Tag Archives: Dr. Glenda Glover

TSU Announces Updates From Its 10-Point Safety Enhancement Plan

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University continues to implement its 10-Point Safety Enhancement Plan by working with a consultant to review and make recommendations about the campus police department.

August Washington
August Washington

August Washington, a longtime law enforcement expert, will serve as a consultant to the university’s police department for 60 days.  Washington is charged with developing an attainable policing plan and providing guidance on personnel, training and organizational restructuring.

“The university is pleased to have an individual of Mr. Washington’s caliber and level of expertise in this capacity to assist us with such an important area as public safety,” said TSU President Glenda Glover.  “In addition to Mr. Washington’s experience, he is familiar with local law enforcement and works with the same agencies as our police department in his current role.”

“One of my first actions will be to bring in a team of law enforcement professionals to review current policies, procedures, and practices of the TSUPD,” explained Washington. “This group will be responsible for developing a strategic plan of goals and objectives by utilizing best practices in IACLEA  and CALEA standards.”

President Glenda Glover
President Glenda Glover

Washington, currently chief of police and associate vice chancellor at Vanderbilt University, previously served as police chief for the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. He was selected the 2015 Middle Tennessee Chief of the Year by the Tennessee Association of Chiefs of Police. The Louisiana native holds a master’s degree in criminal justice from Grambling State University. He has 36 years of experience in law enforcement working in higher education at seven universities.

“Tennessee State University is taking the necessary steps to enhance safety with the 10-point plan that calls for immediate action and accountability,” said Chancellor John Morgan of the Tennessee Board of Regents. “President Glover has sought out and received assistance from local law enforcement agencies to move the institution forward in the area of public safety, and TBR supports this effort.”

TSU also continues to increase staffing with police officers and security guards. More personnel have been added through the Metro Nashville Police Department Secondary Employment Unit, while additional security personnel have been hired through the security firm Allied Barton for 30 days while the consultant review takes place.

The additional staffing helps to fulfill the component of the 10-Point Safety Enhancement Plan that calls for more visibility and increased manpower.  Earlier this month, TSU opened a police satellite office in the student center and established a Student Safety Patrol.

Visit  http://www.tnstate.edu/police/safety/washington.aspx for a comprehensive list of the safety plan and a complete bio on August Washington.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

In One-On-One Interview, TSU President Discusses Successes, Challenges of Her Administration

Courtesy of the Tri-State Defender

Firmly anchored in the present, Tennessee State University President – and Memphis product – Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover takes a look back to her January 2013 start and peeks forward in a sit-down exclusive with the “Tri-State Defender.”

Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover took over as president of TSU in January 2013 with a five-point plan: (1) academic progress and customer service, (2) fund raising and partnerships, (3) diversity and inclusion, (4) shared governanceand (5) business outreach.

Interview
Eloise Abernathy Alexis, the new associate vice president for Institutional Advancement, left, and President Glenda Glover talk to Karanja Kajanaku, editor of The New Tri-State Defender during an interview in the Peabody Hotel in downtown Memphis. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

“It’s an honor to have grown up in Memphis and then to attend TSU and then to come back as president. It’s such an awesome blessing and I don’t take that lightly. I don’t for any reason think that that is a given,” said Glover during an interview at The Peabody Hotel as the Southern Heritage Classic Weekend of activities unfolded. “I know there are expectations. You asked if there was something the alumni expected. They demand accountability and rightly so. … I am enjoying it, embracing it,” she said, tipping her hat to a quality team of administrators.

Together, and with the support of alumni, the team has managed to increase enrollment, even as enrollment at the other five Tennessee Board of Regents universities stayed the same or declined. And it has done so against the challenge presented by the Tennessee Promise initiative, which offers two years of tuition-free community or technical college to Tennessee high school graduates beginning with the Class of 2015.

Karanja A. Ajanaku: On a macro level, what do you see as the purpose of a university?

Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover: A university exists for more than one reason. It exists first to educate students, to impart the knowledge they will need to function in their daily lives in a professional arena. Then secondly, it is to improve the wellbeing, the overall well roundedness of our students. That’s what a university is for.

KAA: So coming down to the micro level and looking at Tennessee State, how well do you say you are doing?

Dr. Glover: We are doing an outstanding job of educating students. Over the years I can give you the names of TSU alums who have done well and made their marks on life. We continue to carry out our mission of serving a population that really needs us. We serve largely Tennessee students but we are open to all students who apply and meet the standards and criteria we have set for TSU and approved by our governing boards.

KAA: Coming in, you had something in your mind, like a baseball manager with a three to five year plan. A few years in, where do you see that you are relative to the plan that you came in with?

Dr. Glover: We are on track, maybe a little bit ahead of schedule. When I came, I had a five-point vision. I knew it would take three to five years. First and foremost was student progress, make sure students are progressing as speedily as necessary through the academic system. (And) to improve the customer service as it related to students. Students who go to TSU deserve the right and opportunity and support they need to graduate. And that is our mission. To get the students the proper amount of knowledge and understanding so that when they are deposited back into the larger community, the larger world, they will be able to function and excel.

KAA: So you had plan and you come in. Did you find anything that you didn’t expect and you said, “Wow, I’ve got to adjust my plan?”

Dr. Glover: There were some things that caught me off guard. The quietness of the faculty and staff, initially there was not much communication. I’m not sure if there was some reason perhaps that they thought they might be penalized for speaking with the president, for being open and candid. So I wanted to make sure that they understood that I am here because the students are here. Whatever it takes to advance the students, I want to hear that. I want to know if there is an issue that has come up obstructing the path. We want to be open, honest and transparent. There are no hidden agendas when it comes to this administration. We are totally focused on students and making sure that students get a better life when they graduate. And the professional world they are looking for, we make sure they are ready for that. The second amazement to me …one of the rules that we have in Tennessee is that as you grow and need new buildings, somehow TSU is responsible for 25 percent of that. That was a shocker. I’ve never been in a system where the actual administration was responsible for a fourth of the funding of a facility. That was quite new, but again, once I learned the rules, I have to function within those rules and we function very well within those rules.

KAA: You get a lot of Memphis students historically. They have been trying to raise the standards here. I am curious as to what (caliber) you are receiving and what, if anything, special you have to do to help students that are sort of academically challenged.

Dr. Glover: Actually, Memphis students are no different from students across the country that we admit. We have excellent students from Memphis and we have some others who have some challenges. We want to make sure that we serve the students and service the students and meet their needs where they are. Everybody is not cut out to be an engineer major or a CPA. On the other hand, they might be cut out to be music majors. We help students find their proper pursuit and then move in that direction.

KAA: Are there any new programs or initiatives that you are bringing on board this year, or soon?

Dr. Glover
: Yes. We know that STEM and health care, those two areas, are probably hottest in the academic arena, in the professional arena…. So we combined the life and physical sciences – biology, chemistry, math, physics – so we could have a better focus on the STEM areas and keep those students who are really STEM oriented and make sure that we provide an education for them that is conducive to what they need…We have engineering by itself and put the others together.

KAA: We ran a story in our newspaper this week where a couple of HBCU graduates were really making a plea for alumni to not forgot the schools and to step up, particularly from a financial standpoint. What are you experiencing with your alumni?

Dr. Glover: I have the person with me (Eloise Abernathy Alexis, associate vice president of Institutional Advancement) who is over alumni affairs.

KAA: What are you experiencing relative to working with your alumni from a contribution standpoint? And what are you asking of them? And how are they responding?

Eloise Abernathy Alexis: Later this afternoon, we will be gathering our alumni and friends for that purpose; to say thank you to those who have been supportive of the institution. Tennessee State has a solid foundation of alumni who are connected and committed, giving of their talent and time. But also to let them know the current state of the university and the opportunities to invest even more significantly…. Corporations and foundations are asking us now, “Do the people that are closest to your institution support you?” …We know of the wonderful affinity that TSU alumni have for the university. So we are simply going to work together to make sure that love translates into gifts to the university.

KAA: Are they, the alumni, asking anything of you?

EAA: They are, meaningful engagement. They want to be connected and be able to come to events like the Southern Heritage Classic and to see us here and have access to the president. They also want to have engagement with students. TSU alumni come to campus and they get engaged in the general life of the college. They are mentors to our students.

Dr. Glover: One of our tenets was to excite the alumni. An excited alumni is a giving alumni. …I came in and led the pledge myself. …The first day I made a contribution of $50,000 because I wanted to be sure they understood my commitment. …We have an increased enrollment this year largely because of the alumni efforts. They send their own children to TSU, go out and help us recruit and tell the TSU story. We are having such a good time with this because there are six universities in the Tennessee Board of Regents system and of that six one had an increase, one stayed the same and four had a decline in enrollment. Of course Tennessee Promise, we believe, had a great effect on that. … We put together a mechanism as to how we would get around that. … I personally visited high schools and community colleges and met with Greek organizations and met with alumni around the country; asked them to help us to recruit talented students. …That’s what we did and it worked.

KAA: Tennessee State historically has been all African American. Over the years there has been a change in your population. I would like to know the breakdown. Even more, how has the change affected the idea of you being an HBCU?

Dr. Glover: TSU will always be an HBCU. I don’t want people to panic and say, “Oh they are admitting so many non-African Americans.” We’ve always had our doors opene, our arms wide open to students who met our standards. When students in Tennessee could not get into the University of Memphis, Vanderbilt or UT, we never had a prejudice of that sort that kept out students. We’ve always had an admission policy that was inclusive. …Having said that, non-African Americans see the value that they get, there is a value proposition they see. For less money they can get the same quality education. That’s what people are seeing. (About) 12 percent of our students are international students. That is tremendous growth. The African-American population is about 70 percent. I think the white population appears to be about 18 percent. And we embrace all students. …

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU President Glenda Glover Announces Creation of Two New Colleges in State of the University Address

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover gave an upbeat assessment of the state of the university Monday announcing the addition of two new colleges for the coming academic year, but said much work needs to be done in the areas of retention and graduation.

At 60 percent, the 2013-2014 first-time freshman retention rate showed a 1 percent increase over the previous academic year. The 2015 graduation rates are still pending, but she said a 1 percent increase in graduation in 2014 is not where the university wants to be.

Faculty I-4
Faculty and staff listen as President Glenda Glover gives her State of the University address in Kean Hall Monday. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

“We have to do better than that,” Glover said as she announced several new initiatives to improve retention and college completion. “We must do everything possible to help students do better and make them want to stay and graduate. This is fundamental to why we are here not to mention that graduation and retention are key to our funding.”

President Glover announced the addition of the College of Life and Physical Sciences, acting upon recommendations from faculty and students with the approval of the Tennessee Board of Regents. The new college brings all of the STEM degree courses under one umbrella. The new college will include biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics, the only non-degree program.

LSharpe7
Dr. Lonnie Sharpe is the dean of the newly created College of Life and Physical Sciences at Tennessee State University. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. Lonnie Sharpe, a long-time TSU professor and Massie Chair of Excellence, has been named interim dean of the College of Life and Physical Sciences. Sharpe is also the executive director of the Tennessee Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation, which recently won a $987,000 National Science Foundation award to increase the number of minority students who earn Ph.D., in STEM education.

Glover also announced the elevation of the TSU Honors Program to a college level program. Like all the other academic units, the Honors College will exist as an equal collegiate unit within the university structure, with a dean reporting to the vice president for academic affairs.

In another move, the president announced the change in the name of the College of Public Service and Urban Affairs to the College of Public Service, while Early Childhood Education is moved from the College of Agriculture to the College of Education.

