Tag Archives: Glenda Glover

Metro Police Join Forces with Tennessee State University

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has increased campus patrol with the addition of Metro Nashville Police officers. This comes following a shooting on campus Thursday night involving two males not enrolled at TSU. The combination of TSU Police Department and Metro law enforcement is part of the on-going relationship between the University and NPD.

“I want to thank Mayor Megan Barry and Metro Police for this

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President Glenda Glover

alliance to help provide a safe and nurturing environment for our students and peace of mind for their parents,” TSU President Glenda Glover said. “The last 48 hours have been a trying time for our University family, especially our students. My first priority is to assure them and their families that they are safe and will remain safe on campus. TSU’s partnership with Metro Police is not new. Chief (Steve) Anderson and I have talked in detail on many occasions regarding a strategic crime prevention initiative and have implemented phases of this plan to enhance what we are already doing on campus.”

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Mayor Megan Barry

Metro PD’s North Precinct began patrol Friday night with three walking teams of two officers under the supervision of a sergeant. The officers provided coverage around the residence halls and the immediate inner campus area. This included the student courtyard where Thursday’s shooting occurred. The increased walking patrol with the North Precinct officers will continue until a definite timetable has been established. The precinct will provide Flex Teams to increase visibility starting next week.

“This additional display of manpower should send a clear message to those individuals not associated with TSU that the University and City of Nashville will not tolerate you coming onto our campus to commit crimes or behave in an unlawful manner,” President Glover added.

TSU continues to assist Metro with the investigation. The University has turned over four-mounted surveillance cameras in addition to a thumb drive with video footage from the courtyard and adjacent areas. Metro released a portion of that video that showed two gunmen firing weapons into an open area near the courtyard. NPD has erected a “Sky Cop” camera until the cameras are returned and remounted.

“We are hopeful that the release of this video will encourage eyewitnesses to contact Metro Police via their tip hotline,” TSU Assistant Vice President of Public Relations and Communications Kelli Sharpe said. “The TSU Student Government Association organized a town hall meeting on Friday where they asked fellow students to be a part of the University’s crime prevention measures.  This means coming forward with any information regarding this heinous crime and to report any suspicious or unlawful activity when they see it occurring. Like Metro, TSU has confidential systems in place to report suspicious activity before it escalates into something more.”

One of the biggest concerns for the University has been controlling and monitoring non-TSU student traffic coming onto campus, University officials said.  Over the past year, $1 million was spent on surveillance cameras and equipment, lighting, IT and TSU PD personnel, mobile application technology, emergency notification equipment and transportation. The University also erected a new physical barrier, a wrought iron fence, on the east side of campus that begins at Boyd Hall, a male residence, and ends at the Performing Arts Center.

“Reassuring students and parents that we are committed to their well-being is important,” President Glover added. “The University’s collaboration with Metro PD, along with our upgrades, helps us to fulfill that priority.”

Students are asked to install the TSU emergency app on all their mobile devices and program the TSUPD dispatch number in their phones. Any information regarding the campus shooting should be reported to Crimestoppers at 615-74CRIME. There is a $6000 reward for information that leads to an arrest.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Marks 103rd Birthday With Procession, Speeches and Music

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is 103 years old today.

Harold Love-2
State Rep. Harold M. Love Jr.

President Glenda Glover, accompanied by keynote speaker State Rep. Harold M. Love Jr., led a procession of faculty for a Founders’ Day celebration in Kean Hall, with cheers from the audience and selections from the University Wind Ensemble.

“This is a great day for Tennessee State University,” said President Glover, as she recounted events in the University’s history from its founding in 1912 to the role it plays today as a major center of education in the nation.

“From 1912 when the then-Agricultural and Industrial Normal School for Negroes, built to provide educational opportunity for blacks, opened its doors to the first 247 students, TSU has maintained a tradition of excellence in education for a diverse population,” Glover said.

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Members of the Student Government Association celebrate during the 2015 TSU Founders’ Day program in Kean Hall. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

In his keynote address, Rep. Love, a 1994 graduate of TSU, reminded administrators, teachers and students that they have a special role to play in maintaining the institution’s legacy of excellence. Teachers, he said, must learn to understand the special needs of each student to help that student succeed.

“Don’t be quick to give up on a student because he or she misses a class or two,” Love said. “That student may just grow up to become a state representative one day,” the Tennessee 58th District representative added, referring to his own path as a student.

Speaking on the theme, “Honor Our Legacy,” Love said those who laid the foundation for TSU, although under tough circumstances and with scarce resources, were determined to ensure that their students were well prepared for the world ahead of them.

