Tag Archives: Department of Communications

TSU Meter Advisor wins Journalism Educator of the Year honor

Harriet Vaughan-Wallace
Harriet Vaughan-Wallace

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The advisor for the TSU student newspaper, The Meter, has won the 2014-2015 Journalism Educator of the Year, an honor presented by the Southeast Journalism Conference.  Harriet Vaughan-Wallace, an adjunct teaching in the Department of Communications, received the award during the conference Friday, Feb. 27, held at Georgia State University in Atlanta.

“Winning, is never about the person who won, but about how they touched others with their work,” said Vaughan-Wallace. “I am beyond humbled and thankful for this honor. A lot of work goes in to teaching our students and overseeing the newspaper. I dedicate and sacrifice a lot to do so. The fact that my students thought enough of me to nominate me, means absolutely everything to me.

‪”My mother, Dr. Verla Vaughan, a former tenured professor at Tennessee State University in the nursing department, always tried to get me to leave journalism for teaching. I fought it for many years. She taught me how to teach. She always had a laptop with her and was always meeting with her students. I guess mother knows best,” she said.

Vaughan-Wallace joined TSU in January 2012 as advisor to The Meter while teaching several classes including Print/Online 1, Print/Online II, Multimedia Reporting and Feature Writing. An award-winning, multimedia journalist, Vaughan-Wallace worked for various television stations and newspapers throughout the country and provided special event reporting for FOX and CBS network news. She now manages WTNTribune Radio where she is the lead host of the popular radio show, Pumps & Politics.

Anastasia Williams, senior Mass Communication student and Meter Managing Editor, said Vaughan-Wallace has changed her life in several of ways, and is a leader she can look up to and follow in her footsteps.

“Being a member of her class has allowed me to experience real-life situations,” said Williams. “My classmates and I have experienced the opportunity of a lifetime from being in her class.”

Senior mass communication student, Chantell Copeland, also praised Vaughan-Wallace, saying “this woman has taken educating students to another level.”

“Instead of just giving us assignments and readings to try to teach us the material, she takes on a hands-on approach,” said Copeland. “By doing this, it prepares us for what is to come, and what will be expected of us once we graduate. She cuts us no slack and turns our average classroom into an actual newsroom.”

According to Dr. Terry Likes, Chair of the Department of Communications, Vaughan-Wallace has done a “terrific” job changing the culture of the Meter. “She has changed The Meter into an uplifting place to work, creating the best product seen in several years,” added Likes. “She is following industry best practices by producing news content across multiple media platforms and turning all of this into an award-winning product.”

The Southeast Journalism Conference is a vibrant learning community of journalists honing their craft through professional development and the Best of the South Collegiate Journalism Competition. An organization comprised of more than 45 member colleges and universities in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee, SEJC was created to encourage greater interest in student journalism and to form closer ties among journalism schools in the Southeast United States.

 

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TSU Chair Wins Two National Media Awards

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Department Chair Wins Two National Media Awards

Likes 2010NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The national awards among faculty competing in the Broadcast Education Association have been released and TSU’s Chair of the Department of Communications, Dr. Terry Likes, has won in the Faculty Audio Competition: Best of Competition: “The alarm clock for your favorite tv show: The theme song.”

Likes’ report aired on the Tennessee Radio Network in 2014. The report shows when people think of their favorite songs of all time, most forget the obvious choices from an overlooked category: television theme songs. This program explores the popularity of TV theme songs, the Nashville connection and what the future is for these theme songs in popular culture.

“When students can see professors remain active in the industry and achieve at a high level, professors can, in turn, encourage students to seek excellence in their own student competition,” said Likes. “It is part of the teacher-scholar method.”

This is the second award Likes has received for this program. Earlier this month, the documentary was selected for exhibition from the National Broadcasting Society. A formal announcement of winners will occur at the NBS national convention in March.

The BEA Festival of Media Arts is an international exhibition of award-winning faculty and student works. Winners will receive recognition and exhibition of their works during the Broadcast Education Association’s annual convention in Las Vegas in April.

This is the eleventh Broadcast Education Association award for Likes.  He is the recipient of 55 awards during his career including other honors from the Associated Press and the National Press Club.  Since joining TSU in 2008, Likes has won 39 awards or honors.

BEA is an international academic media organization, driving insights, excellence in media production, and career advancement for educators, students and professionals. The association’s publications, annual convention, web-based programs, and regional district activities provide opportunities for juried production competition and presentation of current scholarly research related to aspects of the electronic media. Established in 1955, the BEA serves more than 2,500 professors, students and media professionals at approximately 275 college and university departments and schools.

 

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Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Chair Wins Two Prestigious Edward R. Murrow Awards

Likes 2010NASHVILLE, Tenn.  (TSU News Service) – The Radio Television Digital News Association has announced that a communications professor at Tennessee State University has won two regional Edward R. Murrow Awards for excellence in electronic journalism.

Dr. Terry Likes, Chair of the Department of Communications and Professor of Multimedia Journalism, won the awards in two separate categories, including Audio News Documentary—“In Our Memory, the Soundtrack to News:  How News Events Shape Music,” and Audio Sports Reporting, “We Will Rock You: The Branding of Sports Music.”

Both programs aired on the Tennessee Radio Network.

“It is an honor to represent TSU in this regard and to continue to enhance my reporting skills for the benefit of our students,” said Dr. Likes. “It helps in the classroom when students can see professors remain active in the industry, achieve at a high level.  This helps us encourage students to seek excellence in their own student competitions, as TSU students are doing with evidence of tremendous recent success including 17 Southeast Journalism Conference awards and 9 Tennessee Associated Press student awards this year alone.”

These awards mark the seventh and eighth regional Murrow Award received by Dr. Likes having won Murrows in 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, and two in 2012.   Likes is the recipient of 52 awards during his career including honors from the Broadcast Education association, the Tennessee Associated Press, Kentucky Associated Press, National Broadcasting Society and the National Press Club.

This year, RTDNA awarded 661 regional Edward R. Murrow Awards in 14 categories, including Overall Excellence, Breaking News, Investigative Reporting, and Website.  RTDNA received more than 4,000 entries during the 2014 awards season, surpassing 2013 by more than 500 entries and setting an all-time record for entries in what proved to be one of the most competitive Edward R. Murrow Awards seasons in RTDNA history.

Dr. Likes competed in Region 8 against other entries from Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia. Regional winners automatically become eligible for the national awards competition, which will be judged in June. The national Edward R.  Murrow Awards will be presented in October at the RTDNA Awards Dinner in New York.

The Radio Television Digital News Association has been honoring outstanding achievements in electronic journalism with the Edward R. Murrow Awards since 1971. Murrow’s pursuit of excellence in journalism embodies the spirit of the awards that carry his name. Murrow Award recipients demonstrate the spirit of excellence that Edward R. Murrow made a standard for the broadcast news profession.

A complete list of the 2014 Regional Edward R. Murrow Awards winners can be found at rtdna.org.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Students Capture Nine Tennessee Associated Press Awards

AP_RGBNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A trio of students from Tennessee State University’s Department of Communications were the recipients of the top Tennessee Associated Press awards recently, capturing nine awards in the student competition, up from six the previous years.

The Tennessee AP Broadcasters and Tennessee APME Best of College awards were announced on Saturday, March 22, and recognized Tennessee student journalists for outstanding performance in college journalism.

Students receiving awards included:

  • 1st place, Best Radio Reporter, Chantell Copeland, senior Mass Communication major from Atlanta
  • 1st place, Best Radio Newscast, Chantell Copeland
  • 1st place, Best News Story, Brandi Giles, senior Mass Communication major from Nashville, Tenn.
  • 2nd place, Best Use of Sound, Brandi Giles
  • 2nd place, Best Radio Reporter, Miya Jefferson, 2013 graduate, Mass Communication major, Lansing, Mich.
  • 2nd place, Best Newscast, Brandi Giles
  • 3rd place, Best Feature Story, Chantell Copeland
  • 3rd place, Best Radio Reporter, Brandi Giles
  • 3rd place, Best Use of Sound, Miya Jefferson

According to Dr. Terry Likes, Chair of the Department of Communications, students excelled in reports aired on the campus radio station, WTST.

“Our new Center for Media Arts and Production houses WTST and our other media outlets in a converged media environment.  The dedicated faculty teach committed students who are learning across media platforms to best prepare themselves for real-world opportunities.”

This is the third year the Associated Press has conducted a competition for college students in the state of Tennessee. The students from TSU competed in more than 12 different categories in the college contest against entrants from MTSU, Vanderbilt University, Lipscomb, UT-Chattanooga, UT-Martin, UT-Knoxville, Austin Peay State University, and Southern Adventist.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Ten TSU Students Named Finalists for Regional Journalism Awards

Dept of CommNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The 2014 finalists have been announced for the best in broadcast, print and online journalism by the Southeast Journalism Conference, with Tennessee State University students capturing finalist slots in 10 of the 23 individual categories.  College finalists in categories such as Best Website, Best Newspaper and Best Radio or TV Newscast were not released early.

Award winners will be announced at the SEJC conference, Friday Feb. 21, hosted by the University of Louisiana-Lafayette.

Tennessee State University finalists include:

*Best Opinion-Editorial Writer: Patrick Lewis
*Best Magazine Page Layout Designer: Brittney Bodden
*Best Radio Hard News Reporter: Brandi Giles
*Best Television News Feature Reporter: Quinn Panganiban
*Best Radio News Feature Reporter: Kelli Volk
*Best Radio Journalist: Chantell Copeland
*Best Advertising Staff Member: Ashli Beverley
*Best Journalism Research Paper: Jer’Mykeal McCoy
*College Journalist of the Year: Ce’Dra Jackson
*Best Multimedia Journalist: Alicia Bailey

According to Dr. Terry Likes, Chair of the Department of Communications, this is a testament to the commitment to excellence of students, faculty and the administration.

“Teaching students to work across media platforms, and an enhanced partnership with the student newspaper, The Meter, means we have improved the quality of our student media to the point where we now have more entries and more finalists in SEJC than we have had in recent years,” said Likes.

The Southeast Journalism Conference is a vibrant learning community of journalists honing their craft through professional development and the Best of the South Collegiate Journalism Competition. An organization comprised of more than 45 member colleges and universities in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee, SEJC was created to encourage greater interest in student journalism and to form closer ties among journalism schools in the Southeast United States.

The Best of the South competition recognizes individual student journalists and university publications. The competition consists of 23 individual and eight university categories.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU’s PAC House Productions Goes Hollywood with “Voices of War”

Mark Schlicher (left), operates a camera jib during the filming of Voices of War, a documentary about life at Travellers Rest Plantation during the Civil War. PAC House Productions at Tennessee State University produced the 20-minute documentary that will debut Nov. 23 at the museum. (courtesy photo)
Mark Schlicher (left), operates a camera jib during the filming of Voices of War, a documentary about life at Travellers Rest Plantation during the Civil War. PAC House Productions at Tennessee State University produced the 20-minute documentary that will debut Nov. 23 at the museum. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A short 10 miles from the steps of Tennessee State University stands a living museum that pays tribute to one of the bloodiest battles to take place during the Civil War.

Travellers Rest, a plantation and now a museum located at Harding Place and Interstate 65, saw some of the fiercest fighting during the two-day Battle of Nashville, where approximately 6,000 Confederate soldiers were killed, captured or considered missing in action. The battle decimated the southern forces in Nashville and was literally fought on the front lawn of the plantation.

Today, students from TSU’s PAC House Productions are bringing that history back to life with the documentary, Voices of War.

The Department of Communications student-led production company helped write, direct and produce the 20-minute documentary for the historic landmark’s new exhibit, The Battle of Nashville: History Unfolds at Travellers Rest, which debuts Nov. 22 at the museum.

According to Melissa Richie, director and editor of Voices of War and advisor to PAC House Productions, the project began a year and a half ago when she and Dr. Donald Page, professor of Communications, where asked to participate in creating media for the historic landmark’s new exhibit. After countless hours of collaboration with Travellers Rest on writing the script, pre-production began last spring with filming this fall. Now in its final phase, the documentary is ready for debut at the museum.

“Of all the colleges and universities in middle Tennessee, the Board of Directors commissioned the students from PAC House Productions at Tennessee State to produce this documentary,” said Richie, who also serves as assistant professor of Mass Communications at the University. “That really says a lot about the capabilities we have and the quality of work our students produce. This short documentary will rival anything you might see at the Smithsonian or any other Civil War museum.”

The documentary, filmed over five days at the Travellers Rest Plantation, cast more than 30 Civil war re-enactors, including men, women, children and horses sporting period-correct costumes, and depicts life on the plantation during the Battle of Nashville.

According to MC Potts, producer of the documentary, the hard part was the coordination of “all the moving parts.”

“It was very stressful and made for some extremely long days,” said Potts, a senior from Columbus, Ohio majoring in Theater and Communications. “The filming began the end of October, which is a very busy time of year at the plantation, and for the re-enactment community. All the students on the production team worked hard putting this together and we are very proud of the final product.”

Besides the production crew, others lending their talents to the documentary include Tennessee Governor, Bill Haslam, who provides the video epilogue, and Maj. Gen. Terry “Max” Haston, Adjutant General of the Tennessee National Guard, who portrays Andrew Johnson. Tennessee National Guard Assistant Adjutant General, Maj. Gen. Robert Harris, portrays Isham Harris who was the Governor of Tennessee from 1857 until 1862, and Col. (ret.) Randy Harris, public affairs director for the Tennessee National Guard, who lends his voice for character narration for the documentary.


(As seen on Fox 17 morning News)

PAC House production members that worked on the documentary included Micah Wickre and Chris Garner, directors of photography; Jonathan Starks and Justin Dixon, assistants of photography; assistant directors Jasmine Scarber and Ariana Heslup; special effects editing by Tervell Smith; crew members Sean Jenkins and Thema Dial; set photographer and crew member JaQuita Stewart; and actors Carrington Edwards, Tyree Taylor and Porshia Edwards.

Travellers Rest is the oldest house open to the public in Nashville. Built in 1799, it was home to several generations of the Overton family. In December 1864 it served as the headquarters for the Confederate Army under Gen. John Bell Hood. Covering nearly 1,050 acres, some of the heaviest fighting took place on the second day of the Battle of Nashville at Peach Orchard Hill on the plantation grounds. Today the plantation is a living piece of American history depicting life before and after the Civil War.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Professor Receives TV Faculty Program Executives Fellowship

Melissa Richie
Melissa Richie

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Assistant professor of Mass Communications, Melissa Richie, has been chosen as a National Association of Television Program Executives Faculty Fellowship recipient for the January 2014 NATPE Marketplace and Conference.

The conference, which takes place Jan. 25-29 in Miami, provides selected college and university media faculty with complete access to sessions and activities of the annual NATPE Market and Conference, and exposes the educational community to current television issues and practices, and fosters improved communication and cooperation between educators and the industry.

“I am honored to be able to attend this conference and meet one-on-one with television executives and members of the industry,” said Richie. “This is something that energizes you, and keeps you up-to-date on what is going on in the industry. I look forward to being able to bring back a tremendous amount of useful information that I can share with our faculty and staff on any emerging trends.”

Richie has been teaching video production courses at the University since 2008. She came to Tennessee State University from the Walt Disney World Company in Orlando, Fla., where she spent nearly 10 years producing internal communication videos throughout the Disney Company as well as working with the development and production of the weekly news program, Studio News, at Disney’s Hollywood Studios. She also worked as a freelance video editor for a variety of video projects, commercials, animation, and a children’s music education project for Warner Brothers Publications.

She has been a postproduction video editor for 12 years. She was the editor for a documentary project called Stephen Burrows World, which screened in New York City at the Fashion Institute of Technology theatre. Her experience also includes directing and editing her own short films for the festival circuit.

Celebrating more than 50 years of service to the ever-evolving global television industry, NATPE continues to redefine itself and the services it provides to meet the needs of its members and the industry. NATPE conducts an annual conference that attracts executives from around the world for sessions featuring leaders from all facets of the global telecommunications industry, along with hundreds of exhibiting companies.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

‘Race’ comes to Tennessee State University Nov. 7-10

Play tackles controversial issues of rape, sex and race

   

race-poster-3-biggerNashville, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – “Race,” the latest play from Pulitzer and Tony Award-winning playwright David Mamet, makes it debut Nov. 7-10 at Tennessee State University, and will explore the questions of rape, sex and race.

Produced by the Theatre Department at TSU, the play will take place in the Cox-Lewis Theatre of the Performing Arts Center. Admission is free, however, “Race” contains adult language and is recommended for mature audiences.

Mamet’s play, which opened in December 2009 on Broadway and ran for just under 300 performances, tackles America’s most controversial topic in a provocative tale of sex, guilt and bold accusations. The story focuses on three attorneys, two black and one white, who grapple with evidence to defend a white man charged with a crime against a black woman, as well as their own personal feelings about race. The play features ethnic one-liners about guilt and shame that will provide fuel for the post-performance discussions.

“Race” playwright David Mamet is a two-time Oscar nominee, director, essayist, novelist and poet who has been a force in American theater since 1976. His works include “American Buffalo,” “Glengarry Glen Ross,” “Speed-the-Plow” and “Oleanna.” Mamet has also won acclaim for numerous screenplays, including “The Verdict” and “Wag the Dog” (both nominated for the Academy Award for Best Screenplay), as well as “The Postman Always Rings Twice” and “The Untouchables.”

