Tag Archives: TSU President Glenda Glover

Tennessee State University Continues Campus Wipe Down Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

NASAHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – With nearly all students away and classes online, Tennessee State University is continuing a complete wipe down to protect the campus from the COVID-19 and other diseases.

In the TSU campus wipe down, workers are using equipment and products that are extremely effective in killing the coronavirus. (Photo by TSU Media Relations)

The university is using professional cleaning companies with disinfectants and sanitizing equipment to wipe down its main campus and downtown location. Cleaning crews are using protective equipment including gloves, body suits, and products that are “extremely effective” in killing the virus, company representatives say.

Interim Associate Vice President for Facilities Management Albert Hill says the goal is to keep the campuses clean and less susceptible to the spread of infectious illnesses, such as the coronavirus.

“We just want to make sure that when our students and employees return, they feel comfortable going into the classrooms, residence halls, and work places,” says Hill. “We also want to assure parents that their children are safe.”

On March 16, TSU was the first public university in Tennessee to transition to all online classes as a precaution to contracting and spreading coronavirus (COVID-19). The university also canceled all campus events where large crowds are expected, and suspended all international travel through the end of April to minimize exposure to the disease. On Monday, March 23, the university ceased normal operations, allowing most employees to work remotely.

Lecture halls are also receiving thorough cleaning in the campus-wide wipe down at TSU. (Phopto by TSU Media Relations)

 “These decisions were made in the best interest of the university, as both the federal government and State of Tennessee have declared a state of emergency,” says TSU President Glenda Glover.

 “In following directives from the Governor and Mayor, we have adjusted the traditional manner in which we serve our students and operate the university and will continue to take every precaution necessary to minimize the spread of the virus.   Most importantly, we are ensuring that students continue to learn and excel academically by providing all the resources needed to successfully engage and complete online courses.” 

  TSU has one confirmed case of a student testing positive for COVID-19. The individual, who did not live on campus, has been at home in self-isolation for a number of days while receiving the necessary care to treat their condition.

Dr. Joseph Perry, TSU’s director of sustainability, says the cleaning crews are doing an “excellent job” of making sure chemicals they are using are safe for humans and the environment.

“We are going to do this until we get to the point where we feel it is safe for people to come back into the buildings,” says Perry. “Essential staff and faculty who occasionally come on campus are safe because they are allowed to go in only certain areas.”

The U.S. Department of Education recently launched a COVID-19 (Coronavirus) information and resources web page for schools and school personnel.

For more information on campus operations and student information, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/covid19.

NOTE: Kelli Sharpe contributed to this story.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU employees begin teleworking to ward off spread of COVID-19

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University employees began working remotely on Monday to help prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).  University officials said the move is in-line with directives from the Mayor and Governor in an effort to curtail the spread of the virus. TSU employees were told last week and began making arrangements for teleworking on Thursday and Friday.

“TSU’s modified operations plan, which includes employees teleworking, is in-line with the Mayor and Governor’s directive for individuals to stay home when possible,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. 

Employees with Campus Police, Emergency Management and Facilities Maintenance will continue working on campus. All individuals on campus or coming to TSU should self-quarantine and contact their healthcare provider if they feel sick.

The University has enhanced its cleaning and sanitizing process and will continue a campus wide wipe down of academic buildings and residence halls. TSU began online instruction for all students on March 16, almost all students have left the campus.

The University recently learned that a student has tested positive for COVID-19. 

The individual, who did not live on campus, has been at home in self-isolation for a number of days while receiving the necessary care to treat their condition. No further information is being given about the individual for privacy reasons.

The University has compiled a list of individuals who were in contact with the student, and is in the process of notifying them. 

For more information on campus operations and student information, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/covid19.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Students Express Mixed Feelings About Leaving Campus in Wake of Coronavirus

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Like many Tennessee State University students, Trenton Jones says he understands why TSU is asking them to go home, but many have mixed feelings about leaving their campus environment.  Students must vacate the campus by Saturday, March 21.

“The coronavirus is a big deal right now and this move is to help us stay healthy,” said Jones, a freshman agricultural science major, as he and his parents emptied out his dorm room in Watson Hall on Wednesday to head back home to Northport, Alabama.

