Tag Archives: Founders Day

Tennessee State University Marks 103rd Birthday With Procession, Speeches and Music

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is 103 years old today.

Harold Love-2
State Rep. Harold M. Love Jr.

President Glenda Glover, accompanied by keynote speaker State Rep. Harold M. Love Jr., led a procession of faculty for a Founders’ Day celebration in Kean Hall, with cheers from the audience and selections from the University Wind Ensemble.

“This is a great day for Tennessee State University,” said President Glover, as she recounted events in the University’s history from its founding in 1912 to the role it plays today as a major center of education in the nation.

“From 1912 when the then-Agricultural and Industrial Normal School for Negroes, built to provide educational opportunity for blacks, opened its doors to the first 247 students, TSU has maintained a tradition of excellence in education for a diverse population,” Glover said.

Founders15
Members of the Student Government Association celebrate during the 2015 TSU Founders’ Day program in Kean Hall. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

In his keynote address, Rep. Love, a 1994 graduate of TSU, reminded administrators, teachers and students that they have a special role to play in maintaining the institution’s legacy of excellence. Teachers, he said, must learn to understand the special needs of each student to help that student succeed.

“Don’t be quick to give up on a student because he or she misses a class or two,” Love said. “That student may just grow up to become a state representative one day,” the Tennessee 58th District representative added, referring to his own path as a student.

Speaking on the theme, “Honor Our Legacy,” Love said those who laid the foundation for TSU, although under tough circumstances and with scarce resources, were determined to ensure that their students were well prepared for the world ahead of them.

“To honor that legacy, university administrators must learn to go the extra mile to help that student who may be late registering or in meeting his or her requirements for class,” said Love who has long ties to the university.

Love earned a bachelor’s degree in Economics and Finance from TSU before going on to earn a master’s degree in Theological Studies at Vanderbilt University. He is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Public Administration at TSU. His late parents, Harold Love Sr., and Mary Y. Love, also attended TSU and was an administrator at the university for many years.

He thanked President Glover, also an alumnae, for the invitation and her own legacy of excellence in earning multiple degrees. He called on students to be more focused and away from the “gadgets.”

“Students, don’t rely on TV and all the gadgets out there. Be focused on your learning as your way of honoring the legacy of this great institution,” Love said.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Marks 102nd Birthday With Procession, Speeches and Cheers

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is 102 years old today.

President Glenda Glover, accompanied by keynote speaker, State Rep. Brenda Gilmore, led a procession of faculty, staff and students for a Founders’ Day celebration in Kean Hall, amid cheers from the audience and renditions from the University Marching Band.

“This is a great day for Tennessee State University,” said Dr. Glover, as she recounted events in the University’s history from its founding in 1912 to the role it plays today as a major center of education in the nation.

“From 1912 when the then Agricultural and Industrial Normal School for Negroes, built to provide educational opportunity for blacks, opened its doors to the first 247, TSU has maintained a tradition of excellence in education for a diverse population,” Dr. Glover said.

In her keynote address, Rep. Gilmore, a 1984 graduate of TSU, emphasized “Think, Work, Serve,” the University’s motto and its relevance in achieving success, but quickly pointed to pitfalls many face for misusing that success.

“TSU has helped to better the lives of so many and opened doors for countless others,” Gilmore said. “But many, including elected officials and others in key positions have failed because they end up hurting the very people they are supposed to help.”

Gilmore, a noted advocate for abused and special needs children, and a strong supporter of women’s cause, said many officials suffer what she called ethical lapses, either out of greed for power, wealth, disrespect for others or lack of integrity.

“As TSU graduates we are responsible to pass our good fortune to help those unfortunate ones in our community,” said Gilmore, who earned a B.S. degree in Business at TSU, before going on to earn a master’s degree in Human Resource Development at Vanderbilt University.

“Get involved in fruitful endeavors that improve your community; give back to the community that nurtured you; and reconnect yourselves to the TSU motto to make this world a better place,” added the four-term member of the Tennessee General Assembly from the 54th District in Davidson County.

Mr. and Miss TSU, accompanied by their Royal Court, and faculty members dressed in full regalia, added to the pomp in celebration of the founders and birthday of the University, which now boasts more than 9,000 students, up from 247, one hundred and two years ago.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Alumna and State Representative Brenda Gilmore to Speak at TSU’s Annual Founders’ Day Commemoration

State Rep. Brenda Gilmore
State Rep. Brenda Gilmore

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – State Rep. Brenda Gilmore, a graduate and staunch supporter of Tennessee State University, will return to her alma mater on Thursday, Oct. 2 as the keynote speaker at the University’s 2014 Founders’ Day celebration.

The ceremony will be held in Kean Hall on the main campus at 9 a.m.

Gilmore, a Democrat and four-term member of the Tennessee General Assembly, represents Tennessee’s 54th District in Davidson County. A native of Sumner County, she was first elected to the General Assembly in 2006.

The former Metro Councilwoman served in many other areas before becoming a state lawmaker. For 20 years she was the director of University Mail Services at Vanderbilt University. She also worked as a mortgage loan counselor for Fidelity Federal Savings & Loan Association, and director of the Postal Services Division of the State of Tennessee.

In the General Assembly, Gilmore chairs the Davidson County Delegation and is a member of the House Committees on Agriculture and Natural Resources, and Criminal Justice, and a member of the Agriculture and Natural Resources Subcommittee. She is also a member of the Assembly’s Joint Fiscal Review Committee.

Previously, Gilmore served as the chair of the Environment Committee, secretary of the Conservation and Environment Committee, member of the Commerce and Insurance, and Utilities, and Conservation Committees. She also served as chair of the Parks Committee, and as a Member of the Small Business Committee.

A recipient of several awards, Gilmore is noted for taking strong stands for women and children causes. Recently, she served as chair of the Capital Campaign for the Northwest YMCA, and helped raise $5 million for an indoor swimming pool and center renovations.

She has held seats on many community boards including serving as chair of the Senior Citizens Inc. Board, trustee of the board for Skyline Medical Center, and a member of the Board of Trust for Belmont University.

Gilmore holds a B.S. degree in Business Administration from TSU, and a master’s degree in Human Resource Development from Vanderbilt University. She is married to Harry Gilmore. They have one daughter, Erica Gilmore, a Metro Councilwoman.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University to Celebrate Founders’ Day October 3

The Honorable Harvey Johnson Jr.
The Honorable Harvey Johnson Jr.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will revisit one of its most hallowed traditions on Thursday, Oct. 3 when it holds its annual Founders’ Day program to honor all those who have sacrificed through the years to make TSU the leader in higher education that is has become.

The event will take place in the Howard C. Gentry Center beginning at 9 a.m., and is free and open to the public.

The Honorable Harvey Johnson Jr., former Mayor of Jackson, Miss., will provide the keynote address. Johnson served as the first African-American mayor of Jackson from 1997-2005 and again from 2009-2013.

Johnson is a native of Vicksburg, MS., where he graduated from Rosa A. Temple High School.  He received a bachelor’s degree in political science from Tennessee State University in 1968 and a master’s degree in political science from the University of Cincinnati in 1970.  He has done additional study toward a doctoral degree in public administration at the University of Southern California’s Washington Public Affairs Center.  Johnson was awarded the Doctor of Humane Letters, from Tougaloo College.

In 1997, Johnson made history by being elected Jackson, Mississippi’s first African-American mayor.  In 2001, Jackson voters again chose Johnson for a second four-year term as mayor of Mississippi’s Capital City. He was elected to a third term in 2009, making him the longest-serving mayor under the City’s mayor-council form of government, which was instituted in 1985. He left office in June of 2013.

Johnson led the effort which resulted in the construction of the City’s first Convention Center, located adjacent to a new state-of-the-art, high tech Telecommunications Training and Conference Center. Johnson-created initiatives include:  Jobs for Jacksonians, which focuses on finding jobs for local residents; the Equal Business Opportunity Program, established in 1998 to ensure that minority contractors have an equal opportunity in the procurement of City contracts; Fresh Start, a program to assist ex-offenders in re-entry into the community; and monthly ward meetings, where local residents are given the opportunity to meet with City officials, department directors and staff.

Prior to being elected Mayor of Jackson, Johnson assisted economically depressed small towns with minority leadership in obtaining basic necessities such as water and sewer service, as the founder and Executive Director of the Mississippi Institute for Small Towns, a nonprofit agency. His 25 years of professional experience include planning and community development as well as serving as assistant professor of political science at Jackson State University. He is a former member of the Commission on Colleges for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

During his years as mayor, Johnson served on the U.S. Conference of Mayors Advisory Council, President of the National Conference of Black Mayors, member of the National Conference of Democratic Mayors,  member of the Executive Committee of the Democratic National Committee, and a charter member of 100 Black Men of Jackson, Incorporated. He was a 1965 initiate into Beta Omicron Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., and he is a life member.  Johnson is also a life member of the NAACP.  He has served on the Boards of Directors of various private and non-profits organizations, and has received numerous awards, commendations, recognitions and honors.

Harvey Johnson, Jr. is married to Kathy Ezell Johnson, and they have two adult children, Harvey III and Sharla.  He is a member of Hope Spring Missionary Baptist Church.

For more information on the event, call 615.963.5331.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu