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TSU, FedEx Partner to Conduct Top Leadership Training Program

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is partnering with FedEx to reinstitute a program that trains and develops students with top leadership skills to help them be even more competitive in the workforce.

Called “Leadership TSU,” 40 students – from freshmen to seniors – with demonstrated ability to lead, have been selected as the first cohorts of the program, which kicked off Jan. 20.

LTSU, considered the highest level of leadership training at the university, with 27 learning outcomes that have been modeled around the nation, closed out about seven years ago, according to Frank Stevenson, TSU’s dean of students.

“We are bringing it back under the same idea of developing top leaders at the university.  We secured the funding and created the opportunity,” he said. “We pitched the idea to FedEx about creating an opportunity for students to learn some of their best practices, they immediately were on board.”

He said in addition to material and other support, FedEx will expose the cohorts to “some of the company’s leadership practices that fit in with what they do.” TSU faculty and national leadership training experts are also participating in the training.

Dr. Joseph Walker III, Chairmain of the TSU Board of Trustees, right, meets with Dean of Students Frank Stevenson during the LTSU cohorts’ visit to Dr. Walker’s residence. (Submitted Photo)

A component of the training program, Stevenson said, is to connect cohorts to successful individuals and groups “to share with our students and cohorts the habits of successful people.”

For instance, on Jan. 19, TSU Board of Trustees Chairman, Dr. Joseph Walker III, and his wife, Dr. Stephanie Walker, hosted the inaugural class of LTSU at their home. Dr. Joseph Walker, pastor of Nashville’s Mt. Zion Baptist Church, is presiding bishop of the Full Gospel Baptist Church Fellowship International, as well as chairman of the TSU Board of Trustees. His wife, Dr. Stephanie Walker, is a top pediatrician. They are authors of several books and publications.

“Leadership TSU is a game changer,” Bishop Walker said. “Dr. Stephanie and I were honored to host this group of extraordinary students. Their stories are powerful and their drive for success is contagious. The future looks bright and this program will be a major contributor.”

LTSU is a one-year program. To be nominated, students must maintain a minimum 2.5 grade point average. Stevenson said the current cohorts have a combined average GPA of 3.2, and were nominated by their deans, vice presidents, and the president.

“We wanted them (nominators) to identify those students who had already exhibited incredible leadership skills, and who really celebrate the best of TSU culture in terms of how they carry themselves. We asked them to also nominate those students, who in their mind, would best benefit from this training or this opportunity,” Stevenson said.

Donovan Stewart, the current Mr. Sophomore, is a member of the reinstituted LTSU. He said he is serious-minded and happy to be a part of such a diverse group of fellow students.

“It is a great feeling to be selected,” said Donovan, a nursing major from Birmingham, Alabama. “It is a great feeling to be acknowledged, not only for academics, but also leadership. And it is a good thing to get people from different backgrounds.”

As part of their initial activities, the group will visit the Tennessee State Capitol on Feb. 1 to hear about law and policy making from top elected officials, Stevenson said. In March, they will “make a social justice learning trip” to Washington, D.C.

TSU Assistant Dean of Students, Erica Gilmore, who is also at-large council member; and Tasha Andrews, director of student activities, coordinate LTSU along with Stevenson. Andrews spoke about the caliber of students in the program and why they were selected.

“As student affairs practitioners, we really understand that being a student leader goes beyond academic excellence. It is more about being well rounded and well cultivated,” she said. “We have students with 2.7 or 2.8. Some of them may have a low GPA, but they excel in other ways. It was important that we had a very diverse group. All of those students bring leadership traits that we admire and that are unique to each of them.”

Students interested in being selected for the 2020 class of Leadership TSU should contact the Office of the Dean of Students at (615) 963-2154 or fsteven1@tnstate.edu.mailloc.

Southern states may lag behind on marijuana laws, but Tennessee State University is leading the way in hemp research

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is among the nation’s leaders in hemp research, and the recently passed U.S. Farm Bill is making sure it remains at the forefront.

Hemp workshop at TSU in March. (Photo by Joan Kite, College of Agriculture)

The bill Congress approved in December legalizes the growth and manufacturing of industrial hemp, cannabis plants with little of the chemical that can cause a high. The legalization clears the way for existing programs at land-grant institutions like TSU to expand research and development programs for medicinal and textile production.