“To honor that legacy, university administrators must learn to go the extra mile to help that student who may be late registering or in meeting his or her requirements for class,” said Love who has long ties to the university.

Love earned a bachelor’s degree in Economics and Finance from TSU before going on to earn a master’s degree in Theological Studies at Vanderbilt University. He is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Public Administration at TSU. His late parents, Harold Love Sr., and Mary Y. Love, also attended TSU and was an administrator at the university for many years.

He thanked President Glover, also an alumnae, for the invitation and her own legacy of excellence in earning multiple degrees. He called on students to be more focused and away from the “gadgets.”

“Students, don’t rely on TV and all the gadgets out there. Be focused on your learning as your way of honoring the legacy of this great institution,” Love said.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tom Joyner Foundation Selects Tennessee State University October School of the Month

Nationally Syndicated Radio Show to Award Scholarships, Highlight TSU Accomplishments

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is The Tom Joyner Foundation School of the Month for October. The designation was announced recently by the foundation, founded nearly 20 years ago by syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner. The TJF supports Historically Black Colleges and Universities with scholarship, endowment, and capacity building enhancements. Donations to the School of the Month scholarship campaign can be made through the Tom Joyner Foundation website at tomjoynerfoundation.org.

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Tom Joyner

“I’m so excited that the Foundation is partnering with the Tigers this month,” Joyner said. “You know, HBCUs are part of my DNA, and I’m glad that Tennessee State is working overtime to make sure that their students have a chance to get the scholarships they need to complete their education.  These scholars are the future leaders of this country. Let’s do all we can to help them succeed.”

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President Glenda Glover

“We are pleased to partner with the Tom Joyner Foundation in this fundraising effort,” TSU President Glenda Glover said. “With the national exposure that comes with this designation, we expect to advance our visibility and capacity to help students stay in school.”

With the designation, The Tom Joyner Foundation will award scholarships weekly to TSU students. They will include five “Hercules Scholars,” who are preselected male students with “strong” academic and community service backgrounds. Also during the month, Joyner’s weekly morning program will feature TSU accomplishments, interviews with President Glenda Glover and other officials, as well as spotlight national and local donors who make significant contributions to the university.

Those selected as Tom Joyner Foundation Hercules Scholars are: Jaquantey Bowens, a sophomore Biology major with a 4.0 GPA; Ronald Talley, a junior Accounting major from Chicago with a 3.67 GPA; and Romin Geiger, a junior Psychology major from Sacramento, California, with a 3.80 GPA.

Also selected as Hercules Scholars are Renard Talley, a junior Accounting major from Chicago with 3.74 GPA; and Jordan Price, a sophomore Mass Communication major from Atlanta, with a 3.5 GPA.

Hercules Scholars are males, full-time students with GPAs of 3.5 or higher, exhibit academic excellence, demonstrate leadership skills, and have performed community service.

Eloise Abernathy Alexis, TSU’s associate vice president for Institutional Advancement, said the collaboration with The Tom Joyner Foundation supports the university’s strategy to increase dollars raised toward scholarships for students.

“We are grateful for the opportunities afforded deserving Tennessee State University students through the Hercules Scholarship.  Without the stress associated with financial need, these emerging scholars can focus on academic achievement.  The Tom Joyner Foundation’s support of students through scholarships represents the best in educational partnerships,” Alexis said.

The Tom Joyner School of the Month fundraising campaign coincides with a number of activities at TSU in October. The University is gearing up for its annual Scholarship Gala at the Omni Hotel in downtown Nashville on Friday Oct. 16, as part of the 2015 Homecoming events Oct. 11-17. Grammy-nominated and Tony Award winner Melba Moore will be the featured guest at the Gala. Also, making his second straight appearance as celebrity host of the Gala is comedian, actor and entertainer Jonathan Slocumb.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Receives Official Designation as a Certified Vets Campus

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) –Tennessee State University today received its official designation as a Certified “Vets Campus.”

The University first received word of the distinction during the Veterans Day ceremony on Nov. 11, 2014 when Dr. Mark Hardy, vice president of Academic Affairs, announced the award.

Tom Morrison, the Tennessee Higher Education Commission Assistant Executive Director for Veterans Education, presents the title and certificate of designation to President Glenda Glover, officially declaring TSU a certified "Vets Campus."  (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Tom Morrison (right), the Tennessee Higher Education Commission Assistant Executive Director for Veterans Education, presents the title and certificate of designation to President Glenda Glover, officially declaring TSU a certified “Vets Campus.” (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

At a special recognition ceremony on the Avon Williams Campus this morning, TSU President Glenda Glover called the designation a “monumental achievement” not only for Tennessee State University but also for the entire community.

“This recognition is a fulfillment of our goal to make Tennessee State University a top destination for veterans,” Dr. Glover said. “This was made possible after much work, including surveys, student orientation and mentoring to make sure we had everything in place to ensure that veterans coming to TSU are provided the necessary environment and resources to ease their transition. I am honored to accept this award on behalf of TSU.”

Presenting the certificate and letter if designation to Dr. Glover, the Tennessee Higher Education Commission Assistant Executive Director for Veterans Education, Tom Morrison, said the organization was highly appreciative of TSU’s commitment and dedication to veterans.

“Veterans play a very important role in our nation, and we are thankful to Tennessee State University for its commitment to ensure the educational wellbeing of people who have served our country,” Morrison said.

He estimated that TSU currently has about 200 veterans who are enrolled on the GI Bill. “I am happy to present this title and certificate designating Tennessee State University as a Certified Vets Campus,” Morrison added.

During last year’s Veteran Day ceremony when the award was announced, Hardy explained that Vets Campus designation recognizes the institution’s efforts toward increasing the educational attainment of student veterans.

Passed into law in 2014, the Tennessee Veterans Education Transition Support (VETS) Act created an honorary program classification for state colleges and universities that effectively foster a supportive environment for veterans.

This “VETS Campus” means that the University provides support services especially for veterans to ease their transition from military service to college life; some are transitioning from military life to civilian life while adjusting to the ins and outs of college. Many are nontraditional students with spouses and children, who need help in navigating their way. We help them find resources or put them in the right direction for help to make their educational experience more rewarding.”

To attain the “Vets Campus” designation, schools must meet statutory criteria, including the facilitation of support and mentoring programs for veterans, in addition to ensuring academic credit is received for skills and training received during military service.  Schools must also educate faculty and staff about veterans’ culture, including information on the combat-related mental or physical disabilities many soldiers face during and after their service.

Today’s ceremony included several senior university officials, among them Dr. Evelyn Nettles, associate vice president for Academic Affairs, who thanked the various departments and individuals who were instrumental in making the designation possible.

 

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Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

To Succeed, Learn to Keep Pace with Fast-Changing World, TSU Commencement Speaker Tells More than 500 Graduates

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President Glenda Glover presents a plaque of appreciation to Shannon A. Brown, Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resource and Diversity Officer at FedEx Express, who served as the keynote speaker for the fall commencement at TSU.


NASHVILLE, Tenn.
(TSU News Service) – Saying that today’s fast-changing world requires people who can adapt, Tennessee State University fall commencement speaker told nearly 500 graduates Saturday that to be successful they must be ready to “run when the sun comes up,” to keep pace.

“Today’s reality is that the world is changing faster,” said Shannon Brown, senior vice president and chief human resource and diversity officer at FedEx Express. “Economies and their enterprises are moving at a very fast pace and people who are slow to adapt will be left behind.”

Brown, recognized by Black Enterprise magazine as one of the “100 Most Powerful Executives in Corporate America,” paralleled his remarks to the “gazelle” and the “lion” in Christopher McDougal’s book, “Ready to Run,” where the gazelle must outrun the fastest lion or be killed, or the lion must run faster than the slowest gazelle or it will starve.

“It doesn’t matter whether you are the lion or the gazelle, when the sun comes up, you better be running,” said the FedEx executive, who, in 30 years, worked his way from a package handler to become one of the top executives at the world’s largest express transport company.

He said in a fast-track world with constant technological advances and changes that have revolutionized all aspects of industry and human thinking, people who are slow to catch on and prepare for the future will be left behind.

He applauded the graduates for their determination to complete their university journey, urging them to use that same determination to press their way forward.

“As you enter this fast changing world, surround yourselves with good mentors; they can help you make the transition from one environment to the other; don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone; and commit to being lifelong learners,” Brown told the graduates.

The Memphis, Tennessee, native who said his job as the highest ranking human resource and diversity officer at FedEx is to keep employees engaged and satisfied, named charisma, individual consideration, intellectual stimulation, courage, dependability, flexibility, judgment and respect for others as “time-tested” leadership principles that will keep them competitive in their chosen fields.

“It is about believing that every individual brings value to the table; and do not forget to give back to the community,” Brown added.

Leaitrice Medina
President Glenda Glover congratulates Leatrice Medina for receiving the Academic Excellence Award. The award is given to a graduating senior with the highest GPA of 4.0 among her classmates. Medina received her degree in Psychology.

TSU President Glenda Glover, herself a Memphis native, thanked Brown for what she called, “a thought-provoking” speech, and congratulated the graduates for their accomplishment.

