Tag Archives: James Shaw Jr.

TSU alum and Waffle House hero James Shaw Jr. launches new charity

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU alum and Waffle House hero James Shaw Jr. launched his new charity during an anti-violence rally at Tennessee State University on Sunday.

Kids enjoying activities at “Come Together Day” rally at Hale Stadium. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

Called “Come Together Day,” the event kicked off at Hale Stadium with vendors and activities for kids before moving into Kean Hall where there was a celebrity basketball game that included TSU alum and Philadelphia 76ers star Robert Covington.

“We’re so proud of James Shaw Jr. for stepping up to the forefront to launch this effort to bring people together,” said TSU President Glenda Glover, who has set up a scholarship at the university in Shaw’s name. “This is very important to this community, and TSU is an integral part of this community. We’re pleased that we can serve in this role.”

TSU alum and Philadelphia 76ers star Robert Covington talks to referees during break in game Sunday. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

Nashville Mayor David Briley attended the rally and also lauded Shaw’s efforts.

“James has really shown how strong a man he is, and I look forward to working with him as he moves forward in his life and lifts up this community,” Briley said.

Shaw said the mission of The James Shaw Jr. Foundation is to work with other like-minded organizations and community advocates to eradicate violence and address mental health issues, as well as provide support, tools and resources for individuals and families who have experienced severe violence and trauma.

James Shaw Jr. shows off basketball skills. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

“It’s about accountability and caring for one another,” Shaw said Sunday.

Chelsey Dyer of Nashville said she attended the rally with her 5-year-old son, Jeremiah, because she wanted to support Shaw’s effort to make the community safer.

“I think it’s awesome,” Dyer said. “We need to come together and make Nashville the best that it can be. We need more James’.”

Four people were killed and several others wounded on April 22 when a gunman opened fire in a Waffle House in the Nashville suburb of Antioch.

Family members of Waffle House shooting victims receive check from James Shaw Jr. during ceremony at TSU in May. (photo courtesy of TSU Media Relations)

Authorities have said there would have probably been more casualties had it not been for Shaw’s actions. He wrestled a rifle away from the gunman and tossed it over the counter before shoving the shooter out the door.

In May, family members of the shooting victims attended a ceremony at TSU to honor those killed and wounded in the shooting. Shaw presented the victims with a check for more than $240,000. Immediately after the shooting, Shaw set up a GoFundMe campaign with a goal of $15,000. He raised much, much more.

Donations to the James Shaw Jr. Scholarship Fund can be paid through the link below or by mail. Please send to: The James Shaw, Jr. Scholarship Fund at Tennessee State University, Tennessee State University Foundation, 3500 John A. Merritt Blvd. Box 9542, Nashville, TN   37209. Donors can also call, 615-963-5481.

https://epay.tnstate.edu/C20204_ustores/web/classic/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCTID=415&SINGLESTORE=true

Note: Feature photo of TSU President Glenda Glover and James Shaw Jr. by Jon Strayhorn-Media Arts Collective.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU alum and Waffle House hero James Shaw Jr. to launch new charity

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU alum and Waffle House hero James Shaw  Jr. will launch his new charity during an anti-violence rally at Tennessee State on Sunday, Aug. 26.

The event will begin at Hale Stadium and culminate in Kean Hall on TSU’s campus. Activities kick off at 2  p.m., and will include a celebrity basketball game.

Shaw said the mission of the James Shaw Jr. Foundation is to work with other like-minded organizations and community advocates to eradicate violence and address mental health issues, as well as provide support, tools and resources for individuals and families who have experienced severe violence and trauma.

“TSU is honored to be a part of this special event as Mr. James Shaw Jr. launches his foundation to address community issues and concerns that plague our neighborhoods. We are particularly pleased that TSU is a part of this kickoff event,” said TSU President Glenda Glover, who has set up a scholarship at the university in Shaw’s name.

“James could have easily stepped from the forefront and quietly gone on with his life. Instead, he has created a platform that allows him to be a voice for those who feel disenfranchised and have lost hope. His giving of himself speaks to his character and values.”

Four people were killed and several others wounded on April 22 when a gunman opened fire in a Waffle House in the Nashville suburb of Antioch.

Authorities have said there would have probably been more casualties had it not been for Shaw’s actions. He wrestled a rifle away from the gunman and tossed it over the counter before shoving the shooter out the door.

A few months ago, family members of the shooting victims attended a ceremony at TSU to honor those killed and wounded in the shooting. Shaw presented the victims with a check for more than $240,000. Immediately after the shooting, Shaw set up a GoFundMe campaign with a goal of $15,000. However, he raised much, much more.

And he plans to continue the giving with his James Shaw Jr. Foundation.

“We can only make real progress if we work together, stand collectively and care for one another,” said Shaw. “I will never let my life, or those lives we sadly lost, be in vain.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

‘Black Panther’ star gives MTV ‘Best Superhero’ Award to TSU alum and Waffle House hero James Shaw, Jr.

Courtesy: The New Zealand Herald

He starred in one of the biggest films to ever grace the silver screen.

James Shaw, Jr. presents check to families of Waffle House shooting victims. (TSU Media Relations)

And while Chadwick Boseman won the “Best Superhero” golden popcorn statue at the 2018 MTV Movie & TV Awards Monday night, he was quick to praise a true hero in the audience at the Barker Hanger in Santa Monica, California.

The 40-year-old Black Panther star thanked the fans for accolades before calling on “real life” Waffle House shooting hero James Shaw, Jr. to accept the award on stage, the Daily Mail reports.

“Thank you to the fans,” Boseman said. “You made this movie special, you made this moment special when Black Panther came out.”

The star-studded film amassed more than $1 billion in four weeks at the box office, and became the third highest grossing film in North America.

“Ryan Coogler and I wanted to make sure that we did a movie that everybody could embrace, so thank you so much for what you did,” he continued.

“Receiving an award for playing a superhero is amazing but it’s even greater to acknowledge the heroes that we have in real life. So I just want to acknowledge someone that is here today, James Shaw Jr.”

The 29-year-old father became a national hero after he wrestled an AR-15 assault rifle from a gunman who burst into the Antioch, Tenn. Waffle House on April 22 and opened fire.

“You didn’t even know we were about to do this,” Chadwick laughed as the crowd erupted in applause for James. “If you don’t know James – he fought off a gunman in Antioch, Tennessee … a Waffle House. He saved lives.

“So this is gonna live at your house. Godbless you man.”

Immediately after the shooting, Shaw set up a GoFundMe page with an initial goal to raise $15,000 for the victims.

In mid May, the total hit more than $241,000 and Shaw presented a check to the families, and injured victims, at a private ceremony at Tennessee State University.

Shaw, the father of a four-year-old girl, initially hid in the toilet when half-naked shooter Travis Reinking burst into the restaurant.

Reinking shot through the door, grazing his forearm, when James decided it was time to fight back.

“I acted in a blink of a second. When he reloaded his clip, which felt like 30 minutes. I looked at him, and he wasn’t looking at me. He just had the barrel down. It was like, ‘Do it now. Go now.’ I just took off,” he told the New York Times.

“I hit him with the door and the gun was kind of jammed up. I grabbed it from him and I threw it over the counter top.”

Shaw then chased the killer out of the diner while the fleeing man hurled abuse at him for intervening. “I just wanted to live, and he was, like, astonished, that I wanted to live,” he recalled.

Reinking escaped on foot, shedding his only item of clothing, and fled into the woods. He was finally arrested almost 36 hours later after a manhunt involving 160 law enforcement officers, and charged with four counts of criminal homicide.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Families of Waffle House shooting victims say ‘thank you’ to TSU alum, hero, James Shaw, Jr.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Families of the victims of the Waffle House shooting last month got a chance to collectively thank TSU alum James Shaw, Jr., the man being hailed a hero for disarming the shooter.

TSU President Glenda Glover (center) is joined by James Shaw, Sr., and his wife, Karen, as they talk to families of the Waffle House shooting victims. (Copyright 2018 TSU Media Relations. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

Family members attended a ceremony at Tennessee State University on Tuesday to honor those killed and wounded in the April 22 incident at the Waffle House in the Nashville suburb of Antioch.

TSU President Glenda Glover welcomed the families to the university, before everyone gathered for a brunch with Shaw and his mother and father. Four balloons were later released on the university’s campus in remembrance of those killed in the shooting.

