Tag Archives: Rep. Harold Love Jr.

TSU Welcomes New Male Freshmen with Third Annual ‘Tied to Success’

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University first-time male freshmen packed Poag Auditorium on the main campus on Thursday evening for the third annual “Tied to Success,” a rite of passage for all incoming male students.

Dwight Beard, President of the Nashville Chapter of the TSUNAA, left, along with Mr. TSU Darian McGhee, greets students and participants at the 2018 “Tied to Success” ceremony in Poag Auditorium. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

As a welcome into the “Big Blue Brotherhood,” the young men were given TSU blue ties with the name of the university. For those individuals who needed help tying just the right knot, university officials and community leaders were on hand to provide assistance.

Dwight Beard, president of the Nashville Chapter of the TSU National Alumni Association, was among those demonstrating the art of tying the perfect knot. He applauded the program for helping the new students assimilate into the collegiate culture.

First-time male freshmen learn the art of tying the perfect knot at the ‘Tied to Success” ceremony. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“It’s important for them to understand that wearing of the tie is essential because they will need one for job interviews,” Beard said. “They may end up with a job in the corporate world, like I did, where how you look matters.”

Before the tie tying and male bonding, TSU officials talked to the freshmen about how they should behave on campus, and in general.

“As these students embark on their college careers and prepare for the professional world, we want to help them develop good character and avoid anything that could hinder their future success,” said Frank Stevenson, TSU’s dean of students. “’Tied to Success’ is a step in that direction; we’re preparing them now.”

As Dean of Students Frank Stevenson makes opening remarks at the “Tied to Success” ceremony in Poag Auditorium, student leaders and upper class men demonstrate the look of a man dressed for business. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Bryon Keith, a human resource management major from Louisville, Kentucky, who had never tied a tie before, said he appreciates the orientation and hopes other institutions will emulate TSU.

“’Tied to Success’ is a great representation at the university, and for us as young men,” Keith said.

For the third year, State Rep. Harold Love, Jr., a TSU alum, participated in the “Tied to Success” ceremony. Senior university male administrators, deans, faculty, staff, student government association leaders and upper class students joined him.

The Men’s Initiative Office in the Division of Student Affairs helped to coordinate “Tied to Success.” All together, there are more than 1,300 first-time freshmen enrolled at TSU this fall.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Joins Community to Give Students and Parents a “Healthy Start” back to School

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) -Tennessee State University recently partnered with several organizations to help hundreds of youngsters get school supplies and advice on educational opportunities and healthy living as they prepare to go back to school.

Rep. Harold Love, Jr., left, and Nashville Mayor David Briley talk to a student at the festival. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The effort was to support Love’s Healthy Start Festival that took place July 28 at Hadley Park. It was the sixth year of the festival, started by State Rep. Harold Love, Jr., a TSU graduate.

More than 500 youngsters attended the festival. They received free backpacks and school supplies, along with educational information and free health tips and screenings. They were also treated to free food and entertainment. Food items at the festival included roasted corn harvested from the TSU farm.

Associate Vice President for Administration and Chief of Staff, Dr. Curtis Johnson, represented TSU President Glenda Glover, who was away on a previous engagement.

Representatives from the TSU College of Agriculture distribute packages on healthy living to visitors at the festival. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

He said the university was excited to work along with other organizations and institutions to provide information and resources to the students.

“Representative Love and his team are doing an excellent job by providing these gifts to students to get them ready to go back to school,” Johnson said.

Love said the event is a way for the community to support educational success, physical health and safe communities for Nashville’s children and youth.

“I’m so grateful for the participation in today’s event,” he said. “We should all feel good about the number of students and families who benefit from this. This will definitely give the students a healthy start.”

Rose Park Elementary School 5th grader Cayli Wilson, right, with her mother, Tesia Wilson, said the festival was more fun than she expected. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Cayli Wilson, a 5th grader from Rose Park Elementary School, attended the festival for the first time with her mother, Tesia Wilson. Cayli was surprised at the amount of fun at the festival.

“I thought I was just coming to get my backpack and school supplies, but there is a lot of fun here,” Cayli said.

Her mother, who is assistant principal at Alex Green Elementary School, agreed.

“This really helps to prepare the students and gets the community and parents energized to help the students have a successful school year,” said Tesia.

TSU’s College of Agriculture, represented by the Cooperative Extension, the Early Learning Center, and the Bio-Diesel program, set up tents and displays at the festival. The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, was also among the many organizations that participated.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU, faith community, city officials begin New Year with 6th Annual Presidential Prayer Service

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University and the Nashville faith-based community began the New Year with a morning of prayer during the 6th Annual Presidential Prayer Service on Wednesday.

Mayor Megan Barry. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

The service was held at Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church in Nashville, Tennessee. TSU President Glenda Glover was the keynote speaker.

“As we start another semester, another year at TSU, we start with prayer, with thanks,” Glover said. “I am truly thankful that God has blessed me to lead such a marvelous university. I thank you for your prayers, and for embracing and supporting TSU; and for supporting me as your president.”

Faith-based leaders of various denominations from across Metro Nashville participated on the program or were in attendance, including gospel legend and TSU alum Dr. Bobby Jones, and community activist and pastor Bishop Joseph Walker III.

Others in attendance were Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, as well as other city and state officials, including State Reps. Harold Love, Jr. and Brenda Gilmore, and Councilwoman Sharon Hurt.

“It is so wonderful to be here, because today we’re celebrating Dr. Glover, and also recognizing the incredible power that TSU has in our community,” said Mayor Barry. “You make Nashville better, stronger, more just, more equitable. And you are producing graduates every day that are ready to serve and lead, including several who are on my staff, and several who work in metro government.”

TSU honor students Chris Buford, II and Breanna Brown participate in prayer service. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Jefferson Street Church senior pastor Aaron Marble, who succeeds community activist James Thomas, said he’s glad to be collaborating with TSU and plans to continue the tradition.

“TSU has strong ties to the Nashville community, and so does Jefferson Street,” Marble says. “So uniting the university, the church and the community, is just awesome.”

The service was followed by a breakfast in the lower auditorium of the church that was open to the public.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

First-semester freshmen get new ties, good advice

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is making sure its students are prepared for success – or better yet, “tied” to it.

IMG_0778
TSU First-semester freshmen receive guidance on tie tying. (photo by Lucas Johnson, TSU Media Relations)

On August 23, first-semester male freshmen packed the Forum in TSU’s Campus Center for the second annual “Tied to Success” program. All of the young men were given reflex blue colored ties with the name of the university in white letters at the base of the tie.

And for those individuals who needed assistance tying just the right knot, university officials and community leaders were on hand to provide assistance.

“Many of them will be going into professional arenas, and some have never even worn a tie,” said Frank Stevenson, TSU’s dean of students. “And so this is kind of our right of passage into that professional world; we’re preparing them now.”

State Rep. Harold Love, Jr., an alumnus of TSU, agreed. In addition to the ties, he applauded the program for helping the new students assimilate into the collegiate culture. Following the tie tying and male bonding, TSU officials talked to the freshmen about how they should behave on campus, and in general.

“I’ve always appreciated my alma mater because it took young men and made them better,” said Love, who attended the program. “When we talk about African-American males going into their freshman year, it’s important for them to understand that wearing of the tie is essential because they will need one for job interviews. And they may end up with a job one day like mine, where they’ll be wearing one almost everyday.”

Orlandis Timmons of Huntsville, Alabama, said he appreciated the orientation, and that the tie provides a “better look for TSU.”

“It’s great representation at the school, and for us as individuals, as young men,” said Timmons, who plans to major in psychology.

More than 1,200 first-time freshmen are enrolled at TSU this fall.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU among several participants in back-to-school festival

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is doing its part to help area youngsters have a “healthy start” back to school.

The university partnered with several organizations on August 13 to sponsor Love’s Healthy Start Festival, an event started by State Rep. Harold Love, Jr.

13908995_1375945612421921_7102149335276399564_o
TSU nursing students provide free screenings at Love’s Healthy Start Festival. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

The festival at Hadley Park near TSU was once again a success. TSU President Glenda Glover and Nashville Mayor Megan Barry stopped by to show their support.

“I’m so grateful for the participation in today’s event,” Love said. “We should all feel good about the number of students and families who will benefit. This will definitely give them a healthy start.”

Love said the event is a way for the community to support educational success, physical health and safe communities for Nashville’s children and youth.

“It’s our hope that the festival always meets some of the needs of the community,” said Love, who graduated from TSU.

This was the fourth year of the festival, which provided free backpacks and other school supply giveaways. One of the main sponsors of the event, Tyson Foods, Inc., has been a participant for three years.

“We know that getting ready for back to school is something that everyone should be able to do and have the appropriate resources to do so,” said Anna Kimble-Roberson, community relations manager at Springdale, Ark.-based Tyson Foods. “We very much appreciate Rep. Love in terms of his efforts to coordinate so many community partners to offer different resources to make it easier for families to have the tools that they need to get off to a good start.”

In addition to giving away school supplies, the festival had a health fair, as well as free food and live entertainment.

Tennessee State University’s Ralph H. Boston Wellness Center was one of several departments from the university that participated in the festival.

“It’s a good opportunity to enlighten and make people more aware of what they’re eating, what they’re doing,” said Gerald Davis, director of the Wellness Center. “We want them to do things a little bit better than they have been; to live a better lifestyle, physically and mentally.”

TSU’s College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, and the Office of Enrollment Management also participated in the festival.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.