Tag Archives: Faculty and staff institute

TSU President Glenda Glover discusses initiatives to improve retention, graduation rates at spring 2017 Faculty and Staff Institute

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU President Glenda Glover says the university is implementing initiatives to improve retention and graduation rates, and the overall success of its students.

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Dr. Glenda Glover addresses Faculty and Staff Institute, as Dr. Achintya Ray, Faculty Senate chair, and Staff Senate Chair Linda Goodman look on. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations).

Glover addressed the Faculty and Staff Institute for the spring 2017 semester on Monday, Jan. 9.

Like any higher education institution, she said TSU has its challenges, but she’s optimistic about what lies ahead for the university because of initiatives that will help it maintain a “legacy of excellence.”

“This is an exciting time,” said Glover, “because the history of TSU is still being written.”

Employees gathered in Kean Hall also heard from Dr. Mark Hardy, vice president for academic affairs; Dr. Achintya Ray, chair of the Faculty Senate; and Staff Senate Chair Linda Goodman, all of whom told faculty and staff they play a roll in the success of TSU.

“Let’s commit ourselves to excellence,” Ray said.

Glover outlined steps TSU is taking to help students graduate – and on time. One key initiative uses eight so-called coaches to help students with their “personal and educational goals,” Glover said.

“They will help students understand their goals, and how to work through barriers,” she said.

At the same time, Glover said the university wants to stay competitive and reputable, which is why it’s implementing higher admission standards. Beginning the fall of 2017, all students must have a 2.5 grade point average and a 19 on the ACT for admission to TSU. The previous admission scores were 2.25 or a 19 on the ACT for in-state students, and a 2.5 or 19 ACT for out-of-state students.

“Quality begets quality,” Glover said.

The president also discussed capital improvement and infrastructure enhancements. They include construction of a new Health Sciences building, as well as plans for new residence halls, and stadium enhancements.

Glover also touted TSU’s nationally-recognized research, which undoubtedly contributed to $54 million in new awards for funding grants last year, at least $3 million more than the previous year.

Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, TSU’s chief research officer, said the millions of dollars the university receives is a result of “faculty members working hard to create innovative ideas.”

“I’m excited that we have new funds that will give us an opportunity to work on some outstanding research, to solve some of the national problems and needs,” Young said.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU President Glenda Glover says student success remains a priority

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU President Glenda Glover says the university has several priorities which include improving retention and graduation rates, and creating new residence halls for students.

Glover addressed the Faculty and Staff Institute for the fall 2016 semester on Monday, August 15. While the university has its challenges, she said they must not overshadow the well-being of TSU’s most important customers: its students.

“We must never forget that we’re here because of the students,” Glover said. “We’re here for the purpose of enhancing their lives and their well-being, and ensuring the quality of their future.”

The president outlined steps TSU is taking to help students be more successful in college. They include the creation of a completion committee, block scheduling, and the formation of a consortium of advisors who will make sure that students stay on track to graduate.

Before Glover spoke, TSU Student Government president Aarian Forman addressed the crowd and said the Student Government Association is also committed to doing what it can to help students be successful.

Forman said the association is spearheading an initiative called START (Stimulating Transformative Academic Routines at TSU) that will have an academic achievement task force comprised of students, faculty and staff.

“We, as a TSU family – faculty, staff and students – have to continue to work together to make sure that we are successful as individuals and as a university,” he said.

Glover also discussed construction plans for building new student residence halls over several phases, the construction of a new football stadium, as well as acquiring land to build a transdisciplinary research center.

Other plans include: the development of higher admission standards; pay raises for faculty and staff; enhanced campus security; and implementation of the state’s new higher education governing structure, or the FOCUS Act.

Glover said regardless of the changes, and the challenges the university faces, she’s confident TSU will persevere.

“We’ve covered a lot of territory; we have a lot more to pursue,” she said. “This is an exciting time for us. The history of TSU is still being written.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU President Glenda Glover urges faculty and staff to focus on helping students succeed

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover urged faculty and staff to stay focused on helping students succeed amid university challenges.

Glover, now in her third year at TSU, on Monday addressed the Faculty and Staff Institute for the spring 2016 semester. She noted some of the challenges the university is facing, but said they shouldn’t distract from the university’s main objective, which is to improve retention and graduation rates.

“We’re here for the purpose of educating our students, and enhancing their well-being,” she said. “That’s our one fundamental overriding goal.”

She said steps being taken to help in that endeavor include the formation of a completion committee that will meet twice a month, and requiring teachers to have an assessment measure in place to evaluate students two weeks into the year so that those who are struggling can get assistance.

“By the time it gets to mid-terms, it’s too late,” Glover said. “If we catch students early enough, we can put them in tutoring.”

The president’s speech also highlighted some of the university’s successes, such as the Tennessee Board of Regents’ approval to build a $39 million Health Sciences Building, and the record amount of money it received last year for research grants.

Last year, the university set a goal to get $50 million in grants and received $51 million. This year the goal is $60 million.

“Research grants are very important to the university because they allow faculty members to work on quality solutions that help to meet needs in our country, and give students an opportunity to get engaged in cutting edge ideas,” Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, associate vice president and chief research officer, said after the president’s speech.

During her speech, Glover also discussed university challenges. She said one task is getting money to adequately fund security upgrades, and another is a proposed governance plan that could adversely affect the university.

Nevertheless, Glover said she’s optimistic about TSU’s future.

“We will fight through our difficulties,” she said. “We will roll up our sleeves and persevere.”

Glover told faculty and staff they can help in the fight by being “ambassadors” for the university, and promoting the positive things TSU is doing. She urged deans and faculty to make the university’s public relations department aware of what’s going on in their departments.

“It takes all of us working together, fighting together, as a unit,” Glover said. “It takes all of us.”

The Faculty and Staff Institute is a bi-annual event that convenes university employees prior to each academic semester. Following her speech, Glover took questions from faculty and staff, and later met with faculty during a planning session.

 

TSU President Glenda Glover Announces Creation of Two New Colleges in State of the University Address

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover gave an upbeat assessment of the state of the university Monday announcing the addition of two new colleges for the coming academic year, but said much work needs to be done in the areas of retention and graduation.

At 60 percent, the 2013-2014 first-time freshman retention rate showed a 1 percent increase over the previous academic year. The 2015 graduation rates are still pending, but she said a 1 percent increase in graduation in 2014 is not where the university wants to be.

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Faculty and staff listen as President Glenda Glover gives her State of the University address in Kean Hall Monday. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

“We have to do better than that,” Glover said as she announced several new initiatives to improve retention and college completion. “We must do everything possible to help students do better and make them want to stay and graduate. This is fundamental to why we are here not to mention that graduation and retention are key to our funding.”

President Glover announced the addition of the College of Life and Physical Sciences, acting upon recommendations from faculty and students with the approval of the Tennessee Board of Regents. The new college brings all of the STEM degree courses under one umbrella. The new college will include biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics, the only non-degree program.

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Dr. Lonnie Sharpe is the dean of the newly created College of Life and Physical Sciences at Tennessee State University. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. Lonnie Sharpe, a long-time TSU professor and Massie Chair of Excellence, has been named interim dean of the College of Life and Physical Sciences. Sharpe is also the executive director of the Tennessee Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation, which recently won a $987,000 National Science Foundation award to increase the number of minority students who earn Ph.D., in STEM education.

Glover also announced the elevation of the TSU Honors Program to a college level program. Like all the other academic units, the Honors College will exist as an equal collegiate unit within the university structure, with a dean reporting to the vice president for academic affairs.

In another move, the president announced the change in the name of the College of Public Service and Urban Affairs to the College of Public Service, while Early Childhood Education is moved from the College of Agriculture to the College of Education.

“The recommendations for these changes have been reviewed by us and found to be appropriate and sound academic steps, and with the approval of the Tennessee Board of Regents, we are implementing them,” Glover said.

On other institutional achievements, the president touted recent national accolades TSU has received, such as the no. 1 ranking among the Top 10 HBCUs that Produce Teachers; no. 1 among Most Affordable Colleges Online in Tennessee; and no. 34 of the 100 Most Affordable Universities. She also spoke about the university’s expanded marketing campaign through billboards, social and print media promoting its programs, offerings, community college and distance learning initiatives.

Glover announced upgrades in dining with the adding of Starbucks on the main campus and POD and coffee shop on the Avon Williams campus, which received a rousing chant of approval. A 2-percent across-the-board salary increase retroactive to July was also announced.

With nearly 1,400 new freshmen expected, Glover called on faculty and staff to “join hands” in making sure the new students receive all the support necessary to make their fall freshman move-in Tuesday successful.

“Let all of us show up and give our new freshmen and their parents a rousing TSU welcome during the freshman move-in tomorrow,” Glover said.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

President Glover Addresses Faculty, Staff at Spring Institute

The University held its annual Spring Faculty-Staff Institute Jan. 9 when TSU President Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover (Center) shared her vision for the new semester and highlighted accomplishments from her first year in office. Also speaking at the institute were Dr. Veronica Oates (Left) Faculty Senate Chairperson, and Yvonne Sanders (Right) Staff Senate Chairperson. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
The University held its annual Spring Faculty-Staff Institute Jan. 9 when TSU President Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover (Center) shared her vision for the new semester and highlighted accomplishments from her first year in office. Also speaking at the institute were Dr. Veronica Oates (Left) Faculty Senate Chairperson, and Yvonne Sanders (Right) Staff Senate Chairperson. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – In an address punctuated by numerous applauses from faculty and staff, Tennessee State University President Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover shared her vision for the new semester today and highlighted accomplishments from her first year in office.

“It is an honor to serve the institution that gave me my start and I want to express my gratitude to each one of you for your support over the past year,” Dr. Glover told members of the University during the Faculty and Staff Institute to begin the spring semester.

Glover, who assumed the TSU presidency January 2013, highlighted the University successes from the past year by revisiting her five-point vision of Student Progress and Customer Service, Fund Raising and Partnerships, Diversity and Inclusion, Shared Governance and Community Outreach that she announced when she first took office.

While there were notable successes in each of the areas, she said, they continue to be a strategic blueprint for planning, overall growth and development of TSU.

“Our purpose at this University is educating, graduating and enhancing the lives of the students we touch,” she added. “Our one overriding objective is to meet the needs of all our students. The five goals foster an environment of all we do.”

Speaking on Student Progress and Customer Service, Dr. Glover touched on improvements in customer service, especially with registration and the financial aid process. While there is always room for improvement, she said, the process has improved in the short year, while student complaints are down.

“We have increased our efforts to streamline the enrollment process, and to educate and engage students and parents much earlier about financial aid resources and the required criteria, which have reduced confusion and complaints,” she added.

Student recruitment and retention were also highlighted, with the focus, she said, of turning toward a new recruitment plan, with a shift toward magnet schools and community colleges in Nashville, Memphis and Murfreesboro, Tenn.

“Not only are we reaching into new areas, we are also increasing our contact with potential students, and increasing our outreach to non-traditional students while promoting online learning,” she said.

Touching on student retention and graduation rates, Dr. Glover noted that the two areas need improvement. Since funding is tied directly to graduation rates, it must, she said, improve in the future.

“Our graduation and first-year retention rates are low and we must improve them since they are tied to funding,” she remarked. “First and foremost, we have an ethical obligation as a University to graduate students, and the two go hand-in-hand.”

Turning to fundraising, while the final figures are still being worked out, Dr. Glover announced that the University has received $2.77 million in cash contributions, with alumni giving more than tripling since 2012. Also notable, she continued, was corporate giving, with the number of donations from the business community climbing to 165 corporate partners.

“This shows that TSU is a viable business partner,” she said. “Corporations are seeing the talent we have at the University with corporations recruiting more on campus while we have seen an increase in academic and business partnerships.”

She also mentioned the value of recognizing diversity. While she acknowledged that TSU would always remain an HBCU, the expansion of racial and cultural groups is a top priority.

“We will always live up to the designation as an HBCU, and respect our past and our history,” she added. “At the same time, we must embrace diversity and ensure everyone has equal opportunity to a quality education. As Nashville’s only public institution, we are looking at ways to be more inclusive.”

Ending on community outreach, she thanked everyone in attendance for their hard work in “taking the University to the community while bringing the community to the University.” The goal, she said, was to make sure “we strengthened relationships with community partners while increasing the visibility of programs and the opportunities available.” From forming administrative councils to help spread the good news of the University, multiple media engagements, to delivering Holiday baskets this past December, the goal has been to foster good partnerships with the surrounding community and the greater Nashville area.

“We have worked hard and people are now taking notice of the University and the wonderful things happening here,” she remarked.

Dr. Glover again thanked everyone for “a year of hard work, collaboration and building trust” in the administration. “There is a lot expected of you,” she told the faculty and staff gathered. “I appreciate everything you do. Your commitment to this University and the students it serves is evident. Continue to do your very best. That’s all I can ask of you.”

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.