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TSU, Regions, AKA launch financial empowerment initiative for college students and underserved communities

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is partnering with Regions Bank and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated to help college students and underserved communities build financial wealth.

TSU President Glenda Glover receives $25K check from Latrisha Jemison, Regional Community Development and Partnership Manager for Regions Bank. (TSU Media Relations)

The groups officially announced the agreement during the Financial Education and Empowerment workshop on Wednesday at Tennessee State.

Before the workshop, which was sponsored by the Alpha Psi Undergraduate Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha, TSU President Glenda Glover received a $25,000 check from Regions Bank that will be used for student scholarships. Glover is also the international president of AKA.

TSU students joined leaders from Regions and AKA for the event.

“TSU is extremely proud to have Regions Bank as a partner to provide the tools and resources to promote financial stability for our students, and our communities,” Glover said.

“Alpha Psi, along with all AKA chapters, will serve as a network to host financial education workshops with Regions to promote and engage students and underserved communities on best practices when it comes to spending, saving and credit building.”

TSU senior Morgan Courtney of Detroit said she appreciated the workshop, particularly discussion about maintaining a good credit score, and managing finances.

Student Trustee Braxton Simpson talks to students attending workshop. (TSU Media Relations)

“Building your credit now is very helpful for your future, and understanding financial literacy is also very important for college students; all people, actually,” Courtney said.

Organizers said the workshops will begin locally on college campuses and increase to encompass underserved neighborhoods in cities across the country. As part of the program, financial professionals from Regions will work with Alpha Kappa Alpha to deliver high-quality, cost-free financial training through interactive workshops for students and the community. The goal is to help more people achieve financial security and build savings.

“Financial education leads to financial empowerment,” said Latrisha Jemison, Regional Community Development and Partnerships Manager for Regions Bank. “No matter what stage of life you are in, the time to prepare for your financial future is now. And no matter how much, or how little, you have to begin with, we want this program to offer a place where you can find the insights, tools, compassion, understanding and resources that can help you save more, spend wisely and reach your goals.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

White House Initiative Names TSU Student 2018 HBCU Competitiveness Scholar for Academics, Leadership

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A top Tennessee State University student with dreams to change his Kentucky neighborhood has been named a 2018 HBCU Competitiveness Scholar by the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Jailen Leavell, a sophomore mass communications major with a concentration in broadcast journalism, will serve as an ambassador of the White House Initiative by providing outreach and communication with his fellow students about the value of education and the Initiative as a networking resource.

Jonathan M. Holifield, Executive Director of the White House Initiative on HBCUs, right, congratulates Jailen Leavell in Washington, D.C. (Submitted Photo)

Selected for his accomplishments in academics, leadership and civic engagement, Leavell was among 63 undergraduate, graduate and professional students chosen from 54 HBCUs. They were recognized for successfully preparing to “compete for top opportunities that improve long-term outcomes.” Each student was nominated and endorsed by their institution’s president.

Leavell, the third TSU student selected by the White House Initiative in the last five years, is a member of the TSU Honors College with a near 3.6 grade point average. He is also president of the sophomore class.

“We are very excited to learn of Jailen Leavell’s selection as a White House 2018 HBCU Competitiveness Scholar,” said Dr. Alisa Mosley, interim vice president for Academic Affairs. “Mr. Leavell is a very engaged student who exemplifies academic excellence. He is engaging in national dialogue about promoting peace as a fellow with the Youth Violence Prevention Research Center, and as a proactive member of our Student Government Association.”

According to a release from the White House Initiative, Leavell and his fellow Competitive Scholars will serve for one year, during which they will learn and share “proven and promising practices that support individual and HBCU competitiveness, with the goal of strengthening prospects for career and life success.”

Leavell grew up in West Louisville, Kentucky, with high crime, violence and poverty. He wants to change that. He calls the White House honor “a representation of me, my community and my environment.”

“Growing up in West Louisville, the narrative is, ‘You will not make it outside of Louisville,’ and going after this award is all part of my effort to change that,” said Leavell, who grew up about eight blocks from the boyhood home of the late boxing champion Mohammad Ali.

“If Mohammad Ali can grow up eight blocks from me and become the greatest of all time and …change the world, I can do that eight blocks down the road. I love Louisville. I just have a lot of pride in my city and ultimately I just want to change it, with black people doing positive things, black businesses flourishing, stopping violence and just changing the narrative.”

