Tag Archives: Seanne Wilson

Angela Rye Inspires Attendees to Take Political Action At Annual Scholarship Fundraiser Honoring Outstanding Women

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Political commentator and analyst Angela Rye served as the special guest for this year’s Women of Legend and Merit Awards Dinner at Tennessee State University, as part of the TSU Women’s Center’s effort to celebrate Women’s History Month.

Rye, who offers regular on-air commentary for several media outlets including BET, CNN, MSNBC, and TV One, spoke briefly from the podium and then participated in a seated interview-style presentation. She answered questions from various attendees, including TSU President Glenda Glover and addressed several issues, such as affirmative action, the legitimacy of legacy admissions and the need for a black agenda.

“I want to help establish what a black agenda should look like, not just for 2020, but ongoing,” Rye said.  “Do you all know that before the Emancipation Proclamation, every year black folks met to talk about our political agenda? The last time we did that collectively, where there was a lot of attention drawn to it, was in 1972 in Gary, Indiana.”

During a light-hearted moment towards the end of the conversation, Glover suggested a petition be started for Rye to run for president.  She encouraged the audience with the chant, “Run! Angie Run! Run! Angie Run!”

Angela Rye

“You want me to run right out that door,” Rye jokingly replied.

Seanne Wilson, chairperson of the event, which took place in Kean Hall Auditorium, said the annual awards dinner raises money for student scholarships and highlights the careers of women she hopes her students will emulate.

“As we know, this is the year of the woman, and women are being more vocal, and we are owning who we are. It’s very important with us attempting to educate these young ladies, that they are aware of opportunities and not afraid to speak out and to speak up for their rights,” said Wilson, who serves as coordinator of the TSU Women’s Center.

According to Wilson, the center is a “safe zone” for women at TSU who experience issues such as fear, anxiety and depression, as well as domestic violence, homelessness and the lack of food.

Lyric Carter, a freshman civil engineering major who serves as a work-study student for the Women’s Center, said she was inspired by Rye’s comments.

” If we don’t speak for us, who is going to speak for us,” Carter said.

Vivian Wilhoite, Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County property accessor and a former Women of Legend and Merit honoree, said the event is important because it celebrates the women.

“We do not do enough to recognize women in the various areas of the world, whether it be in business or leadership or government or strong women committed to different topics and issues,” she said.  “I really think there are so many women doing so many different things, and we really cannot do enough to honor them.”

Several women where  honored during this year’s event including: Veronica Marable Johnson, Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce New Member Representative; Dr. Robbie Melton, TSU interim dean of the Graduate School; Karen Johnson, Davidson County Register of Deeds; Attorney Cynthia Fitzgerald; Attorney Joy Kimbrough; Dr. Judy Cummings, Pastor of New Covenant Christian Church; and Zaya Mouto, a sophomore Business Administration major who received the “Rising Star” Award.

For more information about how to support the TSU Women’s Center, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/womenscenter/

Editor’s Note: Featured photo by Ramona Whitworth Wiggins

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Political Analyst Angela Rye To Speak at TSU Women’s Center Scholarship Fundraising Affair

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Political Commentator and Analyst Angela Rye will serve as the keynote speaker for this year’s Women of Legend and Merit Awards Dinner at Tennessee State University on March 19 as part of the TSU Women’s Center’s effort to celebrate Women’s History Month.

Rye, who offers regular on-air commentary for several media outlets including BET, CNN, MSNBC, and TV One, will speak about “Making An Impact Economically, Civically, and Politically.” The event is scheduled for 7 p.m. in Kean Hall on the main campus.

Seanne Wilson, chairperson of the event, which raises money for student scholarships, said she hopes Rye’s visit will inspire young women at TSU to be more aware of the power of their voice. 

“As we know, this is the year of the woman, and women are being more vocal and we are owning who we are. It’s very important with us attempting to educate these young ladies, that they are aware of opportunities and not afraid to speak out and to speak up for their rights,” said Wilson, who serves as coordinator of the TSU Women’s Center.

Wilson said an increasing number of young women in the Nashville community have expressed interest in attending this year’s event because of Rye.

“I think that a lot of women, whether they are in politics or not, will feel coached and mentored by her, or feel empowered by her.  And empowering women is something that the Women’s Center attempts to do,” Wilson said. “There are so many people out there who are interested in how we have gotten into this political climate.  How did we get here? And how do we fix the problems that we see?”

