Tag Archives: Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover

TSU’s Aristocrat of Bands prepares for big performance and recruiting in Texas

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Houston, Texas will serve as the backdrop for a special performance by Tennessee State University’s Aristocrat of Bands in July.

TSU’s Aristocrat of Bands

Affectionately known as the AOB, the band will be front and center during the upcoming national conference for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Members are preparing for a big show, which is extremely important as the natives believe, “everything is bigger in Texas.”

“The Aristocrat of Bands is honored to be invited and have the opportunity to perform for a prestigious audience such as Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated,” said TSU Band Director Dr. Reginald McDonald.  “This performance will also give us exposure in the Houston area. The Aristocrat of Bands Staff started vigorously recruiting the Houston market about three years ago to date,” added McDonald.

Dr. Glenda Glover, TSU’s first female and eighth president, will become the 30th international president of Alpha Kappa Alpha. The service organization is the oldest African American sorority in the country with nearly 300,000 members worldwide, in 1,000 chapters. Glover believes her leadership role with the organization will assist in recruiting talented students to TSU and enhance the university’s presence on a national stage.

“I’m truly humbled by the membership  for electing me to this position, and just as proud to have my institution, and alma mater be  part of the this special moment,” said President Glover. “Our world renowned band is one of the university’s greatest ambassadors. Band members will have center stage in front of nearly 20,000 sorority members and special guests to showcase their talents. The performance will be a proud moment for me and for the institution.”

The band is a part of several performers scheduled for the 68th national conference for the sorority.  Glover noted she was pleased that friends and sponsors made the trip possible. This means the university will not incur costs or be responsible for paying transportation, food or lodging, another major incentive for the band. McDonald said he reminds band members they represent themselves, but most importantly TSU whenever they travel.

“While we are no strangers to being on a national stage, anytime the Aristocrat of Bands has an opportunity to perform anywhere, I always remind my students that the TSU on our chest is bigger than we are.  We represent the dreams and hopes of past, present and future alumni, as well as all of our stakeholders.”

In 2014, the AOB became the first collegiate band ever to be presented at halftime of the NFL Pro Football Hall of Fame game. The band and university made national headlines again in 2017 by accepting a special invitation from President Barack Obama to perform on the White House Lawn. Both President Glover and McDonald believe the presentation in Houston will continue to open more doors for the band and TSU.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Local TSU alumni chapter hosts president and administrators, spurs enhanced partnership

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A presentation by Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover was the only agenda item for the Nashville Alumni Chapter meeting held Tuesday night in the Floyd-Payne Campus Center in the Robert N. Murrell Forum.

The meeting, which lasted a little over two hours, was led by TSU Nashville Alumni Chapter President Dwight Beard.

“We have to support Dr. Glover.  She has made it clear where she is trying to take the institution,” said Beard, a 1974 TSU alum.  “We as the alumni have to love and support TSU, get involved with the activities, mentor our students and give back to the institution.”

Beard said TSU alums across the nation need to “support the president by motivating students to come to TSU, and not only TSU, but all HBCUs.”

After a brief introduction by Beard, Glover updated local alumni on advancements the university has made in the areas of retention recruitment, enrollment, and marketing.

A little over 100 attendees listened attentively as Glover enthusiastically recounted her personal involvement in recruiting two of Memphis’ top high school seniors, Meaghen Jones and Jayla Woods, whose combined scholarship awards equal close to $19 million.

Glover informed attendees about upcoming changes to the campus landscape, including the addition of a new Health Sciences Building, two new residence halls, the Field Research Organic Laboratory, the Gateway Arch Entrance, a new engineering building and the Alumni House and Welcome Center.

Alumni also learned about a half million dollar gift from the family of the late Dr. Levi Watkins, Jr., that will be used to establish an endowed scholarship fund in honor of the TSU alumnus and renown heart surgeon.

Following the president’s presentation, members of the audience were given an opportunity to ask questions and share their ideas and concerns.

“The meeting was great.  It was an awesome way of updating the alumni regarding the efforts of President Glover and her team to make Tennessee State University the best that it can be,” said Vivian Wilhoite,  a 1987 alumnae of TSU who serves as the Property Assessor for Davidson County.

Wilhoite said she was impressed by what the president is doing to move the university forward.

“It was just wonderful.  It says that we have a vision.  It says that the president has a plan. It says that President Glover is saying, ‘Hey.  Join us. We need you. We appreciate all who have been involved, but we want to reignite the spirit of those people who haven’t been involved by letting them know we have been doing those things you have expected of us to grow our great university.’”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU scholarship recipients say ‘thank you’ to donors during Appreciation Program

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University scholarship recipients got a chance to say “thank you” to their donors on Friday.

Scholarship recipient Nijaia Bradley with donor, Dr. Sandra Holt. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

During a Scholarship Appreciation Program in Elliott Hall, students lined up to thank those who helped make it possible for them to attend TSU. A number of donors attended the event, which is in its seventh year.

TSU President Glenda Glover personally thanked the donors for their contributions in her greetings.

“Thank you for coming out and your support to TSU,” said Glover, who has an endowed scholarship at the university. “You make a significant different in peoples lives.”

Nijaia Bradley of Detroit said it’s simple; she wouldn’t be at TSU if she had not received scholarships.

“College wasn’t a possibility,” said Bradley, a sophomore majoring in child development. “I’m blessed to be here at TSU.”

Like many of the scholarship recipients attending the event, Bradley got a chance to meet her donor, Dr. Sandra Holt. It was her first time meeting Holt, who has a scholarship in her name.

“I just want to thank her,” said Bradley. “Without her scholarship, I wouldn’t be here.”

Holt said it’s a wonderful feeling to know her scholarship is helping a student to be successful.

“When you meet young people like this, who are eager to do … it’s worth whatever it takes to see these young people make it,” said Holt, a former director of TSU’s Honors College. “That’s why I give.”

Junior Madison Brown of Memphis, Tennessee, said the scholarship he received from the TSU Foundation made it possible for him to get a higher education..

“I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for you,” said Brown, a computer science major who has an internship with Google. “I appreciate you a lot.”

Ben Northington, director of fiscal affairs for the TSU Foundation and institutional advancement, said more than 650 students received scholarships this year totaling close to $2 million.

“We look forward to our donors interacting with the students who have benefited from their respective scholarships,” said Northington. “This event is to tell each of our donors thank you.”

For information on how to support the TSU Foundation or make a scholarship donation, please go to http://www.tnstate.edu/foundation/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Delta Sigma Theta, Inc. National President to Speak at Women of Legend And Merit Event To Raise Scholarship and Program Dollars for Students

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Beverly Smith, national president and chief executive officer of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated, will serve as the keynote speaker for this year’s Women of Legend and Merit Award Dinner at Tennessee State University on April 10 in Kean Hall.

Smith, who also serves as the assistant commissioner and Georgia State director for Adult Education and GED Testing through the Technical College System of Georgia, said she is excited about addressing the young ladies at TSU because of the many issues facing women today.

Beverly E. Smith

“We are at a time today when the power of women really matters,” she said. “The power of our voice is clearly something of significance these days whether or not we are comfortable enough with ourselves to use or understand it.”

TSU President Glenda Glover echoed the same sentiments.

“We are extremely pleased to welcome Beverly Smith to our campus for our Women of Legend and Merit Awards Dinner, and look forward to hearing her inspiring and powerful words,” she said. “Women of Legend and Merit is in its 11th year and couldn’t have come at a more pivotal time in our nation’s history. Women should feel empowered and celebrated. Our dinner allows us to do this and raise scholarship and program dollars for students, all while partnering with the community.”

Seanne Wilson, chairperson of the event, which raises money for student scholarships, said Smith’s visit will give the young ladies at TSU an opportunity to witness a “woman of excellence” who is the head of a large body of women of excellence.

“This is an opportunity for them to meet women from varying organizations and diverse positions in life, and to hear their stories and their struggles and how they made it,” said Wilson, who serves as coordinator of the TSU Women’s Center.

According to Wilson, the Women’s Center is a “safe zone” for women at TSU who experience issues such as fear, anxiety and depression, as well as domestic violence, homelessness and the lack of food.

Wilson said the purpose of this event is to empower and uplift the female students at TSU.

Smith said the influence of her father, a civil rights activist, as well as powerful women in her family and early mentors such as legends Dorothy Heights and Althea Gibson helped propel her to success.

“You can’t be what you can’t see, and I think that certainly holds true especially for us in our communities. A lot of times it is very difficult to be what you can’t see,” she said. “If we celebrate who we are and who we have been, it gives us an opportunity for greater heights.”

This year’s honorees are Vivian Wilhoite, Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County property accessor; Dr. Tameka Winston, TSU interim chair of Department of Communications; Many Bears Grinder, commission of the Tennessee Department of Veterans Affairs; and Tina Tuggle, Tennessee Titans director of community relations.

Awards will also be presented to retired educator Gwendolyn Vincent, and TSU freshman Natalie Cooper.

To purchase tickets for the April 10 awards dinner or learn more about the Women’s Center, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/legendandmerit/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, faith community, city officials begin New Year with 6th Annual Presidential Prayer Service

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University and the Nashville faith-based community began the New Year with a morning of prayer during the 6th Annual Presidential Prayer Service on Wednesday.

Mayor Megan Barry. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

The service was held at Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church in Nashville, Tennessee. TSU President Glenda Glover was the keynote speaker.

“As we start another semester, another year at TSU, we start with prayer, with thanks,” Glover said. “I am truly thankful that God has blessed me to lead such a marvelous university. I thank you for your prayers, and for embracing and supporting TSU; and for supporting me as your president.”

Faith-based leaders of various denominations from across Metro Nashville participated on the program or were in attendance, including gospel legend and TSU alum Dr. Bobby Jones, and community activist and pastor Bishop Joseph Walker III.

Others in attendance were Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, as well as other city and state officials, including State Reps. Harold Love, Jr. and Brenda Gilmore, and Councilwoman Sharon Hurt.

“It is so wonderful to be here, because today we’re celebrating Dr. Glover, and also recognizing the incredible power that TSU has in our community,” said Mayor Barry. “You make Nashville better, stronger, more just, more equitable. And you are producing graduates every day that are ready to serve and lead, including several who are on my staff, and several who work in metro government.”

TSU honor students Chris Buford, II and Breanna Brown participate in prayer service. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Jefferson Street Church senior pastor Aaron Marble, who succeeds community activist James Thomas, said he’s glad to be collaborating with TSU and plans to continue the tradition.

“TSU has strong ties to the Nashville community, and so does Jefferson Street,” Marble says. “So uniting the university, the church and the community, is just awesome.”

The service was followed by a breakfast in the lower auditorium of the church that was open to the public.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Alumnus Receives Prestigious Chancellor’s Award for Philanthropy

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University alumnus Amos Otis continues to add accolades to his impressive resume. The 1965 TSU graduate and multi-million dollar entrepreneur was recently awarded the Tennessee Board of Regents’ Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Philanthropy for his contributions to the University.

Otis received the prestigious award from TBR Chancellor John Morgan recently during his 50th graduation anniversary celebration with former classmates at TSU. The award recognizes “people and organizations that have clearly demonstrated generosity of time and resources to TBR institutions, encouraged others, promoted higher education, and provided examples of ethical leadership, civic responsibility and Integrity.”

Chancellor Morgan recognized Otis for “never excluding Tennessee State University” from his success.

“It is my honor to present TSU alumnus, Mr. Amos Otis, with the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Philanthropy for his outstanding contribution and visionary leadership to Tennessee State University,” Chancellor Morgan said.

Otis has had a very successful and distinguished career as a public servant, entrepreneur, and as an officer in the United States Air Force. He is often recognized for his business development and management skills, as well as his civic leadership, and as a member of various advisory boards. Through his success, he has touched lives in many places, including his alma mater, Tennessee State University. He established the SoBran/SComan Educational Scholarship Endowment to help keep students in school with an annual donation of more than $110,000.

In addition to Tennessee State, Mr. Otis’ philanthropy also includes the Brenda Faye Otis-Lee Educational Scholarship at the St. Jude Educational Institute in Montgomery, Alabama. He also supports numerous national causes ranging from the American Heart Association to the U.S. Marine Toys for Tots Foundation.

Otis is president and CEO of SoBran Inc., a $61 million, leading technical and professional services company that provides expertise on biomedical research, engineering and logistics programs for government and commercial clients around the world. An advocate for higher education, Mr. Otis’ storied career has had him serving as a consultant to the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences for Post-Doctoral Programs, and as Director of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

Tennessee Titans Safety Chris Hope Says Education, Not Football, is the Pathway to Success

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – It sometimes takes one bright student who has been through the “trenches” to get the message across to another smart student about the pathway to a successful future.

Chris Hope
Chris Hope

That’s what happened at Tennessee State University today when the University’s Honors students got a message they will not soon forget. The “unlikely messenger” – Tennessee Titans Safety Chris Hope. Although the Super Bowl winner and former Pittsburgh Steeler has amassed wealth, fortune and recognition as an NFL player, he was not at TSU to talk about football.

“Education is what I am here to talk about,” said 12-year NFL veteran and Pro Bowler with the Titans, who was asked to make a statement at the Honors Day Convocation. “I have always loved playing football, but I never forgot about the importance of a quality education as something to fall back on. The average span of an NFL career is three years. I always knew I was just one hit away from permanent injury. I have been fortunate to play for 12 years, but what if my playing had been cut short and I did not have the education to cope?”

That question left Jaquantey Bowens, of Indianapolis, to rethink his approach in preparing for the future. Although the freshman Cell Biology major with a perfect 4.0 grade point average said he is not much on athletics, Hope’s lecture on education and success hit a nerve.

“I study hard and meet all of my course objectives, but listening to him (Hope) makes me want to work even harder,” said Bowens who wants to be a cardiologist because heart disease is prevalent in his family.

When it comes to educational preparedness as something to fall back on, Hope knows what he is talking about. Considered a proven leader and instrumental in the development of young players in the Titans defense, the Rock Hill, South Carolina native was a top honor student at Florida State University, where he graduated in three and half years with a 4.0 GPA.

“Even though I loved football and was a top player in college, I took my education very seriously and I am glad to see you all doing that. Football has made me millions, given me fame, but when I can stand before great people and speak without feeling intimidated, that’s because of my education,” Hope said.

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President Glenda Glover, right, assisted by Dr. Coreen Jackson, director of the Honors Program, presents the Dr. McDonald Williams Scholarship to Lauren Wiggins, a Health Sciences major with a 3.7 GPA from Atlanta.

TSU President Glenda Glover thanked Hope for his words of encouragement and congratulated the honorees for their academic excellence.

“Thank you for speaking to these exceptional students,” President Glover said. “As an honor student yourself when you were at Florida State, these students can relate to you.” She congratulated the more than 2,400 students with GPAs of 3.0 and above for their “outstanding achievement.”

“As honor students you are defined by your aptitude, and your achievement demonstrates pride in TSU,” she added.

At the start of the convocation, President Glover led a moment of silence for former TSU Honors student and SGA President, Dr. Levi Watkins Jr., who died Friday of a massive heart attack and stroke at age 70.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331
About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU to Celebrate Best and Brightest Students During University Honors Convocation April 13

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – When it comes to academic achievement and excellence at Tennessee State University, Carla Gibbs and Lauren Thomas are part of an exclusive club.

As members of the University Honors Program, since entering TSU as freshmen four years ago, Gibbs, a Biology major from Miami, and Thomas, from Memphis, Tennessee, majoring in Mass Communications, have not averaged below a 3.0 grade point average.

2014-08-06 22.01.09
Carla Gibbs

Gibbs hold a 3.76 GPA and is a MARC Scholar, a National Institute of General Medical Sciences program designed to increase the number of minority scientists. She plans to attend Meharry Medical College to study internal medicine. For Thomas, she has already received graduate study offers from Northwestern University, Seattle University and Boston University to study public relations and management after a two-year commitment with Teach for America.

2014-08-06 21.24.26
Lauren Thomas

Gibbs and Thomas are part of more than 2,400 of the University’s best and brightest students who will be honored Monday, April 13, 9:30 a.m., when Tennessee State University holds its annual Honors Convocation in Kean Hall. TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover, will be the keynote speaker.

According to Dr. D. McGahey, associate director of the University Honors Program, the 2,402 students with GPAs of 3.0 and above, is an 11 percent increase over the 2,016 who were honored last year. He said 92 of this year’s honorees have “perfect scores” of 4.0 GPAs, while 356 maintain GPAs between 3.75 -4.0.

“We are really excited about these outstanding students,” said Dr. Coreen Jackson, director of the Honors Program. “They are an example of what hard work is all about. We are excited to give them this well-deserved honor.”

Among those who will be honored are Honors Program Scholars, those on the Dean’s List, members of the University-Wide Honor Societies, Student Leadership Awards, the President’s List Scholars, and the Top Graduating Seniors. The ceremony will also include the presentation of private scholarship awards, such as the Dr. McDonald Williams Scholarship.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331
About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Leader Launches “Walk with the President” to Promote Healthy Living on Campus

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NASHVILLE, Tenn.
(TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover is launching “Walk with the President,” starting Monday morning, March 2 in an effort to promote healthy habits and fitness on campus. The walk will take place each Monday around the track at Hale Stadium, beginning at 6 a.m.

She is calling on faculty, staff and students to join her in this initiative.

“This effort is geared toward us encouraging each other to live much healthier lives,” Dr. Glover said. “Earlier this year we started this effort in our campus cafeteria and dining services by offering more green and vegetable choices. ‘Walk with the President’ is just a continuation of that effort.”

The Director of the Wellness Center at TSU, Gerald Davis II, called “Walk with the President” a great idea that will give students, faculty and staff “another avenue” to engage in cardiovascular activities.

“This will help them to relieve stress and weight loss in maintaining good health,” he said.

Solving the issue of obesity and unhealthy dieting is a national challenge, and TSU, as an educational institution, has a major role is battling this epidemic, the president noted.

“The lack of regular forms of exercise is a major risk factor in developing illnesses and other forms of disease,” she said.

Studies support the President’s assertion. A recent National Institutes of Health study gives an overwhelming evidence that proves the notion that reductions in daily physical activity are primary causes of chronic diseases.

In Tennessee, the situation is even dire. The state now has the fourth highest adult obesity rate in the nation, according to The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America, published in 2013. Tennessee’s adult obesity rate is 33.7 percent, up from 25.6 percent in 2004 and from 11.1 percent in 1990.

“We know ‘Walk with the President’ will not solve all of our problems, but it is a beginning and I am asking all of our faculty, staff, students and anyone else who is interested to join us in this worthy cause for healthy living,” Dr. Glover said.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Sexual Assault, Relationship Violence Focus of Two-Day Summit at Tennessee State University

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Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover addresses participants at a two-day summit on sexual assault on college campus, during opening ceremonies in Poag Auditorium on the main campus. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)


NASHVILLE
(TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover Tuesday welcomed more than 400 representatives from 76 universities, colleges and organizations across the state to a two-day summit on campus sexual assault.

The summit, featuring national experts on sexual assault prevention and complying with changing federal laws, includes customized tracks for campus police, student support services providers, and Title IX investigators.

The Tennessee Board of Regents, the Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association, and the University of Tennessee System, in partnership with the Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence, are sponsoring the summit.

“We are especially delighted and honored that you selected Tennessee State University for this all important summit,” President Glover said, as she presented TBR Chancellor John Morgan. “Sexual assault is a very serious issue, and every member of our campus community has a responsibility to not only know how to prevent it, but also how to respond to it.”

Dr. Glover thanked the summit planners and facilitators from across the state, including the TSU offices of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, and Student Affairs for their contributions.

“Your contribution to this gathering is well noted. Your efforts demonstrate that we must be ready to take every step necessary to support our students when they need us,” the President added.

According to the TBR, the summit also solidifies a partnership between the state’s higher education community and Tennessee’s leading private, non-profit sexual assault coalition.

“Through the development and implementation of effective prevention and awareness programs and campaigns, the statewide partnership will enhance the efforts of Tennessee’s higher education institutions to focus on student safety at all levels,” a TBR release stated.

The summit covers topics ranging from “Domestic and Dating Violence 101” to bystander intervention and the psychological and biological effects of sexual assaults.

Keynote speakers include: Katie Koestner, executive director of the Take Back the Night Foundation and Campus Outreach Services and the first survivor of acquaintance rape to speak out nationally. Others include S. Daniel Carter, director of the 32 National Campus Safety Initiative formed by the families of the victims and survivors of the Virginia Tech tragedy; Connie Kirkland, director of sexual assault services at Northern Virginia Community College and contributing author of the 2014 NCAA guide “Addressing Sexual Assault and Interpersonal Violence,” Jim Hopper, consultant and instructor of psychology at Harvard Medical School specializing in the psychological and biological effects of sexual assault and serving on the congressionally-mandated Peace Corps Sexual Assault Advisory Council, and Kayce Matthews, program specialist with the Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence.

The summit concludes on Wednesday.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.