Leavell thanked TSU President Glenda Glover for recommending him, and Charles Jennings, director of the TSU Career Development Center, for helping him through the “rigorous process.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, Nashville State Community College reaffirm agreement to help students get four-year degrees

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The presidents of Tennessee State University and Nashville State Community College have reaffirmed an agreement to help students get a four-year degree.

TSU President Glenda Glover speaks at press conference. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

TSU President Glenda Glover and NSCC President Shanna Jackson held a press conference at NSCC on Tuesday to reaffirm the Dual Admission Agreement the institutions made in 2009, as well as announce new ways to partner moving forward.

The agreement provided certain guarantees to students who committed to Tennessee State early in their college career, such as priority advising and registration, as well as access to TSU’s campus.

However, there have been some changes since the agreement was made. For instance, the Tennessee Board of Regents instituted the Tennessee Transfer Pathways program, which superseded DAAs and provided guarantees to community college graduates statewide.

The reaffirmation focuses on ways to get Nashville State students to commit to TSU as early as possible. Those that do commit early do not have to pay an application fee. Additionally, students who excel academically at Nashville State may be eligible for TSU transfer scholarships, and 100 percent of the courses students take at Nashville State will transfer to TSU.

“We’re just pleased and honored to have this partnership,” Glover said. “We look forward to receiving Nashville State students as TSU students. Simply put, it’s just time to become a TSU Tiger.”

NSCC’s president expressed similar sentiment.

“Nashville State has long enjoyed a partnership with Tennessee State University,” said Jackson, a TSU graduate. “I am grateful to President Glover and her staff for the commitment to strengthening and growing the relationship between our institutions.”

TSU and NSCC are in the process of finalizing several new articulation agreements in the area of hospitality and tourism, as well as teacher education.

“In fact, most recently, there were three much needed new pathways that were created for future high school teachers in the area of biology, chemistry and mathematics (STEM),” Jackson said. “And this is only the beginning.”

On Tuesday, the presidents signed an agreement that would allow articulation from a university parallel associate of science at NSCC to a bachelor of science in biology or mathematics or chemistry with teacher certification/licensure.

“We’re focusing on the STEM majors because we know that employment demands in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math are steadily increasing,” Glover said. “TSU has solid partnerships with certain companies, and Nashville State students will have access to the same companies.”

The NSCC-TSU partnership is a continuing effort by Tennessee State to attract community college students. Earlier this year, TSU partnered with Motlow State Community College to offer an agriculture degree in Fayetteville, Tennessee.

Under the “2 + 2” Ag program, participants get an associate’s degree at MSCC, then have the option of getting a bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Sciences from TSU, which can be conveniently done at MSCC.

For more about community college initiatives at TSU, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/commcolleges/

 

TSU, Nashville State Community College continue collaboration promoting four-year degrees

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The presidents of Tennessee State University and Nashville State Community College are collaborating to encourage students to get a four-year degree.

TSU President Glenda Glover and NSCC President Shanna Jackson, a TSU graduate, are scheduled to meet on Tuesday, Oct. 9, to discuss the Dual Admission Agreement that was formed between the two institutions in 2009.

The agreement provided certain guarantees to students who committed to Tennessee State early in their community college matriculation, such as priority advising and registration, as well as access to TSU’s campus.

However, there have been some changes since the agreement was made. For instance, the Tennessee Board of Regents instituted the Tennessee Transfer Pathways program, which superseded DAAs and provided guarantees to community college graduates statewide.

Dr. Sharon Peters, executive director of community college initiatives at TSU, said one of the main objectives of the meeting is to discuss ways to draw NSCC students to TSU.

“Nashville State should be our pipeline,” Peters said. “The majority of the students that leave Nashville State should be coming here, or considering us, particularly if they live in Davidson County.”

Peters said two articulation agreements will also be signed at the meeting.

One would be an articulation from an applied associate of science degree in Hospitality and Tourism Management at NSCC to a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration with a concentration in Hospitality and Tourism Management at TSU. The other is an articulation from a university parallel associate of science at NSCC to a bachelor of science in biology or mathematics or chemistry with teacher certification/licensure.

“We are excited about both of these articulations because hospitality and tourism is a booming area, particularly in Nashville, and because selected students who choose to be certified STEM teachers can utilize the Tom Joyner Teaching Scholarship and the Project Tiger Teach Scholarship,” Peters said.

The NSCC-TSU partnership is a continuing effort by Tennessee State to attract community college students. Earlier this year, TSU partnered with Motlow State Community College to offer an agriculture degree in Fayetteville, Tennessee.

