strong member of AMIE (Advancing Minorities Interests in Engineering), the company is one of the leading organizations that support HBCU engineering programs and employment. We are indeed grateful for their continuous investment, and look forward to enhancing our partnership in other areas as well.”

Zhuri Winfree-Givens, a senior mechanical engineering major, and Nagee Clowney, a junior architectural engineering major, are two of the four TSU students who will each receive a $3,000 scholarship thanks to Lockheed Martin.

“I’m so grateful for this opportunity,” said Winfree-Givens of Waldorf, Maryland. “Not only will this allow me to complete my studies, but it will also allow me to make a change in the world. I look forward to bringing more research ideas and implementations to the College of Engineering.”

Zhuri Winfree-Givens

Clowney shared similar sentiment.

“I am blessed to have this scholarship; knowing that I have a solid foundation financially, as well as Tennessee State University being a welcoming family,” said Clowney of Moreno Valley, California. “My end goal is to give back to my community, especially those that have blessed me. This helps me further my education to continue to excel and reach my goals.”

Antoinette Hargrove Duke, director of the Career Development Center at TSU, said Lockheed Martin has also given funds to the center and she appreciates the company’s continued support to TSU.

In addition to helping students prepare for the job market, such as through interview coaching, internship search, and career assessments, Duke said the center uses different platforms to keep students and companies connected.

“We work with many companies and franchisees throughout the year to prepare our students through internships, co-ops, and employment opportunities,” said Duke. “We are committed to our students and will continue to prepare them for working in any corporation.”

For more information about the College of Engineering, visit https://www.tnstate.edu/engineering/.

To learn more about TSU’s Career Development Center, visit https://www.tnstate.edu/careers/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU joins Secretary of State, other universities, in hosting voter registration tailgates

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is doing its part to get people registered to vote during National Voter Registration Month. The university, along with Tennessee’s eight other Division I Public Universities, is working with the Secretary of State’s office to hold a voter registration drive during the tailgate before a home football game at each school. 

Secretary of State Tre Hargett participates in a student-led voter education and registration rally at TSU last September. (TSU Media Relations)

TSU’s was Sept. 18 before the Tigers’ game against Kentucky State. There was strong turnout for the tailgate, and TSU went on to rout Kentucky State 41-7.

“Like most Tennesseans, we love college football and the excitement of game day,” said Secretary of State Tre Hargett, who participated in a student-led voter education and registration rally at TSU last September.

“These Voter Registration Tailgates are the perfect opportunity for us to show students and fans how easy it is to register to vote in Tennessee so that they can get in the game and make their voice heard on Election Day.”

The Voter Registration Tailgates kicked off on Sept. 11 at Tennessee Tech University, East Tennessee State University and the University of Tennessee at Martin.

Voter Registration Tailgates will continue at the University of Memphis on Saturday, Sept. 25; and the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Middle Tennessee State University and Austin Peay State University on Saturday, Oct. 2.

At each tailgate, students and football fans will be guided through the registration process in minutes using the Secretary of State’s fast, easy and secure online voter registration system, GoVoteTN.gov. They will also be able to get their questions about Tennessee’s easy voting process answered by local election officials.

The Secretary of State’s office is working with students, university leadership and staff, athletic departments, student government associations, campus civic engagement organizations and local county election commissions to host the Voter Registration Tailgates.

The Voter Registration Tailgates are part of the Secretary of State’s ongoing efforts to help all eligible Tennesseans register to vote and are one of the many initiatives the office is carrying out in celebration of National Voter Registration Month.

For more information about registering to vote in Tennessee, go to GoVoteTN.gov or call the Division of Elections toll-free at 1-877-850-4959.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, other HBCUs featured on the #11 FedEx Toyota, part of ‘Shaping Black Futures’ initiative

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – When the #11 FedEx Toyota raced around Daytona International Speedway at the Coke Zero Sugar 400 on Saturday, Aug. 28, Tennessee State University and three other historically black colleges and universities were represented.

TSU among HBCU logos featured on #11 FedEx Toyota. (TSU Media Relations)

FedEx and NASCAR driver Denny Hamlin unveiled the car’s special paint scheme on Aug. 25. It has several unique features including an illustration of HBCU college graduates, “Shaping Black Futures” on the quarter panel, and four HBCU school logos – Jackson State University, Tennessee State University, Mississippi Valley State University, and LeMoyne- Owen College – on the rear bumper.

Hamlin made a strong showing at the Coke Zero Sugar 400. He is among the 16-driver field for the 2021 NASCAR Cup Series Playoffs, which means HBCUs will also be in the spotlight.

In particular, the Shaping Black Futures initiative delivered by FedEx is a collective of experiential concepts that support the Black community, specifically highlighting education and career readiness.

Dating back to the early 2000s, FedEx has supported HBCUs to help cultivate the next generation of leaders. Building off its long-standing relationship, FedEx announced a new $5 million HBCU initiative in February 2021. With the donations adding fuel to the cause, the new initiative helps position FedEx as a company that is intentional about driving real benefits and opportunities for students.

When the announcement was made in February, TSU officials said they were pleased to receive the funds, which would be used to help students complete their degrees and prepare them for the workforce.