According to Wilson, the Women’s Center is a “safe zone” for women at TSU who experience issues such as fear, anxiety and depression, as well as domestic violence, homelessness and the lack of food. She said this year for Women’s History Month, the Women’s Center hopes to inspire students by bringing numerous professional women to campus, including judges, political figures, entrepreneurs, chief executive officers, and international women of distinction.

Several women will be honored during this year’s event including: Veronica Marable Johnson, Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce New Member Representative; Dr. Robbie Melton, TSU interim dean of the Graduate School; Karen Johnson, Davidson County Register of Deeds; Attorney Cynthia Fitzgerald; Attorney Joy Kimbrough; Dr. Judy Cummings, Pastor of New Covenant Christian Church; and Zaya Mouto, a sophomore Business Administration major who will receive the “Rising Star” Award.

To purchase tickets for the March 19 awards dinner or learn more about the Women’s Center, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/legendandmerit/.

Delta Sigma Theta, Inc. National President to Speak at Women of Legend And Merit Event To Raise Scholarship and Program Dollars for Students

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Beverly Smith, national president and chief executive officer of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated, will serve as the keynote speaker for this year’s Women of Legend and Merit Award Dinner at Tennessee State University on April 10 in Kean Hall.

Smith, who also serves as the assistant commissioner and Georgia State director for Adult Education and GED Testing through the Technical College System of Georgia, said she is excited about addressing the young ladies at TSU because of the many issues facing women today.

Beverly E. Smith

“We are at a time today when the power of women really matters,” she said. “The power of our voice is clearly something of significance these days whether or not we are comfortable enough with ourselves to use or understand it.”

TSU President Glenda Glover echoed the same sentiments.

“We are extremely pleased to welcome Beverly Smith to our campus for our Women of Legend and Merit Awards Dinner, and look forward to hearing her inspiring and powerful words,” she said. “Women of Legend and Merit is in its 11th year and couldn’t have come at a more pivotal time in our nation’s history. Women should feel empowered and celebrated. Our dinner allows us to do this and raise scholarship and program dollars for students, all while partnering with the community.”

Seanne Wilson, chairperson of the event, which raises money for student scholarships, said Smith’s visit will give the young ladies at TSU an opportunity to witness a “woman of excellence” who is the head of a large body of women of excellence.

“This is an opportunity for them to meet women from varying organizations and diverse positions in life, and to hear their stories and their struggles and how they made it,” said Wilson, who serves as coordinator of the TSU Women’s Center.

According to Wilson, the Women’s Center is a “safe zone” for women at TSU who experience issues such as fear, anxiety and depression, as well as domestic violence, homelessness and the lack of food.

Wilson said the purpose of this event is to empower and uplift the female students at TSU.

Smith said the influence of her father, a civil rights activist, as well as powerful women in her family and early mentors such as legends Dorothy Heights and Althea Gibson helped propel her to success.

“You can’t be what you can’t see, and I think that certainly holds true especially for us in our communities. A lot of times it is very difficult to be what you can’t see,” she said. “If we celebrate who we are and who we have been, it gives us an opportunity for greater heights.”

This year’s honorees are Vivian Wilhoite, Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County property accessor; Dr. Tameka Winston, TSU interim chair of Department of Communications; Many Bears Grinder, commission of the Tennessee Department of Veterans Affairs; and Tina Tuggle, Tennessee Titans director of community relations.

Awards will also be presented to retired educator Gwendolyn Vincent, and TSU freshman Natalie Cooper.

To purchase tickets for the April 10 awards dinner or learn more about the Women’s Center, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/legendandmerit/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Actress Vivica A. Fox empowers Women of Legend and Merit Awards attendees, encourages students to make right choices

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Actress Vivica A. Fox has a message for Tennessee State University students: make the right choices.

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TSU President Glenda Glover, scholarship recipient Kayla Daniels, and Dr. Samantha Morgan-Curtis, associate professor of English and Women’s Studies at TSU. (By John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Fox was the keynote speaker at the Women of Legend and Merit Awards on March 21, which also featured a performance by entertainer Angela Winbush.

With an extensive body of work that includes television, stage and film credits, Fox talked about her career, at times drawing laughter from attendees, and striking a more serious note when discussing her mother and her faith.

But Fox, who is also a producer and accomplished businesswoman, probably had the strongest message when she focused directly on TSU’s students, who participated in some capacity throughout the program.

“You all are our future,” Fox said. “The choices you make today will shape your tomorrow.”

First held in 2007, the WOLM awards is designed to bring awareness and raise funds to support the TSU Women’s Center, which offers student-focused programming to empower individuals and student organizations, as well as help students make the right choices.

At the awards dinner, TSU freshman Kayla Daniels was given a $1,000 scholarship to pursue her degree in business. The scholarship dollars are available mainly because of money raised at the WOLM awards through ticket sales and sponsorships.

Women’s Center coordinator Seanne Wilson said the awards dinner is also an opportunity for the TSU family and the Nashville community to be introduced to “dynamic, successful, and positive women who impact their community,” as well as society.

This year’s honorees were Dr. Stephanie Walker, Vanderbilt University/First lady Mt. Zion Baptist; Cheryl White Mason, Vanderbilt Law School; Teresa Phillips, TSU athletic director; Yvette Boyd, R.H. Boyd Publishing; and Vicki Yates, WTVF Nashville news anchor.

In particular, Wilson said the event seeks to expose the university’s “female student population to positive role models, networking opportunities and resources to assist in their academic, personal and professional growth as women.”

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Entertainer Angela Winbush. (By John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

But its main objective is to help the Women’s Center, which assists students with issues that range from financial needs to domestic abuse, Wilson said. It also has programs like “Wisdom Speaks,” in which alumni return to the campus to engage students in empowering discussions, as well as a clothing boutique.

“Some of our students are first generation college students and have a very limited wardrobe,” Wilson said. “Some young ladies, if they’re interviewing or doing internships, will come to the center looking for something to wear.”

The center is also sort of a home-away-from-home where students, not just females, can visit and do homework, or just hang out and debate the latest topics with friends, Wilson said.

Senior Kourtney Daniels said the center is a “vital resource to all students on campus.”

“It’s not just for the female population,” said Daniels, an agriculture science major with a concentration in food science and technology.

“Guys come in all the time, and we’ll have debates about everything from politics, to family issues we might have.”

For more information about the Women’s Center, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/womenscenter/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Tennessee State’s Women’s Center is a ‘vital resource’ to students

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Actress Vivica A. Fox says she’s looking forward to speaking at this year’s Women of Legend and Merit Awards, and highlighting Tennessee State’s Women’s Center.

WOLM-2
Women’s Center coordinator Seanne Wilson talks with students. (By John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

The WOLM awards dinner is scheduled for March 21 at 7 p.m. in the TSU Gentry Complex.

“It’s an evening where the women get to honor and uplift one another, and support one another,” Fox told Nashville radio station WQQK in a recent interview. “I’m looking forward to just celebrating and having a wonderful evening.”

First held in 2007, the WOLM awards is designed to bring awareness and raise funds to support the center, which offers student-focused programming to empower individuals and student organizations.

Center coordinator Seanne Wilson said the awards dinner provides an opportunity for the TSU family and the Nashville community to be introduced to “dynamic, successful, and positive women who impact their community,” as well as society.

Fox, also a producer and accomplished businesswoman, will be the keynote speaker. Entertainer Angela Winbush, whose hit songs include “Your Smile” and “Angel,” will perform.

Unknown-3This year’s honorees are Dr. Stephanie Walker, Vanderbilt University/First lady Mt. Zion Baptist; Cheryl White Mason, Vanderbilt Law School; Teresa Phillips, TSU athletic director; Yvette Boyd, R.H. Boyd Publishing; and Vicki Yates, WTVF Nashville news anchor.

In particular, Wilson said the event seeks to expose the university’s “female student population to positive role models, networking opportunities and resources to assist in their academic, personal and professional growth as women.”

TSU’s center assists students with issues that range from financial needs to domestic abuse, Wilson said. It also has programs like “Wisdom Speaks,” in which alumni return to the campus to engage students in empowering discussions, as well as a clothing boutique.

“Some of our students are first generation college students and have a very limited wardrobe,” Wilson said. “Some young ladies, if they’re interviewing or doing internships, will come to the center looking for something to wear.”

The center is also sort of a home-away-from-home where students can visit and do homework, or just hang out and debate the latest topics with friends.

Senior Kourtney Daniels said the center is a “vital resource to all students on campus.”

“It’s not just for the female population,” said Daniels, an agriculture science major with a concentration in food science and technology. “Guys come in all the time, and we’ll have debates about everything from politics, to family issues we might have.”

This year, Wilson said a deserving TSU student will be presented a $1,000 scholarship at the awards dinner. She said scholarship dollars are available mainly because of money raised at the WOLM awards through ticket sales and sponsorships.

To purchase tickets for the March 21 awards dinner or learn more about the Women’s Center, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/womenscenter/legend.aspx.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.