Tag Archives: Residence Life

TSU Faculty and Staff Celebrate Giving With ‘Sweet Talk’

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Tennessee State University Department of Dental Hygiene received special recognition at the university’s “Sweet Talk” event, along with the Office of Events Management and the Department of Residence Life.

Each area achieved 100 percent participation in the university’s annual faculty and staff giving campaign, which raises money to benefit TSU students.

Sonya Smith, assistant director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving, thanks ‘Sweet Talk’ attendees for giving as part of faculty and staff giving campaign.

“Some made direct deposits. Some made one-time gifts. But what matters most is the sacrifice,” said Sonya Smith, assistant director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving and chair of the campaign. “Whatever your sacrifice is, we just ask you to be a part of the faculty and staff campaign.”

The event, which took place Feb. 14 on the Avon Williams Campus, provided an opportunity for campus employees to enjoy delicious pastries and discuss the importance of supporting students beyond the classroom.

Smith expressed her gratitude to the campaign co-chairs and various contributors for exceeding their goal of $155,000 for the 2017-2018 fiscal year by raising $161,763.  She said the goal for the current fiscal year is to raise $175,000. The campaign has raised $136,000 of that amount.

Rosalyn Word, a faculty member in the Department of Dental Hygiene and a co-chair of the faculty and staff annual giving campaign, expressed excitement about the effects of increased giving in dental hygiene.

Department of Dental Hygiene Faculty and Staff Members

“One of the things that we have been able to do in the Department of Dental Hygiene is establish a dental hygiene academic scholarship. The first year we were able to award one $1,000 scholarship to a deserving student,” Word said. “This year we were able to award two $1,000 scholarships to our dental hygiene students. I am really excited about that initiative, and we hope to be able to carry this legacy on, and keep this scholarship going.”

Eloise Alexis, associate vice president for Institutional Advancement, said Sweet Talk provides an opportunity for her staff to say thank you to participants and ask attendees to rally others to support students.

“The amazing thing about faculty and staff in this initiative is that, not only do they give of themselves all day and everyday in the classroom and as staff by supporting our students in the campus environment, they also give back to Tennessee State University from their hard earned resources to Tennessee State,” Alexis said.

Office of Events Management and Conference Services Administration and Staff Members

Trudie Thomas, coordinator for the Honors College and a co-chair of the campaign, said Sweet Talk helps a lot of students who really need support to attend the university.

“I like to give because it helps the university, and it has an impact on some child’s life. When I was in school tuition was $65 a quarter,” said Thomas, who graduated from TSU in 1972. “I give because I see the need, especially with black students right now. Education is an investment.”

“Sweet Talk” Committee Members show off variety of tasty desserts prepared by TSU Alum Alexis Hughes-Williams, Owner of Something Sweet, LLC.

TSU Alumna Alexis Hughes-Williams, owner of Something Sweet, LLC, provided a variety of colorful desserts for the event. Hughes-Williams, who graduated in 2011 with a degree in business/marketing, said Sweet Talk provided the perfect opportunity for her “virtual pop-up shop” to collaborate with the university.

With the deadline for reaching this year’s goal being June 30, Smith encourages faculty and staff to continue giving. For more information about how to participate in the campaign, call (615) 963-2936.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Alum Emerges as Smooth Jazz Phenom

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Deborah Ghent says when she and her husband Carl went on their first date, they hit it off so well that they discussed naming their first child Jazmin to honor their mutual love for jazz music.

The couple had no idea they would have twins, but their decision to name their daughter Jazmin seems almost prophetic considering the recent success and recognition she has garnered as a smooth jazz artist.

Jazmin Ghent, who was recently voted Best New Artist of 2017 by the Smooth Jazz Network, outshined Gerald Albright’s daughter Selina Albright, Billboard-charting jazz guitarist Adam Hawley and a host of other smooth jazz notables for the coveted title.

Ghent earned a master’s degree in music from Tennessee State University in 2014. She said music has always been a part of her life.

“If I didn’t have music, I know I wouldn’t be where I am today,” she said. “Music distracted me from getting off track and being something I’m not.  It really allowed me to express myself and find my way in life.”

TSU Alum Jazmin Ghent was recently voted Best New Artist of 2017 by the Smooth Jazz Network.

Nicknamed “Jazzy Jaz” by her grandfather Fletcher Gaines, who also played saxophone, Ghent grew up listening to jazz standards from his music collection, as well as the music of Gerald Albright, Kirk Whalum and Brian Culbertson.

Currently an elementary school music teacher on weekdays and a traveling smooth jazz phenom on weekends, Jazmin credits TSU for playing a major role in her success.

She said Dr. Robert Elliot, head of the Department of Music at TSU, her residence life coworkers Gregory Williams and Brent Dukhie, and various members of the TSU family, provided direction and support during her time at the university.

“I found out about the program at TSU through the Bobby Jones Show,” she said.  “I performed on his ‘Show Your Talent Show,’ and went to do an interview with Dr. Elliot. He didn’t have to give me a chance and an opportunity, but I am beyond thankful that he did.”

Elliot, who served as chair of Ghent’s thesis committee, said that as a musician, Jazmin brings the “total package.”

“She is very much a modern saxophonist, but she is well-grounded in the music of those greats who came before her, and she has built upon that legacy,” he said.  “Jazmin is a very knowledgeable musician and a very creative person.  She has good character, a pleasing personality, and the great ability as an educator to teach people about what it is she does.”

Elliot said for her master’s degree project, Ghent developed a summer camp in music for children to teach them jazz. She held the camp and then documented the curriculum and the delivery of the curriculum.

A great deal of Jazmin’s love for education comes from her mother Deborah, who worked as a special education teacher for 38 years.  Deborah Ghent, who currently serves as her daughter’s manager, said Jazmin and her twin sister, Jenai, started taking piano lessons at the age of six and playing saxophone in middle school.

According to her mother, Jazmin honed a lot of her leadership skills and musicianship in church.

“She was always a little different because she would read the music, but she would always like to add things to the music,” her mother said.  “At the age of 8 she started playing in church, and she and her twin sister alternated weeks and they became the church Sunday school pianists.  When she was older and the church pianist was out, she would take over.  When the pianist was there, Jazmin would find a little spot over in the corner and she would play the saxophone along with whatever hymns or whatever songs were being played in church.”

Jazmin’s dedication and commitment to music paid off in high school when she was named drum major of her 200-member high school band in Huntsville, Alabama. She held the position for three years until she graduated and attended Florida State University, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in music education with a minor in jazz studies.

As she continues to find success as a professional musician, Jazmin also relishes in the opportunity to continue working as a music educator.

“Education is such a big part of my life and what I do,” she said.  “I think it’s always going to be there in some capacity. If the opportunity does present itself, I will definitely be a full-time professional musician, but I will always like to keep some aspect of education.  My goal is to get my doctorate and teach on the collegiate level, so I’m going to try to juggle them both for as long as I can.”

Currently, Jazmin is working on her third project, “The Story of Jaz,” which she said highlights her various musical influences and life experiences.

“I’m one of those people who likes to go outside the box and try different things,” she said.

Jazz lovers from around the world can experience Jazmin’s unique musical gift at her scheduled performances which include bookings at the Perfect Note in Hoover, Alabama, and the Mallorca Smooth Jazz Festival in Mallorca, Spain.

For more information about booking Jazmin or to purchase her previous projects, “Boss” and “Chocolate Sunshine,” visit www.jazminghent.net.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Names Dr. Michael Freeman as New VP for Student Affairs

Dr. Michael Freeman
Dr. Michael Freeman

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has brought a familiar face back in naming Dr. Michael Freeman as the new associate vice president of Student Affairs.

From March 2013 up to his recent appointment, Freeman served as the assistant vice president and dean of Students at the University of South Florida. However, Freeman is no stranger to TSU, having spent nearly seven years at the University, also serving in the same role as vice president for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management from 2006 until 2011, and assistant professor of Higher Education.

“I’m excited to be back at a place I know,” said Freeman. “It’s rare that you get a second, ‘first’ look at an institution and come back to work for a place that holds a special place in your heart.”

Freeman said he has a large task ahead of him as he will be a part of the TSU president’s senior cabinet, and will oversee the following departments: Residence Life, Career Services, Student Activities, Judicial Affairs, the Men and Women’s Centers, Campus and Wellness Centers, Health Services, Counseling, and Recreation and Intramurals.

But it is a task, he said, he is ready to tackle and will focus on three areas to help students prepare for their future.

According to Freeman, he wants to get the staff back to minimum levels to be able to deliver services and support to students, and focus on integrated planning and programing while creating deeper, more meaningful programs for students. He also plans on partnering with departments around campus to help students meet their goals.

“Ultimately, everything we do needs to be geared toward student success and their growth and development,” Freeman added.

But one of the biggest challenges Freeman sees is getting to know TSU in a “new” way.

“I want to make sure I see the University as it is today, and not how it was when I left a few years ago,” he said. “I want to know it in this moment and still be productive. TSU has its own spirit, pride and history, and I’m happy to be a part of this movement.”

Prior to his arrival to TSU in 2006, Freeman served as the vice president and Dean at Saint Mary’s College of Maryland from 1999-2006, as well as dean of Student Affairs from 1995-1999, director of Residence Life from 1987-1989 and associate director for Minority Recruitment and Services from 1984-1987 at the same institution. He also served as senior academic advisor and faculty member at John Hopkins University.

Freeman has a Bachelor of Science in General Studies in Psychology and Sociology, and a Master of Arts in Counselor Education from the University of Iowa, and Ph.D. in Counseling and Personnel Services from the University of Maryland.

 

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Longtime educator, scientist named associate vice president for Research and Sponsored Programs at TSU

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.