Tyrani Randolph, left, a freshman dental hygiene major from Memphis, helps classmate Trenton Jones, second from right, move out of Watson Hall. Jones’ parents, Malcolm and Rhonda Skinner, travelled from Northport, Alabama, to pick up their son. (Photo by TSU Media Relations)

“Students need to stay functional and campus offers that,” added Jones. “Being on our own, and to do class online, you are missing that interaction with teachers and fellow students. Face-to-face is the best interaction for learning.” 

 Parents Ronda Skinner and her husband Malcolm, who travelled from Northport, Alabama, to pick up their son, Trenton, said the trip was inconvenient, “but worth it.”

“Due to the circumstances of the coronavirus, an epidemic that has hit our nation severely, it is understandable that the school would have to make this decision,” Rhonda Skinner said. “The fact that schools around the country had to make this decision, I do believe that it is in the best interest of the students, and comforting for parents.”

TSU President Glenda Glover said the decision was in the best interest of the university, as both the federal government and State of Tennessee have declared a state of emergency.

On March 16, TSU went online with all classes as a precaution to contracting and spreading coronavirus (COVID-19).

“While we have adjusted the traditional manner in which we serve our students, we are ensuring that they continue to learn and excel academically,” stated President Glover. “We are taking every precaution necessary to minimize the spread of the virus.” 

The university will soon serve as a mobile testing site. As further precaution, the university has canceled all campus events where large crowds are expected, as well as suspended all international travel through the end of April to minimize exposure to the disease. Also, beginning Monday, March 23, the university will cease normal operations, allowing most employees to work remotely.

Tyrani Randolph, a freshman dental hygiene major from Memphis, Tennessee, who moved out of Wilson Hall, agreed with her fellow classmate.

“I believe everything is for a reason, and I believe this is a safety precaution,” she said.

 Frank Stevenson, associate vice president for student affairs and dean of students, said the university understands the “anxiety that this change causes for students.”

“It is an interruption into their ‘normal’ way of doing things as students,” he said. “We are trying to mitigate the situation and help them work through those feelings.”

Stevenson said the university is following the Centers for Disease Control and Infections guidelines, and best practices recommendations, in accordance with instructions from the governor’s office.

On Monday, the University will begin a campus wide wipe down of academic buildings and residence halls.

 For more information on campus operations and student information, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/covid19/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU allowing students to go home and finish semester online as a precaution to COVID-19

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is allowing students to return home and finish the semester online as a precaution to the spreading coronavirus (COVID-19). Online classes started Monday.

University officials announced last Thursday that TSU was transitioning to online learning. In a correspondence to students, TSU President Glenda Glover stated the decision was in the best interest of the university, as both the federal government and State of Tennessee have declared a state of emergency.

“Concerns pertaining to the coronavirus COVID-19 are affecting all of us and continues to worsen,” said Dr. Glover. “Within the last 48-hours, the country has changed drastically, as the number of U.S cases continue to be confirmed.”   

TSU will close all residence halls and apartments on Saturday, March 21. The university will evaluate requests from students with extenuating circumstances that need more time to make arrangements. Housing officials said those requests will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Students will continue their classes in an online format and there is no requirement to live on campus.

As further precaution, the University has canceled all campus events where large crowds are expected, as well as suspended all international travel through the end of April to minimize exposure to the disease. TSU has made these decisions to ensure the safety and health of the campus family. 

The university will provide more information on campus operations as decisions are made.     

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU exceeds goal of ‘$1 Million in 1 Month’ during historic campaign for student scholarships with contributions over $1.7M

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Hundreds of Tennessee State University students will receive scholarships to continue their education after the university exceeded its goal to raise $1 million during the month of February. The total collected hours before the deadline on Saturday, February 29, was $1,702,674. 

TSU President Glenda Glover

TSU President Glenda Glover expressed her gratitude and appreciation to everyone that made a contribution. 

“This wouldn’t be possible without the unprecedented support of alumni, faculty, staff and our corporate partner, the Nashville Predators, along with the faith-based community and many others,” said Glover.  “Because of your unwavering support, hundreds of young men and women will be able to continue their educational journey here at TSU.”  

Campaign Chairman Jamie Isabel also expressed gratitude to the Predators, as well as the hard work of the campaign committee, and Dr. Glover’s leadership.

“I am grateful that Dr. Glover challenged the alumni to think outside of the box and begin a new year and a new decade with the mindset of giving,” said Isabel, a TSU alum. “The campaign has been a very big success, and we are excited about the results.”

The campaign to raise $1 Million in 1 Month during Black History Month laid the foundation for the historic partnership between TSU and the National Hockey League’s Nashville Predators. It is the first known partnership between an HBCU and the NHL, and coincided with the league’s Hockey is for Everyone initiative in February. 

Joni McReynolds, president of the TSU National Alumni Association, said she’s proud of the way alumni responded.

“I know this will definitely help our students,” said McReynolds. “They are in such need because the state does not provide us with as much money as they used to. “

TSU alum Charles Galbreath of New York City is among the many alumni who contributed to the campaign.

“It’s important for the students to see that we don’t forget about what their needs are after we leave,’ said Galbreath. “I think that the energy that everyone is coming together with is everything we learned at TSU; that Big Blue spirit, to continue to take care of our school even after we’re gone.”

TSU President Glenda Glover with Nashville Predators President and CEO Sean Henry, along with $1 Million in 1 Month Campaign Chairman Jamie Isabel and TSU student leaders following the kickoff announcement in early February. (Submitted photo)

Money raised from the campaign will provide both merit-based and need-based scholarships for TSU students. Approximately 500 scholarships will be awarded to students in an average amount of $2,000. About 90 percent of TSU students receive some form of financial aid.

TSU freshman Jacob Taylor is one of them. The Memphis, Tennessee, native said he probably would not be at TSU if he did not currently have a scholarship.

“My mother has a good salary, but she doesn’t make enough to put me through school,” said Taylor, a health sciences major. “Having that extra money to pay for college really does a lot, because it takes stress off students.”

Junior Sydney Morehouse of St. Louis, Missouri, agreed.

“There are a lot of students that need financial aid,” said Morehouse, who is also majoring in health sciences. “Some of my friends are close to the finish line, but they don’t have funds to pay for their tuition and graduate. I want them to graduate. They are the future doctors, lawyers and physical therapists. So scholarships from the $1 Million in 1 Month campaign will really be beneficial.” 

The Predators organization made the first donation to the campaign, as well as an additional $100,000 of in-kind assets to help spread awareness to the initiative, which includes providing TSU students with internships.

“With the help of the most passionate fan base in all of sports and the Nashville Predators organization, we are proud to partner with Tennessee State University on this life-changing education initiative,” said Predators President and CEO Sean Henry. 

Nashville Predators mascot, and TSU mascot. (Submitted photo)

In addition to the kickoff event with the Nashville Predators, the university engaged the TSU family with various challenges. The Alpha Theta Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. claimed victory in the Alumni Chapter Challenge with a contribution of $16,305, and they also won the TSU Divine Nine Fraternity and Sorority Challenge with a donation of $21,627. In the Staff/Faculty Challenge, TSU staff won with a contribution of $10,393.

Campaign activities also included the TSU Sunday Day of Giving, along with the Dialing for Dollars telethon that took place the last Sunday of the month, and involved the faith-based community. The pledges for the telethon exceeded $60,000. The goal was $25,000. The TSU College Challenge was the final campaign challenge between the eight academic units. Gifts for this activity are still being calculated.  

TSU students played a major role in bringing in donations as well. Over 100 students staffed a phone bank to make evening calls to alumni during the campaign and participated in the telethon as callers or as a part of the production to live stream the event. 

To learn more about the campaign, visit www.tnstate.edu/1million1month

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

IBM Executives say TSU Students developing right Skills for tech workforce

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Two IBM executives were on campus recently to talk to TSU students about job-readiness skills and employment opportunities with the tech giant and its affiliates.

Meredith Stowell, vice president for IBM Z Ecosystem; and Shirley Meierarend, IBM’s Z series skills leader for North America, spoke to a group of students, faculty and deans about “very lucrative” job opportunities available for those with skills and knowledge in Enterprise Computing, which supports IBM’s mainframe technology.

“IBM is here today because we are very interested in building a talent pipeline for enterprise computing for both our clients or IBM,” Stowell said in a presentation on Enterprise Computing and Digital Transformation.

John Thompson, right, TSU’s Enterprise Systems Consultant, talks to a cross-section of students, deans and chair during the IBM executives’ visit. (Photo by TSU Media Relations)

“We do have a number of very large clients here locally, but the other great thing about TSU is that many of their students are interested in relocating to other areas. So, that’s why I am here today, to share more with the students, and to connect students to talent and to the talent pipeline.”

Enterprise-related classes are currently being offered at TSU through an initiative that was launched in 2014 through the Department of Computer Science. The initiative was designed to prepare TSU students to be able to compete for high-paying enterprise internships and permanent job opportunities with enterprise clients. According to TSU’s Enterprise Systems Consultant, John Thompson, a former IBM senior manager, between 2015 and 2018, more than 20 students were placed with enterprise companies earning annual average starting salaries of more than $82,000, with some receiving signing bonuses of up to $10,000.

Citing a Wall Street Journal 2020 projection, Thompson said there will be more than 84,000 enterprise-related jobs available for students across all disciplines. TSU, being the only school in Tennessee offering courses in this area, can be a major source to fill the huge demand for enterprise computing skills that is being created by the retiring baby boomer generation.

During the IBM presentation, TSU President Glenda Glover, who was on travel, called in to thank Stowell and Meierarend for their visit, and Thompson, for arranging and coordinating the visit.  She stressed the importance of the TSU partnership with the company.

“This partnership is making a great difference in the lives of our students,” Glover said. “Student placement is a very key part of what we are and a major performance indicator for our state stakeholders and our accrediting body. Training our students to be adequately ready is so important. That is why we are so appreciative of this great collaboration.”

In her presentation, Stowell spoke about specific areas of enterprise computing that students should focus on in “sharpening your job-skill readiness.”  She and Thompson emphasized the importance of taking classes in fundamental COBOL business language programming, as well as a basic introduction to programming, such as C++ and Java. 

“Once again, it is really about this openness between industry and academics, and academic environment opening up to understand what specific skills that the industry needs and then partnering with those industry partners to incorporate and infuse those skills within their curriculum. So that, when the student graduates, there is a job lined up for him already,” Stowell said.

Thompson added:  “What makes TSU students so attractive is that they understand the distributing networking environment, but also, when you put them on an enterprise platform, they are right at home, and that’s where we come in. So, I work with the companies to find what they need from the enterprise platform, then I come back and work with Dr. (Ali) Sekmen and the deans, and say, ‘Look, how can we put this in the curriculum for the students to learn that skill?’ Once we do that, then we go and bring these companies in to recruit the students.”

Tamarcus Summers, a senior computer science major from Memphis, and Donovan Varnell, also a senior political science major from Nashville, were among the diverse group of majors at the presentation.

“As a computer science major, I am glad to see the focus on key areas emphasized here today that my professors talk about in preparing us for the job market,” Summers said.

For Varnell, he said he is impressed with IBM’s integration of technology into all disciplines.

“This really opens my eyes to how it is important to understand that all these technologies and coding are a need-to-know no matter your discipline,” said Varnell.

Dr. Sekmen, who is chair of the Department of Computer Science, and a facilitator of the Enterprise Systems Program, said TSU is seeking funding to establish a comprehensive enterprise computing program in the department with a mainframe computer lab.

“We will be the first institution in Tennessee to have such a computer,” said Sekmen. “We are going to develop an undergraduate concentration in enterprise computing, as well as training opportunities for TSU faculty, students and all HBCU faculty.”

Other university officials who spoke at the gathering were Dr. Jacqueline Mitchell, professor and Enterprise Systems Program manager, as well as Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering. Frank Stevenson, associate vice president for Student Affairs and dean of students; Dr. Coreen Jackson, dean of the Honors College; and Dr. Ray Richardson, Enterprise Program liaison, were present. Students from a cross section of disciplines and majors were also present representing computer science, engineering, criminal justice, business and social work.

For more information on TSU’s Department of Computer Science, please go to http://www.tnstate.edu/computer_science/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Displays of University Excellence, Innovation, Speeches Mark 7th Annual TSU Day At the Capitol

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – State lawmakers got a taste of Tennessee State University’s excellence at the annual TSU Day at the Capitol on Tuesday.

Visitors to the TSU Day on the Capitol check out displays at the daylong event. (Photo by TSU Media Relations)

More than 150 TSU students, administrators, faculty, staff and others packed a conference room on the 8th flor of the Cordell Hull Building to hear TSU President Glenda Glover kick-off the event. Before the official kick-off, lawmakers saw displays of the university’s diverse research and academic offerings, including robotics and giveaways like White Dogwood trees grown on the university farm, that has become a prized and highly requested staple during the annual visits.

“I am so pleased to see our lawmakers, along with our students, our faculty our staff, our alumni and friends. Thank you for joining us,” Glover said. “This is our seventh annual TSU Day at the Capitol. This event has become one of the institution’s most successful outreach programs. We take this opportunity to share with the lawmakers the great things that are going on at TSU, and to share with them our needs, as we continue the proud legacy of training and nurturing our future – our students.”

Before the kick-off, President Glover made courtesy visits to the offices of Lt. Gov. Randy McNally (R-Crossville) and several key members of the Tennessee General Assembly. Student ambassadors also used the time to deliver packages of TSU mementos to the offices of lawmakers, as tokens of appreciation from the university.

Among many displays at the TSU Day at the Capitol, researchers in the College of Health Sciences demonstrate the use of the Vest Airway Clearance System, a therapy designed to assist patients who have thick secretions, such as in cystic fibrosis. (Photo by TSU Media Relations)

In her speech, Glover told the lawmakers that past and future appropriations have allowed TSU to maintain its longstanding legacy of “providing education for our students.”

“Thank you for being a part of this day and for money you have given us,” she said. “However, we have some tremendous needs. So, we are here asking you to help us meet those needs. We want to improve our campus’ age-old infrastructure, we need scholarships for students, we need to make sure that electricity is in order for next year.”

Several of the lawmakers followed Glover with greetings and congratulations to TSU and its leaders for the “great work going on at TSU.”

“I appreciate you all being here today,” House Speaker Cameron Sexton said. “We are going to work well to make sure that we move Tennessee forward and keep doing the things we can agree on, such as education.”

TSU alums Sen. Brenda Gilmore, and Rep. Harold M. Love, Jr., two strong supporters of the university, promised to keep TSU at the top of the agenda.

“I am so happy to see you all up here. It means the world to me,” Gilmore said. “As you (students) walk these halls and meet the legislators, tell them about your studies and what you plan to do when you graduate. That helps us as we work hard to get your rightful funding.”

Love added: “It does our heart well to see our students, faculty, staff and alumni here with us on Capitol Hill. We need your voice to move TSU. So, I encourage you to keep telling us what needs to be changed in policy.”

In an oratorical presentation, Mr. TSU Damyr Moore moved lawmakers with a call for proportionate funding for HBCUs, arguing that the matrix used to determine funding, such as retention, enrollment and on-time degree completion, are not the best indicators by which to measure HBCUs.

“I propose proportionate funding for HBCUs and PWIs, or predominantly white institutions, alike, as well as increase funding for scholarships and funding for pre-college summer bridge programs,” said Moore, a senior mass communication major from Atlanta.

Also making remarks was Katelyn Thompson, president of the TSU Student Government Association. Among other lawmakers who spoke at the ceremony were Reps. Antonio Parkinson (District 98) and Barbara Cooper (District 86), a TSU alum.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University, Nashville Predators kickoff ‘$1 Million in 1 Month’ campaign with ‘TSU Night’ at Bridgestone Arena

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Aristocrat of Bands drumline and New Direction Gospel Choir headlined “TSU Night” at Bridgestone Arena on Saturday. The event kicked off a historic, long-term partnership between the university and the Nashville Predators to raise $1 million during Black History Month for student scholarships, and more.

TSU President Glenda Glover talks about campaign in interview before Predators’ game. (Submitted photo)

“This is an exciting night for TSU,” said TSU President Glenda Glover in a live broadcast before the Predators’ game against the Vegas Golden Knights. “This is a time to raise $1 million in one month for our students, our need-based students, our merit-based students. These are amazing students with promising careers, and we need to do our best to help them graduate and go on to make the best contributions to society.”

The choir performed the national anthem, and the drumline entertained Predators’ fans before the game and throughout it.

TSU New Direction Gospel Choir performs national anthem at Predators’s game Saturday night. (Submitted photo)

Fan Kenny Scribner said he saw the Aristocrat of Bands perform at football games and was looking forward to seeing the drumline. He also thinks the partnership between TSU and the Predators is a good idea.

“Anytime you help the students it’s a good deal,” Scribner said.

TSU and the Predators announced their partnership on Thursday. The Predators organization made the first donation to the campaign, as well as an additional $100,000 of in-kind assets to help spread awareness to the initiative.