“I am excited for this opportunity for TSU, and I look forward to seeing how this will help produce the next generation of agricultural leaders in our state,” said Tennessee Congressman Jim Cooper.

Historically, industrial hemp has been regarded primarily as an agricultural crop valued for fiber and grain. Hemp fiber is used to make textiles, building materials, animal bedding, mulch, paper, industrial products, and biofuels. Hemp grain, or seed, is used in food and feed products, and oil from the seed is used to make personal care products and industrial products, including paints, solvents, and lubricants.

TSU’s College of Agriculture has charged a team of scientists to develop hemp production practices for Tennessee. The research projects include developing hemp nutritional products for human consumption and studying the economic viability of hemp production in Tennessee. Currently, the university is growing and evaluating 10 varieties of hemp.

Products made from hemp. (Photo by Joan Kite, College of Agriculture)

“TSU wants to be at the forefront of this new interest that’s cropping up across the country,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture. “If it’s ever approved for large scale use, we have some knowledge about it and can work with the farmers.”

TSU has hosted several hemp workshops/meetings, including one on Jan. 11 with the Tennessee Hemp Industries Association, an advocate for the production of industrial hemp. More than 200 people attended the meeting.

Joe Kirkpatrick, president of the TNHIA, said Tennessee currently has the largest state HIA chapter in the nation and he credited “TSU for helping us facilitate those meetings and outreach to the public.”

“It’s also great to have the world-class laboratories and scientists there, the researchers, to help … move the hemp industry forward,” Kirkpatrick said.

Dr. Fitzroy Bullock heads up the hemp research at TSU. He said people have come from as far as Colorado to attend the university’s hemp workshops.

“We have been very successful,” Bullock said. “We have established something that folks need.”

Tonya Lewis, a Nashville resident interested in growing hemp, said the meeting she attended at TSU was beneficial.

“It helped me understand where the state is in regards to research on hemp, and how to go about getting everything from a license to actually grow hemp, to looking at the benefits of it statewide, as far as economically,” Lewis said.

Farmer Michael Walls talks to local television reporter at TSU hemp workshop in September. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Anand Kumar is a research assistant in TSU’s College of Ag. He said the College has extension programs that allow researchers to visit individuals who are growing hemp and assist them as needed.

“We designed our program so we can be responsive to the demands of farmers in Tennessee,” Kumar said. “We try to reach all counties throughout the state.”

Michael Walls is one farmer who has benefited from TSU hemp researchers. His family has a 140-acre farm in Hardeman County that is using an acre to grow hemp.

“There’s a lot of potential for what hemp can do,” said Walls, adding that his family plans to broaden their hemp growth. “I’m just trying to get more information to see what other possibilities there are.”

In addition to hemp legalization, the Farm Bill also provides TSU and the other 18 historically-black land-grant institutions the following funding over the next five years:

  • $95 million for student scholarships and grants
  • $50 million to support three HBCU Centers of Excellence in agricultural workforce development, nutrition and food security, economic development and emerging technologies
  • $15 million for HBCU cooperative extension and research

To learn more about TSU’s College of Agriculture, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Mother of injured TSU football player Christion Abercrombie says he plans to return to school

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU student-athlete Christion Abercrombie continues to amaze following a severe head injury in a football game. He may be back in the classroom soon.

His mother, Staci, recently stated at a press conference in Abercrombie’s hometown of Atlanta that he intends to return to Tennessee State University to complete his degree in sports management. She did not say exactly when.

The linebacker was injured in a game against Vanderbilt University on Sept. 29. But since then, he has made an incredible recovery.

In October, Abercrombie was transferred from Vanderbilt University Medical Center to the Shepherd Center, a rehabilitation facility in Atlanta. He was released from there last month, and continues to make progress. He spent some time with TSU President Glenda Glover when she visited Atlanta earlier this month.

Abercrombie’s mother has said her son’s improvement to where he is now is a “miracle.”

“We’re very grateful to God for what He’s already done and for what He is going to continue to do,” she said.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Civil rights activist Dr. William Barber II speaks at MLK Day Convocation at TSU, urges action against injustice

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University honored the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on Monday with a convocation that featured prominent civil rights activist, Dr. William Barber II.

The annual event at TSU’s Gentry Complex is in collaboration with the Interdenominational Ministers Fellowship and the Nashville community. Leading up to the convocation, hundreds of people gathered in front of Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist church and marched to the Complex.

TSU President Glenda Glover, Nashville Mayor David Briley, participate in MLK Day march. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relationss)

Before Barber spoke, attendees heard from TSU President Glenda Glover, newly-elected Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee, Congressman Jim Cooper, Nashville Mayor David Briley, and American Baptist College President Forrest Harris, among others.

“I greet you in the name of excellence and in the name of service,” Glover said. “Service is what this holiday is all about. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., said, ‘Everybody can be great, because anybody can serve.’”

In his speech, Barber said that Dr. King was “more than just words,” but action. And like King, people should actively look for ways to address racism, poverty, and other social ills, instead of just talking, or preaching, about them.

Dr. William Barber II and TSU Student Trustee Braxton Simpson. (Submitted photo)

“We make a dangerous mistake to suggest that his words were just soaring oratory,” said Barber, national co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign. “He preached … not only within the quarantine of a sanctuary, but he preached and acted in the streets of the nation. So when we remember Dr. King, it’s not enough to talk about celebration or his oratory. And it’s not enough to say Dr. King just wanted everybody to come together. No, he didn’t. He wanted folks to change. His articulation was turned into liberation.”

Even though Barber is national co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign, the Goldsboro, North Carolina, pastor is probably best known for his Moral Monday alliance of more than 200 progressive organizations. Over the past six years, that statewide movement has fought for voting rights, public education, universal health care, environmental protection, the rights of women, labor and immigrants, and members of the LGBTQ community.

“What Dr. King wanted was for us to get away from left verses right, conservative verses liberal, and to find a moral center,” Barber said Monday.

Sparrow Haynes, a junior Nashville native, volunteers at Hadley Park Regional Center as part of Joint Day of Service honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

On Saturday, TSU hosted the MLK Joint Day of Service with seven other universities and colleges that performed service projects across Metro Nashville.

Sparrow Haynes, a junior human performance sports science major with a concentration in exercise science at TSU, volunteered with a group of students who assisted staff at Hadley Park Regional Center by sanitizing various areas of the facility and setting-up for a father-daughter banquet scheduled for that evening.

“I feel like it is important for us to keep Dr. King’s legacy going,” said Haynes, a Nashville native. “I feel like we should give back just like he did for us.”

To learn about TSU’s Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/servicelearning/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Mourns Loss of former Coach/AD William “Bill” Thomas

Courtesy: TSU Athletics

NASHVILLE, Tenn.  (TSU News Service) – The Tennessee State University family is mourning the loss of former coach and director of athletics William “Bill” Thomas who passed away on Friday, Jan. 18.

“The TSU family and community mourn the passing of Coach William ‘Bill’ Thomas,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “We send our heartfelt condolences to his wife, Gayla, his daughter, Tosha, and his entire family. We were so delighted that we got a chance to honor him as one of our honorees during the 2017 Homecoming festivities. His memory and legacy will live on.”

Thomas was an assistant football coach under the legendary Big John Merritt and served as head coach from 1984-88. He led TSU to an 11-0 record in 1984 and guided the Big Blue to a 10-2-1 finish and to the second round of the NCAA Championships during his tenure.

He compiled a career record of 34-20-3 at Tennessee State and coached current head coach Rod Reed.

After transitioning to the role of Athletics Director, a position in which he held for eight years, Thomas hired Teresa Phillips as the head women’s basketball coach. Phillips, who now serves as TSU’s Director of Athletics, won two OVC Championships at the helm of the Lady Tiger program

“I’ll be forever grateful to him,” Phillips said. “My heart goes out to his wife Gayla and their daughter as well as his TSU teammates and the student-athletes whose lives he touched. We’ve lost one more of our great Tigers.”

Thomas, who played on the Tennessee State football team from 1967-70, also served as the head coach at Texas Southern from 1994-2003.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

C-SPAN Bus Visits TSU Campus, Engages Students in Civics, being an American

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Civic minded or not, Tennessee State University students recently got a crash course in politics, and a chance to express what it means to be an American.

The students, mainly communications and journalism majors, participated in a C-SPAN segment, “Voices from the Road,” aboard the C-SPAN Bus, which visited the TSU campus on Jan. 15 as part of its “Southern Swing Tour.”

C-SPAN Marketing Representative Jenae C. Green, right, talks to TSU students about civic engagement aboard the C-SPAN Bus. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“As an American, I am grateful for the opportunity to be able to be who it is that I want to be,” said Tyler Bullard, a journalism major from Springfield, Massachusetts, when asked what it means to be an American. “I understand in other countries and cultures, you have to go by the guideline, and if you do not, there is trouble that comes with that. I am grateful to be who it is I want to be.”

C-SPAN, a cable-satellite and public affairs network, has a mission to make government more transparent to Americans. In partnership with Comcast, the C-SPAN Bus Tour will also make stops in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico and Arizona.

In Nashville, the Bus will also participate in Martin Luther King Jr. Day events around the city on Monday, March 21, including the Youth Rally at Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church, and the Annual Convocation at the TSU Gentry Center.

A C-SPAN representative lectures TSU students on the network’s in-depth coverage of the American political process, and about internship, employment and networking opportunities at C-SPAN. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Through interactive kiosks and demonstrations aboard the award-winning state-of-the-art, 45-foot customized Bus, TSU students and visitors learned about C-SPAN’s in-depth coverage of the American political process and comprehensive online educational resources. Students also received information about networking, internship and employment opportunities with the network.

“We are so excited to be in Nashville as part of our ‘Southern Swing Tour,’ specifically at Tennessee State University,” said Jenae C. Green, marketing representative for C-SPAN, who is leading the tour. “The biggest thing we’ve learned is the high spirit among the students who are so passionate about their education. We come to show that we’re here for students and if you want to be civically engaged, know what’s going on in D.C., or around the country, you have C-SPAN here as an unbiased, unfiltered source that allows you to make your own informed decision.”

Wateasa Freeman, a sophomore journalism major from Columbus, Ohio, said she gained hands-on experience touring the bus and interacting with the C-SPAN representatives.

“Being here with people who actually do this daily for a living is just a whole new experience,” said Freeman. “It is great to know that there are people in this industry who care about us as college students. I feel being here really provided a lot of reassurance that I am in the right field.”

Before coming to TSU, the C-SPAN Bus also visited Antioch High School to engage students, teachers, community members, and elected officials.

For internship opportunities and information on C-SPAN, go to www.c-span.org and click on “Employment.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU celebrates legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with ‘Day of Service,’ Convocation featuring Dr. William Barber II

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will remember the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with a MLK Day of Service and Convocation featuring prominent civil rights activist, Dr. William Barber II.

TSU will host the MLK Joint Day of Service with seven other universities and colleges on Saturday, Jan. 19. Participants will gather in Kean Hall at 10:30 a.m. before leaving to perform service projects across Metro Nashville.

On Monday, Jan. 21, TSU will join the Interdenominational Ministers Fellowship and the Nashville community in celebrating the slain civil rights leader. Hundreds of people are expected to assemble in front of Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church at 9:30 a.m. to march to TSU’s Gentry Complex for its annual Convocation honoring King. The Convocation is scheduled for 11 a.m.

Barber will be the keynote speaker at this year’s Convocation. Even though he is national co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign, the Goldsboro, North Carolina, pastor is probably best known for his Moral Monday alliance of more than 200 progressive organizations. Over the past six years, that statewide movement has fought for voting rights, public education, environmental protection, and the rights of women, labor and immigrants.

“He has a very large platform,” said Dr. Learotha Williams, an associate professor of history at TSU. “He’s doing things in the spirit of Dr. King. I’m looking forward to hearing him speak.”

Shirley Nix-Davis, director of outreach for TSU’s Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement, is one of the organizers of the MLK Joint Day of Service. She said TSU seeks to honor the legacy of King every day through its motto: Think. Work. Serve.

“One of his quotes is, ‘everybody can be great, because anybody can serve,’” said Nix-Davis.

To learn more about TSU’s Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/servicelearning/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

President Glover visits TSU football player Christion Abercrombie in Atlanta

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover recently traveled to Atlanta to visit football player Christion Abercrombie, who is making a miraculous recovery.

TSU President Glenda Glover and Christion Abercrombie. (Submitted photo)

Dr. Glover spent time with Abercrombie this past weekend. The linebacker suffered a severe head injury in a game against Vanderbilt University on Sept. 29. But since then, he has made an amazing recovery.

In October, Abercrombie was transferred from Vanderbilt University Medical Center to the Shepherd Center, a rehabilitation facility in Atlanta. He was released about three weeks ago, according to TSU athletic officials.

On Dec. 16, Abercrombie went home for a little while to watch NFL games with his family. A few days later, he attended a special day in his honor at his alma mater, Westlake High in Atlanta.

Abercrombie is now at home, which his mother and others say is a “miracle.”

“We’re very grateful to God for what he’s already done and for what He is going to continue to do,” said Staci Abercrombie, Christion’s mother.

A GoFundMe has been set up to help Christion and his family. To donate, visit www.gofundme.com/tennessee-state-univ-athletics-dept.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Students to See Inner Workings of US Politics when C-SPAN Bus Visits Campus Jan. 15

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The TSU community, especially journalism and communications students and professors, will get a firsthand look at how one of the nation’s major news networks operates.

C-SPAN, a cable-satellite and public affairs network, whose mission is to make government more transparent to Americans, will visit the campus Tuesday, Jan 15, as part of the C-SPAN Bus “Southern Swing” Tour.

The Bus, which will make stops at other locations in Nashville, will also help celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day at events around the city on Monday, March 21. The MLK Day’s events include the Youth Rally at Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church, and the Annual Convocation at the TSU Gentry Center.

For the TSU campus visit on Tuesday, Jan. 15, the C-SPAN Bus will be located in front of the Performing Arts Center on the main campus. The event will run from 12 – 2 p.m.

“The university is thankful for this incredible opportunity for our students, especially those aspiring to be civic leaders, journalists and others, to see the principles on which this nation was built and how the constitution and laws govern everyday life,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “The C-SPAN mobile unit is a great way to bring the civics curriculum to life in an interactive manner.”

Through interactive kiosks and demonstrations aboard the award-winning state-of-the-art, 45-foot customized Bus, students and visitors will learn about C-SPAN’s in-depth coverage of the American political process and comprehensive online educational resources, including an extensive video library of close to 250,000 hours of searchable content for viewing, research and education purposes.

In addition, bus visitors will be invited to share their thoughts on what it means to be an American for C-SPAN’s “Voices from the Road” project.

Dr. Karen Russell, professor of journalism and coordinator of the mass communications program at TSU, said faculty will use this opportunity to engage with the students and incorporate that learning experience into the curriculum.

“This is a great opportunity for our students, not just our journalists and future media professionals, but for all students to get an in-depth look at a respectable, well-known news source,” Russell said. “We plan to take full advantage of the C-SPAN visit while we have them for the benefit of our students.”

Leone Dunn is a senior communications major from Omaha, Nebraska. She is also news editor of the TSU student newspaper “The Meter.” She believes that many of her fellow students do not have a good understanding of the current political climate and how it affects them.

“I believe that the C-SPAN Bus visit will be extremely beneficial because it will give students an opportunity to be engaged in an interactive way,” Dunn said. “This is certainly going to open doors for a lot of people to see what actually is going on and give them a better understanding of how politics affects there daily life.”

A C-SPAN release said in addition to Tennessee, the “Southern Swing” Tour, over eight weeks, will make stops in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. Partnering with Comcast, the C-SPAN Bus will also visit Antioch High School while in Tennessee to engage students, teachers, community members and elected officials.

“We are excited for the opportunity to meet, engage and share our resources with residents along our ‘Southern Swing’ and hearing from people about what being an American means to them,” said Heath Neiderer, C-SPAN marketing manager. “Some of the cities on this tour haven’t seen our Bus in many years. We hope they enjoy their experience aboard our interactive mobile classroom and discover new ways of keeping well-informed.”

Below are the times and locations of the C-SPAN Bus stops in Nashville for the MLK Day:

Monday, January 21, 2019 

7:45 AM – 10 AM     MLK Day in Nashville – Youth Rally 

Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church                                                         2708 Jefferson St., Nashville, TN 37208

 11 AM – 12:30 PM   MLK Day in Nashville – Convocation      

 Gentry Center at Tennessee State University                                    3500John A. Merritt Blvd., Nashville, TN 37208

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.