“The recommendations for these changes have been reviewed by us and found to be appropriate and sound academic steps, and with the approval of the Tennessee Board of Regents, we are implementing them,” Glover said.

On other institutional achievements, the president touted recent national accolades TSU has received, such as the no. 1 ranking among the Top 10 HBCUs that Produce Teachers; no. 1 among Most Affordable Colleges Online in Tennessee; and no. 34 of the 100 Most Affordable Universities. She also spoke about the university’s expanded marketing campaign through billboards, social and print media promoting its programs, offerings, community college and distance learning initiatives.

Glover announced upgrades in dining with the adding of Starbucks on the main campus and POD and coffee shop on the Avon Williams campus, which received a rousing chant of approval. A 2-percent across-the-board salary increase retroactive to July was also announced.

With nearly 1,400 new freshmen expected, Glover called on faculty and staff to “join hands” in making sure the new students receive all the support necessary to make their fall freshman move-in Tuesday successful.

“Let all of us show up and give our new freshmen and their parents a rousing TSU welcome during the freshman move-in tomorrow,” Glover said.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU President Glenda Glover Joins Bernice King, Rev. Jesse Jackson and Thousands to Commemorate 50th Anniversary of Selma to Montgomery March

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover joined Bernice King, daughter of the late civil rights activists Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott King, and others for the “Bloody Sunday” commemorative march in observance of the 50th anniversary of the 1965 Selma to Montgomery March.

TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover (right) marches the streets of Selma, Alabama with noted civil rights activist, the Rev. Jesse Jackson and others, as they commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery March. (courtesy photo)
TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover (right) marches the streets of Selma, Alabama with noted civil rights activist, the Rev. Jesse Jackson and others, as they commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery March. (courtesy photo)

President Glover met presidents from Historically Black Colleges and Universities from around the country in Selma, Alabama to celebrate the historic 1965 event. National leaders including the Reverend Jesse Jackson, head of Rainbow PUSH, and Dr. Charles Steele, president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) called for HBCU presidents to make the journey for the anniversary.

“The Selma to Montgomery March is the single most galvanizing moment in our nation’s history in the fight for civil rights, particularly voting rights,” said Dr. Glover. “What happened on the Edmund Pettus Bridge was engrained in the minds of millions of Americans as we watched in horror and disbelief – yet trusting that it would bring about change for all Americans.”

While in Selma, President Glover met with other college presidents, educators, civil rights leaders, students, community organizers, and several service groups. The Selma journey was also significant for Dr. Glover as it gave her the opportunity to memorialize the people and place where thousands of leaders came together to march for the “paramount victory” in the fight for equality.

“I am honored to make the journey to Selma as president of Tennessee State University to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of this historical event. This 50th Anniversary has personal relevance for me because of my father’s role in the Civil Rights Movement in Memphis, Tennessee.  I also appreciate the impressionable role of the TSU Freedom Riders in the Civil Rights Movement. I am pleased to go back to Selma in honor of my father’s memory and in dedication of those who fought for freedom everywhere.”

Glover made a contribution in the name of Tennessee State to Brown A.M.E. Church for $1,000. The church was a starting point for the Selma to Montgomery marches in 1965 and, as the meeting place and offices of SCLC during the Selma Movement.

“We appreciate President Glover’s commitment to advancing education, economics and human rights,” Dr. Steele remarked. “She is clearly a leader in higher education, and brings a unique perspective in engaging students. Glover is dedicated to educating and empowering the next generation of leaders.”

It is estimated that as many as 70,000 people took part in the commemorate march. One of the highlights included President Barack Obama’s address mark at anniversary.

Tennessee State University Marks 102nd Birthday With Procession, Speeches and Cheers

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is 102 years old today.

President Glenda Glover, accompanied by keynote speaker, State Rep. Brenda Gilmore, led a procession of faculty, staff and students for a Founders’ Day celebration in Kean Hall, amid cheers from the audience and renditions from the University Marching Band.

