Tag Archives: Southern Heritage Classic

For Tennessee State University, Southern Heritage Classic game Cancellation Not a Loss

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Although the much-anticipated 29th Southern Heritage Classic football game was canceled due to inclement weather, TSU’s spirit remained high.

The university experienced gains in recruitment, fundraising and community relations – three of TSU’s main goals at the annual gathering.

Emily Greer, Chief Administrative Officer of the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, welcomes President Glenda Glover during a guided tour of the world renowned hospital. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The game between TSU and Jackson State University scheduled for Sept. 8 was eventually called off because of inclement weather.

TSU, with a 17-11 SHC record, was looking to extend its current win streak, which stands at 6-0 over JSU. Last year, the TSU Tigers defeated the JSU Tigers 17-15 before more than 47,000 fans in the Liberty Bowl.

While there was obvious disappointment, it did not overshadow positive experiences that occurred during the weekend.

Leading up to the game, TSU officials, administrators and staff engaged in a number of activities around Memphis.  Among them, a life changing experience when TSU President Glenda Glover was taken on a guided tour of the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, the only facility in the world with a research center and a hospital in the same venue.

The TSU Aristocra of Bands participates in the 29th Southern Heritage Classic Parade in Memphis on Sept. 8. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Accompanied by former Memphis Mayor AC Wharton, and Richard Lee Snow, senior adviser for Multicultural Marketing & Business Development for St. Jude, Glover saw labs and research facilities. She also received the history on the vision of St. Jude’s founder Danny Thomas, the evolution of the hospital, as well as its partnership with African-American communities, institutions and organizations.

Hospital employees who are TSU graduates were among those who greeted Glover. Earlier, Emily Greer, chief administrative officer of the St. Jude Children’s Hospital and Research Center, received Glover.

“It was phenomenal to see all the research that’s being done to save lives,” Glover said. “I am also amazed to see the generosity of the hospital as it pertains to patients, when families’ only concern is the well-being of their child and not costs. That is truly amazing.”

TSU sophomore Rachelle Brown. (Submitted photo)

The rain also didn’t stop Tennessee State University sophomore Rachelle Brown from winning big at the Classic. Brown received the first of four $10,000 McDonald’s “True to the HBCU” scholarships, facilitated by the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. While maintaining a 3.8 grade point average, the Memphis native was active in her community: sorting and packaging food at the Second Harvest Food Bank in Nashville, Tennessee; collecting supplies for homeless women and victims of natural disasters in the Virgin Islands; and serving as a reading volunteer with Smart Baby, an organization promoting childhood literacy to children.

“I chose to attend an HBCU, for the rich education, both inside and outside the classroom,” Brown said. “I wanted to go to a college that would encourage me to step outside of my comfort zone and provide me with an atmosphere designed to promote excellence.”

Memphis WANTV Local 24 reporter Jeané Franseen interviews President Glover Sept. 7 during a morning show outside the Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium in Memphis. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

As for recruitment, officials said a number of top graduating high school seniors who attended TSU’s Memphis Recruitment Reception on Sept. 7 have signed on to attend the university next fall. They said nearly 80 percent of the students who attended the reception in the Sheraton Memphis Downtown Hotel have already met “scholarship requirements.”

“We have already received their scholarship applications, transcripts and ACT scores,” said Dr. Gregory Clark, director of high school relations and NCAA certification at TSU. To be considered for a scholarship, a candidate must have at least a 3.0 GPA and 21 or higher on the ACT.

More than 200 high school seniors from the West Tennessee area and their parents attended the standing-room-only program in one of the hotel’s reception areas.

Jovon Jones, associate director of recruitment at TSU, talks to students and parents about scholarship requirements and deadlines at recruitment reception. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

According to officials of the Office of Institutional Advancement, this year’s Alumni Mixer – a key fundraising event of the Classic week – was a big success. With President Glover and Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, vice president for Research and Institutional Advancement leading the charge, more than $20,000 was raised and nearly 20 new individuals joined the President’s Society. These are individuals who commit to contributing $1,000 or more a year.