“We are so appreciative to FedEx leadership for this innovative program to address some of the long-standing issues faced by HBCU students,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “It is no secret that many of the challenges faced by students at TSU relate to limited funds. This partnership is a great example of public and private entities collaborating to enhance the higher education experience for African-American students.”

TSU senior Ammria Carter said she appreciates the FedEx commitment to HBCUs.

“FedEx prioritizing HBCUs during the current climate of our economy means so much to so many people,” said Carter, a political science major from Cleveland, Ohio. “I hope that this act of generosity will spark other companies to consider donating and partnering with HBCUs, especially our beloved Tennessee State University.”

This new initiative continues FedEx support of HBCUs, which includes endowed scholarships at Jackson State University, Tennessee State University and LeMoyne-Owen College; a customized career readiness program established at Mississippi Valley State University; and leadership summits in support of the Southern Heritage Classic for students at both Tennessee State University and Jackson State University, according to FedEx officials.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU’s national coding hub welcomes 12 new HBCUs to be community centers

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service)Tennessee State University’s national coding hub is welcoming 12 new HBCUs to be community centers as part of Apple’s Community Education Initiative.

The schools will become community centers for Coding and Creativity as part of Apple’s Community Education Initiative and Tennessee State University’s HBCU C2. The teaching and learning initiative is designed to empower Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to expand technology and creativity experiences within their institutions and broader communities. 

“In expanding the partnership to include the twelve new HBCUs we are on track in reaching our goal to empower all 106 HBCUs with the digital competencies and technology skill sets to meet the job demands for our global digital workforce careers,” said Dr. Robbie Melton, associate vice president of the TSU SMART Innovation Global Center.

The new schools are: Alabama State University, Clark Atlanta University, Edward Waters College, Elizabeth City State University, Florida A&M University, Harris-Stowe State University, Lane College, LeMoyne-Owen College, Lincoln University, MO, Simmons College of Kentucky, Virginia State University, and Texas Southern.

They join nearly three dozen universities across the country serving as HBCU C2 community coding centers or regional hubs. Since 2019, participating HBCUs have offered new learning opportunities to thousands of degree-seeking students and community learners and expanded their impact through partnerships with local K-12 schools, community organizations, local governments, and more. 

As part of its Community Education Initiative, Apple is supporting the institutions with equipment and ongoing professional development to become the pre-eminent HBCU C2 community center to bring coding and creativity to their communities.

Faculty and educators will learn about coding and app development, and work with Apple to identify opportunities to incorporate its comprehensive Everyone Can Code and Everyone Can Create curricula, which utilizes the easy-to-learn Swift programming language. Support from Apple also includes mobile iPad and Mac labs, opportunities for student jobs and scholarships, and funding for staff. 

To learn more about TSU’s HBCU Cinitiative, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/hbcuc2/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU offering course on history of HBCUS and their global impact

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is offering a course on the history of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and their impact around the world.  

Dr. Learotha Williams, TSU history professor who will teach HBCU course.

The course starts this fall and is available to undergraduates and graduates. It provides a chronological and thematic study of the history of HBCUs in the United States from 1837 to the present, paying close attention to the ways they have influenced the social, economic, political, and intellectual life of African Americans in the U.S. and the impact their graduates have had on Modern America and the world.

“Along with President Glenda Glover, the Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs is excited to have initiated the effort to bring this course to fruition,” said Dr. Michael Harris, interim provost and vice president for Academic Affairs. 

“This course offers students deep insight into the success of HBCUs and their impact on American society. HBCUs are the pillar of educational excellence, key institutional anchors for neighborhoods and communities, and foundational to the academic experience of African Americans.”

There are more than 100 HBCUs in the United States. They have pretty much always maintained a degree of popularity. But more attention was undoubtedly given to them when former U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris, a graduate of Howard University, began her run for vice president of the United States. And the spotlight on HBCUs has remained now that Harris has become the second most powerful person in the world.

“Needless to say, that we are excited about this course on the history of HBCU’s,” said Dr. Samantha Morgan-Curtis, dean of the College of Liberal Arts at TSU. “It is important to recognize and promote the rich history and impact of HBCUs.”

In the course, students explore the historic role that HBCUs have played in the development of the communities where they are located and the intimate relationship they cultivated with the residents of those spaces over time.

“I am excited about taking a scholarly look at these institutions,” said Dr. Learotha Williams, a history professor at TSU who is teaching the course. “I hope to provide a better understanding of the role of HBCUs in American society. Not only that, but the national and international impact they’ve had, particularly the individuals and social movements they’ve produced.”

To learn more about HIST 4325, visit https://www.tnstate.edu/history/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU surpasses housing capacity, expecting largest freshman class in five years

By Kelli Sharpe

Tennessee State University announced today that the institution is facing an unprecedented demand for student housing and is working to fulfill all housing assignments in the next few days. 

Residence Life staff have completed nearly 97 percent of requests and will have provided housing for over three thousand students when the semester begins on August 16. The news comes as the largest freshman class in five years started moving in today through August 12, followed by returning students later this week. TSU is working to accommodate everyone and asks those still waiting on an assignment to check their student account for updates.

Traditionally, upperclassmen seek off campus housing. However, the high cost of housing in Nashville is prompting them to return to campus. The completion of the new 700-room residence hall will help to ease the University’s housing needs once it is completed in 2022, especially if this trend continues.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and eight doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.