Tag Archives: TSU President Glenda Glover

TSU breaks ground for first new residence halls in 23 years

TSU breaks ground for first new residence halls in 23 years

 NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU President Glenda Glover helped break ground Wednesday for two new co-educational residence halls, the first of three groundbreakings taking place during Homecoming week.

TSU President Glenda Glover unveils information about new residence halls. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

Wednesday’s groundbreaking, the first for a new residence hall at TSU since 1995, took place on the lawn of the Strange Performing Arts Building. The groundbreaking for a Health Sciences Building is scheduled for 10 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 18, in the Hankal Hall Courtyard. And the groundbreaking for an Alumni Welcome Center will take place around 1:30 p.m. at the corner of 31st and John Merritt Blvd.

Construction of the residence halls was initially announced last fall after the State Building Commission approved construction of the $75.3 million project.

“We break ground this morning for student residence life,” said Glover at a ceremony before the groundbreaking. “We break this ground for student success. And we break this ground because it is altogether fitting and proper for upgrading student life on the campus of Tennessee State University.”

Dr. Tracy Ford, vice president of student affairs at TSU, said the groundbreaking for the residence halls and the other planned construction is indeed “reason to celebrate.”

“Today doesn’t just mark the groundbreaking of a physical structure, but it shines a light on the amazing future of TSU, and represents one of the many exciting and strategic changes to come,” Ford said.

Student trustee Braxton Simpson speaks at ceremony before groundbreaking. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

Braxton Simpson, student representative on the TSU Board of Trustees, expressed similar sentiment.

“This is a very exciting moment for all of the students here at Tennessee State University,” she said.

Besides TSU’s faculty and staff, Wednesday’s groundbreaking was also attended by local and state officials.

“This is a wonderful day,” said State Sen. Thelma Harper. “TSU is No. 1!”

State Rep. Harold Love, Jr., a TSU graduate, lauded Dr. Glover and “all those involved in the intricacies of getting this done.”

“Residence halls represent a university’s commitment to student success just as much as other educational buildings,” Love said. “Tennessee State continues to invest in facilities to increase the opportunities for students to find a home away from home.”

For more information about the other groundbreakings and Homecoming activities, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/homecoming/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Remembers Founders During 2018 Homecoming

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – This is Homecoming week and today is Founders’ Day at Tennessee State University.

TSU President Glenda Glover, accompanied by keynote speaker Council Woman-At-Large Sharon Hurt, led a procession of faculty, student leaders and administrators in Kean Hall to mark the university’s 106th birthday.

President Glenda Glover presents 2018 Founders’ Day speaker Sharon Hurt with a plaque at the ceremony in Kean Hall. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The University Wind Ensemble, led by Dr. Reginald McDonald, offered selections to a cheering audience, following presentation of colors by the Air Force ROTC Color Guard.

“This is a great day for Tennessee State University,” Glover said, as she recounted events in the University’s history from its founding in 1912 to the role it plays today as a major center of education in the nation.

“From 1912 when the then-Agricultural and Industrial Normal School for Negroes, built to provide educational opportunity for blacks, opened its doors to the first 247 students, TSU has maintained a tradition of excellence in education for a diverse population.”

Student leaders and faculty join in singing the Alma Mater at the Founders’ Day program. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

In her keynote address, Rep. Hurt, president and CEO of Jefferson Street United Merchant Partnership, or JUMP, reminded the students, faculty and alumni that as members of the TSU family, they have a “rich legacy” to uphold of people who believe in self-determination.

“As you celebrate Founders’ Day, remember that you have an ancestral calling to serve and support this institution,” said Hurt, a graduate of TSU. Hurt also holds a master’s degree in non-profit leadership from Belmont University.

Miss TSU Kayla Sampson, joined by Mr. TSU Darian McGhee, gives the university history at the Founders’ Day program. (Phto by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“You are the keepers of a legacy of worldwide accomplishments and have the God-given right by virtue of your calling to glorify, magnify and fortify the legacy that you have inherited as a descendant of doctors, teachers, engineers, talk show host, etc.,” she said. “Whatever your profession, TSU gave you a purpose.”

Hurt, a recipient of several awards and recognitions, is a former board member of the Center for Non-Profit Management and past president of the Association of Non-Profit Executives Council, and is a graduate of the 2004 Class of Leadership Nashville. During her tenure as president of JUMP, Hurt has secured more than $4 million in funding from the Neighborhood Stabilization Program Grant to acquire and rehabilitate homes in the North Nashville community.

She thanked President Glover, also an alumna, for the invitation and for her own legacy of excellence in earning multiple degrees. She called on students to be more focused, and congratulated the university on the celebration of the 2018 Homecoming.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU kicks off 2018 Homecoming with 31st annual Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Contest

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University kicked off this year’s Homecoming with the 31st annual Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Contest on Sunday.

The event, which was free and open to the public, was held in the Floyd-Payne Campus Center on the main campus. Cash prizes of $1,200, $800 and $500 were awarded respectively for first, second, and third place winners in freshman and upperclassman divisions.

There were 23 participants this year. The freshman winners were: Bryanna Scott, 1st place; Norel McAdoo, 2nd place; and Jamir Jackson, 3rd place. In the upperclassman division, Ashanti Holland claimed 1st place; Sydni D. Daniels, 2nd; Tayneria Gooden, 3rd; and Elijah J. McNutt received a $100 bookstore gift certificate for 4th place.

Before the contest, TSU President Glenda Glover charged the participants to “do your best.”

“You’re here because you’re competent, you qualify, and you’re ready,” she said. “Be excellent in all that you do. We honor you, we salute you, and we thank you for your participation.”

The contest, established in 1988, is named in honor of the late Robert N. Murrell, a longtime administrator and dean of men at TSU. It encourages students to develop skills in research, writing and oratory.

“This is the 31st event, and I’m most grateful to all of you who played a part in making this happen, and for all of you who are here today,” said Ms. Barbara Murrell, whose late husband the event honors.

In 1993, the TSU Homecoming Committee incorporated the oratorical contest into the official Homecoming schedule of activities, and established the Homecoming theme as the theme for the contest. This year’s theme is: “Visions of Excellence with a Spirit of Success.”

Dwight Beard, president of the Nashville Chapter of the TSU Alumni Association, encouraged the participants to maintain the passion they conveyed in their speeches.

“You are our future,” Beard said. “The baton is in your hand. Win that race.”

Following the oratorical contest, TSU’s Homecoming events continued with the Gospel Explosion in Kean Hall gymnasium. The concert, which was also free, featured hit artists Jonathan McReynolds, Earnest Pugh, and The Walls Group.

Other Homecoming highlights throughout the week include the Coronation of Mr. and Miss TSU, Oct. 17; Ralph Boston Golf Tournament, Dr. Levi Watkins, Jr. Symposium, and Homecoming Concert, Oct. 18; and the Greek Step Show and the Charles Campbell Fish Fry, Oct. 19.

On Friday evening, TSU has planned a stellar Scholarship Gala at the Music City Center. This year, the Gala welcomes back comedian Jonathan Slocumb as the master of ceremony. Special entertainment will be provided by legendary jazz artist Roy Ayers. Proceeds from ticket sales and sponsorships are used to provide financial assistance to students.

Homecoming will conclude Oct. 20 with the Homecoming Parade from 14th and Jefferson Street to 33rd and John Merritt Boulevard, and the big football matchup between the Tigers and the Golden Eagles of Tennessee Tech at Nissan Stadium.

For more information about Homecoming activities, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/homecoming/documents/HomecomingSchedule.pdf

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, Regions, AKA launch financial empowerment initiative for college students and underserved communities

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is partnering with Regions Bank and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated to help college students and underserved communities build financial wealth.

TSU President Glenda Glover receives $25K check from Latrisha Jemison, Regional Community Development and Partnership Manager for Regions Bank. (TSU Media Relations)

The groups officially announced the agreement during the Financial Education and Empowerment workshop on Wednesday at Tennessee State.

Before the workshop, which was sponsored by the Alpha Psi Undergraduate Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha, TSU President Glenda Glover received a $25,000 check from Regions Bank that will be used for student scholarships. Glover is also the international president of AKA.

TSU students joined leaders from Regions and AKA for the event.

“TSU is extremely proud to have Regions Bank as a partner to provide the tools and resources to promote financial stability for our students, and our communities,” Glover said.

“Alpha Psi, along with all AKA chapters, will serve as a network to host financial education workshops with Regions to promote and engage students and underserved communities on best practices when it comes to spending, saving and credit building.”

TSU senior Morgan Courtney of Detroit said she appreciated the workshop, particularly discussion about maintaining a good credit score, and managing finances.

Student Trustee Braxton Simpson talks to students attending workshop. (TSU Media Relations)

“Building your credit now is very helpful for your future, and understanding financial literacy is also very important for college students; all people, actually,” Courtney said.

Organizers said the workshops will begin locally on college campuses and increase to encompass underserved neighborhoods in cities across the country. As part of the program, financial professionals from Regions will work with Alpha Kappa Alpha to deliver high-quality, cost-free financial training through interactive workshops for students and the community. The goal is to help more people achieve financial security and build savings.

“Financial education leads to financial empowerment,” said Latrisha Jemison, Regional Community Development and Partnerships Manager for Regions Bank. “No matter what stage of life you are in, the time to prepare for your financial future is now. And no matter how much, or how little, you have to begin with, we want this program to offer a place where you can find the insights, tools, compassion, understanding and resources that can help you save more, spend wisely and reach your goals.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

White House Initiative Names TSU Student 2018 HBCU Competitiveness Scholar for Academics, Leadership

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A top Tennessee State University student with dreams to change his Kentucky neighborhood has been named a 2018 HBCU Competitiveness Scholar by the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Jailen Leavell, a sophomore mass communications major with a concentration in broadcast journalism, will serve as an ambassador of the White House Initiative by providing outreach and communication with his fellow students about the value of education and the Initiative as a networking resource.

Jonathan M. Holifield, Executive Director of the White House Initiative on HBCUs, right, congratulates Jailen Leavell in Washington, D.C. (Submitted Photo)

Selected for his accomplishments in academics, leadership and civic engagement, Leavell was among 63 undergraduate, graduate and professional students chosen from 54 HBCUs. They were recognized for successfully preparing to “compete for top opportunities that improve long-term outcomes.” Each student was nominated and endorsed by their institution’s president.

Leavell, the third TSU student selected by the White House Initiative in the last five years, is a member of the TSU Honors College with a near 3.6 grade point average. He is also president of the sophomore class.

“We are very excited to learn of Jailen Leavell’s selection as a White House 2018 HBCU Competitiveness Scholar,” said Dr. Alisa Mosley, interim vice president for Academic Affairs. “Mr. Leavell is a very engaged student who exemplifies academic excellence. He is engaging in national dialogue about promoting peace as a fellow with the Youth Violence Prevention Research Center, and as a proactive member of our Student Government Association.”

According to a release from the White House Initiative, Leavell and his fellow Competitive Scholars will serve for one year, during which they will learn and share “proven and promising practices that support individual and HBCU competitiveness, with the goal of strengthening prospects for career and life success.”

Leavell grew up in West Louisville, Kentucky, with high crime, violence and poverty. He wants to change that. He calls the White House honor “a representation of me, my community and my environment.”

“Growing up in West Louisville, the narrative is, ‘You will not make it outside of Louisville,’ and going after this award is all part of my effort to change that,” said Leavell, who grew up about eight blocks from the boyhood home of the late boxing champion Mohammad Ali.

“If Mohammad Ali can grow up eight blocks from me and become the greatest of all time and …change the world, I can do that eight blocks down the road. I love Louisville. I just have a lot of pride in my city and ultimately I just want to change it, with black people doing positive things, black businesses flourishing, stopping violence and just changing the narrative.”

Leavell thanked TSU President Glenda Glover for recommending him, and Charles Jennings, director of the TSU Career Development Center, for helping him through the “rigorous process.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, Nashville State Community College reaffirm agreement to help students get four-year degrees

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The presidents of Tennessee State University and Nashville State Community College have reaffirmed an agreement to help students get a four-year degree.

TSU President Glenda Glover speaks at press conference. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

TSU President Glenda Glover and NSCC President Shanna Jackson held a press conference at NSCC on Tuesday to reaffirm the Dual Admission Agreement the institutions made in 2009, as well as announce new ways to partner moving forward.

The agreement provided certain guarantees to students who committed to Tennessee State early in their college career, such as priority advising and registration, as well as access to TSU’s campus.

However, there have been some changes since the agreement was made. For instance, the Tennessee Board of Regents instituted the Tennessee Transfer Pathways program, which superseded DAAs and provided guarantees to community college graduates statewide.

The reaffirmation focuses on ways to get Nashville State students to commit to TSU as early as possible. Those that do commit early do not have to pay an application fee. Additionally, students who excel academically at Nashville State may be eligible for TSU transfer scholarships, and 100 percent of the courses students take at Nashville State will transfer to TSU.

“We’re just pleased and honored to have this partnership,” Glover said. “We look forward to receiving Nashville State students as TSU students. Simply put, it’s just time to become a TSU Tiger.”

NSCC’s president expressed similar sentiment.

“Nashville State has long enjoyed a partnership with Tennessee State University,” said Jackson, a TSU graduate. “I am grateful to President Glover and her staff for the commitment to strengthening and growing the relationship between our institutions.”

TSU and NSCC are in the process of finalizing several new articulation agreements in the area of hospitality and tourism, as well as teacher education.

“In fact, most recently, there were three much needed new pathways that were created for future high school teachers in the area of biology, chemistry and mathematics (STEM),” Jackson said. “And this is only the beginning.”

On Tuesday, the presidents signed an agreement that would allow articulation from a university parallel associate of science at NSCC to a bachelor of science in biology or mathematics or chemistry with teacher certification/licensure.

“We’re focusing on the STEM majors because we know that employment demands in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math are steadily increasing,” Glover said. “TSU has solid partnerships with certain companies, and Nashville State students will have access to the same companies.”

The NSCC-TSU partnership is a continuing effort by Tennessee State to attract community college students. Earlier this year, TSU partnered with Motlow State Community College to offer an agriculture degree in Fayetteville, Tennessee.

Under the “2 + 2” Ag program, participants get an associate’s degree at MSCC, then have the option of getting a bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Sciences from TSU, which can be conveniently done at MSCC.

For more about community college initiatives at TSU, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/commcolleges/

 

TSU, Metro Schools Partnership Brings More than 5,000 on Campus for Area’s Largest College Fair

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – High school seniors PatriĆyonna Rodgers and Jaida Dunlap have made up their minds: they’re going to be Big Blue Tigers.

Rodgers and Dunlap say TSU’s close proximity to home, the HBCU family experience, and strong academic programs make TSU “number one” in their college selection.

“I am very interested in TSU,” said Rodgers, a top student at John Overton High in Nashville with a 4.27 grade point average who wants to study pre-law and journalism. “My mom’s best friend went to TSU. She really loved the college experience, and I heard that TSU has a very outstanding communications program.”

TSU President Glenda Glover talks to a student and her mother at the MNPS College Fair in the Gentry Complex. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

For Dunlap, a track star at East Nashville High School, she wants to bring her talent to TSU.

“I hear you have a very good track program, and I want to join the track team,” said Dunlap, who plans to major in political science with a minor in criminal justice. “I have a lot of friends who come here and they tell me it is a real good place to come to if you want to be close to home. It is a family-oriented school.”

Rodgers and Dunlap were among more than 5,000 middle and high school students and their parents who attended the annual Metro Nashville Public Schools College Fair in the Gentry Complex at TSU on Sept. 20. This is the second straight year TSU has hosted the fair. It is also the first university or college to host the fair in its decades-long history, according to TSU and MNPS officials.

More than 180 colleges, universities and post-secondary institutions from across the nation took part in the fair to offer students the opportunity to review information on admissions and financial aid, as well as college life and programs to help them decide their choice of college or university.

PatriĆyonna Rodgers, a top student at John Overton High School, and her mother, Shenell Gilliam-Rogers, inquire about programs in the TSU Honors College, at the MNPS College Fair. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

TSU President Glenda Glover was among TSU and metro school officials who attended the fair. She said hosting the fair at TSU highlights the partnership between the university and MNPS.

“This is an exciting opportunity for Tennessee State University,” Glover said. “Having this at TSU gives us an opportunity to showcase the campus and what we have to offer. I am excited to see our various colleges and departments here participating.”

MNPS Chief of Schools, Dr. Sito Narcisse, said the Metro schools are excited to partner with TSU to host the college fair. He said TSU has been a major partner and the biggest pipeline for teachers in the entire system.

“TSU has been a great partner, and we appreciate how the university has supported us like today with thousands of kids and their parents attending this fair,” Narcisse said.

Dr. Gregory Clark, TSU’s director of High School Relations, helped to coordinate the fair, along with Dr. Megan Cusson-Lark, MNPS’ executive director of school counseling.  Clark said the university is excited to welcome so many institutions from across North America.

“TSU and metro public schools have done it once again,” Clark said. “This is an excellent recruitment opportunity. In particular, the opportunity to see this many students in our house at one time is outstanding.”

For information on admission at TSU, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/admissions/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU President Glover leads Service Organization in raising over $1.2 Million in Historic One-Day Campaign to Help Nation’s HBCUs

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover is impacting historically black colleges and universities across the country.

Dr. Glenda Glover

Glover is also the international president of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, which has raised over $1 million during its HBCU Impact Day initiative to benefit historically black colleges and universities.

Glover announced last week that the organization exceeded the goal.

“I am extremely proud of this historic moment Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority has accomplished by not only meeting but exceeding our goal and raising over $1.2 million to assist HBCUs,” she said.

“As leaders in service, sorority members have demonstrated that HBCUs have significant value and deserve to be treated as an essential educational resource. I thank our membership, family members, friends and the community for their generous contributions.”

Donations were made online and by mail during the 24-hour campaign. Glover said the sorority’s goal is to raise $10 million over the next four years to benefit HBCUs.

In July, Glover was presented a $20,000 check for the Glenda Baskin-Glover Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated 30th International President Scholarship fund at TSU during her installation activities in Houston, Texas.

The scholarship was established to celebrate Glover taking the helm of AKA, the nation’s oldest African-American female Greek-lettered service organization, and to highlight her role as TSU’s first female president.

Glover donated $50,000 to the AKA Educational Advancement Foundation for the sorority’s HBCU initiative during her installation ceremony. She made that same commitment of a $50,000 donation to TSU when she became president of the university in 2013.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU President Glenda Glover solidifies relationship with Regions Bank and other corporate partners during HBCU Braintrust meeting

By Kelli Sharpe

Nashville, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover is promoting HBCU partnerships with corporate America.

TSU President Glenda Glover

Earlier this month, she attended the National HBCU Braintrust in Washington, D.C., meeting with companies to express the importance of diversity and how historically black colleges and universities can bridge the gap.

“As HBCU presidents, we continue to applaud the visionary leadership of Congresswoman Alma S. Adams, of North Carolina, and the members of the Bipartisan HBCU Caucus for creating a platform that allows me and my colleagues the opportunity to network with corporate leaders,” said Dr. Glover, who moderated a panel with chief diversity officers from top corporations, including Amazon, Pinterest, GM Financial and Dell.

“All are fully committed to strengthening relationships between HBCUs and their companies. This is an enormous victory for our students, who are some of the best and brightest in the country.”

TSU President Glenda Glover with top diversity and inclusion executives at the HBCU Braintrust Town Hall: “The Power of Black Women: Reshaping, Redefining & Diversifying America’s Workforce.” President Glover served as moderator for discussion on the important role HBCUs play in building the workforce. (Submitted photo)

Last year, the Caucus issued the HBCU Partnership Challenge, an effort to promote corporate engagement with HBCUs and the students they serve. Following the challenge, the Caucus conducted a survey to assess current HBCU engagement with corporations. The group then worked with industries to determine how to best recruit and retain diverse talent.

The goal was to identify 10 corporate partners within the first year. Amazon, AnitaB.Org, Dell, Inc., GM Financial, Nielsen, Pandora, Regions Bank, and Volvo Group North America are additional partners that have helped the Caucus exceed its goal.

“Regions Bank is the epitome of a good corporate partner and does an outstanding job of integrating TSU students into various levels of the company,” added Dr. Glover.

The National HBCU Braintrust, Sept. 12-14, included corporate giving, STEM innovation, and scholarships. The Bipartisan HBCU Caucus was founded by Congresswoman Alma S. Adams, Ph.D during the 114th Congress. The Caucus is comprised of 74 members from both chambers and both sides of the aisle.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

For Tennessee State University, Southern Heritage Classic game Cancellation Not a Loss

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Although the much-anticipated 29th Southern Heritage Classic football game was canceled due to inclement weather, TSU’s spirit remained high.

The university experienced gains in recruitment, fundraising and community relations – three of TSU’s main goals at the annual gathering.

Emily Greer, Chief Administrative Officer of the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, welcomes President Glenda Glover during a guided tour of the world renowned hospital. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The game between TSU and Jackson State University scheduled for Sept. 8 was eventually called off because of inclement weather.

TSU, with a 17-11 SHC record, was looking to extend its current win streak, which stands at 6-0 over JSU. Last year, the TSU Tigers defeated the JSU Tigers 17-15 before more than 47,000 fans in the Liberty Bowl.

While there was obvious disappointment, it did not overshadow positive experiences that occurred during the weekend.

Leading up to the game, TSU officials, administrators and staff engaged in a number of activities around Memphis.  Among them, a life changing experience when TSU President Glenda Glover was taken on a guided tour of the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, the only facility in the world with a research center and a hospital in the same venue.

The TSU Aristocra of Bands participates in the 29th Southern Heritage Classic Parade in Memphis on Sept. 8. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Accompanied by former Memphis Mayor AC Wharton, and Richard Lee Snow, senior adviser for Multicultural Marketing & Business Development for St. Jude, Glover saw labs and research facilities. She also received the history on the vision of St. Jude’s founder Danny Thomas, the evolution of the hospital, as well as its partnership with African-American communities, institutions and organizations.

Hospital employees who are TSU graduates were among those who greeted Glover. Earlier, Emily Greer, chief administrative officer of the St. Jude Children’s Hospital and Research Center, received Glover.

“It was phenomenal to see all the research that’s being done to save lives,” Glover said. “I am also amazed to see the generosity of the hospital as it pertains to patients, when families’ only concern is the well-being of their child and not costs. That is truly amazing.”

TSU sophomore Rachelle Brown. (Submitted photo)

The rain also didn’t stop Tennessee State University sophomore Rachelle Brown from winning big at the Classic. Brown received the first of four $10,000 McDonald’s “True to the HBCU” scholarships, facilitated by the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. While maintaining a 3.8 grade point average, the Memphis native was active in her community: sorting and packaging food at the Second Harvest Food Bank in Nashville, Tennessee; collecting supplies for homeless women and victims of natural disasters in the Virgin Islands; and serving as a reading volunteer with Smart Baby, an organization promoting childhood literacy to children.

“I chose to attend an HBCU, for the rich education, both inside and outside the classroom,” Brown said. “I wanted to go to a college that would encourage me to step outside of my comfort zone and provide me with an atmosphere designed to promote excellence.”

Memphis WANTV Local 24 reporter Jeané Franseen interviews President Glover Sept. 7 during a morning show outside the Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium in Memphis. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

As for recruitment, officials said a number of top graduating high school seniors who attended TSU’s Memphis Recruitment Reception on Sept. 7 have signed on to attend the university next fall. They said nearly 80 percent of the students who attended the reception in the Sheraton Memphis Downtown Hotel have already met “scholarship requirements.”

“We have already received their scholarship applications, transcripts and ACT scores,” said Dr. Gregory Clark, director of high school relations and NCAA certification at TSU. To be considered for a scholarship, a candidate must have at least a 3.0 GPA and 21 or higher on the ACT.

More than 200 high school seniors from the West Tennessee area and their parents attended the standing-room-only program in one of the hotel’s reception areas.

Jovon Jones, associate director of recruitment at TSU, talks to students and parents about scholarship requirements and deadlines at recruitment reception. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

According to officials of the Office of Institutional Advancement, this year’s Alumni Mixer – a key fundraising event of the Classic week – was a big success. With President Glover and Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, vice president for Research and Institutional Advancement leading the charge, more than $20,000 was raised and nearly 20 new individuals joined the President’s Society. These are individuals who commit to contributing $1,000 or more a year.

“We just want to say thank you for all that you do for Tennessee State University to help keep needy students in school,” Glover said. “Your continued financial, material and other support and gifts are making a big difference in our students’ lives. We are thankful beyond measure for your support.”

During the week, Glover, accompanied by several senior university officials, also visited Power Center Academy High School and Whitehaven High School where she spoke to students and administrators, and answered questions about the importance of a college education and the programs and offerings at TSU.

Earlier on Saturday, Glover, the TSU Aristocrat of Bands, student organizations, including Mr. TSU and Miss TSU and their court, lead the 29th Southern Heritage Classic Parade in Memphis, with thousands along the route cheering on parade participants.

Next year’s Southern Heritage Classic football game is scheduled for Sept. 14.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
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About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.