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C-SPAN Bus Visits TSU Campus, Engages Students in Civics, being an American

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Civic minded or not, Tennessee State University students recently got a crash course in politics, and a chance to express what it means to be an American.

The students, mainly communications and journalism majors, participated in a C-SPAN segment, “Voices from the Road,” aboard the C-SPAN Bus, which visited the TSU campus on Tuesday, Jan. 15, as part of its “Southern Swing Tour.”

C-SPAN Marketing Representative Jenae C. Green, right, talks to TSU students about civic engagement aboard the C-SPAN Bus. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“As an American, I am grateful for the opportunity to be able to be who it is that I want to be,” said Tyler Bullard, a journalism major from Springfield, Massachusetts, when asked what it means to be an American. “I understand in other countries and cultures, you have to go by the guideline, and if you do not, there is trouble that comes with that. I am grateful to be who it is I want to be.”

C-SPAN, a cable-satellite and public affairs network, has a mission to make government more transparent to Americans. In partnership with Comcast, the C-SPAN Bus Tour will also make stops in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico and Arizona.

In Nashville, the Bus will also participate in Martin Luther King Jr. Day events around the city on Monday, March 21, including the Youth Rally at Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church, and the Annual Convocation at the TSU Gentry Center.

A C-SPAN representative lectures TSU students on the network’s in-depth coverage of the American political process, and about internship, employment and networking opportunities at C-SPAN. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Through interactive kiosks and demonstrations aboard the award-winning state-of-the-art, 45-foot customized Bus, TSU students and visitors learned about C-SPAN’s in-depth coverage of the American political process and comprehensive online educational resources. Students also received information about networking, internship and employment opportunities with the network.

“We are so excited to be in Nashville as part of our ‘Southern Swing Tour,’ specifically at Tennessee State University,” said Jenae C. Green, marketing representative for C-SPAN, who is leading the tour. “The biggest thing we’ve learned is the high spirit among the students who are so passionate about their education. We come to show that we’re here for students and if you want to be civically engaged, know what’s going on in D.C., or around the country, you have C-SPAN here as an unbiased, unfiltered source that allows you to make your own informed decision.”

Wateasa Freeman, a sophomore journalism major from Columbus, Ohio, said she gained hands-on experience touring the bus and interacting with the C-SPAN representatives.

“Being here with people who actually do this daily for a living is just a whole new experience,” said Freeman. “It is great to know that there are people in this industry who care about us as college students. I feel being here really provided a lot of reassurance that I am in the right field.”

Before coming to TSU, the C-SPAN Bus also visited Antioch High School to engage students, teachers, community members, and elected officials.

For internship opportunities and information on C-SPAN, go to www.c-span.org and click on “Employment.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU celebrates legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with ‘Day of Service,’ Convocation featuring Dr. William Barber II

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will remember the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with a MLK Day of Service and Convocation featuring prominent civil rights activist, Dr. William Barber II.

TSU will host the MLK Joint Day of Service with seven other universities and colleges on Saturday, Jan. 19. Participants will gather in Kean Hall at 10:30 a.m. before leaving to perform service projects across Metro Nashville.

On Monday, Jan. 21, TSU will join the Interdenominational Ministers Fellowship and the Nashville community in celebrating the slain civil rights leader. Hundreds of people are expected to assemble in front of Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church at 9:30 a.m. to march to TSU’s Gentry Complex for its annual Convocation honoring King. The Convocation is scheduled for 11 a.m.

Barber will be the keynote speaker at this year’s Convocation. Even though he is national co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign, the Goldsboro, North Carolina, pastor is probably best known for his Moral Monday alliance of more than 200 progressive organizations. Over the past six years, that statewide movement has fought for voting rights, public education, environmental protection, and the rights of women, labor and immigrants.

“He has a very large platform,” said Dr. Learotha Williams, an associate professor of history at TSU. “He’s doing things in the spirit of Dr. King. I’m looking forward to hearing him speak.”

Shirley Nix-Davis, director of outreach for TSU’s Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement, is one of the organizers of the MLK Joint Day of Service. She said TSU seeks to honor the legacy of King every day through its motto: Think. Work. Serve.

“One of his quotes is, ‘everybody can be great, because anybody can serve,’” said Nix-Davis.

To learn more about TSU’s Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/servicelearning/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

President Glover visits TSU football player Christion Abercrombie in Atlanta

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover recently traveled to Atlanta to visit football player Christion Abercrombie, who is making a miraculous recovery.

