Tag Archives: Scholarships

25 Top High School Seniors Awarded Full Scholarships to Attend Tennessee State University

By Emmanuel S. Freeman

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – When Meaghen Jones found out she was getting a full scholarship to attend Tennessee State University, she summed up her feelings in one word: “overwhelming!”

Dr John Cade, Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Services, talks to Academic High Achiever Scholarship recipients Kamryn Martin, left, Brittney Johnson and Leslie Curry. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

“I was always sure I wanted to come to TSU, but tonight secured it,” said Jones, who was one of 25 high school seniors awarded Academic High Achiever Scholarships to TSU at a ceremony in Memphis on Wednesday. “I have worked so hard throughout just to make sure I get a full ride to college and this was just so overwhelming for me.”

Jones has a 4.2 grade point average and is ranked No. 4 out of 411 in her senior class at Whitehaven High School in Memphis. She and the other top seniors attended the Annual TSU Memphis Recruitment Reception at the Sheraton Memphis Downtown for graduating high school seniors and their parents and family members.

The reception is held each year by TSU’s Office of Admissions as part of activities leading up to the Southern Heritage Classic between TSU and Jackson State University in the Liberty Bowl. This year’s game is on Saturday.

Jones is coming to TSU as a pre-med. Her mother, Jackie Latiker, said the fact her daughter is getting a full ride is “absolutely phenomenal.“

“To see her stand before 24 other students that were selected, I am just too elated,” Latiker said. “This is what we’ve worked for all these years.”

TSU’s Vice-President for Enrollment Management and Student Services, Dr. John Cade, congratulated the scholarship recipients, and said the university’s goal is to seek out the best students, nurture them, and graduate them prepared for the global market.

“As you come to TSU, you are following in the footsteps of great people, among them our president, Dr. Glenda Glover, a Memphis native, and a very high achiever herself who believes in your potential for greatness,” Cade said. “So, having someone of that caliber to lead Tennessee State University is a prime example of what you can aspire to become and all of you can do that. We offer a number of programs at TSU that will assist you in your success.”

At the reception, more than 50 high school seniors and their parents attended to hear TSU admissions officials discuss the university’s offerings and programs.

Talia Chambers and William Edwards were also among the 25 selected for the Academic High Achiever Scholarship. To qualify for the scholarship, a student must have a 3.5 GPA or higher and 23 and above on the ACT.

Chambers, who wants to major in animal science, has a 4.0 GPA at Middle College High School. Edwards plans to study graphic design. He has a 3.5 GPA at Wooddale High School.

“I am very excited to attend Tennessee State,” Chambers said. “It is within my distance range and it has my area of study in pre-vet medicine. I came here tonight just to get some information and now here I have a full ride scholarship, this is great”

Said Edwards: “When they first called my name I was really nervous. All my siblings received full-ride scholarships to go to college. So I am just glad to be able to measure up to them with a full ride of my own. Thank you TSU.”

Several members of the Memphis chapter of the TSU National Alumni Association, friends of TSU, and the Tennessee State University Cheering Squad were on hand to cheer on the scholarship recipients.

For more information on admission to Tennessee State University, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/admissions/contact.aspx

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Tyson Foods CEO Donnie Smith Wows TSU Students on Success, Corporate Culture and Leadership; Discusses Partnership Opportunities with University Officials

smith1.2
Donnie Smith, Tyson Foods President and CEO, speaks to students at TSU on Wednesday. (Photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)


NASHVILLE, Tenn.
(TSU News Service) – Developing corporate partnerships and relationships with industry leaders have been at the core of Dr. Glenda Glover’s vision since becoming president of Tennessee State University nearly two years ago.

This has included visits and talks with major corporations and businesses and invitations to their leaders to visit the TSU campus to see the kinds of preparations students are receiving to be ready for the job market.

“This is necessary not just because we want these corporations to give to the University, but it also helps to expose our students to industry’s best as well as offer them opportunities to develop job-ready skills through internships, cooperative assistantships, scholarships and employment opportunities,” Dr. Glover said.

Scholars
President Glenda Glover and Tyson Foods President and CEO Donnie Smith meet with Tom Joyner Foundation scholarship recipients following the check presentation. From left are, Bria Monk, Tyson CEO Smith, Kourtney Daniels, President Glover and David Conner. (Photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

And today, TSU students received a good dose of exposure and lecture on corporate culture and leadership when the President and Chief Executive Officer of Tyson Foods, Inc., a $42 billion, Fortune 500 Arkansas-based company, visited and spent an entire day interacting with students, administrators, faculty and staff on the main campus.

Donnie Smith, whose visit also included the presentation of scholarships to three TSU students, in a partnership with the Tom Joyner Foundation, said his visit was intended to broaden existing relationship with TSU and explore areas in which student preparation in agriculture and science are more aligned with Tyson’s needs.

“We want to continue to build the relationship deeper by developing a streamline of talents that is suited to our company’s needs,” said Smith, who added that about 12 TSU students have interned at Tyson in the last two years, while another was fully employed with the company.

In a meeting earlier in Dr. Glover’s office with senior administration members, President Glover welcomed Smith and his team, which included Holly Bourland, Corporate Recruitment Manager for Professional Employment.

The TSU team emphasized that student preparation remains the main focus of the University, “because TSU wants to have a broad footprint” on industry by putting out students with job-ready skills, and Tyson could be a major partner in that area.

“Our students are involved in cutting-edge research in many areas of agricultural production and food security that could be useful to your company,” Dr. Glover told the Tyson executives.

“We are doing breakthrough research on our campus,” added Dr. Lesia Crompton-Young, chief research officer and associate vice President for Research and Sponsored Programs. “If you see the kinds of research we are involved in you will find that we are doing things that surely correlate with what Tyson’s needs are.”

A visit and tour of the University’s new Agricultural Biotechnology Research Building provided the Tyson visitors a closer look at some of the cutting-edge research the University officials spoke about.

“This visit is a great opportunity for us,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, following a meeting with the Tyson president. “We are trying to connect student and research to corporate needs because we want our research to be relevant to the market needs.”

In a gathering with Business students, the Tyson CEO spoke about corporate leadership, understanding the needs of “team members” (employees), and how to stay ahead of the competition.

“At Tyson we like to win, but for us winning is to make great food and helping those in need,” said Smith, adding that hunger relief is a major part of what Tyson does.

On corporate culture, Smith reminded the student about what he called his five “Is” and three “Rs.”

“To be successful you must have ‘integrity,’ be ‘intelligent,’ ‘innovative,’ have ‘interpersonal skills’ and you must be ‘inspirational.’ To achieve these, you must learn to develop ‘relationships,’ be ‘resilient’ and ‘result’ oriented,” smith said.

At a luncheon with Dr. Glover, along with her Cabinet and deans, the Tyson group saw PowerPoint presentations of offerings and programs in the College of Business, and the College of Engineering.

Prior to the presentations, the Tyson chief executive presented a check for $7,500 to Briar Monk, a senior Agricultural Science major with a 3.65 GPA from Little Rock, Arkansas; Kourtney Daniels, a sophomore Food Biosciences and Technology major with a 4.0 GPA from Chicago; and David Connor, a junior Agricultural Science major with a 3.42 GPA from Birmingham, Alabama.

The money, with each student receiving $2,500, is the result of a partnership between Tyson Foods and the Tom Joyner Foundation called the TScholars Project, to offer scholarships and internship opportunities to selected students majoring in Agriculture and Business at four historically black colleges and universities. The schools, TSU, Florida A&M University, North Carolina A&T State University and the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, were selected because of their proximity to Tyson company facilities.

According to the Interim Director of the Career Development Center at TSU, Tina Reed, each scholarship recipient will receive a summer 2015 internship at Tyson Foods.

Before leaving the TSU campus, the CEO also met with an array of students in different disciplines in Poag Auditorium, where he reiterated his views on corporate culture and leadership.