“This is a great day for Tennessee State University,” said Dr. Glover, as she recounted events in the University’s history from its founding in 1912 to the role it plays today as a major center of education in the nation.

“From 1912 when the then Agricultural and Industrial Normal School for Negroes, built to provide educational opportunity for blacks, opened its doors to the first 247, TSU has maintained a tradition of excellence in education for a diverse population,” Dr. Glover said.

In her keynote address, Rep. Gilmore, a 1984 graduate of TSU, emphasized “Think, Work, Serve,” the University’s motto and its relevance in achieving success, but quickly pointed to pitfalls many face for misusing that success.

“TSU has helped to better the lives of so many and opened doors for countless others,” Gilmore said. “But many, including elected officials and others in key positions have failed because they end up hurting the very people they are supposed to help.”

Gilmore, a noted advocate for abused and special needs children, and a strong supporter of women’s cause, said many officials suffer what she called ethical lapses, either out of greed for power, wealth, disrespect for others or lack of integrity.

“As TSU graduates we are responsible to pass our good fortune to help those unfortunate ones in our community,” said Gilmore, who earned a B.S. degree in Business at TSU, before going on to earn a master’s degree in Human Resource Development at Vanderbilt University.

“Get involved in fruitful endeavors that improve your community; give back to the community that nurtured you; and reconnect yourselves to the TSU motto to make this world a better place,” added the four-term member of the Tennessee General Assembly from the 54th District in Davidson County.

Mr. and Miss TSU, accompanied by their Royal Court, and faculty members dressed in full regalia, added to the pomp in celebration of the founders and birthday of the University, which now boasts more than 9,000 students, up from 247, one hundred and two years ago.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU President to Discuss Minorities in Higher Education on National Platform

A Quest for Equality and PeaceNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover has spent more than 20 years in higher education. Prior to entering the academia arena, the Memphis, Tennessee native spent the majority of her time in corporate America. She has the distinction of being one of only two women in the country to hold the Ph.D., J.D., CPA combination.

On Monday, June 30, President Glover will serve as a guest panelist to discuss the State of Blacks in Higher Education. The panel will be featured during the Rainbow Push Coalition and Citizenship Education Fund 43rd Annual International Convention.

Glover
President Glenda Glover

“I am extremely pleased to have this opportunity to dialogue about the tremendous strides African Americans and other minorities have made in higher education,” said Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover.  “However, those gains are in great jeopardy with limited state and federal resources to assist students with getting a college education. One prime example is the recent changes made to the Parent Plus Loan requirements.”

The HBCU school president explains that the qualifications are more stringent, and are having an adverse affect on families that need the loans the most.

“As a university president and former dean, I know first hand the impact the new requirements have had along with the struggles and hard decisions our families are having to make,” Glover added.

“The Rainbow Push Convention is an opportunity for the public to hear the other side of the debate, from practitioners, about the decisions Congress has made regarding higher education. This one move has been devastating.”

The Rainbow Push Coalition and Citizenship Education Fund 43rd Annual International Convention takes place June 28 thru July 2, in Chicago. Visit www.rainbowpush.org for detailed information on the convention.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Presidents’ Panel: Historically Black Colleges and Universities Are Still Very Relevant

TSU Diversity and Inclusion Summit Brings Together Three HBCU Presidents

 

Dr. Kevin D. Rome, of Lincoln University, left; Dr. William B. Bynum, of Mississippi Valley State University; and Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover say non-minority institutions should take a lesson from HBCUs on how they are coping in the face of limited resources. The university presidents joined forces to discuss the question of relevancy of HBCUs and whether they can embrace the culture of diversity and continue to play a key role in the nation’s higher education landscape. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Dr. Kevin D. Rome, of Lincoln University, left; Dr. William B. Bynum, of Mississippi Valley State University; and Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover say non-minority institutions should take a lesson from HBCUs on how they are coping in the face of limited resources. The university presidents joined forces to discuss the question of relevancy of HBCUs and whether they can embrace the culture of diversity and continue to play a key role in the nation’s higher education landscape. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – In spite of fewer resources compared to the nation’s other majority institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities graduate impressive number of majors in education and in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Responding to critics who question the relevancy of HBCUs and whether they can embrace the culture of diversity they have demanded of others, a panel of HBCU presidents meeting at Tennessee State University Monday said HBCUs continue to play a key role in the nation’s higher education landscape and have become more diverse in student population, faculty and staff.

“Those raising questions about the relevancy of HBCUs have no case to back their claim,” said President Glenda Baskin Glover, of TSU, in an opening statement, adding that the question should be about how HBCUs have survived with limited resources and yet produce outstanding graduates.

“How can HBCU’s become a model for other institutions by operating with limited resources and yet we have survived with a high level of performance by putting out more than 5 percent of all graduates in the nation annually? That should be the question,” Dr. Glover asserted.

Attending a three-day “Diversity and Inclusion Summit on HBCU’s,” Dr. Glover, Dr. William B. Bynum, of Mississippi Valley State University; and Dr. Kevin D. Rome, of Lincoln University Missouri, answered questions about HBCU mission, good governance, customer service, and a culture of openness that embraces all without regard to race, sexual preference or heritage.

The summit brought together participants from institutions and organizations across the country including the Association of Public Land Grant Universities, Clark Atlanta University, Indiana University, Alcorn State University, Xavier University, Prairie  View A&M University, Alabama A&M University, Vanderbilt University, Fisk University, and Florida A&M University.

Dr. Ben Reese, longtime educator and president of the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education, served as moderator of the Presidents’ Panel, a key component of the summit organized by the TSU Office of Diversity and International Affairs.

On the issue of limited resources with high return, Bynum and Rome agreed with Glover that instead of questioning HBCU’s relevancy, critics should be asking how non-minority institutions could learn from HBCUs.

“Not only are our institutions diverse, HBCUs are relevant to those students who are there,” said Dr. Rome, at whose Lincoln University blacks are now in the minority at 40 percent, a shift seen in the last six years. “HBCUs give opportunities to those who would not have had those same opportunities at other institutions. Their graduates are making great difference as doctors, engineers and educators.”

“Are we still true to the HBCU mission,” Reese asked.

“We should be true to our mission, focus on what we are about, and continue to do what we do well,” said Dr. Bynum, warning that HBCUs should not try to take on the mantle of being everything to everyone. “This is not a one-size fits all business. Role models and mentorships are the backbone of what we are about.”

On the broader issues of diversity and inclusion, especially dealing with lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgender, the presidents said their institutions have exercised complete openness on “individual” free expression, and have instituted policies that put no barriers to individual practices.

“It is an asset that we can do things that embrace everyone,” Dr. Rome said. “If we are in the business of teaching, then we must be ready to embrace and allow people to speak out and not be faced with questioning who they are.”

Presidents Bynum and Glover agreed that universities should be a place where people can be who they are.

Drawing from his background as a sociologist, Bynum said he was dismissive of the long-held belief by “religious conservatives” that being gay is a lifestyle choice.

“For those in the black community who say being gay is a choice, science has proven them wrong,” said the MVSU president. “And the comparison of gay rights to civil rights has great merit because it all comes down to a mater of individual right.”

Dr. Glover, the longtime educator and trained lawyer, sees the issue as a matter of constitutional right.

“I am a strong supporter of the Constitution that tells one to be what they want,” Dr. Glover said. “We can’t close the doors on some and say we are diverse. Allowing people to be what they are is what diversity is.”

Among other issues, the presidents said resources, especially funding, was one of the main problems facing HBCUs. For instance, in Tennessee, it is not how many students you recruit but how many you graduate that determine funding level, Dr. Glover told her colleagues.

“So why we try to go the traditional recruitment route, we have to recruit in a certain way to carry out the mandate of the state, and remember to recruit students who can help us get funding,” Glover said.

On the question of how HBCUs can be a model for other institutions, the TSU president repeated her assertion that non-minority institutions should learn how HBCUs have remained successful in the face of limited resources.

The summit, which started Sunday, ends Tuesday.

Break-out sessions discussed topics including “The New HBCU: Does Diversity and Inclusion Impact the Relevance of HBCUs?”; “Beyond the Choir: Developing a Culture of Inclusion and Excellence”; “Repositioning HBCUs for the Future”; “Student Leadership Apprentices: Whose Mentor are You”; “Renovating Academy: Challenges Associated with a Diverse  Faculty”; and “Exploring the Chemical  Dynamics of an HBCU to the Global marketplace: A Possible Plausible STEM Transition.”

At a reception Monday night for summit participants in the Holiday Inn Express Downtown Nashville, Dr. Dennis Rahiim, CEO of the Center for Black Student Achievement, wowed the gathering with words of inspiration.

He was followed by Freedom Rider and Civil Rights Activist Dr. Ernest “Rip” Patton, who spoke about his role in organizing the first lunch counter sit-ins in Nashville in the early 1960s.

Later, President Glover, along with summit Chair, Dr. Jewell Winn, presented awards and gifts to sponsors and supporters including AT&T, NADOHE, HCA, AGB, APLU and the Tennessee Board of Regents.

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU will Continue to Build Upon Successes in New Year

The following editorial was published in The Tennessean
Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014

 

Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover President, TSU
Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover
President, TSU

A year ago today, the faculty, staff and alumni of Tennessee State University along with the Nashville community welcomed me with open arms as I took the helm as the institution’s eighth president. I express my gratitude to each of you for your support, and involvement, as well as the confidence you demonstrated in me as the leader of our university.

My first day began last year with a prayer service at Jefferson Street Baptist Church. I emphasized the importance of the community embracing TSU as its university and humbly asked the community to travel this road with me as I accepted the enormous responsibility.

As I prepare for my second year, students will continue to be the focus of all university activity through the five-point vision implemented last year: 1) student success and customer service; 2) fundraising and partnerships; 3) diversity and inclusion; 4) shared governance; and 5) community outreach.

There were notable successes in each of these areas that will serve as a blueprint for continued strategies, and for planning for the overall growth and development of TSU.

We began by improving customer service for our students and community, and ensuring the campus understood our strategic focus of improving retention and graduation rates.

We made a concerted effort to excite and energize our alumni base. Alumni contributions have more than tripled from $450,000 in 2012 to more than $1.7 million in 2013. I issued a challenge to TSU alumni chapters to match my initial contribution made last year. As of this date, several chapters have either matched that contribution or are very close. Corporate contributions also have increased substantially, as have the number of new partnerships.

This support from alumni and the community allowed TSU to overcome one of its most significant challenges of 2013. Last fall, the university faced the difficulty of 352 students being purged for financial reasons. We issued an SOS, Save our Students, initiative and the response was phenomenal. It was the support from you, the entire TSU family and community, that allowed each student to remain in school, and no one had to withdraw from the university during the 2013 fall semester. In fact, TSU was the only four-year university in the TBR system that did not experience a decline in enrollment. This was the ultimate display of support and partnerships; and the university is forever grateful.

Since then, we have increased our efforts to streamline the enrollment process, and to educate and engage students and parents much earlier about financial aid resources and the required criteria.

TSU remains the most affordable institution in the TBR system and has been featured in national rankings regarding the quality education offered to our students, preparing them for the nation’s top high demand careers such as nursing, physical/occupational therapists, engineers, computer scientists and accountants. Academic units continue to be flagships of the university, and garner millions in research funding to solidify their offerings as premiere global programs.

Finally, TSU’s football team returned to the playoffs, and was named the top HBCU football program in the nation. This feat proves the university can have successes in both academics and athletics.

My continued vision is to build upon the strong academic legacy and high intellectual standards for which TSU is internationally known. I will carry out this vision by ensuring that the university continues to provide an enriched, highly technical, academic environment which is diverse and inclusive; and successfully educates and prepares competitive students for the global marketplace.

I believe we are poised and well-positioned to do just that in 2014.

Glenda Glover is president of Tennessee State University.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Announces Homecoming, Inaugural Week Events

Homecoming2013University ushers in a New Century, New Direction for Excellence

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will hold a week full of exciting events October 20-26 as community members, alumni and friends of the University come to Nashville to celebrate Homecoming 2013 and the Investiture of the University’s eight president, Dr. Glenda Glover.

Inspired by last year’s centennial and moving forward into its next 100 years, TSU will celebrate a New Century, New Direction for Excellence for 2013 with a week full of events.

“Homecoming at Tennessee State University is unlike any other,” said Cassandra Griggs, Director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving. “It’s a time to reconnect with old friends, classmates, and reminisce about the days they walked the campus as a student. The positive changes and growth are remarkable. Although there has been much expansion, the traditions of Tennessee State A&I remain sound.”

While TSU has cherished and maintained certain Homecoming traditions, it has also moved forward across the century, finding new ways to celebrate pride in the institution, its students and alumni. Innovations that have sprung up over the years include the parade, pep rally, Homecoming Court, tent parties and many additional campus activities.

This year sees the return of the Homecoming Parade back to Jefferson Street. The parade route will begin at 14th Avenue and Jefferson Street, and proceed two miles to 33rd Avenue and Albion Street. Last year, the route was moved for the Centennial celebration only to accommodate large floats and a large influx in crowd size. This year’s parade begins at 8 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26.

The annual Robert Murrell Oratorical Contest will officially kick off homecoming week on Sunday, Oct. 20 beginning at 3 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center. The Gospel Explosion rounds out the evening, beginning at 6 p.m. also in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

Student events highlight Monday, Oct. 21 when the Courtyard Show takes place in Welton Plaza starting at 11 a.m., followed by the Battle of the Residence Halls at 7 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

The Blue Sapphire Awards will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 22 in the Walter S. Davis Humanities Building in the Poag Auditorium beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Presidential Inaugural events kick off Wednesday, Oct. 23 in conjunction with Homecoming starting with the Presidential Processional at 11 a.m., and the Mr. and Miss TSU Coronation and Ball at 7 p.m. in Kean Hall.

Events continue on Thursday, Oct. 24 with the Inaugural Ecumenical Prayer Breakfast at 7:30 a.m., a service of fellowship bringing together leaders of the faith community to impart well wishes and solidarity to President Glenda Glover and the TSU community. The day continues with the Inaugural Symposium on the Common Core State Standards at 10 a.m. at the Avon Williams campus Auditorium, and Homecoming Concert at 7 p.m. in Kean Hall.  A special “From the Rough,” movie premiere and reception round out the evening beginning at 5:30 p.m., and is an exclusive invite only presentation of the inspiring film based on the true story of Dr. Catana Starks, a former Tennessee State University swim coach, who became the first woman ever to coach a college men’s golf team.

Friday, Oct. 25 begins with the Investiture of President Glenda Baskin Glover as 8th President of the University beginning at 9 a.m. in the Howard Gentry Complex. Homecoming events include the Charles Campbell Fish Fry on the President’s Lawn at 11 a.m., the annual Pep Rally at 11:45 a.m. in Hale Stadium, and the TSU Pan-Hellenic Step Show at 5 p.m. in the Gentry Complex. Tickets are $10 for students in advance, $15 at the door. The night ends with the Inaugural Reception and Scholarship Gala beginning at 6 p.m. at the Gaylord Opryland Resort.

Saturday, Oct. 26 begins with the Homecoming Parade beginning at 8 a.m., followed by the Showcase of Bands at 2 p.m. at LP Field. The Homecoming football game between TSU and Eastern Illinois kicks off at 4 p.m. at LP Field. Fans attending the game are asked to review the tailgating guidelines.

View the complete list of alumni, student, reunion and inaugural events.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University
With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu