Tag Archives: President Glenda Baskin Glover

College Graduates Must Impact Society Beyond Personal Success, TSU Commencement Speaker Says

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President Glenda Glover and Dr. Lomax, the Fall 2015 Commencement speaker, lead the graduation procession in the Gentry Complex. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – College graduates are expected to be leaders with capabilities that impact society beyond their families and personal careers, the keynote at Tennessee State University’s fall commencement told more than 500 undergraduate and graduate students who received degrees in various disciplines Saturday.

Dr. Michael L. Lomax, president and CEO of the United Negro College Fund, said by working so hard and achieving a university degree in spite of difficult and insurmountable odds, position graduates to be leaders who are “doers, makers and shapers of events and outcomes.”

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The Fall 2015 Commencement celebration begins in the Gentry Complex. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

“America and the world need active and engaged citizens who are not just satisfied with their personal success,” Lomax said. “As leaders you must see that some part of your life, some portion of your personal power, and your leadership are invested in work beyond yourself, your family and close friends.”

While challenging the graduates, Lomax, leader of the nation’s largest provider of scholarships and other educational support to African-American students, also called for strengthening of the educational system if those leaving institutions of higher learning are to have any chance to succeed.

“The global, technology-driven knowledge economy demands that educational institutions be more effective and efficient in producing measurable student outcomes and graduates who can transition smoothly from the classroom to the workplace,” he said. “Those (graduates) who either don’t have the advanced skills or cannot attain them will be punished with low-wage jobs at the bottom of the employment ladder.”

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Many TSU staff were among those receiving advance degrees at the Fall 2015 Commencement. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Among those receiving degrees were the first graduating class of the university’s 12-month Accelerated MBA Program in the College of Business. The program started in January 2015 with 14 cohorts. Also receiving degrees was a mother/daughter team, who earned bachelor’s degrees in Interdisciplinary Studies, and Psychology, respectively.

Chelsea Marlin, who earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology, was recognized for achieving the highest GPA among her fellow undergraduates.

Lomax, under whose leadership the UNCF has fought for college readiness and education reform, said, “The increasing emphasis on test is to confirm that students are learning, building the knowledge and skills they will need to advance and compete and demonstrate that their diploma is more than a piece of paper.”

He extolled the leadership of TSU under President Glenda Glover, calling her an “exemplary leader.”

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More than 500 undergraduate and graduate students received degrees in various disciplines at the Fall 2015 Commencement. (Photo by John Cross)

“The challenge of building and maintaining a 21st century university is great,” he said. “This calls for leaders who can envision the future, set bold and challenging goals and guide the institution through disagreements and controversies toward attaining its goals. This is the work that TSU’s dynamic, determined, focused and keenly intelligent president, Dr. Glover, is called to do.”

Earlier, President Glover thanked Lomax for agreeing to be the fall commencement speaker. She presented the UNCF leader with a plaque as a token of appreciation from the university. She congratulated the graduates for their accomplishments.

“You have endured and prepared yourselves to reach this goal which may have seemed unattainable, but you stuck with it,” Dr. Glover said. “You must always remember that you did not accomplish this goal all by yourselves. There were parents, relatives, friends and mentors who helped you along the way. Remember to thank them.”

Friday night, Glover hosted a reception in honor of Lomax at the President’s Residence. Nashville Mayor Megan Barry; TSU graduate and Vice Chair of the UNCF Board, Kevin W. Williams, were among guests, including university administrators, alumni and friends who attended the reception.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

President Glenda Glover Nominated “Female President of the Year” as TSU receives four finalist nods for HBCU Digest Awards

TSU finalist in categories for “Best Choir,” “Male Athlete of the Year,” and “Best Women’s Team of the Year”

LogoJPEGblueNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has been nominated as a finalist in four top categories for the 5th Annual AARP HBCU Digest Awards. The winners will be unveiled July 10 during the AARP National HBCU Media Week to be held on the campus of Hampton University.

Among the categories TSU will be vying for include awards for “Best Choir,” “Male Athlete of the Year,” “Women’s Team of the Year,” and “Female President of the Year.”

tumblr_static_a8g1kyd2cdkow8sgw4sko8ssgA record 430 nominations from institutions, alumni and students were submitted for the 2015 edition of the awards. Finalists are annually selected based upon the impact of nominees’ achievement on institutional development, and for media coverage earned for the institution by way of the nominee.

Winners are selected by an academy of former HBCU Awards winners, former and current HBCU presidents, alumni, faculty, students and journalists covering HBCU issues for local or national outlets.

“The HBCU Awards is the first national awards event to recognize the influence and impact of HBCUs on American culture,” said HBCU Digest Founding Editor Jarrett L. Carter Sr., who created the event in 2011. “The awards seek to recognize and crown winners in the fields of leadership, arts, athletics, research, and community engagement.”

The TSU finalists (names, categories, areas of award) include: 

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President Glenda Glover is nominated for “Female President of the Year” award. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover – “Female President of the Year” (Highest Honor)
Dr. Glenda Glover began serving as president of Tennessee State University on January 2, 2013. She has advanced a five-point vision that includes: 1) academic progress and customer service; 2) fundraising and partnerships; 3) diversity and inclusion; 4) shared governance; and 5) business outreach.

Her educational development began as a student at Tennessee State University, where she majored in mathematics. After graduating with honors with a Bachelor of Science degree, she pursued the Master of Business Administration at Clark Atlanta University. She then completed her doctorate in business at George Washington University, and later earned her law degree from Georgetown University.

President Glover is the former dean of the College of Business at Jackson State University in Jackson, Mississippi and served as chairperson of the Department of Accounting at Howard University. She is a certified public accountant, an attorney, and is one of two African-American women to hold the Ph.D.-CPA-JD combination in the nation.

President Glover has been a corporate board member of three publicly-traded corporations and is the author of more than 100 articles and papers. She is regarded as one of the nation’s experts on corporate governance. In 2013, President Glover was named to Diverse Issues in Higher Education’s prestigious list as one of the “Top 25 Women in Higher Education.”

Since joining TSU, she has offered dozens of scholarships to top high school seniors, raised millions of dollars in support of the university’s programmatic, research and service efforts, engaged new business and industry partners, and has established TSU Safety Commission made up of administrators, faculty/staff, alumni, students and community leaders to address campus security concerns.

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New Direction Choir, winner of the “Nation’s Best Gospel Choir Award” at the National College Choir Explosion this year, receives nod as “Best Choir.” (Submitted photo)

New Direction Choir – “Best Choir” (Student Activities)
Tennessee State University’s New Direction Choir proved it is the best college gospel group in the country after receiving top honors at the National College Choir Explosion this year in Louisville, Kentucky. Competing as one of eight finalists from among several college gospel choirs, the TSU New Direction Choir won the coveted title as the “Nation’s Best Gospel Choir.” The group also won the “People’s Choice Award” as the audience’s favorite group. This is the group’s third straight finish as champions and runners-up in national competitions in the last four years. In 2011, they won first place in the Fourth Annual National Black Collegiate Alumni Hall of Fame Gospel Choir Competition in Atlanta, competing against four HBCU choirs. Two years later in 2013, the group won the Regional Runner-Up title in Verizon’s How Sweet the Sound Gospel Choir Competition. In addition to vocal presentation, New Direction has mastered diction, intonation, tone quality, appearance, stage presence and audience appeal. 

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Nick Thrasher, “College Sports Madness OVC Defensive Player of the Year,” and the Tigers’ second all-time leader in tackles, is nominated for “Male Athlete of the Year” award. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Nick Thrasher – “Male Athlete of the Year” (Athletic Excellence)
Nick Thrasher started all 12 games at middle linebacker and amassed a team and career-high 128 stops (69 solo). He was also a terror to opposing offenses, notching 11.5 tackles for loss and recording 3.5 sacks. The Morrow, Ga. native also excelled in zone coverage and broke up three passes. He even recorded first career interception against Florida A&M (Sept. 27), taking it all the way back for a touchdown. The senior-captain anchored the OVC’s top total defense (303.2 yards per game) and pass defense (153.3 yards per game) and helped TSU to a No. 4 FCS ranking in sacks per game (3.58). Thrasher led the Tigers to a 6-6 record which gave Big Blue three consecutive non-losing seasons, a feat that had not been done since 1984-86. With his stellar senior campaign, Thrasher moved up to second-place in tackles in the TSU record book over the course of the season, finishing with 358. At the end of the year, Thrasher was named College Sports Madness OVC Defensive Player of the Year and a Second Team and Third Team All-American by Phil Steele and The Associated Press, respectively.

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Nominated for “Best Women’s Team of the Year,” award, the TSU Women’s Basketball Team is the 2015 OVC Conference Tournament Champion. The Lady Tigers were honored at the Tennessee State Capitol April 8, where they were received and celebrated with a standing ovation by the Tennessee House of Representatives. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Tennessee State University Women’s Basketball Team – “Best Women’s Team of the Year” (Athletic Excellence)
The TSU Women’s Basketball Team snagged the 2015 Ohio Valley Conference Tournament Championship. TSU defeated four-time defending champ UT Martin, 64-60, on March 7 to claim the program’s first OVC title in 20 years. The victory also earned the Lady Tigers a berth in the NCAA Tournament. 

The Lady Tigers were honored at the Tennessee State Capitol April 8, received and celebrated with a standing ovation by the Tennessee House of Representatives. Once the team, coaches and administrators made it to the front of the room, TSU alumnus, Rep. Harold M. Love, Jr., presented the team with a Resolution for their accomplishments.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 45 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Graduation Fulfills Dreams for Many as Nearly 1,000 Receive Degrees at TSU’s 2015 Spring Undergraduate Commencement

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President Glenda Glover and Commencement Speaker, Mayor AC Wharton, march in the procession during the Spring 2015 Undergraduate Commencement in Hale Stadium

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Michaiah Hinds’ greatest gift for graduating college at Tennessee State University today was for his 82-year-old grandmother to see him go across the aisle to receive his degree.

“When I was in the fourth grade my grandmother told me she wouldn’t be around when I graduated from high school,” said Hinds. He did not only prove his grandmother wrong by graduating high school, the Milwaukee native received a bachelor’s degree with honors as a double major in Computer Science and Mass Communications. He has already been accepted to study theology at Wake Forest University in the fall.

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Michaiah Hinds proved his grandmother, 82-year-old Wilma Weddle wrong by graduating from college while she is still alive, something she said wouldn’t happen before he graduated high school. Sitting behind, left, is Michaiah’s father Mark, and another relative who came for his graduation.

“I feel joy and blessed to still be here and see him complete college,” said Wilma Weddle, a retired nurse, who led a team of more than 30 people from Milwaukee, including Hinds’ parents and other family members and friend sporting specially designed T-shirts and carrying a congratulatory banner to cheer on Hinds. “Michaiah has always been a good boy who believes in himself just as we taught him when he was growing up.”

For Hinds, the commencement message about “being yourself” was a refresher, as Memphis Mayor AC Wharton, a TSU alum and renowned lawyer told the graduates that the key to success is having confidence and believing in oneself.

“With the advent of modern technology such as social media, there is too much distraction that has taken away our capability to pay attention to each other, and appreciate our own abilities because of gadgets that have taken away our sense of personal touch,” Wharton said. “I am not against technology, but sometime we need to leave our machines and give our full attention to someone who means something to us.”

On his emphasis to “be,” Wharton called on the nearly 1,000 students receiving degrees in TSU’s first undergraduates-only commencement in Hale Stadium to learn to adapt to the changing times and circumstances around them.

“Some of you may have changed majors several times, or life may not have panned as you planned, but you must learn to adapt by being creative, assertive and determined and believing in yourself,” said Wharton, who is in his second term as mayor of Memphis, one the nation’s thriving and fastest growing cities. “Fight to be the best in you than trying to be someone else. Believe in a better world by believing in the possibilities of today. You can be the difference in all the problems that is going on across the nation.”

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Outgoing Student Government President Markeil Lewis receives thunderous applause as he is acknowledged by President Glover as an outstanding student and leader.

For Wharton, speaking at TSU’s spring commencement is a “homecoming.” TSU is where he got his start in higher education, earning a bachelor’s degree with honors in Political Science in 1962. He did not miss on the opportunity to congratulate Memphis native and TSU President Glenda Glover, referring to her as “the best president” Tennessee State University has ever had.

“You are doing a remarkable job here at our alma mater. Congratulations for being a great leader at this institution,” Wharton said.

Earlier, the president welcomed Mayor Wharton, and congratulated the graduates for their achievement.

“I applaud you for achieving this extraordinary milestone in your life,” President Glover said. “You have endured and in the process you have increased your resources for success. Do not forget to thank your parents, relatives, friends and those who were there to see you through this journey.”

Today’s ceremony was a culmination of TSU’s 2015 Dual Commencement Exercises. On Friday, the University held its first graduate commencement, at which more that 300 received advanced degrees, including master’s, education specialist degrees, Ph.Ds., and Ed.Ds.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 45 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

President Glover Addresses Faculty, Staff at Spring Institute

The University held its annual Spring Faculty-Staff Institute Jan. 9 when TSU President Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover (Center) shared her vision for the new semester and highlighted accomplishments from her first year in office. Also speaking at the institute were Dr. Veronica Oates (Left) Faculty Senate Chairperson, and Yvonne Sanders (Right) Staff Senate Chairperson. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
The University held its annual Spring Faculty-Staff Institute Jan. 9 when TSU President Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover (Center) shared her vision for the new semester and highlighted accomplishments from her first year in office. Also speaking at the institute were Dr. Veronica Oates (Left) Faculty Senate Chairperson, and Yvonne Sanders (Right) Staff Senate Chairperson. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – In an address punctuated by numerous applauses from faculty and staff, Tennessee State University President Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover shared her vision for the new semester today and highlighted accomplishments from her first year in office.

“It is an honor to serve the institution that gave me my start and I want to express my gratitude to each one of you for your support over the past year,” Dr. Glover told members of the University during the Faculty and Staff Institute to begin the spring semester.

Glover, who assumed the TSU presidency January 2013, highlighted the University successes from the past year by revisiting her five-point vision of Student Progress and Customer Service, Fund Raising and Partnerships, Diversity and Inclusion, Shared Governance and Community Outreach that she announced when she first took office.

While there were notable successes in each of the areas, she said, they continue to be a strategic blueprint for planning, overall growth and development of TSU.

“Our purpose at this University is educating, graduating and enhancing the lives of the students we touch,” she added. “Our one overriding objective is to meet the needs of all our students. The five goals foster an environment of all we do.”

Speaking on Student Progress and Customer Service, Dr. Glover touched on improvements in customer service, especially with registration and the financial aid process. While there is always room for improvement, she said, the process has improved in the short year, while student complaints are down.

“We have increased our efforts to streamline the enrollment process, and to educate and engage students and parents much earlier about financial aid resources and the required criteria, which have reduced confusion and complaints,” she added.

Student recruitment and retention were also highlighted, with the focus, she said, of turning toward a new recruitment plan, with a shift toward magnet schools and community colleges in Nashville, Memphis and Murfreesboro, Tenn.

“Not only are we reaching into new areas, we are also increasing our contact with potential students, and increasing our outreach to non-traditional students while promoting online learning,” she said.

Touching on student retention and graduation rates, Dr. Glover noted that the two areas need improvement. Since funding is tied directly to graduation rates, it must, she said, improve in the future.

“Our graduation and first-year retention rates are low and we must improve them since they are tied to funding,” she remarked. “First and foremost, we have an ethical obligation as a University to graduate students, and the two go hand-in-hand.”

Turning to fundraising, while the final figures are still being worked out, Dr. Glover announced that the University has received $2.77 million in cash contributions, with alumni giving more than tripling since 2012. Also notable, she continued, was corporate giving, with the number of donations from the business community climbing to 165 corporate partners.

“This shows that TSU is a viable business partner,” she said. “Corporations are seeing the talent we have at the University with corporations recruiting more on campus while we have seen an increase in academic and business partnerships.”

She also mentioned the value of recognizing diversity. While she acknowledged that TSU would always remain an HBCU, the expansion of racial and cultural groups is a top priority.

“We will always live up to the designation as an HBCU, and respect our past and our history,” she added. “At the same time, we must embrace diversity and ensure everyone has equal opportunity to a quality education. As Nashville’s only public institution, we are looking at ways to be more inclusive.”

Ending on community outreach, she thanked everyone in attendance for their hard work in “taking the University to the community while bringing the community to the University.” The goal, she said, was to make sure “we strengthened relationships with community partners while increasing the visibility of programs and the opportunities available.” From forming administrative councils to help spread the good news of the University, multiple media engagements, to delivering Holiday baskets this past December, the goal has been to foster good partnerships with the surrounding community and the greater Nashville area.

“We have worked hard and people are now taking notice of the University and the wonderful things happening here,” she remarked.

Dr. Glover again thanked everyone for “a year of hard work, collaboration and building trust” in the administration. “There is a lot expected of you,” she told the faculty and staff gathered. “I appreciate everything you do. Your commitment to this University and the students it serves is evident. Continue to do your very best. That’s all I can ask of you.”

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

President takes oath of office, outlines goals (video)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University welcomed a new president Friday, Oct. 25 when Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover took the oath of office and officially became the eighth president of the University. Dignitaries and politicians from across the country and Middle Tennessee joined community members to welcome the University’s newest president. Spend a few minutes reliving the Inauguration of Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover and listen to her vision for the future. (Video courtesy of News Channel 5, Nashville)

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University
With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu