Tag Archives: featured

TSU Nursery Research Center Named ‘Recycler of the Year’ by Tennessee Recycling Coalition

TRC New Banner rounded1NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences’ Otis L. Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville was recognized recently as the Tennessee Recycling Coalition’s “Recycler of the Year” in the Higher Education School category after recycling approximately 200,000 pounds (100 tons) of polyethylene plastic since 2010.

Each year, across Middle Tennessee an estimated 60,000 pounds of polyethylene plastic film is used to provide overwintering protection for plants. This film is removed each spring and typically discarded in landfills or illegally burned or buried. Producers have historically been hesitant to commit to recycling this plastic due to increased costs and inconvenience. To solve these problems, the NRC developed a recycling program that uses an innovative mechanical spooler—made available to nursery producers free of charge—to remove the plastic and spool it into compact rolls for cost-effective shipping.

Dr. Nick Gawel
Dr. Nick Gawel

Drawing on its connection to the Tennessee nursery industry, the NRC has had overwhelming success with this program. The program has been eliminating approximately 40,000 pounds of plastic waste per year while saving participating producers money since its inception.

According to Dr. Nick Gawel, superintendent of the NRC, the program has had a “fundamental” impact on the way the nursery industry—one already known for its “green” initiatives—operates.

“It is a great honor to be recognized for this program,” Gawel said. “TSU is proud of our partnership with the Tennessee nursery industry and the opportunity to make this industry even more green and sustainable.”

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Debate Team Thrives at State Championship

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – It’s been a busy few months for the Forensics team at Tennessee State University and they have the proof of their endeavors. They won more than 50 awards in February alone and now boast one of the “Best Speakers” in the state.

The Forensics team continues their winning ways bringing home 50 awards during February and the "Best Speaker" in the state. Members of the team include: Top row (L-R): Aaron Walker, John Nix, Kavon Coleman, and Tyler Kinloch Bottom Row (L-R): Ricky Madden, Shaylyn Rice, Ashley Doxy, Tyra Laster, Tristan Halfacre, Kevon Graves (courtesy photo)
The Forensics team continues their winning ways bringing home 50 awards during February and the “Best Speaker” in the state. Members of the team include: Top row (L-R): Aaron Walker, John Nix, Kavon Coleman, and Tyler Kinloch Bottom Row (L-R): Ricky Madden, Shaylyn Rice, Ashley Doxy, Tyra Laster, Tristan Halfacre, Kevon Graves (courtesy photo)

This semester the 11-member team of undergraduate students have netted impressive results, bringing home awards wherever they compete. Nowhere was this more prevalent than at the recent Tennessee Intercollegiate Forensics State Championship when they placed third in the state and brought home 28 more awards. The team also placed third in combined debate and Individual Events School Sweepstakes.

More than 100 students gathered at TSU Feb. 14-15 to see who would be crowned the “best of the best” in the state. John Nix, a junior Political Science major from Franklin, Tennessee, took home the coveted first place Pentathlon speaker, qualifying him for the “Best Speaker in the State.” Nix also won numerous awards including third place Persuasive Speaking, Top Novice Persuasive Speaking, first place Poetry Interpretation, Top Novice Poetry Interpretation, first place Prose Interpretation, Top Novice Prose Interpretation, third place Impromptu Speaking, Top Novice Impromptu Speaking, NPDA Novice Semi-Finalist, and fifth place Novice NPDA speaker.

Other team winners included:

  • Kevon Graves, freshman Urban Studies major, Kansas City, Missouri – NPDA Novice Semi-Finalist, fourth place Novice NPDA Speaker
  • Kavon Coleman, junior Civil Engineering major, Grand Rapids, Michigan – third place International Public Debate Association Varsity Speaker
  • Shaylyn Rice, junior Mass Communications major, Birmingham, Alabama – second place Poetry Interpretation, second place Dramatic Interpretation, Top Novice Dramatic Interpretation, fifth place Programmed Oral Interpretation, first place Radio Broadcasting, Top Novice Radio Broadcasting
  • Aaron Walker, junior English major, Memphis, Tennessee – third place Poetry Interpretation
  • Tyler Kinloch, senior Aeronautical Engineering major, Canton, Michigan – fourth place Prose Interpretation, first place Dramatic Interpretation
  • Tyra Laster, junior Mass Communications major, Marietta, Georgia – second place Radio Broadcasting
  • Tyra Laster and Ashley Doxy, sophomore Biology and Chemistry major, Chicago – fourth place Duo Interpretation
  • Shaylyn Rice and Aaron Walker – first place Duo Interpretation, Top Novice Duo Interpretation

This was the second competition during February for the team, having earned 22 awards at the Jackson-Purchase Swing at Murray State University Feb. 6-8.

Award winners included:

Friday, Feb. 6 – National Parliamentary Debate Association tournament (NPDA)

  • Fifth place team sweepstakes in NPDA
  • Tyler Kinloch and Barbra Dudley – semifinalists in Novice NPDA
  • John Nix and Kevon Graves – quarterfinalists in Novice NPDA
  • Tyler Kinloch – fifth place novice NPDA speaker
  • Barbra Dudley, sophomore economics major from Indianapolis – eighth place Novice NPDA speaker

Saturday, Feb. 7 – MSU Swing

  • Third place Small School Sweepstakes
  • John Nix – fourth place Extemporaneous Speaking, first place Poetry Interpretation, sixth place Pentathlon Speaker
  • Shaylyn Rice – sixth place Poetry Interpretation
  • Kevon Graves – fourth place novice Extemporaneous Speaking

Sunday, Feb. 8 – Alumni swing

  • Second place Small School Sweepstakes
  • John Nix – fourth place Persuasive Speaking, first place Poetry Interpretation, sixth place Pentathlon Speaker
  • Tyler Kinloch – sixth place Dramatic Interpretation
  • Shaylyn Rice – first place Radio Broadcasting
  • Kevon Graves – third place Novice Impromptu Speaking, first place Novice Extemporaneous Speaking
  • Shaylyn Rice and Aaron Walker – fifth place Duo Interpretation

The TSU Forensics Team closed out the month attending the Rock & Roll Swing at Bowling Green State University in Ohio, Feb. 27-March 1.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Golf Channel Highlights Accomplishments of TSU Trailblazing Coach Catana Starks

Coach_StarksNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – As we transition out of Black History Month and into National Women’s Month, we honor one of our own…Tennessee State University Coach Catana Starks, the first female coach of a Division I men’s golf team. Her amazing journey first caught the attention of Hollywood as her story was told on the big screen in From the Rough. Recently, the Golf Channel visited the University to share the  story of her time at TSU as the first woman ever to coach a men’s golf team. Coach Starks eventually went on to lead the team to victory at the PGA Minority Collegiate Golf Championship in 2005,  with the all-time best score record for the tournament.

Watch the video that originally aired on the Golf Channel’s Morning Drive, highlighting  the trailblazing TSU alum’s accomplishments in the male-dominated sport of golf.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

“Do Not Change Tennessee Education Standards,” TSU Panel Tells State Leaders and Lawmakers

Dr. Candice McQueen, Tennessee Commissioner of Education, welcomes the audience to the Forum and explains her thoughts on the education standards in Tennessee. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Dr. Candice McQueen, Tennessee Commissioner of Education, welcomes the audience to the Forum and explains her thoughts on the education standards in Tennessee. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Without an outright endorsement, a panel of educators and legislators meeting at Tennessee State University Thursday appears to support the position of many who are urging lawmakers to rethink making any changes to the state’s academic standards for grades K-12.

Giving what they called a “balanced” representation of views on one of the biggest and controversial issues facing the Tennessee General Assembly, the panel said the focus should be on preparing students to think beyond graduation either for successful college careers, or technical or trade education that prepares them for the work place.

The panel was part of a forum under the theme, “Viewpoints on Tennessee Academic Standards for K-12,” hosted in partnership with the American Association of University Women of Tennessee, and the College of Public Service and Urban Affairs at TSU. It brought together key members of the House Committee on Education, including Rep. Harold Love Jr. (D-Nashville), member of the Education Instruction, and Programs Standing Committee; and Rep. Mark White (R-Memphis), chair of the Education and Administration Planning Subcommittee.

State Representative Harold Love Jr. (left) comments on the current education standards in Tennessee at a Legislative Forum today at the Avon Williams Campus. Representative Mark White (right) also attended the Forum, as well as Dr. Candice McQueen, Tennessee Commissioner of Education, and Dr. Linda Gilbert, director for Murfreesboro City Schools. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
State Representative Harold Love Jr. (left) comments on the current education standards in Tennessee at a Legislative Forum today at the Avon Williams Campus. Representative Mark White (right) also attended the Forum, as well as Dr. Candice McQueen, Tennessee Commissioner of Education, and Dr. Linda Gilbert, director for Murfreesboro City Schools. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. Michael Harris, dean of the College of Public Affairs and Urban Planning, who moderated the panel, welcomed participants on behalf of TSU President Glenda Glover, who was away on travel.

In a statement earlier, Tennessee Commissioner of Education, Dr. Candice McQueen, welcomed the discussion on the standards, pointing to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, the Nation’s Report Card, which shows Tennessee as the fastest academically improving state in the nation.

But even with this level of success, the commissioner sees a “widening gap” in the achievement level. She said more than half of the state’s students are from disadvantaged backgrounds who lack the resources to keep pace.

“If we want to be successful then we must find ways to help these disadvantaged students,” she said. “We have to prepare these students to think about success after graduation by steering them toward college or skills sets such as auto mechanic, welding or other trade or technical areas that improve their chances for successful life careers. To achieve this we must develop the ability to work together as K-12 educators and higher education professionals.”

Representative Love, a staunched supporter of education, citing his own late mother’s role as a longtime educator, said he understands the need for fully trained people in the classroom, and parents who are actively engaged in their children’s education.

A proponent of the current K-12 academic standards, Love said the role of the standards should be to prepare students for world-class jobs, which they emphasize.

“The current standards do not need changing,” he said. “Maybe some minor tweaking, but we do not need to change them.”

Responding to a parent’s concern about the lack of resources for their underperforming student, Love called for more funding to provide after-school tutoring for children who need it.

His House Colleague, Rep. White, concurred that students must be prepared to be competitive with the technical and job-ready skills to be successful in the work place.

He also sees no need to change the standards. “Keep the standards in place,” White added.

Another strong proponent of the standards, Dr. Linda Gilbert, director of the Murfreesboro, Tennessee City Schools, said she supports school superintendents who are calling for no change in the standards.

“We are at a crossroad, at the center of which is a child, and we must do everything to provide the environment and learning necessary to make that child successful. We cannot turn back now. …we cannot turn back on education in the state.”

On Tuesday, Feb. 10, 114 superintendents from the state’s 141 school districts presented a letter to lawmakers asking that “no legislative action be taken during the 2015 legislative session to change our academic standards.” This action follows a recent press conference by leaders of all 13 of Tennessee’s community colleges emphasizing their support for the K-12 academic standards.

Many argue, that the success of the recently signed Tennessee Promise law that offers future graduates of any Tennessee high school the opportunity to receive two years of community or technical college tuition-free, hinges on how prepared students are to succeed.

“This is an issue that the public needs to be informed about, and kept abreast on what is facing our schools, our students and our legislators,” Dean Harris said recently as he prepared for today’s forum.

Speaking earlier, the President-elect of the AAUW Tennessee, B. Ayne Cantrell, said her organization, whose mission is to advance equity for women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy, and research, was pleased to partner with TSU to host the forum.

The Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce, Women in Higher Education in Tennessee, the American Society for Public Administration, and the Lipscomb University Institute for Conflict management, sponsored the forum.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TSU Department Chair Wins Two National Media Awards

Likes 2010NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The national awards among faculty competing in the Broadcast Education Association have been released and TSU’s Chair of the Department of Communications, Dr. Terry Likes, has won in the Faculty Audio Competition: Best of Competition: “The alarm clock for your favorite tv show: The theme song.”

Likes’ report aired on the Tennessee Radio Network in 2014. The report shows when people think of their favorite songs of all time, most forget the obvious choices from an overlooked category: television theme songs. This program explores the popularity of TV theme songs, the Nashville connection and what the future is for these theme songs in popular culture.

“When students can see professors remain active in the industry and achieve at a high level, professors can, in turn, encourage students to seek excellence in their own student competition,” said Likes. “It is part of the teacher-scholar method.”

This is the second award Likes has received for this program. Earlier this month, the documentary was selected for exhibition from the National Broadcasting Society. A formal announcement of winners will occur at the NBS national convention in March.

The BEA Festival of Media Arts is an international exhibition of award-winning faculty and student works. Winners will receive recognition and exhibition of their works during the Broadcast Education Association’s annual convention in Las Vegas in April.

This is the eleventh Broadcast Education Association award for Likes.  He is the recipient of 55 awards during his career including other honors from the Associated Press and the National Press Club.  Since joining TSU in 2008, Likes has won 39 awards or honors.

BEA is an international academic media organization, driving insights, excellence in media production, and career advancement for educators, students and professionals. The association’s publications, annual convention, web-based programs, and regional district activities provide opportunities for juried production competition and presentation of current scholarly research related to aspects of the electronic media. Established in 1955, the BEA serves more than 2,500 professors, students and media professionals at approximately 275 college and university departments and schools.

 

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Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Day at the Capitol Unveils Cutting-Edge Research, Artificial Intelligence Technology

 

TSU President Dr. Glenda Glover (center) along with State Representatives Harold Love Jr., and Brenda Gilmore cut the ceremonial ribbon in the Senate Chamber of the Capitol marking the official start of TSU Day at the Capitol. Senior members of the cabinet, along with faculty and staff members also took part in the ribbon-cuting ceremony. (photos by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
TSU President Dr. Glenda Glover (center) along with State Representatives Harold Love Jr., and Brenda Gilmore cut the ceremonial ribbon in the Senate Chamber of the Capitol marking the official start of TSU Day at the Capitol. Senior members of the cabinet, along with faculty and staff members also took part in the ribbon-cuting ceremony. (photos by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – From robots that can mimic human motion, to 3-D printing capability, and the development of an advanced visualization computer assisted virtual environment called CAVE, state lawmakers today saw some cutting-edge technology being developed at Tennessee State University.

Celebrating its second “TSU Day at the Capitol” on Tuesday, the University showcased its outstanding academics and research enterprise while assuring lawmakers that state funding and other support to the University were being appropriately directed into areas that promote student learning and advancement.

“TSU Day at the Capitol gives us the opportunity to showcase the tremendous work that is going on at Tennessee State University with funding you provide to us,” President Glenda Glover told members of the State Assembly during a kickoff ceremony in the Senate Chamber. “While we are grateful for the funding, we need more support because as enrollment grows and services are increased, we will need more help to improve on existing facilities and infrastructure.”

State Representative Brenda Gilmore, (center) welcomes TSU President Glenda Glover (left) and the University to the Capitol for "TSU Day at the Capitol" while Representative Harold Love Jr., looks on.
State Representative Brenda Gilmore, (center) welcomes TSU President Glenda Glover (left) and the University to the Capitol for “TSU Day at the Capitol” while Representative Harold Love Jr., looks on.

At the kickoff ceremony, which included a ribbon cutting, State legislators joined key stakeholders, including alumni, community leaders and friends of TSU to thank President Glover, faculty staff and students for the contribution the University is making in providing quality education for students of the state and its impact on the community.

“Tennessee State University’s contribution to education in Tennessee is tremendous and needs the continued support of everyone in the state,” said David Gregory, vice chancellor for Administration and Facilities Development for the Tennessee Board of Regents. “It is good to see this level of support for the University and we are grateful that you are here to celebrate this day.”

State Representatives Harold Love Jr., and Brenda Gilmore, two graduates and staunched supporters of TSU, welcomed President Glover, faculty and staff of the University, and called on their colleagues to support TSU.

Jonathan Reynolds, a Computer and Information Systems Engineering Ph.D. student, uses software and 3-D printer to create
Jonathan Reynolds, a Computer and Information Systems Engineering Ph.D. student, uses software and 3-D printer to  create plastic chess pieces and cups. The printer can create virtually any design and was on display as part of the TSU Day at the Capitol.

“We are proud of the relationship Dr. Glover has formed with the community and members of the Assembly, something that has not always been the case in the past,” said Gilmore, chair of the Tennessee Legislative Black Caucus. “We are pleased that you are here to meet with us and to allow us to see what TSU is all about.”

Sandra D. Hunt, president of the Davidson County Alumni Association, called on her fellow former students and graduates to support the University.

“As alumni, we are the foundation of this University,” she said. “Our support maters as the backbone of this great institution. Our support is vital.”

A robot created by researchers at the College of Engineering that mimics human motions was on display during TSU Day at the Capitol.
A robot created by researchers at the College of Engineering that mimics human motions was on display during TSU Day at the Capitol.

Also speaking was Markeil Lewis, president of the Student Government Association, who thanked the legislators for taking the time to meet and celebrate with the University.

“My fellow students join me in thanking you for setting this time aside to honor our institution. We are very grateful,” Lewis said.

The TSU Day at the Capitol, which brought together nearly 300 administrators, students, faculty and staff, also included displays of different programs, giveaways, free lunch for at least two members from each legislator’s office, and visits to various committee hearings, and discussion with some key lawmakers.

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Nearly 60,000 Fans Witness Aristocrat of Bands Performance at 2015 Honda Battle of the Band Invitational Showcase

Fans also witness presentation of first-ever Honda Power of Dreams Award to TSU honoree with on-field surprise: a 2015 Honda CR-V

 

 

The Aristocrat of Bands returned to Atlanta for a sixth time to participate in the 2015 Honda Battle of the Bands Invitational Showcase January 25, performing in front of nearly 60,000 fans in the Georgia Dome.
The Aristocrat of Bands returned to Atlanta for a sixth time to participate in the 2015 Honda Battle of the Bands Invitational Showcase January 25, performing in front of nearly 60,000 fans in the Georgia Dome.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) –Returning for a sixth time, the Aristocrat of Bands from Tennessee State University marched into the Georgia Dome in Atlanta January 25 and performed their high-energy showcase that has made the band famous at home and across the country.

The AOB performed in front of nearly 60,000 fans in the dome along with seven other bands from Historically Black Colleges and Universities from across the country during the 13th Annual Honda Battle of the Bands that showcased the talents and musical showmanship of more than 2,100 student musicians.

According to Dr. Robert Elliot, chair of the Music Department, the students had an opportunity to see what excellence meant in a real-world setting.

“The Honda Battle of the Bands is a class act in every way,” said Elliott. The planning was excellent, while the execution was even better, and everyone involved is treated with respect. It was an honor to be a part of this event.”

The AOB was one of eight of bands selected out of 38 bands competing for an opportunity to travel to Atlanta through a fierce online voting process. In addition to voting, students, alumni and fans of each HBCU took to social media to help their favorite marching bands advance. The band not only scored big with fans during their performance, but also with Honda, which provided each school with a $20,000 grant to support music education, plus travel to and accommodations in Atlanta for the Invitational Showcase.

“The Honda Cooperation is the only major company in the United States to make this type of significant contribution and support to HBCU bands and instrumental music education,” said Dr. Reginald McDonald, acting band director. “It was indeed an honor to be selected as one of the top eight HBCU bands in the country, and as a show of support for the selection to attend, our students put on an awesome performance.”

This was the sixth appearance for the Aristocrat of Bands at the Honda Battle of the Bands, having performed in 2003, 2004, 2011, 2012 and 2014. According to McDonald, the support of Tennessee State University student body, alumni, administration, faculty, staff and Fans was truly “breathe taking.”

“To be selected for the fourth time in five years under my leadership is confirmation that we are moving the band program here at Tennessee State University to elite status,” he added.

Audrey Stradford sits in her new 2015 Honda CR-V presented to her by American Honda Motor Co. Stratford was named the first-ever Honda Power of Dreams Award honoree for her lifelong dedication to serving HBCU students and the Tennessee State University community, and was awarded the vehicle at the 13th annual Honda Battle of the Bands Invitational Showcase on Jan. 24, 2015.
Audrey Stradford sits in her new 2015 Honda CR-V presented to her by American Honda Motor Co. Stratford was named the first-ever Honda Power of Dreams Award honoree for her lifelong dedication to serving HBCU students and the Tennessee State University community, and was awarded the vehicle at the 13th annual Honda Battle of the Bands Invitational Showcase on Jan. 24, 2015.

The showcase provided another first for schools and fans attending the event. This year, Honda awarded the first-ever Honda Battle of the Bands Power of Dreams Award, meant to honor an individual who has helped HBCU culture thrive—by helping students achieve their dreams through positive support, guidance and leadership within the institution or community.

This year, the inaugural award went to Audrey Stradford, who works as a financial aid assistant at the University, for her lifelong dedication to serving HBCU students and the Tennessee State University community. The surprising moment came when Honda presented her a new 2015 Honda CRV.

“I was floored and didn’t know what to make of it,” said ‘Miss Audrey,’ as she is known around campus. “I’ve always been one to work behind the scenes. I’ve been a giver my whole life and it was hard for me to be on the receiving end. The new car was just the icing on the cake.”

The showcase, dubbed this year as “The Power of Dreams,” was intended to serves as a reminder to students and fans that life on and off the field is a journey, and no matter the challenge, the dream or what may lie ahead, “learning never stops as long as you commit to ‘march on.’”

“Honda congratulates the bands that participated in this year’s Invitational Showcase, and thanks all of the schools, students, alumni and fans who joined us to celebrate these amazing student musicians,” said Stephan Morikawa, Assistant Vice President, Corporate Community Relations, American Honda Motor Co., Inc. “Honda is proud that the Invitational Showcase truly helped students realize what Honda calls The Power of Dreams.”

 

 

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Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Academic Excellence, Parental Engagement Earn TSU “S.W.A.G.” Awards for 50 Elementary Students and Families

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Fourth-grader Marlee Sabria Wade was all smiles as she looked at the blue lapel pin she had just received. The wording on the pin read, “Students with Academic Greatness.”

All semester-long the 9-year-old from Robert Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary School in Nashville came to class every day and on time, participated and scored very high on all her class work, she had no unexcused absences, and no office referrals for bad behavior. Marlee displayed the behaviors necessary to succeed in school.

State Representative Harold Love Jr., pins TSU Students with Academic Greatness Award  winner Marlee Sabria Wade, a fourth-grader from Robert Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary School, during the inaugural S.W.A.G. Award ceremony at TSU on Thursday, Jan. 29. (photos by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)
State Representative Harold Love Jr., pins  Academic Greatness Award winner Marlee Sabria Wade, a fourth-grader from Robert Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary School, during the inaugural S.W.A.G. Award ceremony at TSU on Thursday, Jan. 29. (photos by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

That seems like a badge of excellence, but for Marlee, standing barely 3 feet tall, it is an understatement.

“When I was younger I always knew I had academic greatness but I just didn’t know what it was,” said Marlee, with a grin and a show of confidence that explains how proud she is of her own ability. “I want to be a doctor or a fashion designer and I know I will make it because I do well in all of my work and I am never late.”

She definitely will. Her “no-nonsense” grandmother, Margaret Thomas, a retired seamstress, is a major influence, and already has Marlee watching as she (Thomas) stiches different styles — in case fashion design becomes the choice.

Being on time, working hard and already having career choices have certainly earned stripes of excellence for Marlee, her younger sister, Ilee Wade, a kindergartener, and about 50 other students from their school, thanks to a Tennessee State University initiative that keeps the students on track and their parents engaged.

Participating in the inaugural S.W.A.G. Awards ceremony at Tennessee State University were: State Representative Harold Love Jr., left, Robert Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary School Principal Trellaney Lane, the Dean of the College of Education Dr. Kimberly King-Jupiter, and Robert Churchwell Jr., after whose late father the elementary school was named.
Participating in the inaugural S.W.A.G. Awards ceremony at Tennessee State University were: State Representative Harold Love Jr., left, Robert Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary School Principal Trellaney Lane, the Dean of the College of Education Dr. Kimberly King-Jupiter, and Robert Churchwell Jr., after whose late father the elementary school was named.

About a year ago, the University, through the College of Education, entered a partnership with Robert Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary School through the S.W.A.G. (Students with Academic Greatness) initiative to acknowledge and recognize families and students who strive to achieve behavior and academic benchmarks identified by their home school.

Every nine weeks the Dean of the College, Dr. Kimberly King-Jupiter, and the S.W.A.G. Team travel to Churchwell Elementary School to award certificates to students for maintaining the program’s goals. Students who received two certificates during the fall semester were recognized with a pin and a certificate at the inaugural S.W.A.G. Award ceremony in the Ferrell-Westbrook Complex at TSU on Thursday, Jan. 29.

Essential to the academic greatness of any students are engaged parents. So, the Team recognizes parents for what they do to encourage academic greatness.

SWAG“The goal of ‘S.W.A.G.ging’ these students from K-4th grade is to stress the importance of not just going to school but to do their best academically,” said King-Jupiter. “So often, kids only receive acknowledgement for sports and entertainment. Or, they receive notoriety for bad behavior. The goal of the S.W.A.G. Initiative is to reward students publicly for academic excellence while also exposing them to alternative career choices.”

And the message is getting across, S.W.A.G. officials say. They say parental and family engagement – a key indicator to students’ academic success – is overwhelming.

For instance, Marlee says she does not worry about getting to school on time. It just happens, as she puts it. Her mother, Treva Wade, a TSU graduate with a bachelor’s degree in Communications, knows the importance of being on time and she makes sure Marlee and her sister are out the door in time to be in class on time.

“My mom gets me and my sister up early and ready for school everyday, so we are never late, and she makes sure we do our homework,” said Marlee.

With no direct University or government funding, how is such a novel program staying afloat, dean King-Jupiter was asked.

“We see the S.W.A.G. Initiative as a low-cost way to build a pipeline, but we are looking for funding sources through grants and other means to sustain the program,” she said.

Until then, resources, including award and gift items, are donated by some of her fellow deans, vice presidents, professors and the core of staff members who help run the program. That’s in addition to members of the community who contributed to the purchase of Kindle tablets for each family. “We got by with a lot of help from our TSU family and friends.”

At the inaugural S.W.A.G. award ceremony that included a catered buffet dinner, University, state and local officials formed a procession to receive the students as they came up to be pinned and presented with their certificate of excellence. A parent, representing each of the more than 40 families at the ceremony received a gift bag stuffed with a Kindle tablet and other University paraphernalia.

Officials included TSU Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dr. Mark Hardy; State Representative Harold Love Jr., Churchwell Elementary School Principal Trellaney Lane, and Robert Churchwell Jr., after whose late father the elementary school was named.

“Your child has been a model student in the partnership’s examination of parental involvement and academic achievement,” Hardy said to the parents, as he presided at the ceremony on behalf of TSU President Glenda Glover, who was away on business. “And to you the Robert Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary School, and Dean King-Jupiter and our College of Education, we applaud you for promoting academic excellence. Your presence here tonight along with all of these officials is an indication of how much importance we attach to the S.W.A.G. program and what it is doing for these young people.”

While S.W.A.G.’s primary target is student academic excellence, parents received rousing ovations for encouraging their children.

“In SWAG we recognize and reward the model of parenting that is engaged. This is the only way we can be sure these students will succeed. We also want ‘S.W.A.G.gers’ to know that a focus on academic excellence will open doors to opportunities,” King-Jupiter noted.

Principal Lane added that the TSU/Robert Churchwell partnership offers an opportunity to recognized students who have academic greatness and parents who give it their all to make sure their children are achieving at their very best.

“Today we celebrate academic excellence and congratulate these students for their accomplishments,” she said. “We thank you parents. You are doing something special; please continue to be the great role models you are.”

The College of Education S.W.A.G. Team received high praise for their contribution. They include: Assistant Dean Alethea Hampton, Assistant Professor Thurman Webb, Assistant Professor Calli Holaway, John Barfield, of the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs; and graduate assistant Darreon D. Greer Sr.

The team also receives support from other members of the college including Associate Dean Heraldo Richards, and department chairs Trinetia Respress and John Tiller; and Ruth Gordon, Jo Mercer and Jennifer Sparks.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

USDA Selects Two Tennessee State University Students to Attend National Summit

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Two students from Tennessee State University have been selected to attend a national conference sponsored by the United States Agriculture Department aimed at introducing university students to future trends, scientific research and agricultural policy in today’s real-world environment.

Alexis Allen (left), a junior concentrating in Agribusiness, and Alison Leathers (right), a graduate student concentrating in Agricultural Education, Leadership & Extension, share a moment with Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, upon the USDA announcement sending the pair to Virginia. Allen and Leathers  are among only thirty students selected from across the country to attend the USDA’s 2015 Agricultural Outlook Forum.
Alexis Allen (left), a junior concentrating in Agribusiness, and Alison Leathers (right), a graduate student concentrating in Agricultural Education, Leadership & Extension, share a moment with Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, upon the USDA announcement sending the pair to Virginia. Allen and Leathers are among only thirty students selected from across the country to attend the USDA’s 2015 Agricultural Outlook Forum.

Alexis Allen, a junior concentrating in Agribusiness, and Alison Leathers, a graduate student concentrating in Agricultural Education, Leadership & Extension, are among only 30 students selected from across the country to attend the USDA’s 2015 Agricultural Outlook Forum February 19-20 in Arlington, Virginia.

The Forum, titled “Smart Agriculture in the 21st Century,” is not only designed to introduce students to contemporary agribusiness, future trends, scientific research, and agricultural, as well as give them the chance to lay the groundwork for a future in agriculture, hear speakers from diverse backgrounds, and help them expand their opportunities in their chosen fields.

“This is an excellent opportunity for two of our best and brightest students,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences. “This forum will allow them to network with some of the USDA’s top officials, leaders in the agricultural industry and their peers from across the country. It will also help set them up for successful futures in agriculture.”

The USDA selected 20 university junior and senior students from across the country to attend the conference based on an essay on “Agriculture as a Career,” and 10 graduate students based on their essay, “The Greatest Challenge Facing Agriculture over the next Five Years.” The students were selected from 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, and Non-Land-Grant Agricultural and Renewable Resources Universities.

Allen, from Detroit, came to TSU in the fall of 2014 after completing an associate’s degree at Wayne County Community College. She is excited about the opportunity to attend the conference and would eventually like to work as a food inspector, either through the USDA or the private sector.

“I think I am most looking forward to the diversity and depths of topics that will be presented,” said Allen. “I hope to gain more in-depth understanding to supplement the things I’m learning in class at TSU.”

Leathers, from Preston, Minnesota, received her Bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, and is looking forward to the forum and the opportunities it will create toward helping her achieve her career goal of becoming an Extension agent and a third-generation farmer.

“It will be an excellent learning experience and opportunity to network and meet students and important agricultural leaders,” she said. “I am excited to represent TSU and advocate for our land-grant university system.”

 

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Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Turns Capitol Blue as it Takes Over the Hill

University to showcase academic and athletic programs to lawmakers


TSU Day at the Capitol 1NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee lawmakers will see the impact Tennessee State University is making firsthand with programs like it’s SITES-M project that trains the state’s math teachers to be more efficient and productive, and ground-breaking research in agriculture and health sciences when the University goes to Capitol Hill, Tuesday, Feb. 10 from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m.

Along with providing lawmakers the opportunity to learn about the high-caliber programs at the University, legislators will have the opportunity to interact with students, faculty, staff and student-athletes, as TSU showcases its impressive academic, athletic and research programs during TSU Day at the Capitol. Programs from the University’s various colleges will be on display throughout the Legislative Plaza.

Displays will be available for viewing beginning at 8 a.m. with the official kick-off ceremony taking place at 10 a.m. in the Mezzanine. The event will provide an excellent platform for the state’s elected officials to see and hear firsthand about the issues facing higher education today, and the many student and research success stories from TSU.

TSU Day at the Capitol runs until 1 p.m. and events include:

8 a.m.                                     Displays Open in Legislative Plaza

10 a.m.                                TSU Day at the Capitol Kick-off Ceremony
(Mezzanine)

9 a.m. – noon                  TSU Day at the Capitol Legislative visits

1 p.m.                                  Displays close

Media is invited to attend TSU Day at the Capitol. For more information, call 615.963.5331.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.