“We just want to say thank you for all that you do for Tennessee State University to help keep needy students in school,” Glover said. “Your continued financial, material and other support and gifts are making a big difference in our students’ lives. We are thankful beyond measure for your support.”

During the week, Glover, accompanied by several senior university officials, also visited Power Center Academy High School and Whitehaven High School where she spoke to students and administrators, and answered questions about the importance of a college education and the programs and offerings at TSU.

Earlier on Saturday, Glover, the TSU Aristocrat of Bands, student organizations, including Mr. TSU and Miss TSU and their court, lead the 29th Southern Heritage Classic Parade in Memphis, with thousands along the route cheering on parade participants.

Next year’s Southern Heritage Classic football game is scheduled for Sept. 14.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

More Than 200 Top High School Seniors, Parents Attend TSU Memphis Recruitment Reception

By Emmanuel Freeman

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Kaitlin Mottley is a high achieving high school senior pondering what college or university to attend. She recently attended a program that has her considering becoming a Big Blue Tiger.

Jovon Jones, associate director of recruitment at TSU, talks to students and parents about scholarship requirements and deadlines. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“They said the main things I wanted to hear, like chance for a full ride scholarship, strong academic programs, and their reputation for a great family atmosphere,” said Mottley, a senior at White Station High School, where she maintains a 4.467 grade point average. She also has a score of 29 on the ACT.

The program on Sept. 5 was the Annual TSU Memphis Recruitment Reception at the Sheraton Memphis Downtown for graduating high school seniors and their parents and family members.

TSU’s Office of Admissions holds the reception each year as part of activities leading up to the Southern Heritage Classic between TSU and Jackson State University in the Liberty Bowl.

Kaitlin and her mother, Megan Mottley, were among more than 200 high school seniors from the West Tennessee area and their parents who attended the standing-room-only program in one of the hotel’s reception rooms.

Admissions officials say the goal of the reception is to seek out the best students, nurture them, and graduate them prepared for the global market. It also comes on the heels of sweeping changes TSU President Glover announced in 2016 that raised admission standards to attract the best and brightest student.

“We are going after outstanding students and this reception is usually a major draw for parents and their children, as you can see from this packed room tonight,” said Dr. Gregory Clark, TSU’s director of high school relations and NCAA certification.

He said nearly 80 percent of the students who attended have already met “scholarship requirements.”

“We have already received their scholarship applications, transcripts and ACT scores,” Clark said. To be considered for a scholarship, a candidate must have at least a 3.0 GPA and 21 or higher on the ACT. The deadline to apply is Nov. 1.

Joshua Cannon, who is still considering a major either in electrical engineering or accounting, has met all the requirements and is waiting to get an offer. The Middle College High School senior has a 3.8 GPA and 23 ACT. He was at the reception with his parents.

Like Mottley, Cannon is also encouraged by TSU’s strong family tradition and academic offerings.

“I know going to TSU will be a fun experience and strong preparation for my future,” said Cannon, who has several relatives who attended TSU. “I have already met the criteria and getting a full scholarship will be a big help for me and my family.”

For more information on TSU’s admission requirement, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/admissions/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Southern Heritage Classic More than Football, Builds Careers and Promotes Relationships

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s victory in the 28th Southern Heritage Classic on Sept. 9 wasn’t the only thing sophomore Micah Williams had to celebrate.

The Army ROTC awarded the TSU communications major a $42,500 scholarship during a sideline ceremony at the end of the first quarter of the game.

President Glenda Glover, joined by Rapper and actor T.I., and Associate Vice President for Administration, Dr. Curtis Johnson, right, receives a check for $10,000 from Coors officials at the 28th Southern Heritage Classic in Memphis. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“I love the classic, but receiving this scholarship from the Army is just so exciting,” said Williams, an Army cadet who’s planning a career in the U.S. military. “I am honored to be able to serve my country and to be debt free when I leave college.”

