Tag Archives: TSU Day at the Capitol

State lawmakers experience wave of Tiger Blue at 2017 TSU Day at the Capitol

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee legislative leaders got a chance to see Tennessee State’s excellence up close during TSU Day at the Capitol.

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TSU President Glenda Glover cuts ribbon at TSU Day at the Capitol kick-off ceremony. Photo by John Cross (TSU Media Relations)
University administrators, faculty, students and alumni converged on Legislative Plaza and the Hill on Wednesday, Feb. 1, to showcase the university’s research and other innovative initiatives at the annual event.

TSU President Glenda Glover started the day with a ceremony in the Senate chamber. She was joined by legislative leaders that included Lt. Gov. Randy McNally, House Speaker Beth Harwell, Sen. Thelma Harper, and Reps. Brenda Gilmore and Harold Love, Jr.

“This is our day, this is TSU day,” Glover said. “It gives us a great opportunity to share with our lawmakers, our leaders, the success of TSU, and the needs of TSU, as we continue to nurture some of the best and the brightest minds of this generation, our TSU students.”

Lt. Gov. McNally welcomed the TSU visitors to the state Capitol and shared a personal experience at the university. When he was a state representative, he said he and several other lawmakers took a public administration course at Tennessee State.

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Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of TSU’s College of Engineering, talks about life-size robotic tiger designed and built by TSU students. Photo by Lucas Johnson (TSU Media Relations)

“I really enjoyed my experience at TSU,” McNally said. “On behalf of the Senate, we really honor our relationship with TSU, and look forward to what you do, and the great students that you produce for the state of Tennessee. It really makes a difference in our state.”

House Speaker Harwell said she enjoyed seeing all the Tiger Blue throughout the Plaza and Capitol.

“All this blue looks beautiful; I love it,” she said. “I was presiding this morning and I had a TSU pen in my hand as I was making notes, I want you to know that.”

TSU Student Government Association President Aarian Forman also spoke at the kick-off ceremony, and said TSU’s students were excited to be at the Capitol.

“We’re so glad to be here today to show you why TSU is the true blue, and we’re the best blue in the state of Tennessee,” Forman said.

Displays from the school’s various colleges and departments lined both sides of the hallway in the Legislative Plaza. Robotics, red maple trees, research presentations and goats were among the booths showcasing the university’s diverse academic offerings.

One of the main attractions was a life-size robotic tiger designed and built by TSU’s College of Engineering.

“TSU Day at the Capitol is a day to demonstrate the work that’s being done here in the state of Tennessee, and the legislation and the support the state gives to universities, in particular TSU, and the rate of return by producing outstanding graduates that actually work in the great state of Tennessee,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of TSU’s College of Engineering.

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Emily Hayes, a TSU graduate student and research assistant in the College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Sciences, attends to some of the goats being used for research. Photo by Lucas Johnson (TSU Media Relations)

Also on display at the Capitol was nationally recognized goat research in TSU’s College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Sciences. Its 15-year study of goats and how to address the demand for goat meat in the U.S. is one of the most extensive on that particular topic in the country.

“I probably give 10, 12 talks a year across the country on the research,” said Dr. Richard Browning, who leads TSU’s goat research. “We have a lot of ethnic groups that have goat as a main part of their diet, and that’s why there’s a demand for goat meat. But we don’t produce enough here. A lot of it is imported from other countries.”

Rep. Harold Love, Jr., whose district includes TSU, said he was glad his colleagues got a chance to see the excellent work going on at the university firsthand.

“Oftentimes you can’t see it in a booklet, or a pamphlet, you need to see it face to face,” Love said.

In wrapping up the ceremony, Glover told the legislative leaders that the university appreciates the funding its received over the years, and that it’s been used in an efficient and strategic manner. But she said TSU still has “tremendous needs.”

“Excellence is our habit, but excellence is not cheap; excellence is costly,” Glover said. “So we’re here today to ask you to support our excellence.”

Sen. Harper, whose district also includes TSU, said she and other lawmakers who have been staunch supporters of the university will continue to advocate on its behalf, and will encourage others to do the same.

“We come here to do business, and we do business for TSU,” Harper said.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Tennessee lawmakers to experience wave of Tiger Blue at TSU Day at the Capitol

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee lawmakers will experience a wave of Tiger Blue at the state Capitol on Wednesday, Feb. 1.

Tennessee State University administrators, faculty, students and alumni will converge on Legislative Plaza and the Hill to showcase the university’s research and other innovative initiatives at the annual TSU Day at the Capitol.

TSU President Glenda Glover will kick-off the event with a ceremony at 10 a.m. in the Senate Chambers. TSU visitors will have a chance to meet with lawmakers, who will see displays from the school’s various colleges and departments that will line both sides of the hallway in the Legislative Plaza.

Robotics, red maple trees, research presentations and goats will be among the booths showcasing the university’s diverse academic offerings.

Tennessee State is coming off a stellar year that saw numerous national headlines about its research and other initiatives, and TSU officials expect the same – or better – this year.

“TSU Day at the Capitol is always an exciting day for TSU,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of TSU’s College of Engineering. “It allows us to display Tennessee’s investment in higher education, and the great things that are happening here at TSU.”

In addition to its leading research in cybersecurity, TSU’s College of Engineering recently drew national attention when its Computer Science Department partnered with Google.

TSU is one of 10 historically black colleges and universities participating in the Google in Residence Program, which uses the technology giant’s engineers to teach introductory computer science classes, as well as help students further develop soft and technical skills.

“The GIR program will further make our program and students stronger with understanding of state-of-the-art technical skills and intense interview processes of top software engineering companies,” said Dr. Ali Sekmen, chair of TSU’s Computer Science Department.

Google said in a statement that it’s pleased to be at TSU “as part of our commitment to encouraging greater diversity in the tech sector.”

Also on display at the Capitol on Wednesday will be nationally recognized goat research in TSU’s College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Sciences. It’s 15-year study of goats and how to address the demand for goat meat in the U.S. is one of the most extensive on that particular topic in the country.

“I probably give 10, 12 talks a year across the country on the research,” said Dr. Richard Browning, who leads TSU’s goat research. “We have a lot of ethnic groups that have goat as a main part of their diet, and that’s why there’s a demand for goat meat. But we don’t produce enough here. A lot of it is imported from other countries.”

Rep. Harold Love, Jr., whose district includes TSU, said he hopes young people in attendance will become more interested in the legislative process, and even try to have a voice in policymaking.

“When we talk about active citizen engagement and forming policy, this is a prime example of what we would like to see from all of our students at colleges and universities across the state,” Love said. “This is what citizens are supposed to do, come down and be actively involved in policy formulation when laws are being passed or proposals considered.”

To learn more about the event and what’s happening at Tennessee State, visit http://www.tnstate.edu.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Day at the Capitol Unveils Cutting-Edge Research, Artificial Intelligence Technology

 

TSU President Dr. Glenda Glover (center) along with State Representatives Harold Love Jr., and Brenda Gilmore cut the ceremonial ribbon in the Senate Chamber of the Capitol marking the official start of TSU Day at the Capitol. Senior members of the cabinet, along with faculty and staff members also took part in the ribbon-cuting ceremony. (photos by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
TSU President Dr. Glenda Glover (center) along with State Representatives Harold Love Jr., and Brenda Gilmore cut the ceremonial ribbon in the Senate Chamber of the Capitol marking the official start of TSU Day at the Capitol. Senior members of the cabinet, along with faculty and staff members also took part in the ribbon-cuting ceremony. (photos by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – From robots that can mimic human motion, to 3-D printing capability, and the development of an advanced visualization computer assisted virtual environment called CAVE, state lawmakers today saw some cutting-edge technology being developed at Tennessee State University.

Celebrating its second “TSU Day at the Capitol” on Tuesday, the University showcased its outstanding academics and research enterprise while assuring lawmakers that state funding and other support to the University were being appropriately directed into areas that promote student learning and advancement.

“TSU Day at the Capitol gives us the opportunity to showcase the tremendous work that is going on at Tennessee State University with funding you provide to us,” President Glenda Glover told members of the State Assembly during a kickoff ceremony in the Senate Chamber. “While we are grateful for the funding, we need more support because as enrollment grows and services are increased, we will need more help to improve on existing facilities and infrastructure.”

State Representative Brenda Gilmore, (center) welcomes TSU President Glenda Glover (left) and the University to the Capitol for "TSU Day at the Capitol" while Representative Harold Love Jr., looks on.
State Representative Brenda Gilmore, (center) welcomes TSU President Glenda Glover (left) and the University to the Capitol for “TSU Day at the Capitol” while Representative Harold Love Jr., looks on.

At the kickoff ceremony, which included a ribbon cutting, State legislators joined key stakeholders, including alumni, community leaders and friends of TSU to thank President Glover, faculty staff and students for the contribution the University is making in providing quality education for students of the state and its impact on the community.

“Tennessee State University’s contribution to education in Tennessee is tremendous and needs the continued support of everyone in the state,” said David Gregory, vice chancellor for Administration and Facilities Development for the Tennessee Board of Regents. “It is good to see this level of support for the University and we are grateful that you are here to celebrate this day.”

State Representatives Harold Love Jr., and Brenda Gilmore, two graduates and staunched supporters of TSU, welcomed President Glover, faculty and staff of the University, and called on their colleagues to support TSU.

Jonathan Reynolds, a Computer and Information Systems Engineering Ph.D. student, uses software and 3-D printer to create
Jonathan Reynolds, a Computer and Information Systems Engineering Ph.D. student, uses software and 3-D printer to  create plastic chess pieces and cups. The printer can create virtually any design and was on display as part of the TSU Day at the Capitol.

“We are proud of the relationship Dr. Glover has formed with the community and members of the Assembly, something that has not always been the case in the past,” said Gilmore, chair of the Tennessee Legislative Black Caucus. “We are pleased that you are here to meet with us and to allow us to see what TSU is all about.”

Sandra D. Hunt, president of the Davidson County Alumni Association, called on her fellow former students and graduates to support the University.

“As alumni, we are the foundation of this University,” she said. “Our support maters as the backbone of this great institution. Our support is vital.”

A robot created by researchers at the College of Engineering that mimics human motions was on display during TSU Day at the Capitol.
A robot created by researchers at the College of Engineering that mimics human motions was on display during TSU Day at the Capitol.

Also speaking was Markeil Lewis, president of the Student Government Association, who thanked the legislators for taking the time to meet and celebrate with the University.

“My fellow students join me in thanking you for setting this time aside to honor our institution. We are very grateful,” Lewis said.

The TSU Day at the Capitol, which brought together nearly 300 administrators, students, faculty and staff, also included displays of different programs, giveaways, free lunch for at least two members from each legislator’s office, and visits to various committee hearings, and discussion with some key lawmakers.

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Turns Capitol Blue as it Takes Over the Hill

University to showcase academic and athletic programs to lawmakers


TSU Day at the Capitol 1NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee lawmakers will see the impact Tennessee State University is making firsthand with programs like it’s SITES-M project that trains the state’s math teachers to be more efficient and productive, and ground-breaking research in agriculture and health sciences when the University goes to Capitol Hill, Tuesday, Feb. 10 from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m.

Along with providing lawmakers the opportunity to learn about the high-caliber programs at the University, legislators will have the opportunity to interact with students, faculty, staff and student-athletes, as TSU showcases its impressive academic, athletic and research programs during TSU Day at the Capitol. Programs from the University’s various colleges will be on display throughout the Legislative Plaza.

Displays will be available for viewing beginning at 8 a.m. with the official kick-off ceremony taking place at 10 a.m. in the Mezzanine. The event will provide an excellent platform for the state’s elected officials to see and hear firsthand about the issues facing higher education today, and the many student and research success stories from TSU.

TSU Day at the Capitol runs until 1 p.m. and events include:

8 a.m.                                     Displays Open in Legislative Plaza

10 a.m.                                TSU Day at the Capitol Kick-off Ceremony
(Mezzanine)

9 a.m. – noon                  TSU Day at the Capitol Legislative visits

1 p.m.                                  Displays close

Media is invited to attend TSU Day at the Capitol. For more information, call 615.963.5331.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.