Tag Archives: Jr.

TSU commemorates 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination, celebrates his legacy

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University commemorated the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on Wednesday, and will continue his legacy by participating in a “Joint Day of Service” this weekend.

TSU student Derrick Greene, Jr. presents wreath honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

On Wednesday, the university remembered King by ringing a bell 39 times, the age of the civil rights icon when he was gunned down in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968. An excerpt was played of King’s prophetic “I Have Been to the Mountaintop” speech, and a wreath was presented in his honor.

In that speech, which he gave in Memphis the day before he was killed, King said: “We’ve got some difficult days ahead. But it really doesn’t matter with me now, because I’ve been to the mountaintop … I’ve seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the Promised Land.”

TSU President Glenda Glover spoke to local news stations before Wednesday’s event and said she hopes the activities commemorating King will inspire young people to continue his fight for social justice, as well as heed his call to get an education and vote.

“I want the students to walk away with the knowledge that they must participate in political and economic struggles that are still going on,” said Glover, whose father worked for the sanitation department in Memphis where King was helping energize workers who were on strike.

“We want students to understand that those not registered to vote, must indeed do so.”

JerMilton Woods, president of TSU’s Student Government Association, agreed.

“When it comes to our students, when it comes to Nashville, when it comes to our world, we still have to fight to make sure everything’s on an equal playing field,” said Woods, a graduating senior from Memphis.

On Saturday, April 7, TSU will participate in a Joint Day of Service in remembrance of King.

The event with other area higher education institutions was originally scheduled for Jan. 13, but was postponed because of inclement weather.

However, organizers say it’s only fitting that an event keeping King’s legacy of service alive should take place amid commemoration of his death.

“What better way to commemorate him than by serving others,” said Shirley Nix-Davis, director of outreach for TSU’s Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement. “One of his quotes is, ‘everybody can be great, because anybody can serve.’”

In addition to performing service projects across Metro Nashville, TSU students will provide more than 10,000 meals for families in need. That project will take place in TSU’s Gentry Complex at 1 p.m. on Saturday.

Last year, more than 300 TSU students participated in various MLK Day of Service projects around Nashville that included working with kids, assisting elderly residents, packing food and painting.

Linda Tynan, a resident at an independent living apartment complex in La Vergne, Tennessee, said she was grateful for the assistance students provided last year.

“I think it’s terrific to see these students lend a hand to people they don’t even know,” Tynan said. “I appreciated every minute of it.”

For more information about TSU’s Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/servicelearning/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU joins in celebration of life, legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University joined the Interdenominational Ministers’ Fellowship and the Nashville community in celebrating the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

MLK march participants. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Hundreds of people assembled in front of Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church on Monday, Jan. 15, to march to TSU’s Gentry Complex for its annual Convocation honoring King.

Before the march, TSU President Glenda Glover thanked the youth, in particular, for coming out on a chilly day.

“I want to particularly give a shout out to the youth,” said Glover, “because you could have been doing something else today.”

She then went on to emphasize the importance of the occasion.

TSU President Glenda Glover. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

“I lived in Memphis and I was there when the assassination (of Dr. King) took place,” Glover said. “We need to make sure we keep this dream alive each and every year, each and every day.”

Nashville Mayor Megan Barry also lauded the youth for their attendance, and reminded them of the jobs and internships that are available to them in the community.

“I want all the youth who are in this gathering today to hear that we’ve got over 10,000 opportunities on our portal, and I need you guys to go there to find something that you want to do,” Barry said.

“We all know that the way to get people moving toward their future, is they’ve got to graduate from high school, and they’ve got to get that first job. And we’re committed to making sure that our youth can do just that.”

Miss TSU Kayla Smith said the march and Convocation are “great opportunities for the community to come together and keep the dream going that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. had.”

“This is a great event, and it touches my heart to be able to participate in it,” she said.

Taylor Williams, a freshman who is majoring in aeronautical industrial technology at TSU, echoed Smith’s sentiment. Williams added that even though there has been positive change since King’s death, there’s still much work to be done in the case of equality.

“History can repeat itself, so it’s very important for me to be a part of this,” said Williams, of Memphis.

Davidson County Juvenile Court Judge Sheila D.J. Calloway. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

Davidson County Juvenile Court Judge Sheila D.J. Calloway, the Convocation’s keynote speaker, continued the message of “investing in our youth.”

“When I think about the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. … it starts with our youth,” Calloway said before the Convocation. “And so I’ll be focusing today on how we can, as a community, support our youth through all of the difficulties that they’re having.”

During her speech, Calloway said early engagement in the lives of youth can deter them from trouble.

“Don’t wait till they are in my courtroom before trying to help them,” she said. “By then, it is way too late. Help them before they get to that point.”

Other Convocation participants included Dr. Glover, Mayor Barry, U.S. Congressman Jim Cooper, State Rep. Harold Love, Jr. and Dr. Shawn Joseph, director of Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools.

During the Convocation, the Interdenominational Ministers’ Fellowship renewed $1,000 scholarships for students at TSU, Fisk University, Meharry Medical College and American Baptist College.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU delves into governor’s FOCUS Act with students, faculty, administrators and alumni

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover and State Rep. Harold Love, Jr. held a forum at TSU to discuss a legislative proposal that would restructure higher education governance.

Protest-4
TSU student Kyara Murry waits in line with other students to discuss the FOCUS Act, a legislative proposal that would restructure higher education governance. (By John Cross, TSU Media Service)

Students, faculty, administrators, and alumni packed the Floyd-Payne Student Center auditorium on the university’s campus on Feb. 23 to learn more about the Focus on College and University Success Act and express their concerns about the proposal being pushed by Gov. Bill Haslam and that’s advancing in the legislative process.

Love, who represents the university in House District 58 and is also an alumnus of TSU, said he wanted to address concerns about the impact the legislation could have specifically on Tennessee State University.

“I felt it was important to make myself available to answer questions,” Love said before the event. “Tennessee State University has great leadership, students, faculty and alumni and it is my intention to convey their concerns to my colleagues in the Legislature and the Governor’s office.”

Currently, the Tennessee Board of Regents oversees 46 institutions: six public four-year state universities (including TSU), 13 community colleges and 27 technical colleges.

Under the FOCUS Act, TBR would oversee the state’s community and technical colleges only, and focus on promoting graduation rates at those institutions. Haslam has said the legislation is the next step in his “Drive to 55” initiative, which seeks to increase the percentage of Tennesseans with a postsecondary credential to 55 by 2025.

“With 46 institutions, it is difficult for TBR to meet all of the diverse challenges of the system,” according to the governor’s website about the legislation. “Community colleges arguably need greater focus at a system level in the Drive to 55, while TBR’s four-year state universities could benefit from greater autonomy.”

Glover said she has concerns about the legislation, but noted that of the nine amendments the university has proposed to the governor, four have been accepted.

She said one of her main concerns is that the legislation maintains an equitable funding process for all of the four-year public institutions, especially TSU.

“We have a mission that is far different from the other five institutions,” Glover said. “The proposed legislation can’t be viewed as one size fits all. This difference must be recognized. I have communicated these and other concerns to the governor’s office and they are working with us. I remain hopeful that the final legislation will be fair and equitable for our students, faculty, and staff, but most important, our university. We’re going to get through this together.”

Glover said she would be persistent in talking to lawmakers about what’s in the best interest of the university.

“Our university is in the planning stages of implementing FOCUS.  We will host several meetings in an effort to keep the TSU family updated on any amendments to the bill as well as where we are in the implementation phase.”

Protest-3
Rep. Harold Love, Jr. speaks about FOCUS Act and takes questions from the audience. (By John Cross, TSU Media Service)

Another concern is the bill’s makeup of local boards that will oversee the state’s six four-year institutions. Some attending the forum questioned whether the eight members appointed by the governor for the 10-member panels should be handling certain higher education issues, such as schools’ leadership, tuition, faculty tenure, and curricula.

“This bill appears to weaken the institutional leadership of the university and potentially allow a university board to manage the day-to-day operations whereby their credentials and vision may conflict with that of the president of the university, “ said Dr. Samuel Hargrove, dean of TSU’s College of Engineering. “However, if this is the intent of the bill, I am confident TSU will respond strategically to continue its mission and purpose.”

Faculty Senate Chair Michael Catanzaro said he’s received phone calls and emails from the Faculty Senate regarding concerns about the bill and its potentially negative impact on the university.

“Each college and school within Tennessee State University has specific curricula and requirements for diplomas and degrees as determined by accrediting agencies,” Catanzaro said. “The FOCUS bill enables a Board of Trustees that may comprise people with little or no knowledge of accreditation requirements to have the power to develop curricula that may adversely affect the quality of education as well as violate the ‘academic freedom’ of professors.”

Students also voiced their concerns about the proposal, with questions ranging from a name change, available funding for campus improvements, to student involvement on the newly formed university board.

SGA President RaCia Poston said she had spoken with her counterparts regarding student participation with the board on student-related programs, fees, and activities.

“I’ve talked with student leaders from the other TBR four-year institutions and shared my concerns about the student representative being a non-voting member of the board,” Poston said.

“As a legislative intern, I’m lobbying lawmakers during my time at the Capitol on why the student vote should count.”

Love urged everyone to email the governor and lawmakers their concerns, as well as attend legislative committee meetings where the bill is being debated. If the measure passes, it is expected to be fully implemented late next year.

Tennessee State University is the only four-year public institution in Nashville and the only public four-year HBCU in the State of Tennessee. TSU offers 45 bachelor’s degree programs and 24 master’s degree programs and awards doctoral degrees in biological sciences, computer information systems, engineering, psychology, public administration, curriculum and instruction, educational administration and supervision, and physical therapy. In entirety, Tennessee State University comprises eight colleges and schools.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.