“You have endured and prepared yourself to reach this goal which may have seemed unattainable, but you stuck with it,” Dr. Glover said. “You must always remember that you did not accomplish this goal all by yourselves. There were parents, relatives, friends and mentors who helped you along the way. Remember to thank them.”

More than 500 graduates received degrees in various disciplines at the ceremony in the Gentry Center Complex. Among officials who attended the program was Dr. Wendy Thompson, vice chancellor for Organizational Effectiveness and Strategic Initiatives, at the Tennessee Board of Regents.

TSU Business Incubation Center Builds Entrepreneurs Through Start-ups and Small Business Development

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Clinton Gray III, Derrick Moore and Emmanuel Reed wanted to turn their three-man moving company into a thriving business, but they didn’t know how.

They turned to the Nashville Business Incubation Center at the TSU Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, for help.

The three former college roommates, who dreamed up their moving business idea while still in school at TSU, only had a rented truck and the “grandiose” dream to build a successful moving company like no other.

In 2010, the NBIC stepped in, providing access to business expertise, networking opportunities, mentoring and consulting relationships, and office space for the business start-up.

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The three former college roommates, who dreamed up their moving business idea while still in school at TSU, only had a rented truck and the “grandiose” dream to build a successful moving company like no other. Now, Clinton Gray III (not pictured) , Derrick Moore (left) and Emmanuel Reed have turned their three-man moving company into a thriving business with an expected revenue projection of $1.6 million by the end of the next business cycle. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

In three and a half years, since moving into the center, The Green Truck Moving Company has more than doubled sales each year, growing from three employees and a rented truck, to 30 employees and seven company-owned moving trucks. For a business that started with an initial $3,000 investment, the company’s revenue projection is $1.6 million by the end of the next business cycle, according to Gray, who, as director of marketing, is the front man for the company.

“We wouldn’t be halfway where we are today if it wasn’t for the incubation center,” said Gray. “We have outgrown two previous spaces and have had to move to another. From 500 square-feet when we first came here, we are now occupying a 2,000 square-foot area.”

The incubation center offers management and technical assistance to small businesses for up to five years through classes, programs, onsite mentoring, one-on-one business counseling and peer support.

Angela Crane-Jones, director of the Nashville Incubation Center
Angela Crane-Jones, director of the Nashville Incubation Center (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations) 

“Our goal is to increase an entrepreneur’s or startup’s likelihood of success by orchestrating connections to coaching, capital, customers, resources and talent,” said Director Angela Crane-Jones.

She said since its establishment in 1986, the NBIC has provided “a well-rounded entrepreneurship and incubation platform” for local businesses. NBIC embraces diversity with a focus on microenterprises: minority, veteran and women owned businesses.

“In the past five years NBIC’s clients have generated over $44.1 million in sales and created 253 new jobs,” Crane-Jones said.

Last year, NBIC clients reported a combined 21 percent increase in sales to close the year at nearly $17 million, while creating 64 new jobs for the Nashville area.

“When they come in, we assess their idea or business growth potential,” Crane-Jones said. “We help them to understand the core functions of human resources, accounting, marketing, legal and operations.”

This way, she said, they can be held accountable to be sure they are hiring the right people, reinvesting their profits into the company, have access or a path to obtain capital, and building sustainable business relationships.

These core values of accountability, reinvestment and sustainability have been a key reason why NBIC start-ups have been successful, and many beat the odds while others floundered under the weight of the recent economic downturn, said Crane-Jones.

U-Kno Catering, a professional catering service and cafeteria food service contractor that prides itself on offering fine cuisine and quality service at an affordable price, knows well the benefit of abiding by the NBIC’s core values.

During the recent recession, while other companies and businesses were struggling and reporting losses, U-Kno Catering, which joined the incubation center in 2008, was maintaining a comfortable profit margin, says owner Brenda Odom, a TSU graduate.

“With the help of the center, we made it a point to reinvest our profits, found a better way to market our business using QuickBooks to track sales, expenses and create invoices instantly,” added Odom, who has more than 20 years experience in the catering and food service industry.

She started the company seven years ago looking to fill a Middle Tennessee market in search of a dependable, fast and quality food service entity with its origin “right here.” There is every indication that Odom has hit her stride. From an initial 1,000 square feet, her business now occupies 2,000 square feet of space at the incubation center.

Among U-Kno Catering’s clients are such notables as Vanderbilt University, Deloitte, Allstate, and NES (Nashville Electric Service), which according to Odom, needed a substantial security bond to sign a contract with the catering service.

“We did not have the bonding, but the incubation center stepped in and provided a letter of guarantee to the bank to help us secure the contract, and bond in less than 30 days,” Odom said.

The success of the NBIC, according to its director, has been largely due to its vision as “the best place to grow a small business,” supported by the University leadership and a Board of Directors including individuals with proven business abilities and keen leadership skills.

Dr. Ruthie Reynolds, executive director of the Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)
Dr. Ruthie Reynolds, executive director of the Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Although TSU President Glenda Glover – a CPA herself and former dean of a business school – joined the University just two years ago, immediately upon arrival saw the need to make the center more responsive to the needs of the business community and the university. She established the Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, with an executive director, to serve as an umbrella overseeing the functions of the incubation center, and the Small Business Development Center in the College of Business.

The goal of establishing the CEED was twofold, said Executive Director, Dr. Ruthie Reynolds, also a CPA and a longtime business professor.

“Being so aware of the business world, President Glover wanted a better coordination of the entrepreneurial efforts at the University, as well as begin an interdisciplinary approach to entrepreneurship,” said Reynolds.

She said CEED was created to expand the focus of educating and preparing students for positions within corporations to raising student awareness of self-employment as career alternative.

“By bringing the incubation center and the SBDC under one umbrella, the Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development endeavors to nurture and encourage entrepreneurial spirit in the students, faculty and staff and the local community,” added Reynolds.

According to Crane-Jones, this coordination of effort has worked well for the incubation center. Although admission to the center is opened to all, she said 27 percent of the new entrepreneurs and startups are either current or former TSU students.

Graduates of the center are making their marks in business and industry.

Take for instance Zycron, started at the center about 23 years ago, is now an industry leader in information technology services, providing client-specific solutions in health care, energy and utilities. It has five offices across the U.S., Latin America and England serving a broad client base.

But while this sounds good, Gray, of The Green Truck Moving Company, says it takes a lot of work to make it all happen.

“Starting a business is not easy, which is why access to business experts and affordable office space that the incubator program offers is so vital,” he noted. “It takes a lot of energy, a lot of will power and a little bit of luck thrown in to succeed.”

And Gray, Moore and Reed know too well what hard work and perseverance can do. Just as they dreamt, they built a moving company like no other…. a real “green company.” Their company trucks run on biodiesel, a cleaner form of fuel, and for every move, the company plants two trees, “which helps beautify our communities as well as clean up our earth’s atmosphere.”

Now, that’s like no other!

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Metro Police Identify Suspect in TSU Attempted Robbery, Shooting

Woodland Hills Escapee De’Mario Fisher Wanted in the Shooting of a TSU Student Wednesday Night

 

Metro Police Chief Steve Anderson announces the identification of De'Mario Fisher as the prime suspect in the attempted robbery and shooting of an 18-year old TSU student Friday, as president Glenda Glover and community leaders look on. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Metro Police Chief Steve Anderson announces the identification of De’Mario Fisher as the prime suspect in the attempted robbery and shooting of an 18-year old TSU student Friday, as president Glenda Glover and community leaders look on. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Metropolitan Nashville Police Chief Steve Anderson today announced they have identified a suspect in Wednesday’s attempted robbery and shooting of an 18-year old female TSU student.

De’Mario Fisher is wanted for aggravated robbery, aggravated assault and unlawful gun possession in connection with Wednesday’s attack.

Fisher, who turned 18 today, has been a fugitive since he and more than 30 other teens escaped from Woodland Hills on September 1.  He is the only one who remains at-large.
 Fisher is considered to be armed and dangerous.

The announcement came during a press conference at Corinthian Missionary Baptist Church when local clergy, politicians, along with Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover and administration members joined together in a show of unity against crime in the community, and against students at area colleges and universities.

“I want to express my gratitude to the Metro and TSU police in identifying a dangerous suspect in this attack,” said Dr. Glover. “We are very appreciative of their efforts.”

On Wednesday night, the gunshot victim and an 18-year-old friend were returning from the Wendy’s restaurant on 28th Avenue North.  As they approached the intersection of John A. Merritt Boulevard and 31st Avenue North, the women noticed a dark colored four-door sedan parked on the street.

Moments later, a man with a pistol visible in his waistband got out of the passenger side, approached the victim and demanded her backpack.  The victim refused and fought the gunman’s efforts to rob her.  Ultimately the gunman put her in a headlock, threw her to the ground and shot her multiple times.  Her friend received a minor injury.  The gunman then fled back to the car, which was last seen traveling on John A. Merritt Boulevard.

Both students have been released from the hospital and are expected to make a full recovery.

Careful analysis of certain evidence recovered from the shooting scene by an MNPD expert led to the development of Fisher as a possible suspect.  The victim picked Fisher as her assailant from a photo lineup earlier today.

Anyone seeing Fisher or knowing his whereabouts is urged to contact the Emergency Communications Center at 615.862.8600 or Crime Stoppers at 615.74CRIME.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Dedicates Cutting-edge Research Facilities to Accommodate “Phenomenal” Growth in Agricultural Sciences

The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences dedicated three new buildings September 17 on campus, including the centerpiece of the additions, the Agricultural Biotechnology Building. The added lab space and updated equipment in the  state-of-the-art $8 million Agricultural Biotechnology Building will provide more room for cutting-edge research, with implications for farmers and consumers in Tennessee and beyond. Helping with the ribbon cutting ceremony include (L-R) Julius Johnson, Commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Agriculture; John Morgan, Tennessee Board of Regents Chancellor; TSU President Glenda Glover; USDA Mid South assistant area director Archie Tucker; Dean Chandra Reddy; and State Representatives Brenda Gilmore and Harold Love(photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences dedicated three new buildings on campus September 17, including the centerpiece of the additions, the Agricultural Biotechnology Building. The added lab space and updated equipment in the state-of-the-art $8 million Agricultural Biotechnology Building will provide more room for cutting-edge research, with implications for farmers and consumers in Tennessee and beyond. Helping with the ribbon cutting ceremony include (L-R) Julius Johnson, Commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Agriculture; John Morgan, Tennessee Board of Regents Chancellor; TSU President Glenda Glover; USDA Mid South assistant area director Archie Tucker; Dean Chandra Reddy; and State Representatives Brenda Gilmore and Harold Love (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – With graduate enrollment in agricultural sciences at Tennessee State University more than tripled in five years and an influx of new Ph.D. faculty topping more than 25 in just three years, University officials are celebrating the addition of new facilities to accommodate this “phenomenal” growth.

Today, TSU President Glenda Glover, joined by Dean Chandra Reddy, Chancellor John Morgan, of the Tennessee Board of Regents, and other University officials, federal and state stakeholders and elected official, held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for three new buildings on campus.

The buildings, with a combined price tag of more than $12 million, were funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture through its National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

The centerpiece of the new facilities is the 25,000 square-foot Agricultural Biotechnology Building, the first new building constructed at the University in nearly eight years. It contains more than 12 state-of-the-art labs for cutting-edge research, including DNA synthesis and chromatography analysis. The building will also house and support primarily agricultural research, and provide working space for more than 20 new Ph.D.-level scientists, as well as administrative offices.

The other two facilities, called the Agricultural and STEM Education and Training Center, and the Agricultural Research Support Building, are located on the University farm.

“Tennessee State University is preparing students who are ready for the workforce,” said a very upbeat President Glover, as she thanked the USDA, the TBR, the Tennessee Department of Agriculture and other stakeholders for their support in making the buildings a reality.

“This is such a wonderful opportunity. With these facilities, our students will benefit tremendously by engaging in cutting-edge research in food safety and security, and by expanding their knowledge in their quest for excellence,” the President added.

Dr. Hongwei Si, Assistant Professor of Food Chemistry, explains some of the research projects going on in the Food Biosciences and Technology Lab, as visitors, including Dean Chandra Reddy, and TBR Chancellor John Morgan, far right, listen. (photo by Rick Delahaya, TSU Media Relations)
Dr. Hongwei Si, Assistant Professor of Food Chemistry, explains some of the research projects going on in the Food Biosciences and Technology Lab, as visitors, including Dean Chandra Reddy, and TBR Chancellor John Morgan, far right, listen. (photo by Rick Delahaya, TSU Media Relations)

For Dean Reddy, he said research funding in the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences has tripled to couple with climbing enrollment on the undergraduate and graduate levels.

“This dedication and these buildings memorialize the ongoing transformation in the college over the last five years,” Reddy said. “We have multiplied every useful metrics during this time, be it student enrollment, research funding and outreach.”

He said the college has integrated academics with research and outreach and extension, established faculty focus groups to provide intellectual leadership to their programs, as well as created new opportunities for students to get involved in research and outreach.

The need for continued investment in agriculture and the food sciences is tremendous, he said, reminding the gathering about the expected growth in human population and the risk of climate change and its effect on food crops, and the impact of food on “our” overall health and wellbeing.

“To address these fundamental problems, our research is focusing on developing crops and products for health, for climate change, for energy, and ultimately alleviate the problems facing the world today and in the future,” added Reddy.

TBR Chancellor Morgan, who described the dedication as very significant, also thanked the USDA, President Glover, Dr. Reddy and other stakeholders for their support.

“This is very significant because it reflects the commitment of this University to excellence and to producing students who are capable and ready for the workforce anywhere in the country and the world.”

While the dedication of the new facilities was the focus of today’s ceremony, a presentation by a TSU student received tremendous cheers from the audience, and caught the attention of several speakers and stakeholders with job offers for the Agricultural Sciences major from Chicago.

Kourtney Daniels
Kourtney Daniels

Kourtney Daniels, a sophomore with a 4.0 GPA, serving as a TSU Student Ambassador, had only to give the welcome remarks, but her “very eloquent,” three-minute presentation drew praises even she did not expect.

“I was just being myself; I did not expect to have such an impact,” said Daniels.

Others also participating in today’s dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony were: Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dr. Mark Hardy; State Representative Brenda Gilmore, a TSU alum, who has championed many causes on the state and national levels for her alma mater; and Tennessee Agriculture Commissioner, Julius Johnson.

State Representative Harold Love Jr.; Archie Tucker, assistant director of the Mid South Area for the USDA’s Agricultural Research Services; Steve Gass, of the Tennessee Department of Education; Dr. Roger Sauve, superintendent of the Agricultural Research and Education Center at TSU; and Ron Brooks, associate vice president for Facilities Management, also took part in the dedication.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Pride Celebrated as TSU Great Claude Humphrey Enters the Pro Foot Ball Hall of Fame

Claude Humphrey
After nearly 30 years, TSU great Claude Humphrey took his rightful place in the NFL Hall of Fame Saturday, Aug. 2 in Canton, Ohio. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – “TSU Pride” was front and center Saturday in Canton, Ohio, when Tiger great Claude Humphrey was enshrined into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in front of thousands of spectators including family members, friends and Tennessee State University fans lead by President Glenda Glover.

“This is the proudest day in my life,” Dr. Glover said of the induction of her fellow Memphis, Tennessee, hometown native. “This very well deserved tribute to Claude Humphrey is beyond measure. I am just too proud to see this former Tiger and a product of Memphis, where I am from to be enshrined into the Hall of Fame.”

TSU President Glenda Glover (center) welcomes TSU great Claude Humphrey (left)  to the NFL Hall of Fame Saturday, Aug. 2.  Humphrey is the second TSU Tiger enshrined into the Hall, including Richard Dent (right) Class of 2011. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)
TSU President Glenda Glover (center) welcomes TSU great Claude Humphrey (left) to the NFL Hall of Fame Saturday, Aug. 2. Humphrey is the second TSU Tiger enshrined into the Hall, including Richard Dent (right) Class of 2011. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“I have so many mixed emotions right now,” Humphrey said, as he received and unveiled his bust that will be displayed in the Hall of Fame Museum alongside many other football greats before him. “I didn’t expect to get here, but I am sure glad that I did.”

Humphrey’s induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame is the second for a former Tiger, and it comes just three years after fellow defensive lineman Richard Dent was enshrined in 2011.

WATCH the complete acceptance speech OR READ the transcript

While many said Humphrey’s induction was long overdue, coming 33 years after he left the game, others saw it as a special moment for Historically Black Colleges and Universities, with the enshrinement of three HBCU graduates on the same day. Michael Strahan, a graduate of Texas Southern University, as well as Aeneas Williams, from Southern University, were also inducted alongside Humphrey.

“I am so happy for Claude, and it really speaks to the type of program we had at Tennessee State, having two players in the Hall of Fame,” said Dent, of his fellow Tiger. “It was a long-time coming, but well-deserved.”

Humphrey, Strahan and Williams were three of seven to be inducted on Saturday, joining Derrick Brooks, Ray Guy, Walter Jones and Andre Reed.

Humphrey adresses the crowd during his enshrinement ceremony into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Humphrey played for TSU as a defensive tackle from 1964 through 1967, and played 13 seasons in the NFL for the Atlanta Falcons and Philadelphia Eagles. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)
Humphrey adresses the crowd during his enshrinement ceremony into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Humphrey played for TSU as a defensive tackle from 1964 through 1967, and played 13 seasons in the NFL for the Atlanta Falcons and Philadelphia Eagles. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

In his 30-minute speech, Humphrey paid tribute to his alma mater, making special references to President Glover for being present at the enshrinement, and his former coach, the late John Merritt, whom he described as “the greatest coach in black college football.”

“A lot of recruiters came to visit me, but none like John Merritt,” Humphrey said of his former coach and collegiate playing career. “To me, he was the greatest. We lost a total of five games in four years.”

Humphrey, the former Atlanta Falcon, who retired with the Philadelphia Eagles, was a three-time All-American defensive tackle at TSU from 1964 to 1967. He ended his collegiate career as the all-time leader in sacks at TSU with 39. He is tied for second behind Lamar Carter along with fellow TSU legend Richard Dent.

Humphrey was selected in the first round of the 1968 NFL Draft going third overall to the Atlanta Falcons. During his rookie season in Atlanta, he was named AP Defensive Rookie of the Year.

Humphrey played 13 seasons in the NFL with the Atlanta Falcons (1968-74, 76-77) and the Philadelphia Eagles (1979-81).

While with Atlanta, he was named All-NFL or All-Pro eight times and was selected to the Pro Bowl on six different occasions.

Humphrey is only the second Falcon to be enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Ben Ray Harrell, ’70, a brother of Humphrey’s late wife Sandra, called the newly inductee “just an all over great guy.”

“This day is so fitting and could not have happened to a better person than Claude Humphrey,” said Harrell. “If there is anything that is missing here today is his wife not being here by his side. They loved each other very much.”

Nashville Councilman Howard Gentry ’74, ‘04, who presented a proclamation to Humphrey on behalf of the City Council, described the enshrinement as a fulfillment of former TSU President Walter Davis’ (1943-1968) dream for TSU to not just be recognized as a great sports program among “black schools,” but a great program compared to any in the nation.

“Claude’s induction and that of Richard Dent three years ago are an embodiment of that dream, and I couldn’t be prouder of their achievement” Gentry said.

Tony Wells ’92, president of the Tennessee State University National Alumni Association, like President Glover, said the enshrinement of Humphrey was a very proud moment for the whole TSU family.

“His mention of TSU, President Glover, and his days at the institution (during his speech) before the whole world was an indication of his pride and his appreciation for the preparation he received at the school,” said Wells. “I couldn’t be prouder as I am today.”

Dr. Reginald McDonald, Acting Band Director, waves to the crowd as the Aristocrat of Bands marches by during the Pro Football Hall of Fame parade in downtown Canton, Ohio Saturday, Aug. 2. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)
Dr. Reginald McDonald, Acting Band Director, waves to the crowd as the Aristocrat of Bands marches by during the Pro Football Hall of Fame parade in downtown Canton, Ohio Saturday, Aug. 2. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Also toting the “TSU Pride” was the University’s 290-member marching show band, the Aristocrat of Bands, which put up a crowd-pleasing performance to thunderous, continuous cheers during the Pro Football Hall of Fame Parade in downtown Canton Saturday. The band also put up another non-stop cheering, eight-minute performance during the half-time show of the nationally televised Hall of Fame game between the New York Giants and the Buffalo Bills at Fawcett Stadium.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU President Receives Honor from National Accounting Organization

Glover
President Glenda Glover

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service)— Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover has been awarded the 2014 National Achievement in Education Award from the National Association of Black Accountants. The award was presented June 21 during the organization’s annual convention in Washington, D.C.

The National Achievement in Education Award is presented to an active member, either a Ph.D. or equivalent accounting educator at the university or college level, who has made a significant contribution to the accounting profession.

President Glover, who was unable to attend the convention, said she was proud to receive the award given her long affiliation with the organization.

“I am honored to receive this award from such a prestigious organization,” she said. “My relationship extends back to the late 1970s when we were all struggling to get through the CPA examination together. NABA has such a worthwhile purpose in the community assisting others in their efforts to enter the accounting profession. It is wonderful to be affiliated with an organization such as NABA.”

According to Angela Avant, NABA president and CEO, Glover’s achievements and impact in education and the accounting profession, “speak for themselves.”

“Many NABA members, including myself, have known and benefitted directly from Dr. Glover’s body of work,” said Avant. “This award was one way for NABA to publicly acknowledge and thank her for all that she has done and achieved.”

After graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics from Tennessee State University, President Glover pursued the Master of Business Administration at Clark Atlanta University. She then completed her doctorate in business from George Washington University, and later completed her law degree from Georgetown University. She is a certified public accountant, an attorney, and is one of two African American women to hold the Ph.D.-CPA-JD combination in the nation.

Founded in 1969, the mission of NABA Inc. is to address the professional needs of its members and to build leaders who shape the future of the accounting and finance profession with a commitment to inspire the same in their successors.

Over the last 40 years the association has grown to include more than 8,000 members across the United States. Today, through the efforts of NABA and other interested groups, there are more than 200,000 African-Americans participating in the field of accounting, of which over 5,000 are Certified Public Accountants.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.