Under the “2 + 2” Ag program, participants get an associate’s degree at MSCC, then have the option of getting a bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Sciences from TSU, which can be conveniently done at MSCC.

For more about community college initiatives at TSU, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/commcolleges/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, Regions, AKA to launch financial empowerment initiative for college students and underserved communities

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is partnering with Regions Bank and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated to help college students and underserved communities build financial wealth.

The groups will officially announce the agreement during a financial education workshop on Wednesday, Oct. 10, at Tennessee State. The workshop is sponsored by the Alpha Psi Undergraduate Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha and will begin at 3 p.m. in the TSU Faculty Dining Lounge in the Floyd-Payne Campus Center.

TSU President Glenda Glover, who is also AKA’s international president, and TSU students will join leaders from Regions and AKA for the announcement, followed by the Financial Education and Empowerment workshop.

“TSU is extremely proud to have Regions Bank as a partner to provide the tools and resources to promote financial stability for our students, and our communities,” said President Glover.

“Alpha Psi, along with all AKA chapters, will serve as a network to host financial education workshops with Regions to promote and engage students and underserved communities on best practices when it comes to spending, saving and investing.”

The workshops will begin locally on college campuses and increase to encompass underserved neighborhoods in cities across the country. As part of the program, financial professionals from Regions will work with Alpha Kappa Alpha to deliver high-quality, cost-free financial training through interactive workshops for students and the community. The goal is to help more people achieve financial security and build savings.

Wednesday’s workshop will include Regions’ financial professionals illustrating how financial education leads to financial empowerment.  Interviews will be available immediately following the announcement.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

2018 TSU Homecoming Concert, Gospel Explosion to Feature Big Name Artists

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University welcomes rap icon Gucci Mane for Homecoming 2018.

The Billboard Music Award winner, known for hits like “I Get the Bag,” “Wake Up in the Sky,” and “Kept Back,” will headline this year’s Homecoming concert in the Gentry Center Complex on Thursday, Oct. 18. Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $25 for students, and $35 for the public.

Homecoming week runs from Sunday, Oct. 14 and culminates on Saturday, Oct. 20 with the parade along Jefferson Street, and the football game between TSU and Tennessee Tech at Nissan Stadium.

The concert, one of several entertainment events for the week sponsored by the Office of Student Activities and SUBG, will also feature big name recording artists like rappers NBA Youngboy and Jacquees, and R&B superstar Layton Green.

“We are really excited for the entertainment lineup for Homecoming 2018,” says Mon-Cherie Robinson, assistant director of student activities.  “We have an amazing lineup of entertainers that’s going to blow minds.”

According to Robinson, the week will kick off on Oct. 14 with the Homecoming Gospel Explosion featuring gospel superstars Earnest Pugh, Jonathan McReynolds, and The Walls Group. The Gospel Explosion will also be held in the Kean Hall. Show starts at 6 p.m. Admission is free for the Gospel Explosion.

Organizers say this year’s Homecoming Step Show on Friday, Oct. 19, will be the biggest ever, with all nine Greek organizations participating. They will be competing for a $1,500 grand prize, says Robinson. The step show will be held in the Gentry Center Complex beginning at 5 p.m. Tickets for students are $15, and $25 the day of. General admission is $20 in advance, and $25 the day of.

Tickets for all events can be purchased at ticketmaster.com, or the TSU Box Office in the Gentry Center Complex.

Like last year, and in addition to these student activities, Tennessee State University is gearing up for another spectacular Homecoming with a stellar group of grand marshals and honorees.

This year’s Homecoming begins Oct. 14 with the Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Contest. The football game between the Big Blue Tigers and the Golden Eagles of Tennessee Tech will take place on Sunday, Oct. 20, at Nissan Stadium at 4:30 p.m.

For just the second time, TSU has a Special Presidential Honoree: James Shaw, Jr. The other honorees are Dr. Calvin Atchison, retired vice president of development/Foundation Office; Mrs. Dorothy Lockridge, retired vice president of student affairs; Coach James Bass, retired health professor and swimming coach. The grand marshals are Mr. Robert Covington, NBA player with Philadelphia 76ers; Dr. Richard Lewis, TSU Board of Trustees member and owner of Lewis & Wright Funeral Directors; and Mrs. Delorse Lewis, former executive director of TSU Development/Foundation Office.

Besides the big game, another highlight of this year’s Homecoming is the Scholarship Gala on Oct. 19. The gala is the biggest single event by the university to raise scholarship money. Contributions swelled from $600,000 in 2016 to more than one million dollars last year.