TSU President Glenda Glover and Christion Abercrombie. (Submitted photo)

Dr. Glover spent time with Abercrombie this past weekend. The linebacker suffered a severe head injury in a game against Vanderbilt University on Sept. 29. But since then, he has made an amazing recovery.

In October, Abercrombie was transferred from Vanderbilt University Medical Center to the Shepherd Center, a rehabilitation facility in Atlanta. He was released about three weeks ago, according to TSU athletic officials.

On Dec. 16, Abercrombie went home for a little while to watch NFL games with his family. A few days later, he attended a special day in his honor at his alma mater, Westlake High in Atlanta.

Abercrombie is now at home, which his mother and others say is a “miracle.”

“We’re very grateful to God for what he’s already done and for what He is going to continue to do,” said Staci Abercrombie, Christion’s mother.

A GoFundMe has been set up to help Christion and his family. To donate, visit www.gofundme.com/tennessee-state-univ-athletics-dept.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Students to See Inner Workings of US Politics when C-SPAN Bus Visits Campus Jan. 15

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The TSU community, especially journalism and communications students and professors, will get a firsthand look at how one of the nation’s major news networks operates.

C-SPAN, a cable-satellite and public affairs network, whose mission is to make government more transparent to Americans, will visit the campus Tuesday, Jan 15, as part of the C-SPAN Bus “Southern Swing” Tour.

The Bus, which will make stops at other locations in Nashville, will also help celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day at events around the city on Monday, March 21. The MLK Day’s events include the Youth Rally at Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church, and the Annual Convocation at the TSU Gentry Center.

For the TSU campus visit on Tuesday, Jan. 15, the C-SPAN Bus will be located in front of the Performing Arts Center on the main campus. The event will run from 12 – 2 p.m.

“The university is thankful for this incredible opportunity for our students, especially those aspiring to be civic leaders, journalists and others, to see the principles on which this nation was built and how the constitution and laws govern everyday life,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “The C-SPAN mobile unit is a great way to bring the civics curriculum to life in an interactive manner.”

Through interactive kiosks and demonstrations aboard the award-winning state-of-the-art, 45-foot customized Bus, students and visitors will learn about C-SPAN’s in-depth coverage of the American political process and comprehensive online educational resources, including an extensive video library of close to 250,000 hours of searchable content for viewing, research and education purposes.

In addition, bus visitors will be invited to share their thoughts on what it means to be an American for C-SPAN’s “Voices from the Road” project.

Dr. Karen Russell, professor of journalism and coordinator of the mass communications program at TSU, said faculty will use this opportunity to engage with the students and incorporate that learning experience into the curriculum.

“This is a great opportunity for our students, not just our journalists and future media professionals, but for all students to get an in-depth look at a respectable, well-known news source,” Russell said. “We plan to take full advantage of the C-SPAN visit while we have them for the benefit of our students.”

Leone Dunn is a senior communications major from Omaha, Nebraska. She is also news editor of the TSU student newspaper “The Meter.” She believes that many of her fellow students do not have a good understanding of the current political climate and how it affects them.

“I believe that the C-SPAN Bus visit will be extremely beneficial because it will give students an opportunity to be engaged in an interactive way,” Dunn said. “This is certainly going to open doors for a lot of people to see what actually is going on and give them a better understanding of how politics affects there daily life.”

A C-SPAN release said in addition to Tennessee, the “Southern Swing” Tour, over eight weeks, will make stops in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. Partnering with Comcast, the C-SPAN Bus will also visit Antioch High School while in Tennessee to engage students, teachers, community members and elected officials.

“We are excited for the opportunity to meet, engage and share our resources with residents along our ‘Southern Swing’ and hearing from people about what being an American means to them,” said Heath Neiderer, C-SPAN marketing manager. “Some of the cities on this tour haven’t seen our Bus in many years. We hope they enjoy their experience aboard our interactive mobile classroom and discover new ways of keeping well-informed.”

Below are the times and locations of the C-SPAN Bus stops in Nashville for the MLK Day:

Monday, January 21, 2019 

7:45 AM – 10 AM     MLK Day in Nashville – Youth Rally 

Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church                                                         2708 Jefferson St., Nashville, TN 37208

 11 AM – 12:30 PM   MLK Day in Nashville – Convocation      

 Gentry Center at Tennessee State University                                    3500John A. Merritt Blvd., Nashville, TN 37208

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

President Glover Shares Inspiring Message at 7th Annual Prayer Service

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover encouraged faith-based leaders and residents from across the city of Nashville at the 7th Annual Presidential Prayer Service to persevere in spite of storms.

“The storm will pass over,” said Dr. Glover, addressing the attendees gathered at Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church on Jan. 9. “We used to sing a song that says, ‘The storm is passing over. I can feel a peace down in my soul.'”

Glover served as the keynote speaker for the service, which featured a diverse group of spiritual leaders, some traveling from as far as Memphis to be a part of the program.

“As we start another semester, another year at TSU, we start it with prayer. We start it with thanks, and indeed, I am truly thankful to God for blessing me to lead such an amazing university,” she said.

TSU students Jaquel Maise and Ismael Turner participate in prayer service. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Several dignitaries and public officials shared greetings including Nashville Mayor David Briley, who spoke about TSU’s significance to the city of Nashville.

“It is pretty clear, I think, that no other institution of higher learning has created more leaders in this community than Tennessee State University,” he said. “There are thousands of engineers, teachers, business leaders and scientists that have graduated from Tennessee State University just in my lifetime that have certainly changed this city.”

Other attendees included Bishop Joseph Walker III, pastor of Mt. Zion Baptist Church; State Rep. Harold Love, Jr.; Minister Samuel X of Muhammad’s Mosque #60; Rabbi Philip Rice of Congregation Micah; and Father Dexter Brewer of Christ the King Catholic Church.

Following Glover’s address, several ministers offered prayer regarding several areas, including peace, the global community, the Nashville community, children and youth and the TSU community.

The prayers concluded with Dr. Forrest Harris, president of American Baptist College, praying fervently for Dr. Glover as various ministers gathered around her in a display of unity and support.

Rev. Aaron X. Marble, pastor of Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church, presided over the program.

The service was followed by a breakfast in the lower auditorium of the church that was open to the public.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Employee Wilson Lee’s Woodcarvings Featured at Nashville Airport

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Wilson Lee Jr. vividly remembers the Smithsonian Institute approaching him about his artwork as an undergraduate student at Mississippi Valley State University.

“One day I was sitting outside under a cottonwood tree, and a man walks up and says, ‘I am looking for Wilson Lee. Are you Wilson Lee?’ And I say, ‘What do you want with him?’ And he says, ‘I am a researcher from the Smithsonian Institute. I’ve already talked to his father. Now I want to talk to him about his carvings.’ So he showed me his credentials, and from there I did a show with the American Folklore Festival. All of this is while I am in college.”

Lee is director of the Tennessee State University One Stop Shop.  His celebrated woodcarvings are currently featured at the Nashville International Airport (BNA) as part of the 2018 Flying Solo Winter Exhibitions. Lee said he grew up in Greenville, Mississippi, going from his bedroom to his father’s woodworking shop where they restored antique furniture.

Wilson Lee Jr., director of TSU One Stop Shop

“We basically worked for the rich land owners in the Delta, so my upbringing was quite different from a lot of other African Americans in the Delta,” he said. “I knew the difference between walnut, mahogany, oak, pine and various fine woods at a very early age.”

That early training provided Lee with the foundational skills he has used to create a lifetime of art, such as that featured in Back to Now, the collection of his work on display at BNA.

“There is so much going on in the country now that reminds me of what I have already gone through,” he said. “So what I did for this show was select work from the late 60s and the late 70s and from 2018.”

The exhibit, which runs through February 24 in the Concourse C Waiting Lounge, features eight of Lee’s carvings, touching on topics ranging from gentrification to the spirit world. He said his work often speaks about injustice and is rooted in his rich heritage and culture.

Wilson Lee Jr.’s woodcarving, We Are One, which is featured in his collection Back to Now at the Nashville International Airport in the Concourse C Waiting Lounge.

“I have never been afraid to speak about injustice, and I’ve never been afraid to create work about injustice,” he said. “The fall out from that is that you won’t be listed in some settings. You won’t be invited to some places. But that’s just the price that you pay if you are willing to go this route.“

Mary Grissim, curator of arts at BNA, said the Flying Solo Exhibit features five Tennessee artists and will last three months.

“Wilson’s art was selected because, one, woodcarving is not that common. We don’t see a lot of entries in that area, so his was very unique in that respect,” she said. “The quality of his work is outstanding, and what I love about this program is that of the 14 million people who pass through our airport yearly, I would say the majority of these people aren’t exposed to art. They don’t go to art museums. They aren’t hanging out in art galleries. So for many of these people, this is their first exposure to fine art.”

Grissim said one of the major purposes of featuring art in airports is to distract people from the personal challenges many of them grapple with as they travel.

Mary Grissom, curator for arts at the Nashville International Airport.

“It’s very similar to art in healthcare,” she said. “You can’t imagine going in a hospital that doesn’t have art in it because art is distracting you from the tension of why you are there, whether it’s for yourself or someone else. That’s what happens in airports. This would be a grim place if there wasn’t beautiful artwork.”

Lee said his work as an artist has paralleled his work in higher education.

“My whole mission in life was to work at an HBCU (Historically Black Colleges and Universities). I wanted to do my whole tenure there,” he said. “I wanted to help these kids, so I just got my credentials, and that’s where I work. That’s where I play ball.”

Lee previously worked at TSU from 1991 until 1999 as the director of financial-aid. He has also worked at Jackson State University, Texas Southern University and Mississippi Valley State University.

Wilson Lee Jr. with his family at the Winter Flying Solo Reception at the Nashville International Airport.

“What I tell young people is, if you are passionate about something, do it. Do it when you don’t get paid. That is my philosophy,” he said. “Just keep doing it if you think that this is what you are here on Earth to do. Somebody has to leave a record; I leave a record in wood. Somebody’s got to say something about gentrification; I comment about it in wood. Somebody’s got to say something about the blues; I do it in wood.”

For more information about Wilson Lee Jr.: Back to Now and the 2018 Flying Solo Winter Exhibitions, visit www.flynashville.com.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU football player Christion Abercrombie continues to make ‘miraculous’ progress

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University football player Christion Abercrombie continues to be an inspiration.

Christion and his mother, Staci, at recent church service. (Submitted photo)

The linebacker suffered a severe head injury in a game against Vanderbilt University on Sept. 29. But since then, he has made a miraculous recovery, and is now at home.

In October, Abercrombie was transferred from Vanderbilt University Medical Center to the Shepherd Center, a rehabilitation facility in Atlanta. He was released about two weeks ago, according to TSU athletic officials.

On Dec. 16, Abercrombie went home for a little while to watch NFL games with his family. A few days later, he attended a special day in his honor at his alma mater, Westlake High in Atlanta, according to media reports.

At that event, Abercrombie’s mother, Staci, asked for continued prayer for her son, whom she called a “miracle.”

“We are very grateful for each and every one of you,” she said. “Because of God and your prayers, our son is here today. He is a miracle. This is a journey and it’s not over, but we’re very grateful to God for what he’s already done and for what He is going to continue to do.”

Now, Abercrombie is home for good. He recently attended a service at his church.

Said a recent Tweet featuring Abercrombie and members of his family: “Prayer changes things!”

A GoFundMe has been set up to help Christion and his family. To donate, visit www.gofundme.com/tennessee-state-univ-athletics-dept.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

New scholarships, higher research designation highlight spring Faculty and Staff Institute

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover welcomed back faculty and staff on Monday to news of more scholarships for students and national recognition in research.

TSU President Glenda Glover speaks at spring 2019 Faculty and Staff Institute. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. Glover informed employees at Monday’s Faculty and Staff Institute for the spring semester that TSU will be receiving millions of scholarship dollars under the recently passed U.S. Farm Bill, and that the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education moved the university up to an elite R2 designation in research.

“These are exciting times for TSU as we create our on future,” said Glover. “I’m proud to serve as president of TSU. Thank you for all you do.”

TSU is among 19 land-grant universities that will each receive millions of dollars under the Farm Bill, most of which will be used for scholarships, according to Tennessee State officials.

The availability of scholarship funds in the legislation is significant, officials say, because previous Farm Bills restricted the money to research and extension.

“This is really a landmark occurrence,” said Dr. Alisa Mosley, interim vice president for Academic Affairs at TSU. “Because of the work of the HBCU presidents and lawmakers, a great deal of that money is going to be directed to scholarships, which helps students progress.”

Mosley said TSU hasn’t been told exactly how much it’s receiving, but she said it’s “in the millions.”

TSU employees attend Faculty and Staff Institute. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The Farm Bill also authorizes the establishment of three Centers of Excellence among the land-grant HBCUs, as well as legalizes hemp production, which will greatly benefit TSU because of its current nationally recognized hemp research.

TSU’s College of Agriculture has charged a team of scientists to develop hemp production practices for Tennessee. The research projects include developing hemp nutritional products for human consumption and studying the economic viability of hemp production in the state.

Currently, the university is growing and evaluating at least 10 varieties of hemp.

“The advantage for us is that we’re already in the game,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture. “There are private entities within Tennessee that have been lobbying the state Legislature (on hemp), and they have been in contact with us.”

As for the new Carnegie designation, TSU officials say the upgrade will make the university more competitive among its peer institutions.

There are three Carnegie classifications: R1 (highest research activity); R2 (higher research activity); and R3 (moderate research activity).

Of the 102 historically black colleges and universities, 11 (including TSU) now have a R2 designation. TSU is among four of the state’s six four-year public institutions with that designation.

“There’s a recognition that we’re doing good scholarly research that will support our academic endeavors,” said Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, vice president for Research and Institutional Advancement at TSU. “I think it will help raise our reputation, our visibility. I’m excited.”

For more information about TSU’s College of Agriculture, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

To learn more about research at TSU, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/research/admin/contact.aspx.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

Percussionists from TSU’s famed Aristocrat of Bands perform in Rose Parade

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Percussionists from Tennessee State University’s famed Aristocrat of Bands recently performed in the Rose Parade in Pasadena, California.

Submitted photo

Honda Corporation of America invited eight percussionists from last year’s Honda Battle of the Bands to perform in an all-star drum section for the annual parade on Jan. 1.

The percussionists are: Keyuna Bufford (senior), Jackson, Tennessee; Quintin Burton (senior), St. Louis; Delvecchio Christian (senior), Memphis; Richard Freeman (sophomore), Birmingham, Alabama; Floyd Ivy (sophomore), Memphis; Devin Pride (junior), Atlanta; Brian Watson (freshman), Nashville; and Evan Armstrong (sophomore), Nashville.

The students were guided by Derrick Greene, assistant band director who was head drum major for the Aristocrat of Bands in 2015-2016.

The band, one of TSU’s greatest ambassadors, made its eighth appearance in the Honda Battle of the Bands last year.

In 2014, the AOB became the first collegiate band ever to perform at halftime of the NFL Pro Football Hall of Fame game. The band and university made national headlines again in 2017 by accepting a special invitation from former President Barack Obama to perform on the White House Lawn.

And in 2018, the band performed with country music megastar Keith Urban during the singer’s tour stop at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville.

To learn more about the Aristocrat of Bands, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/aristocratofbands/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Administrators Attend National Leadership Institute of HBCU Leaders

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Two Tennessee State University administrators were among a cohort of 24 mid- to senior-level administrators from historically black colleges and universities across the nation who attended a four-day leadership workshop in Austin, Texas.

Tiffany Bellafant Stewart, assistant vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Success, and Dr. Erin Lynch, research director for the Center of Excellence for Learning Sciences, participated in the Higher Education Leadership Foundation Institute at Huston-Tillotson University from December 13 – 16.

Called the “Theta cohort,” participants received an intimate, interactive, professional, and personal development experience that provided each fellow with a unique and valuable opportunity to assess personal vocation and leadership skill. The institute also allowed fellows to reaffirm a continuing commitment to HBCUs and identify and enhance the essential qualities for a successful tenure as a principled and effective leader and senior administrator.

Tiffany Bellafant Stewart, left, and Dr. Erin Lynch were among 24 cohorts who attended the HELF institute in Austin, Texas. (Courtesy Photo)

“The Higher Education Leadership Foundation institute was a transformative experience, both personally and professionally,” said Stewart. “The knowledge and wisdom shared by current and past presidents of historically black colleges and universities was enlightening and motivational in moving the needle forward to support students in their pursuit of obtaining college degrees from HBCUs.”

For Lynch, she said to be surrounded by colleagues who also deeply believe in the role and value of HBCUs in higher education reminded her “there is still much work to be done for our students.”

“During the four-day program, we were challenged with learning new ways to approach our collective missions as HBCUs,” she said. “We were reminded that as a collective, we are more impactful on student learning than as individuals.”

Steward and Lynch said TSU students will directly benefit from relationships developed at the institute by augmenting partnerships for external funding opportunities through research engagement and scholarship funding.

“Those relationships and experience reinvigorated my passion for HBCUs and fortified my commitment to excellence for TSU students,” Stewart added.

For more information on Enrollment Management, and the Center of Excellence for Learning Sciences, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/emss/ and http://www.tnstate.edu/learningsciences/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.