The play premiered in the Ethel Barrymore Theatre in 2009, featuring renowned actors Kerry Washington, James Spader, David Alan Grier and Richard Thomas. “We decided to bring this shocking play home to our campus to give our community an opportunity to discuss the continual issues of race in the U.S.,” said play director, Marc Payne.

Performances take place Nov. 7-9, at 7 p.m., and Sunday, Nov. 10, at 3 p.m. Discussions will be held immediately following each performance and reservations should be made in advance by visiting eventbrite.com (Go to “Race” – the play at Tennessee State University, and register for each night with e-mail addresses).

For more information, contact Arianna Petty at pettya@goldmail.etsu.edu.  

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

SiriusXm Radio Shares TSU Radio Programs Starting in November

Beginning in November, SiriusXM subscribers will be able to hear programing from Tennessee State University on the satellite provider’s Channel 142 as part of the HBCU Network, including the Black Docs. They are (L-R) Drs. Iris Johnson Arnold, Heather O’Hara-Rand, Tameka Winston, Crystal deGregory and Keisha Bean. (courtesy photo)
Beginning in November, SiriusXM subscribers will be able to hear programing from Tennessee State University on the satellite provider’s Channel 142 as part of the HBCU Network, including the Black Docs. They are (L-R) Drs. Iris Johnson Arnold, Heather O’Hara-Rand, Tameka Winston, Crystal deGregory and Keisha Bean. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Subscribers to SiriusXM satellite radio will soon be able to listen to programming originating from Tennessee State University.

Beginning in November, Tennessee State Talk and Black Docs will be broadcast over the airwaves, online and through mobile devices on Channel 142 by the satellite radio provider.

Tennessee State Talk is an upbeat yet informative program that provides an in-depth look at University news, accomplishments and more, all while displaying the talents of the TSU community.

Black Docs features a panel of five African American trailblazing female doctors from different fields who will share their opinions on numerous subjects important to the community including HBCU history, mental health, healthy living, and much more. The program currently airs Thursdays at 10 a.m. on the University’s radio station, WTST.

Dr. Tameka Winston, assistant professor in the Department of Communications at TSU, as well as creator and executive producer of both shows, felt it was time for a show such as Black Docs.

“Each host and co-host brings her own unique experiences, which leads to informative yet fun and witty discussions,” explained Winston. “Whether you’re looking for information about education, relationships, health or current events, we’ve got a doctor for you. I think listeners are sure to connect with the five doctors right from the start.”

Along with Winston, co-hosts include Drs. Crystal deGregory, faculty member at TSU, and founder and executive editor of HBCUSTORY Inc., a nonprofit advocacy initiative preserving, presenting and promoting inspiring stories of the historically black colleges and universities; and Iris Johnson Arnold, associate professor with the Department of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology at TSU. Her areas of study include speech and language development and disorders with collateral areas in multicultural and psychosocial variables affecting communication.

Other co-hosts include Drs. Keisha Bean, a licensed psychologist for the state of Tennessee with a Health Service Provider designation, working as a psychologist for Deberry Special Needs Prison for incarcerated men, and sole proprietor of Bean Counseling and Consulting Services; and Heather O’Hara-Rand, a board certified physician in Occupational Medicine and board eligible in Preventive Medicine, and assistant professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at Meharry Medical College.

Winston rounds out the panel, who teaches a variety of undergraduate level courses at TSU including newswriting, social media practices, multimedia storytelling, public speaking and introduction to mass communications. She recently won the College of Liberal Arts faculty award, and researched and developed the department’s new print curriculum. Winston has also authored and published a public speaking textbook, Understanding the Speechmaking Process, which is used by all students at the University.

In addition to teaching and scholarly research, Winston is also the creator, executive producer and host for both programs, and serves as the Director of TSU News Network. Joe Richie, radio operation manager for the Department of Communications, serves as the advisor for both programs.

The programs will debut on the HBCU Radio Network, one of the two channels leased to Howard University from SiriusXM radio December 2011. The HBCU Network will provide music and talk programs from historically black colleges and universities, including Tennessee State University.

 

 

Department of Media Relations   

 

Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331


About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university and is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top Universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912 Tennessee State University celebrates 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu