Tag Archives: white house

TSU President Glenda Glover among leaders on hand for signing of HBCU executive order by President Trump

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover was among a group of HBCU presidents and leaders who witnessed President Donald Trump sign an executive order he said makes “HBCUs an absolute priority in the White House.”

During brief remarks in the Oval Office on Tuesday, President Trump added, “Historically, black colleges and universities are incredibly important institutions. That’s why today I’m thrilled to be signing an executive order to recognize the importance of historically black colleges and universities.”

While similar to other HBCU executive orders of former presidents, this order officially moves the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities from the U.S. Department of Education to the White House.

“Our goal as a group was to share our collective concerns with President Trump and his executive leadership directly responsible for educational funding and policies that impact our institutions,” said TSU President Glover. “We hope the executive order represents a real commitment to historically black colleges and universities which makes HBCUs a significant line item in the President’s budget. What HBCUs need is funding, and this is precisely why we made the trip to Washington.”

The signing comes one day after Vice President Mike Pence and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos hosted representatives from dozens of HBCUs at a “listening session” in the executive office building next door to the White House. The session was hosted by the White House Domestic Policy Council. The Thurgood Marshall College Fund coordinated the initiative on behalf of the HBCUs.

In the session, HBCU leaders discussed ways they can improve education and enhance the infrastructure of their schools. Representatives from Thurgood Marshall College Fund, United Negro College Fund and National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education also participated.

To view the executive order, visit http://bit.ly/2lVYSzP.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Aristocrat of Bands performs for who’s who list of celebrities, dignitaries at the White House

WASHINGTON, D.C. (TSU News Service) – President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama weren’t the only ones awed by the powerful sound of Tennessee State University’s Aristocrat of Bands at the White House on Sept. 23.

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President Glover confers with U.S. Congressman and Civil Rights icon John Lewis at a reception in the White House minutes after the the Aristocrat of Bands’ performance on the south lawn. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The celebrity list of who’s who listening to the performance on the south lawn included music icon Quincy Jones, former basketball star Kobe Bryant, and Hollywood celebrities Debbie Allen and Samuel L. Jackson, just to name a few. There were also dignitaries and current and former government officials, including former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder.

The band was invited to Washington, D.C. to celebrate the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture; the first HBCU band to perform for the Obama administration at the White House.

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President Glover makes a point to actress Debbie Allen, one of many celebrities at the White House reception. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“We are extremely proud that our band and university are a part of this historic event with President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama for the grand opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture in our nation’s capital,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “This is a proud moment for TSU, as we continue to build on our great legacy.”

The band’s tunes included Al Green’s “I’m Still In Love With You,” and TSU favorite, “I’m So Glad I Go to TSU.” Mrs. Obama liked what she heard so much that she posted the band on Instagram.

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President Glovers shares a moment with band officials following the performance by the Aristocrat of Bands on the south lawn of the White House. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. Reginald McDonald, TSU’s director of University Bands, called the opportunity to perform at the White House a “once in a lifetime chance.”

“A lot of people would never be able to say that they’ve had the opportunity to meet the President of the United States, let alone play on the White House lawn,” McDonald said. “This is tremendous.”

Later, President Glover and her delegation were invited to the Grand Hall of the White House for a reception with other dignitaries, following which the President and the first lady joined Dr. Glover and the Aristocrat of Bands for a photo.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.