Just like Williams, the classic also brought great excitement to TSU fans and supporters to cap a week of activities.

Army Master Sgt. Gabriel Cleveland, left, presents a check for $42,500 to Army Cadet and TSU communications major Micah Williams at the 28th Southern Heritage Classic in Memphis. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Before a crowd of more than 47,000 at the Liberty Bowl in Memphis, TSU defeated Jackson State University 17-15 to extend its current winning streak to 6-0 over the JSU Tigers. The win improves TSU to 17-11 in the Southern Heritage Classic.

“This is just another sweet victory for our Tennessee State University Tigers and fans,” said TSU President Glenda Glover.

For TSU, the weeklong celebration was more than about football. It was also a time for administrators, staff, student and alumni to engage in academic and relationship building activities that impact student learning, recruitment and support.

For instance, the annual Memphis Recruitment Reception hosted by the Office of Admissions, took place Wednesday evening at the Sheraton Memphis Downtown hotel. More than 50 high school students and their parents attended the reception to receive information on offerings and programs at TSU.

By the end of the evening, 25 students with exceptional GPAs and ACT scores were awarded full scholarships to attend TSU. One of those students was Talia Chambers of Middle College High School.

“I came here tonight just to get some information and now here I have a full-ride scholarship, this is great,” said Chambers, who has a 4.0 GPA, and plans to major in animal science. “I am very excited to attend Tennessee State.”

A daylong college-recruitment fair in the Pipkin Building on Friday followed the reception. Hundreds of students received information on offerings and programs at TSU and other participating institutions.

Alumni engagement, usually a major feature of the Southern Heritage Classic week, saw a packed room of former students and supporters attend the Memphis Alumni Mixer in the Case Management Building.

At the gathering, Glover called for a moment of silence in honor of those affected by hurricanes Harvey and Irma. She also gave an update on developments at TSU, including a new governing board, and the university’s new strategic plan and its emphasis on new admission standards.

“We are focusing on recruiting students who are academically talented,” Glover said. “We have raised our admissions standards. We want to bring in students with the support and ability to graduate. We are no longer the school of last resort. Those days are over.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Southern Heritage Classic Week Brings Victory, Builds Relationships for TSU

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – For Tennessee State University, the 27th Southern Heritage Classic was all that – classic.

The TSU Tigers trounced the Jackson State University Tigers 40-26 before more than 46,000 at the Liberty Bowl in Memphis, Tennessee, to culminate a weeklong series of activities and celebration.

The TSU victory was their fifth straight over the JSU Tigers, and improves TSU to 16-11 in the Southern Heritage Classic.

But the weeklong celebration was more than about football.

The TSU administration, staff, students and alumni engaged in a number of academic and relationship building activities that impact student learning, recruitment and support.

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President Glover speaks to reporters in the Liberty Bowl minutes before signing a partnership agreement with national syndicate radio host Tom Joyner that would increase the number of STEM teachers in Memphis and Shelby County, and Metro Nashville. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations).

A day before the football game, TSU and national syndicated radio host Tom Joyner announced a partnership that could give Tennessee’s two largest school districts a major boost in STEM teachers.

The initiative encourages community college graduates to attend TSU and teach in Memphis and Nashville after graduation.

“Today’s agreement with the Tom Joyner Foundation will help deserving students from five of our community colleges fulfill their desires to attend Tennessee State without the distractions of worrying about how to pay for tuition and fees,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “Most importantly, we’re providing Memphis and Shelby County, along with the Metropolitan Nashville school system, with much needed STEM teachers for the students.”

Following the signing ceremony, President Glover and some senior members of the administration stopped over at Hanley Elementary School, where the president received a rousing welcome by the more than 600 cheering students in the school’s gymnasium.