TSU’s Aristocrat of Bands drumlins performs outside Bridgestone Arena. (Submitted photo)

Money raised from the campaign will provide both merit-based and need-based scholarships for TSU students. Approximately 500 scholarships will be awarded to students in an average amount of $2,000. About 90 percent of TSU students receive some form of financial aid.

The university and the Predators will also work together on providing internships.

“With the help of the most passionate fan base in all of sports and the Nashville Predators organization, we are proud to partner with Tennessee State University on this life-changing education initiative,” Predators President and CEO Sean Henry said Thursday. “When you combine two great things – the education of the next generation with our passionate fan base, we know that strong goals seem to be more achievable, and that’s what we are hoping to do with this campaign.”

Nashville Predators promote ways to contribute to campaign. (Submitted photo)

Also Saturday night was the Big Blue Old School Concert hosted by TSU Student Affairs. Portions of the proceeds will go toward the fundraising campaign. 

A month of campaign activities includes the TSU Alumni Chapter Challenge Feb. 1-7Faculty/Staff Challenge Feb. 8-14TSU Divine Nine Fraternity and Sorority Challenge Feb. 15-21TSU Sunday Day of Giving on Feb. 23; and TSU Colleges Challenge Feb. 22-29.  

To donate, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/1million1month or text TSU1MIL to 41444. 

#TSU1million1month, @TSU1million1month

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU President Glover partners with Nashville Predators to continue advocacy for student funding with “$1 Million in One Month” campaign

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University, under the leadership of President Glenda Glover, has launched an aggressive campaign to raise $1 million in one month for student scholarships beginning February 1, to kick off Black History Month. TSU, Nashville’s only four-year public institution, is teaming up with the Nashville Predators hockey team to help them reach the winning goal.

TSU President Glover pins Nashville Predators CEO Sean Henry into the TSU family. (Photo by Charles Cook, TSU Media Relations)

The funds will provide both merit-based and need-based scholarships for TSU students. Approximately 500 scholarships will be awarded to students in an average amount of $2,000. About 90 percent of TSU students receive some form of financial aid.


Today, the university held a press conference featuring President Glover, the Predators’ leadership and members of the TSU family to share information about the campaign and partnership. 


“Tennessee State University is proud to launch this campaign to give students access to the funds they need to stay in school, graduate, and achieve their dreams,” said President Glover.

TSU PresidentGlover and Predators CEO Sean Henry with campaign committee members. (Photo by Charles Cook, TSU Media Relations)

“Many students are not able to complete their degrees because of financial hardship, so these funds are very important. We’re excited to have the support of the Predators, and we look forward to contributions from our alumni, friends, and the community to support these TSU students, our leaders of tomorrow.”

February also marks the NHL’s  “Hockey Is For Everyone” initiative. Predators CEO and President Sean Henry said the team’s partnership with TSU is ideal as the university looks to provide scholarships for deserving students. And he said the organization has long-term plans for the TSU- Predators partnership beyond the $1 Million In 1 Month campaign. 

“With the help of the most passionate fan base in all of sports and the Nashville Predators organization, we are proud to partner with Tennessee State University on this life-changing education initiative,” Henry said. “When you combine two great things – the education of the next generation with our passionate fan base, we know that strong goals seem to be more achievable.”

TSU Board of Trustees student trustee Braxton Simpson talks about importance of campaign for TSU students. (Photo by Charles Cook, TSU Media Relations)

Jamie Isabel, a TSU alum and chairman of the campaign, said the entire university family can be a part of this historic fundraiser. 

“I said yes immediately to President Glover when she asked me to chair the one million dollar, one month campaign that will provide financial assistance to help students to continue their education,” Isabel said. “It’s one of the most important responsibilities of an alumnus, and that is you give back to students following in our footsteps, and for them to pay it forward when their time comes.” 

TSU National Alumni Association President Joni McReynolds agreed with Isabel. She said she knows firsthand how beneficial the campaign will be because of the requests she receives from students about funding.

TSU and Predators mascots. (Photo by Charles Cook, TSU Media Relations)

“I get calls, I get emails at the beginning of every semester with students asking me as the president of the National Alumni Association, do I have any resources,” McReynolds said. “So I know the campaign will totally benefit the students of Tennessee State University that are needing additional scholarship money.”

TSU junior Joycelyn Barney of Atlanta said she has personally experienced some financial hardships and understands just how important it is to have funds available to help students in need.

“Students come to college to better themselves, to make a difference in their families,” said Barney, a health sciences major. “So it’s really hard when you can’t go, or have to come back home, because you don’t have the money.”

 Dr. Glover is not only a strong advocate for TSU’s students, but also those attending the nation’s other historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs).

 She has a track record of raising millions, in a short amount of time for the institutions.

 As international president of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, President Glover has successfully led the sorority in raising one million dollars in one day for two consecutive years as a part of their HBCU for Life: A Call To Action Initiative. The initial funds were disbursed to 32 of the 106 HBCUs to establish an endowment. The second round of the disbursement of funds will take place during the summer to 32 more HBCUs.

TSU cheerleaders provide some spirit. (Photo by CharlesCook, TSU Media Relations)

The $1 Million in 1 Month campaign will officially start February 1, with a slate of activities including a TSU Night with the Predators and the Big Blue Old School Concert that night hosted by TSU Student Affairs. Portions of the proceeds will go toward the fundraising campaign.

A month of activities will include the TSU Alumni Chapter Challenge Feb. 1-7; Faculty/Staff Challenge Feb. 8-14TSU Divine Nine Fraternity and Sorority Challenge Feb. 15-21; TSU Sunday Day of Giving on Feb. 23; and TSU Colleges Challenge Feb. 22-29.  

To donate, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/1million1month or text TSU1MIL to 41444. 

#TSU1million1month, @TSU1million1month

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU students, officials believe FUTURE Act long overdue for HBCUs, and will provide much needed boost for sustainability

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University and the nation’s other historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) look to reap the benefits of federal legislation that permanently allocates $255 million to the institutions. 

TSU President Glenda Glover

Last month, Congress passed the FUTURE Act to provide for the historic funding. TSU students and officials say the bill is critical to the viability of TSU and other HBCUs.

TSU President Glenda Glover commended Congress for passing the legislation and hopes it will lead to additional funding.

“The FUTURE Act legislation is a game changer for TSU, and the university is thankful to our Tennessee leadership of Senator Lamar Alexander, Representative Jim Cooper, Congressional Black Caucus members and others for their guidance to ensure the bill passed through both chambers,” says President Glover.

“I personally made calls to Sen. Alexander’s Office, advocating the need for HBCU funding because of the tremendous impact TSU has in changing the lives of our students, the community, state and nation. I also spoke regularly with other HBCU presidents and assisted advocacy groups United Negro College Fund, Thurgood Marshall College Fund and the National Association for Equal Opportunity in higher education in getting the bill passed.  HBCUs have been traditionally underfunded on all levels of government.”

“TSU is fortunate to have relationships with local and state lawmakers that have resulted in much needed appropriations. I believe the FUTURE Act is the beginning of the tide changing in the amount, and types of funding HBCUs receive.”    

The FUTURE Act not only provides permanent funds to HBCUs and other minority-serving institutions, but also simplifies the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and eliminates paperwork for income-driven student loan repayment plans.

“We believe it’s a really important piece of legislation,” says Amy Wood, assistant vice president for financial aid at TSU. 

The legislation eliminates up to 22 questions on the FAFSA and allows the Internal Revenue Service to share applicants’ tax information directly with the U.S. Department of Education. It also automates income recertification for federal student loan borrowers who use income-based repayment plans.

“Being able to eliminate some of the processing time allows us more time to spend counseling students and ensuring that they have what they need,” adds Wood.

Mariah Rhodes, a junior at TSU majoring in political science, says she’s pleased the legislation may soon become law. It has been sent to the President, who is expected to sign it. 

“HBCUs have produced some of the best African-American doctors, lawyers, politicians and engineers,” says Rhodes, a Memphis native who is an HBCU White House ambassador. “This money will help HBCUs in a tremendous way.”

Her mother agrees.

“They (HBCUs) are underfunded, and we need to really do something about that,” says Denise Woods.

TSU Dean of Students Frank Stevenson called the legislation a “game changer.”

“HBCUs are still seeing a number of first generation college students, and funding is really important to the success of these institutions that have done so much to move the needle toward equity and opportunity for higher education for students,” says Stevenson.

Last year, TSU received $2 million to support retention of academically high achieving students from underserved communities.  

The funds were included in Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee’s budget during the latest legislative session, and approved by state lawmakers.

For more information about the FUTURE Act, visit https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/2486/text.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State UniversityFounded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.