Other University officials who participated in meetings with the Tyson CEO and his team include: Dr. Mark Hardy, vice president for Academic Affairs; Jean Jackson, vice president for Administration; Cynthia Brooks, vice president for Business and Finance; Dr. John Cade, vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Support Services; Dr. Alisa Mosley, associate vice president for Academic Affairs; Robin Tonya Watson, assistant vice president for Institutional Advancement; Kelli Sharpe, assistant vice president for Public Relations and Communications; Laurence Pendleton, University Counsel; and Dr. Cheryl Green, assistant vice president for Student Affairs.

Also attending today’s meetings were: Dr. Millicent Lownes-Jackson, dean of the College of Business; and Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College Engineering.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Upcoming TSU Gala More Than Glitz and Glamour

Annual event to raise scholarship dollars for students with real needs

 

 

Lauren Wiggins
Lauren Wiggins

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Lauren Wiggins says she learned a life lesson in high school that continues to follow her even today. That lesson: people aren’t concerned about your excuses. The Atlanta native recalls a high school teacher telling her, at age 14, that she displayed the actions of a criminal because she skipped classes or arrived late. Wiggins says her explanations fell on deaf ears.

“Whenever I was late or missed class, I would let the teachers know I had been up all night taking care of my brothers or in the emergency room with them,” explains Wiggins. “I have a 19-year-old brother who is severely disabled, and a 15-year-old brother who is diagnosed with Autism and ADHD [Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder]. I’m the oldest of three, and I have been changing diapers since I was five years old.”

Wiggins says her oldest brother has cerebral palsy, epilepsy and a cerebral shunt.

“My brother has the mind of a six-month-old. His body has continued to grow since birth, but his brain hasn’t. At times all I could do was just hold him when he cried. He’s unable to communicate and is completely immobile. My choice was easy in high school, family is first.”

Today, the 21-year-old Wiggins is a rising senior at Tennessee State University with a 3.8 GPA as a Public Health major. She received a full music scholarship to TSU following high school. However, after her sophomore year, she had to make another tough decision regarding her education and family. Wiggins decided to give up the scholarship.

“Dropping out [of college] was never an option, but I was needed at home. This conflicted with my commitment to the marching band and wind ensemble. I enjoyed being in the band, but my parents are older and needed help taking care of my brother. I had to rush home several times when my mom called and said her back was out from getting him in and out of bed or his wheelchair.”

2014 Scholarship Gala
Click to Buy tickets today!

Wiggins knew giving up the scholarship meant her family would have to struggle to pay tuition, but she was determined to stay at TSU. The University has been a part of her family for three generations. Through persistence, she found out about the TSU Foundation and was awarded a scholarship that covered nearly all her expenses for the upcoming fall semester.

“This scholarship has helped immensely, and heightened my desire to give back to Tennessee State, for other students who deserve a second chance.”

On Friday, Sept. 26, Tennessee State will hold its annual scholarship gala honoring long-time educators Drs. McDonald and Jamye Williams. Both have ties to some of TSU’s most notable alumni, including Oprah Winfrey. The event will also honor alumnus and former football player Claude Humphrey, one of the newest members inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Dr. Sharon Peters, Gala co-chairman, says while the event will honor these individuals, the primary mission is to raise funds to help students who need money to stay at the University. Students like Wiggins are one of many examples why the gala is so important.

“The gala provides the needed support for students to enroll at the University who may not otherwise have the funds to attend or who may fall short financially,” adds Peters, also director for TSU’s Community College Initiative Program. “A majority of our students need financial aid and without the help of many of our donors, these students would not have the opportunity to attend college.”

This will be TSU President Glenda Glover’s second scholarship gala while serving as the leader of one of the nation’s top HBCUs. Last year’s event had record attendance. According to University officials, more than 600 students were helped with $1.7 million worth of scholarships during the 2013-14 academic year. This represented a 76 percent increase in donations from the previous year and the University was able to award up to $965,000 in private scholarships.

“I am confident that our donors- employees, alumni, corporate partners, and friends of the University will continue to give and partner with us for this year’s scholarship gala,” says President Glover. “We have students with real needs, and the Foundation, along with the Office of Student Enrollment, has done a tremendous job in matching students with dollars. Every dollar counts and will make a difference in a student’s life. It begins with them receiving a quality education at Tennessee State.”

Wiggins says that’s exactly what she’s receiving at TSU – a quality education that has afforded her the opportunity to have internships with environmental watchdog Green Peace and the Centers for Disease Control. She beams with pride when asked what the future holds.

“I’ve lived my life around my brother’s health and wouldn’t change one single thing. I am happy to be alive and not a burden on my parents. I believe my future is bright and I owe it to my future alma mater TSU.”

Following graduation, Wiggins has her eyes set on Yale University where she plans on obtaining master’s degrees in Public Health and Environmental Science. Eventually, she hopes to pursue a Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology.

Call 615.963.5481 or visit www.tnstate.edu/scholarshipgala for more information on how you can help students like Lauren Wiggins through the 2014 Scholarship Gala. The gala takes place at Music City Center and tickets are available now to purchase.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

The HOPE Dream: TSU Alum Pitch Man for State Education Lottery Program

Evan Brown
Evan Brown

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Evan Roosevelt Brown has HOPE. It has taken in him to places he never dreamt of.

So, he is lending his face and voice to help more than 100,000 Tennessee students each year get that same sweet taste of HOPE.

Brown, a native of Nashville, is a TV spokesperson for the Tennessee Education Lottery Corporation, which funds the Tennessee HOPE Scholarship. The corporation is celebrating its 10th year. During that time the Lottery has raised nearly $3 billion.

And Brown, who is the contract compliance coordinator at the Lottery, has all the right tools to get the corporation’s message across. He is savvy, has nice looks with great intellect, but more than that, he has the message that it pays to get an excellent education with hard work, and the HOPE Scholarship is the way.

After all, the 2009 Tennessee State University business administration graduate with a concentration in economics and finance knows what it means to work hard. It took focus like “keeping my nose to the grind” and maintaining decent grades during his college career to get him to where he is.

“Growing up in my home I had no choice but to work hard and move up,” said Brown, whose parents are all college graduates in successful careers. “My brother and sister, who are graduates of TSU, got a full ride in college. But with me not getting that, the HOPE Scholarship made it easy on my parents not to bear that cost.”

So when the opportunity came up to be the spokesperson for the program that helped him through college, Brown jumped on it.

“This is a chance to help other people get what I got,” said Brown. “Being the face of the state’s education lottery program and people seeing me is an encouragement to give back and inspire others.”

Brown knows that his new “gig,” as he calls it, comes with a certain level of notoriety, but he says the part of the “job” that encourages him the most is being able to motivate “young people” to seek excellence.

He has been with the Lottery for seven years, two as an intern, starting when he was a student at TSU. His career growth at the corporation in five years as a full-time staff has been remarkable, something he calls a blessing.

“I have moved from being an intern to being the contract compliance coordinator, which includes project management, procurement services, business development, and records retention,” Brown said in a suave but very humble tone. “I started as an intern in the finance department, to the contract department handling inside sales, then credit analyst before my current position.”

About how he was selected to be the face of the Lottery with commercial spots running on YouTube and TV along with radio stations throughout the state, Brown said it all started with a conversation between him, the president, and the vice president and legal counsel of the corporation when they asked him to appear in the advertisement to mark the 10th anniversary of the Lottery.

“I think because I had been there a long time and because of the level of relationship I had with them and my advancement in the corporation prompted them to consider me,” Brown added.

His spot is one of three commercials running on stations around the state to highlight the success of the Lottery’s education program.

Brown, who earned an MBA in 2012 from Trevecca Nazarene University, touts his undergraduate preparation at TSU as the foundation to his success. He minces no word to talk about “my TSU” whenever the opportunity comes up.

Go Big Blue, I am a Tennessee HOPE scholar and a proud graduate of Tennessee State University,” Brown says in his commercial as he pitches the Lottery.

For him, it is all about HOPE.

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.