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President Glover gives a pep talk to more than 600 elementary students during a stopover at Hanley Elementary School in Memphis. To Dr. Glover’s left is Dr. Sha Fanion, Aspire Hanley 2 Elementary principal and TSU graduate. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman)

“Do you want to go to college?” “What do you want to be when you grow up?” “Have you heard about Tennessee State University?” “Do you know what a university president does?”

These were questions Glover posed to the excited students, with a general mix of overwhelming “yes” and some “no” responses to each question.

“Our expectation for Dr. Glover’s visit is for scholars to know college is for certain no matter where they come from,” said Dr. Sha Fanion, principal of Aspire Hanley 2 Elementary and a 2003 graduate of TSU with a bachelor’s degree in special education. “Prior to Dr. Glover coming, we talked about her and the role of a university president. They were excited to know that she is a native of Memphis.”

Earlier during the week at the Memphis/Shelby County Presidential Reception, a recruitment ceremony for aspiring students and their parents, officials gave out scholarship information and other admission requirements.

Another key activity of the Southern Heritage Classic week is the Alumni Mixer hosted by the Office of Institutional Advancement, to thank alumni and supporters of TSU for their contribution. More than 200 filled the reception hall of Case Management, Inc., to meet former school mates and friends, as well as dine and receive updates from officials about activities and development at their alma mater.

“We just want to say thank you for all that you do for Tennessee State University to help keep needy students in school,” Glover said. “Your continued financial, material and other support and gifts are making a big difference in our students’ lives. We are thankful beyond measure for your support.”

At the VIP Mayor’s Reception, another mainstay of the classic week, officials of Baptist Memorial Health Care presented President Glover with a check for $5,000. The fund is to support a scholarship for a deserving student from Shelby County, who is in the allied health program at TSU.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University and Tom Joyner Foundation partner to increase math, biology, chemistry teachers in State

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The State’s two largest school districts could see an increase in math, biology and chemistry teachers thanks to a partnership between Tennessee State University and national syndicated radio host Tom Joyner.

The initiative, which encourages community college graduates to attend TSU and teach in Memphis and Nashville after graduation, was announced at a news conference in Memphis on Friday, Sept. 9, a day before the Southern Heritage Classic game between TSU and Jackson State University.

The partnership seeks to get more students interested in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM. It will offer full scholarships to students graduating from five Tennessee community colleges: Southwest Tennessee, Nashville State, Volunteer State, Motlow State, and Columbia State.

“Today’s agreement with the Tom Joyner Foundation will help deserving students from five of our community colleges fulfill their desires to attend Tennessee State without the distractions of worrying about how to pay for tuition and fees,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “Most importantly, we’re providing Memphis and Shelby County, along with the Metropolitan Nashville school system, with much needed STEM teachers for the students.”

Tom Joyner said he’s glad the initiative will not only help to produce more STEM teachers, but also ease students’ financial burdens.

“We always say that it’s one thing to go to school, but it’s another thing to stay in school,” said Joyner, whose mother was raised at then Tennessee A&I State College by his great aunt, Jane Elliott Hall. A building was named in her honor.

The Tom Joyner Foundation will provide 75 percent of the scholarship funds, and the rest will come from the NSF funded Tiger Teach Initiative and TSU’s Office of Community College Initiatives.

Sharon Peters, executive director of TSU’s Community College Initiatives, said the scholarship program is very much needed.

“We don’t have enough young people filling STEM careers,” Peters said. “A full scholarship to teach in math and biology or chemistry should lead to more teachers, particularly in Nashville and Memphis where we need them.”

School officials acknowledged the need for STEM teachers and lauded the partnership.

“As a system, we always have a shortage of science and math teachers,” said Roderick Richmond, director of student support services for Shelby County Schools. “So I’m really excited about the partnership with Tennessee State and the Tom Joyner Foundation.”

Students beginning their first semester of community college in fall 2016 will be eligible for the scholarship program. They must graduate from the two-year institution with a 3.0 grade point average, and maintain a 3.0 GPA while at TSU, according to requirements. Graduates must teach within the Nashville or Memphis area.

“This partnership gives our students an opportunity to fulfill their dreams,” said Tracy Hall, president of Southwest Tennessee Community College.

Tom Joyner, Jr., who oversees the foundation, agreed.

“This ensures that more students are able to graduate,” he said. “It ensures more children will be placed where they’re needed, the STEM classrooms of Tennessee, as well as throughout America.”

The Tom Joyner Foundation supports historically black colleges and universities with scholarships, endowments, and capacity building enhancements. Since it was created in 1997, the foundation has raised more than $65 million to help students stay in school.

Last year, the foundation selected TSU to be a “school of the month.” Under the designation, the foundation awarded scholarships to students throughout the month and featured TSU’s accomplishments on Tom Joyner’s weekly morning program.

To learn more about the Tom Joyner Foundation, visit: http://tomjoynerfoundation.org.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Tennessee State University President Glover Extends Scholarship Offers to More than 100 Top High School Seniors

TSU President Glenda Glover interacts with several of the more than one students who attended her annual scholarship reception in the Downtown Memphis Sheraton Wednesday Evening. (Photo my John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
TSU President Glenda Glover interacts with several of the more than 100 students who attended her annual scholarship reception in the Downtown Memphis Sheraton Wednesday Evening. (Photo my John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – If Darrick Tucker’s enthusiasm over TSU President Glenda Glover’s announcement of scholarship offers is any indication, more than 100 top high school seniors from west Tennessee and northern Mississippi could be headed to TSU next fall.

Tucker, an all-A’s senior from East High School in Memphis, who wants to become a bio-medical engineer, was among more than 200 students and their parents who packed a hall in the Downtown Memphis Sheraton Wednesday evening to hear Dr. Glover at her annual Presidential Scholarship Reception.

“Tennessee State University is a caring institution for students who want to succeed, and we do everything possible to help them make the transition,” said Dr. Glover, assuring parents that TSU has plans to ensure on-time and early graduation.

For instance, the President named Take 15, a TSU initiative that ensures students graduate in four years by taking at least 15 credit hours or more per semester, and 3+1, another program that ensures student graduation in three years and beginning graduate school in their fourth year of enrollment.

“We nurture your children for success, but to achieve that they must be ready to work hard and be willing to invest the time and energy to graduate on time,” Dr. Glover, a Memphis native and TSU alum, who spoke about her personal gratification of returning home to recruit students, cautioned parents.

“This area means so much to me. This is where I had my beginning. I went to school here. The possibilities in earning an education are just so many. It is just wonderful to attend TSU and come back home as president.”

Unlike last year when the President awarded $3 million in scholarships to 50 students from 15 high schools in west Tennessee and northern Mississippi, no specific amount was announced this time. However, admissions officials said that all of the more than 100 students in attendance could get a full ride if their complete application packages are received by September 24.

“All of these students have been pre-screened by our admission counselors, with the required GPAs or ACT scores,” said Dr. John Cade, interim vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Support Services. “They only need to act fast to meet the September 24 deadline.”

Darrick Tucker is ready.

“There is a more than 85 percent chance that I will come to TSU,” said Tucker, expressing sentiments and enthusiasm shown by many of his fellow seniors at the reception. “TSU’s programs seem to fit what I am looking for.”

Tucker’s parents, mother Marion and father Kirk are just as equally excited about their son’s prospect of selecting TSU for his college career.

“All we have been receiving are letters from schools interested in our son, but this is the first time we are actually meeting a person talk to us about his future,” Kirk Tucker said about what he called the “face-to-face” approach of the President and the admissions officials.

“He has worked so hard to get to this point, and we are very sure that he is ready to work even harder in college,” added Marion Tucker, about her son.

The Presidential Scholarship Reception, one of many activities leading up to the Southern Heritage Classic in Memphis, offered incentives for parents and students to attend the football game between TSU and Jackson State University on Saturday. All in attendance received at least one free ticket to the game.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.