This year, the gala welcomes back comedian Jonathan Slocumb as the master of ceremony. Legendary jazz artist Roy Ayers will be the celebrity entertainer.

Other Homecoming activities this year include the Coronation of Mr. TSU and Miss TSU on Oct. 17; official groundbreaking of new Health Sciences Building on Oct. 18; the Breakfast of Champions, the Charles Campbell Fish Fry, and the National Pan-Hellenic Step Show on Oct. 19; and the legendary Homecoming Parade on Oct. 20.

For more information on Homecoming 2018, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/homecoming/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Mother of injured football player says her faith keeps her hopeful

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The mother of injured TSU football player Christion Abercrombie says she’s optimistic about his recovery because of her faith.

Christion Abercrombie

Staci Abercrombie spoke at a press conference on Oct. 3 at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, where her son, Christion Abercrombie, is being treated. The linebacker suffered a head injury in the Tennessee State-Vanderbilt game on Sept. 29 and remains in critical condition.

“We’re expecting a miracle,” said Staci Abercrombie, who appeared on ‘The Today Show’ the next morning.  “Each day is a battle. But he’s a strong young man. He’s fighting. We just have to continue to pray.”

Also at the press conference was Christion’s father, Derrick Abercrombie, several family members, and TSU officials: President Glenda Glover, Athletics Director Teresa Phillips, and head football Coach Rod Reed.

One of Christion’s doctors, Reid Thompson, professor and chair of neurological surgery at VUMC, also attended the press conference and told Staci Abercrombie and her family that “you inspire us,” referring to their strong faith.

The night before, the TSU Family held a prayer vigil for Christion. Those gathered in the Courtyard outside the university’s student center held hands as Dr. Joseph W. Walker, III, a pastor and chairman of TSU’s Board of Trustees, led them in prayer.

President Glover asked for continued prayer for the student-athlete and his family.

Students gather for prayer vigil. (Photo by Lucas Johnson, TSU Media Relations)

“We want the entire family to know that we’re standing with them,” she said. “Christion is a fighter. We will continue to support him and his family.”

Several of Christion’s family members attended the event.

“We are very grateful for everyone being here tonight,” said his uncle, Kevin Richardson. “We appreciate all the love we’ve received from everyone.”

TSU student Braxton Simpson said students are hopeful about Christion’s recovery.

“We’re trying to keep our hopes high,” said Simpson, who is the student trustee on TSU’s Board. “In times like this, the best thing we can do is just rally around each other, and pray.”

TSU’s National Alumni Association called for a special day of prayer for Christion on Friday, Oct. 5.

A GoFundMe has also been set up to help Christion and his family. To donate, visit www.gofundme.com/tennessee-state-univ-athletics-dept.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Family holds prayer vigil for injured football player

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The TSU Family held a prayer vigil Tuesday night for football student-athlete Christion Abercrombie.

Christion Abercrombie

The linebacker suffered a head injury in Saturday’s Tennessee State-Vanderbilt game and remains in critical condition at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Those gathered in the Courtyard outside the university’s student center held hands as Dr. Joseph W. Walker, III, a pastor and chairman of TSU’s Board of Trustees, led them in prayer.

TSU President Glenda Glover asked for continued prayer for Abercrombie and his family.

“We want the entire family to know that we’re standing with them,” she said. “Christion is a fighter. We will continue to support him and his family.”

Several of Abercrombie’s family members attended the event.

“We are very grateful for everyone being here tonight,” said Abercrombie’s uncle, Kevin Richardson. “We appreciate all the love we’ve received from everyone.”

TSU student Braxton Simpson said students are hopeful about Abercrombie’s recovery.

“We’re trying to keep our hopes high,” said Simpson, who is the student trustee on TSU’s Board. “In times like this, the best thing we can do is just rally around each other, and pray.”

A GoFundMe has been set up to help Abercrombie and his family. To donate, visit www.gofundme.com/tennessee-state-univ-athletics-dept.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

TSU continues to stay at forefront of hemp research with second workshop this year

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is staying at the forefront of hemp research, a growing topic across the country.

Attendees at Sept. 26 hemp workshop. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The university’s College of Agriculture hosted a workshop on Wednesday, Sept. 26, to discuss the latest research on the plant. It was the second workshop TSU had this year.  The last one was in March.

“TSU wants to be at the forefront of this new interest that’s cropping up across the country,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture. “If it’s ever approved for large scale use, we have some knowledge about it and can work with the farmers.”

Dr. Fitzroy Bullock, one of TSU’s leading hemp researchers and coordinator of the latest workshop, agreed.

“Hemp is being grown just about everywhere in the country, but the growers don’t really have a research base,” Bullock said. “So what we’re doing here at Tennessee State University is taking a leadership role in trying to establish a base for research.”

Hemp, or industrial hemp, typically found in the northern hemisphere, is a variety of the Cannabis sativa plant species that is grown specifically for the industrial uses of its derived products. It is used for all kinds of products, from clothing to food.

TSU’s College of Agriculture has charged a team of scientists to develop hemp production practices for Tennessee. The research projects include developing hemp nutritional products for human consumption and studying the economic viability of hemp production in Tennessee.

Channel 2 (WKRN) reporter CB Cotton interviews farmer Michael Walls, who attended the workshop on Sept. 26. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Currently, the university is growing and evaluating 10 varieties of hemp.

Farmer Michael Walls attended Thursday’s workshop. His family has a 140-acre farm in Hardeman County that is using an acre to grow hemp. He said workshops like the one at TSU are beneficial.

“There’s a lot of potential for what hemp can do,” said Walls, adding that his family plans to grow more hemp next year. “So I’m just trying to get more information to see what other possibilities there are.”

For more information about TSU’s College of Agriculture, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU gearing up for spectacular 2018 Homecoming

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is gearing up for another spectacular Homecoming with a stellar group of grand marshals and honorees.

This year’s Homecoming begins Oct. 14 with the Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Contest. The football game between the Big Blue Tigers and the Golden Eagles of Tennessee Tech will take place on Sunday, Oct. 20, at Nissan Stadium at 4:30 p.m.

For just the second time, TSU has a Special Presidential Honoree: James Shaw, Jr. The other honorees are Dr. Calvin Atchison, retired vice president of development/Foundation Office; Mrs. Dorothy Lockridge, retired vice president of student affairs; Coach James Bass, retired health professor and swimming coach. The grand marshals are Mr. Robert Covington, NBA player with Philadelphia 76ers; Dr. Richard Lewis, TSU Board of Trustees member and owner of Lewis & Wright Funeral Directors; and Mrs. Delorse Lewis, former executive director of TSU Development/Foundation Office.

“As we reflect on many memorable moments that helped to shape our lives while matriculating at our beloved institution, our alma mater charged us to go forth and serve,” said Homecoming Chairman Grant L. Winrow. “Thus, it is only fitting that we honor another outstanding group of individuals who epitomize what Excellence and Success really look like.”

Shaw became a worldwide hero following an incident on April 22, 2018, when a gunman opened fire at a Waffle House in a Nashville suburb. Shaw wrestled the rifle away from the man and tossed it over the counter before shoving the shooter out the door.

Four people were killed and several others wounded in the shooting. However, authorities have said there probably would have been more casualties had it not been for Shaw’s actions. Immediately following the incident, Shaw started a GoFundMe campaign that raised more than $240,000 for family members of the shooting victims. Shaw has also started a foundation that seeks to address mental illness and mass community violence.

“We can only make real progress if we work together, stand collectively and care for one another,” said Shaw. “I will never let my life, or those lives we sadly lost, be in vain.”

Besides the big game, another highlight of this year’s Homecoming is the Scholarship Gala on Oct. 19. The gala, part of TSU’s weeklong Homecoming activities, is the biggest single event by the university to raise scholarship money. Contributions swelled from $600,000 in 2016 to more than one million dollars last year.

This year, the gala welcomes back comedian Jonathan Slocumb as the master of ceremony. Special entertainment will be provided by legendary jazz artist Roy Ayers.

“The Homecoming Scholarship Gala serves as Tennessee State University’s signature fundraising event,” Gala chairs Cassandra Griggs and Iris Ramey said in a statement. “It provides an opportunity for the university to partner with alumni, friends, employees, corporations and organizations to raise annual and endowed scholarship dollars for the outstanding students at TSU.”

Other Homecoming activities this year include the Coronation of Mr. TSU and Miss TSU on Oct. 17; official groundbreaking of new Health Sciences Building on Oct. 18; the Breakfast of Champions, the Charles Campbell Fish Fry, and the National Pan-Hellenic Step Show on Oct. 19; and the legendary Homecoming Parade on Oct. 20.

The parade will be from 14th and Jefferson Street to 33rd and John Merritt Boulevard.

For more information about Homecoming activities, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/homecoming/documents/HomecomingSchedule.pdf

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.