Authorities have said there would have probably been more casualties had it not been for Shaw’s actions. The 29-year-old wrested a rifle away from the gunman and tossed it over the counter before shoving the shooter out the door.

Shaw has been humble about his actions, saying he’s really not a hero. But those attending the event at TSU on Tuesday reiterated what the nation has been saying since the shooting: Shaw is a hero.

Family members release balloons in remembrance of those killed in the Waffle House shooting. (Copyright 2018 TSU Media Relations. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

“Had you not been there, everybody in that building would have been killed,” said Renee Hampton, the aunt of 24-year-old Sharita Henderson, who was wounded in the shooting. “I just want to say thank you.”

Shaw has said he plans to use the notoriety he’s receiving as a platform to address gun violence and mental illness issues. In doing so, Abede Dasilva, who was there with his brother Akilah that didn’t survive said Shaw is honoring his brother.

“My brother was against guns,” he said. “He would want this.”

Immediately after the shooting, Shaw set up a GoFundMe campaign with a goal of $15,000. However, he raised over $240,000.

A replica of the check was presented to the families during the luncheon. The amount will be divided evenly among the families once processed and released.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU honors alumnus and Waffle House hero James Shaw, Jr. with scholarship, Special Presidential Recognition

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has set up a scholarship in the name of alumnus James Shaw, Jr., who has received national acclaim after disarming a Waffle House shooter last month.

The announcement was made during a reception held in Shaw’s honor at the university Monday evening. The event was highlighted on “Good Morning America.”

James Shaw, Jr. and TSU President Glenda Glover

TSU’s Farrell-Westbrook Building was filled to capacity as the Nashville community, state and local elected officials, as well as TSU students, faculty and staff joined the University for the Special Event. TSU President Glenda Glover welcomed the crowd and led a program consisting of area businesses and civic groups paying homage and giving awards to Shaw for his heroism.

“The TSU family is extremely proud of alumnus James Shaw, Jr. for his bravery and courage,” Glover said before the ceremony.  “James epitomizes the core values and mission of our institution, which is think, work and serve. His genuine concern for the well-being of others is a tribute to his parents, who are also TSU alumni.”

Presentations were made by Joni McReynolds, president of the TSU National Alumni Association; Marie Sueing, vice president of Multi-Cultural Community Relations with the Nashville Convention and Visitors Corporation; Carolyn Waller, president of the Nashville Black Chamber of Commerce; Attorney Mary H. Beard with the Nashville Napier-Looby Bar Association; and LaDonna Boyd, CEO of Boyd Publishing Company, along with Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., of which Shaw is a member.

Shaw and his family beamed with pride following each recognition, and were equally surprised and moved about the scholarship in his name. Attending with him were his parents James, Sr. and Karen Shaw, grandmother Mary Louise Edwards, sisters Brina’ and Brittni, cousin Mari Ashley and four-year-old daughter Brooklyn, and her mother Jalicia Collins.

James Shaw, Jr., being pinned by Dr. Jamie Riley, TSU alumnus and executive director of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

Nearly $15,000 was collected just moments after the university made the scholarship donation information public. This included $11,000 from his fraternity. Numerous members of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. were on hand for the celebration of their fraternity brother. The fraternity’s Executive Director Dr. Jamie Riley, also a TSU alumnus and from the university’s Beta Omicron chapter as Shaw, made a special presentation.

Dr. Riley lauded Shaw for his bravery and presented him with a lifetime membership.

“Your example challenges me and others to be our best even in the most uncomfortable circumstances,” said Riley.

Dr. Everett B. Ward, general president of Alpha Phi Alpha, shared a similar sentiment in a statement.

“The well-being and viability of our communities has often been predicated on the willingness of strong men to put themselves in harm’s way,” said Ward. “In like manner, the men of Alpha Phil Alpha Fraternity, Inc., have established a legacy of service and sacrifice to serve the greater good that was continued by our brother James Shaw, Jr., whose actions prevented further loss of life.”

TSU President Glenda Glover, alumnus James Shaw, Jr., and Joni McReynolds, president of the TSU National Alumni Association

Four people were killed and several others wounded during the April 22 incident at a Waffle House in the Nashville suburb of Antioch. Authorities have said there would have probably been more casualties had it not been for Shaw’s actions.

The 29-year-old wrested a rifle away from the gunman and tossed it over the counter before shoving the shooter out the door.

State Rep. Brenda Gilmore, a TSU alumnae, along with State Sen. Jeff Yarbro shared special remarks at the event and applauded the Nashville native for springing into action.

Shaw has been humble about his actions, saying he’s really not a hero. And he reiterated that on Monday.

“Like I said, I was just trying to save myself. I did this with no recognition,” said Shaw. ”But it seems like it inspired so many people throughout the world. For that, I am greatly, greatly appreciative. To all of you, thank you.”

During the event, President Glenda Glover also announced that Shaw will receive a Special Presidential Recognition at Tennessee State’s homecoming in October.

Donations to the James Shaw, Jr. Scholarship Fund can be paid through the link below or by mail. Please send to: The James Shaw, Jr. Scholarship Fund at Tennessee State University, Tennessee State University Foundation, 3500 John A. Merritt Blvd. Box 9542, Nashville, TN   37209

https://epay.tnstate.edu/C20204_ustores/web/classic/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCTID=415&SINGLESTORE=true

Watch and read GMA and ABCNews’ coverage at https://abcnews.go.com/US/alma-mater-waffle-house-hero-establishes-scholarship/story?id=55013512

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU President Glenda Glover lauds ‘bravery’ of alumnus hailed a hero in Waffle House shooting

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover says the university is “extremely proud” of alumnus James Shaw, Jr., who is being hailed a hero for wresting an assault rifle from a gunman at a local Waffle House.

TSU alumnus James Shaw Jr. gets a hug from Waffle House CEO Walt Ehmer during a press conference on the Waffle House shooting Sunday, April 22, 2018 in Nashville, Tenn. (photo, The Tennessean)

“Our hearts go out to the families that lost loved ones in this horrific crime, and we will keep them in our prayers, along with our Nashville community,” says Glover.

Four people were killed and two others wounded in the incident that occurred Sunday in the suburb of Antioch. However, authorities say there may have been more casualties had it not been for Shaw’s actions.

“The TSU family is extremely proud of alumnus James Shaw, Jr. for his bravery and courage,” says Glover. “His actions saved the lives of many others.”

Shaw is scheduled to appear on “The Ellen Show” on Wednesday, May 2, at 3 p.m. President Glover has planned a campus event on May 7 to honor him. It will be at the Farrell-Westbrook Building (The Barn) at 6 p.m.

Last week, state lawmakers honored Shaw with a resolution at the state Capitol. After the resolution was read on the House floor, Shaw received a standing ovation for several minutes. He was joined by his best friend, Brennan McMurray, who was also at the Waffle House that day and pulled several people into the restaurant’s bathroom during the shooting.

Both men were also recognized on the floor of the state Senate.

Shaw, 29, has been humble about his actions, saying he’s really not a hero.

James Shaw, Jr. and his best friend, Brennan McMurry, talk to reporters after being honored by the state House on Tuesday. They were also recognized on the Senate floor. (photo by Lucas Johnson, TSU Media Relations)

“I did save other people, but I don’t want people to think that I was the Terminator or Superman or anybody like that,” Shaw told reporters at a press conference after the shooting.

 One person not surprised by Shaw’s humbleness is current TSU student Shaheed Whitfield. The 21-year-old marketing major is mentored by Shaw and says it’s part of Shaw’s character, which is what he respects most about him.

“The whole thing about him saying he doesn’t want to be a hero, that’s him on a daily basis,” says Whitfield, adding that Shaw “really enjoys helping people.”

Whitfield, a St. Louis, Missouri native, belongs to the same fraternity as Shaw, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Both joined the organization at TSU.

He says Shaw is like a true big brother who continues to give him advice that he takes to heart.

“He always tells me to keep going, regardless of the situation,” says Whitfield. “Just push through it.”

Shaw says he enjoyed his time at Tennessee State and that he’s proud to be part of the TSU family.

“People that I was a freshman with have texted me, or called me,” says Shaw. “It’s just a bond that we have.”

Shaw’s parents are also alumni of the university.

Shaw has set up a GoFundMe page for the shooting victims. To contribute, visit https://www.gofundme.com/5g07bvs.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.