Tag Archives: Department of Communications

TSU Alum Garners National Acclaim With Comedy Series #WeirdMYAH

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – How does a Magna Cum Laude Animal Science/Pre-Veterinary Medicine graduate from one of the nation’s top historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) become an award-winning filmmaker?

That’s a good question for 27-year-old Myah Naomi Lipscomb, a 2013 alumna of Tennessee State University and creator of the comedy series #WeirdMYAH. Lipscomb, along with a host of TSU alums, are garnering national acclaim with their original comedy series, which is currently being featured in the Tennessee Episodic Showcase division of the Nashville Film Festival.

“I feel so blessed, and I am so happy,” said Lipscomb. “I would not have thought when I was working at the animal hospital and not loving it that in just a couple of years I could say that I am doing what I love.”

Members of the #WeirdMYAH cast and crew after winning Best TV Pilot for “#photobomb” at the National Black Film Festival (Houston, Texas) Left to Right: Brandon Lee W., Kelly Keri Greer, Myah Naomi Lipscomb, Jennifer Mkoma, and Lanial D. Madden

#WeirdMYAH, which recently took home the Best TV Pilot Award at the National Black Film Festival in Houston, for its full length episode #photobomb, screens Wednesday, May 16, at 6 p.m. at Regal Hollywood Stadium 27.

In the television comedy, Myah Bridges, portrayed by Lipscomb, is a student at historically black Lloyd University. She struggles to overcome the conflicts in her problematic life, created by the stress of college, lack of income, and her social awkwardness. Overtime, Myah learns to deal with her uniqueness by embracing her individuality, but her quest for normalcy has its obstacles.

Lipscomb and the pilot’s director and cowriter, Kelly Keri Greer, both graduates of TSU, earned MFA’s in Film and Creative Media from Lipscomb University in 2017. The two are just part of a long list of TSU alums involved with the project.

“I think when I first tried to pursue it years ago, it just wasn’t the right season for it,” Lipscomb said. “And I think me going to graduate school and really learning the craft and learning the field, I needed that. Me networking with other filmmakers and actors, I needed that. And all of us together is what has really branded this project into what it is now.”

Greer, a Memphis-native who graduated from TSU with a B.A. in Mass Communications, said the cast and crew of #WeirdMYAH are like a family.

“We are always together, and not only do we work together, we work well together,” she said. “We’re there for long periods of time together on set, but we can actually go and spend our own personal time with one another, so we are really a family, and I think that’s probably the most rewarding part of being a part of this project.”

Greer, like Lipscomb, said attending TSU played a major role in her success.

“We only had one film professor at TSU, Melissa Forte, and she really taught us everything from beginning to end,” Greer said. “We had editing classes with her. We had screenwriting classes with her, and she really taught us the basics of film including production and being your own producer, like being an independent filmmaker. With those tools you really can’t go wrong.”

Lipscomb’s rendezvous with TSU goes back much further. Her grandfather, Dr. Roland Norman, worked at TSU for nearly 40 years, ultimately serving as dean of the College of Agriculture and Home Economics. Her grandmother, Naomi Norman, worked as a nurse in the Queen Washington Student Health Center at TSU throughout her professional career.

Their children, including Myah’s mother, Chandra Norman Lipscomb, grew up on the TSU campus. Myah’s mother eventually attended TSU and became Miss TSU 1979-1980. She worked at the university in various capacities, including teaching in the Department of Communications, serving as a campus administrator, working in the College of Business, and eventually serving as the coordinator of International Student Services and Cultural Programming in the Office of International Affairs before her recent retirement.

As a student at TSU, Myah served as Miss Freshman 2009-2010. She also served on the student government association as representative-at-large and speaker of the house.

An accomplished actress, Norman Lipscomb said she sees a lot of herself in Myah.

“I look at Myah, and a lot of the things she is doing, she got from me. Myah grew up watching me doing my performances and what not, but we never knew she had a desire for the arts or for communications because she would always talk about being a veterinarian,” she said. “To be honest, she was afraid to let her dad and I know that that was the area she wanted because she thought we wanted her to be a veterinarian.”

As a mother, Norman Lipscomb said she sees the hard work her daughter puts into her craft and believes it is the key to her success.

“I personally see what no one else sees. I see Myah getting up to go to the gym at 5 a.m., coming back and working whether it is #WeirdMYAH, editing a project, getting ready to go film a music video, whatever,” she said. “She is working most of the time, and this is like a labor of love for her.“

Myah encourages other young people to pursue their passion.

Myah Naomi Lipscomb – Creator, Executive Producer, Actress, & Editor of #WeirdMYAH

“Whether it’s in film, whatever field you are passionate about, I think you need to follow your passion, and follow your heart, and you’ll get there,” Lipscomb said. “You just need to take that first step and not be afraid.”

Lipscomb said the next step for #WeirdMYAH is to pitch the show to networks and streaming platforms. She hopes to use her journey as a filmmaker to revitalize positive, entertaining content that highlights African Americans.

Other TSU alums involved in the project include the cinematographer, Joseph Patrick; cast and crew members Lanial Madden, Kala Ross, Chelsea Smith Brand Lee W., Asia Jones, Joe Major, Clarke Howard, Evony Thompson and Lauren Waller; and filmmaker Spencer Glover, who also graduated with an MFA from Lipscomb and has worked as a director on the miniseries.

The five episode web-based miniseries of #WeirdMYAH is available online at www.myahnaomi.com/weirdmyah. To purchase tickets for the May 16 screening of the full length episode, #photobomb, visit www.nashvillefilmfestival.org.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Alum Makes Moves In Hip Hop

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Dwane “Key Wane” Weir II still smiles when he recalls his mother buying him a keyboard for Christmas when he was 13 years old. Over a decade later, the Grammy-nominated producer and Tennessee State University alumnus who has worked with everyone from Beyoncé and Jazmine Sullivan to Drake and Meek Mill, still credits his mother for being his biggest inspiration.

“My mom taught me how to go out and really ‘get it-get it.’ I didn’t want to ask my mom for much,” he said. “If I were to ask her for something, she would be like, ‘You’d better figure out a way to get it.’ I think that’s dope because I didn’t grow up lazy.”

Weir, who spent most of his time at TSU as a music major with an emphasis in commercial music, changed his major to Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS) during his final year so he could graduate early and focus on his music career.

Dwane “Key Wane” Weir

“On campus, I really didn’t get out a lot because I was making beats. I got signed when I was a sophomore or a junior, so I was always in and out of school,” he said.  “I did my work, but I was barely there.  I was only there for midterms and finals and whatever type of important assignments that were due. Outside of that, I was in the dorm making records, five to 10 beats a day.  I would go to the café just to get some food, take the tray back to the room, get back to it, send my e-mails and prepare my flights.”

Mark Crawford, TSU associate professor of Music and coordinator of the Commercial Music Program, said what impressed him most about Weir was his dedication and his musicality.

“He was really into it. He was about the music.  He breathes music.  He exudes music, and he’s just a very creative young man,” said Crawford.  “He has been fortunate enough to find an avenue where he could find reward for that. So he was a good student, but I think he was a better producer.”

As Weir’s advisor, Crawford said he noticed that while the producer was diligent, because of his competing demands, he was often the last one to make it to class.

Dr. Mark Crawford

“Sometimes he was late.  Well, when I talked to him about this, about his attendance and everything, he began to tell me about all the activities he was involved with outside of the class.    You know making his tracks and making his beats, trying to return phone calls, trying to make deadlines and all this kind of thing, and that’s when I first became aware of what he was into,” Crawford said.

“Big Sean was one artist he had an early connection with, and he would tell me about that connection. His senior year he began to get some really good placements.  He had a placement, I believe, with a Beyonce’ project,” Crawford recalled.  “I want to say his first year out or his second year out, the project he was involved with was nominated for a Grammy.  And then subsequently, he’s been nominated two more times.”

According to Weir, taking his mother to the Grammy Awards has been the highlight of his career.

“I’ve been nominated year after year which is a blessing, “ Weir said. “I remember I brought my mom when ‘Let It Burn’ got nominated, which is the Jazmine Sullivan joint I did, and I was like,  ‘Mom, you want to come with me to the Grammys?  She was like, ‘Yeah!’  I think that was like the coolest thing because I remember when she and I both had nothing, and she bought me that keyboard, and that changed everything.”

Beyonce’s “Partition”, Drake’s “All Me”, Meek Mill’s “Amen” and Jazmine Sullivan’s “Let It Burn” are just a few of the chart-topping songs with grooves produced by Dwane “Key Wane” Weir.

In spite of his success. the Detroit native remains humble.

“I remember what it was like before everything came.  I don’t want to go back to work,” he said, referring to a time when he worked at a car wash.  “I would be at work and would miss out on things because I would still have like five cars to wax.”

Two years ago he paid a surprise visit to the music department to show his appreciation to TSU, according to Dr. Robert Elliot, head of the Department of Music.

“Dwane, Dr. Crawford and I were all in my office, just the three of us, and Dwane said, ‘I’d like to thank you all.’ And we said, ‘Well, we appreciate that.  We are glad you are doing well.’  He said, ‘No.  You don’t understand.  I really want to thank you.’ And he handed me the check for $10,000. He said, ‘Now, help somebody else.’

Weir said the only thing that has really changed in his life since his days as a student is that he has developed a closer relationship with God.  Weir said he prays before he creates music, and he keeps a positive mindset.

“Everything still feels new to me.  I still make beats in my mama’s basement so really nothing has ever changed,” he said. “I go back home to my mom every now and then, and it just feels the same. It’s a blessing. I don’t want to get comfortable.  I don’t want to feel like I’ve made it because I haven’t.   I definitely still have a lot of work to do.”

For Weir that could mean earning another degree from his alma mater. Weir said he plans to eventually get a masters degree at TSU, and teach a course in the music department.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Getahn Ward Remembered For Excellence, Community Service and Dedication To Students

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Nashville’s most prominent journalists, as well as residents from Middle Tennessee, around the nation and the world, gathered in north Nashville Friday night to celebrate the life of journalist, professor and community leader Getahn Moses Ward.

Ward, who taught journalism as an adjunct professor at Tennessee State University, died Dec. 16 after a brief illness. He was 45 years old.

Varying emotions filled the high-spirited event as family members, coworkers and friends shared heartfelt testimonies in the crowded sanctuary of Born Again Church where Ward served as a deacon.

“He was a man of peace,” said Born Again Church Elder Jerome Brown.  “He was always busy, but he always did it from a place of peace.”

Described by Nashville Mayor Megan Barry as “the hardest-working reporter in Nashville,” Ward migrated from his native Liberia to Nashville in the early 90s, enrolling at TSU where he quickly rose to become editor-in-chief of the university’s student newspaper, The Meter.  He worked as a reporter with the Nashville Banner before it closed in 1997, and then served as a business reporter with The Tennessean beginning in 1998 until his death.

NewsChannel 5 weatherman and “Talk of the Town” co-host Lelan Statom said Ward’s passing is a reminder that “we need to celebrate life.”  Statom, who serves as the treasurer of the Nashville Chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists, worked for years alongside Ward, who served as the organization’s longtime parliamentarian.

“Just last month we asked him if he had an interest in being interim president,” said Statom.  “He politely declined on that because he knew where his passion was.  His passion wasn’t necessarily to be at the top of the chart for the organization.  It was to help students, which is something he did by serving as the chair of the scholarship committee for us.”

Since Ward’s death, TSU, The Tennessean, the Gannett Foundation and NABJ have partnered to create a scholarship in Ward’s name that will benefit aspiring journalists. The new scholarship is the first endowed scholarship in the history of the TSU Department of Communications. Organizers have already raised more than $30,000 with the goal of raising $50,000.

“It is a great way to honor the life of someone who gave back so much to the Nashville Community,” Statom said.

Individuals who would like to give to the scholarship fund should write a check to Tennessee State University, 3500 John A. Merritt Blvd., Nashville, TN, 37209-1561. Online donations can be made at bit.ly/getahnward.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University working on documentary about news radio broadcast pioneer Don Whitehead

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Communications Department is honoring a pioneer in news radio broadcasting: TSU alum Don Whitehead.

Don Whitehead and nationally syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner at TSU’s 2017 undergraduate spring commencement. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

The department is creating a documentary about Whitehead, the first African-American hired as a full-time announcer at Nashville-based WLAC, a clear channel radio station whose signal during its early years reached most of the Eastern and Midwestern United States, in addition to southern Canada and the Caribbean.

“Don Whitehead was the first African-American to work with a station with that reach and that is a CBS affiliate,” said Joe Richie, director of TSU’s Center for Media Arts and Production.

After studying drama and receiving a bachelor’s degree from Tennessee State in 1967, Whitehead continued his studies at the historically black college, hoping to earn a master’s in theater.

But he was soon informed by the then-dean of TSU’s Arts and Sciences Department that he had been chosen to speak with representatives of WLAC. After about three meetings, he agreed to take the position as radio broadcaster.

His hiring came at a critical time in American history: shortly after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968.

It wasn’t long before Whitehead was approached by WLAC sales manager E.G. Blackman, who told Whitehead that he was going to have a new assignment. Due to the racial unrest in the southern states – where the majority of the station’s listeners lived – Blackman and other station associates decided to use Whitehead to reach out to the black community.

Whitehead broadcasted from historically black colleges across the southern U.S., encouraging African-American youth to attend school. He was on his way to becoming a prominent part of WLAC’s rich history.

In the late 1940s, when country music became a big business, WLAC added early-morning and Saturday-afternoon shows. But historians say it was the station’s quartet of nighttime rhythm and blues shows in the 1950s, 60s and 70s that made it legendary. WLAC described itself as the nighttime station for half the nation with African-American listeners, especially in the Deep South, as the intended audience of the programs.

“WLAC had a 50,000-watt clear signal that bounced across the stratosphere as the most powerful force in R&B broadcasting in America,” said Michael Gray, the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum’s editor. “The influence WLAC wielded in America during the Nashville station’s heyday from the late 1940s until the early 1970s can hardly be overstated.”

In 1980, WLAC changed its format to news and talk, and is currently the Nashville home for several popular conservative talk shows. However, the station’s early history and Whitehead’s influence have not been forgotten.

The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum included Whitehead in its 2004-05 major exhibition, Night Train to Nashville: Music City Rhythm & Blues, 1945–1970.

 “He … played a considerable, unique role in covering the era’s conflicts,” Gray said of Whitehead, who was a WLAC radio broadcaster for nine years before signing on with WLAC-TV in sales and advertising. “We appreciate the personal insights and perspectives he offered our visitors during related educational programs.”

Last year, Richie and Brian Day, assistant professor of film and TV production at TSU, traveled to Georgia to meet and interview Whitehead.

“After spending the afternoon with Don, I felt that his personality and story would make a compelling documentary,” Day said. “I hope to have the film wrapped up by the end of the summer/start of the fall. My plan is to submit it to film festivals and then to PBS.”

Richie said the department also plans to launch a campaign this summer to set up a $25,000 foundation scholarship in Whitehead’s name.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Going the Extra Mile to Help Students Succeed Earns TSU Professor Nashville Business Journal’s Top “40 Under 40” Selection

WinstonPicture[1]NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The 2015 winners of Nashville Business Journal’s Top 40 Under 40 were asked to share a hidden talent. Tameka Winston revealed that she has always loved fashion. In her spare time she enjoys serving as a fashion stylist for friends and family.

But while the Tennessee State University alum loves to see others look and feel their best, her passion is far from the glamour of style, lip gloss, clothes and the accessories that go with them.

“Teaching is what makes me the happiest,” said Winston, a professor in the Department of Communications at Tennessee State University. “I enjoy teaching my students. Just working with them, and seeing them succeed give me a special joy.”

That drive to help students be their best has earned the young professor the respect of not just her students and peers; the Nashville community has also taken notice.

Recently, the Nashville Business Journal selected Winston as one of the city’s “Top 40 Under 40” professionals for 2015. The paper described Winston, 36, and her fellow winners in the Class of 2015 as people “deemed to be making a difference” in their professional areas and the Nashville community.

“For starters, they are all making a difference in their industry and community, and they all have yet to reach their 40th birthday,” the paper added.

Winston, who teaches a variety of undergraduate-level courses in her eight-year career as a professor at TSU, also advises and mentors many students, something that has also earned her accolades from students and the College of Liberal Arts, in which she teaches.

In 2012 she was named “Professor of the Year” by the college. Colleagues and students say Winston’s passion for teaching goes beyond the classroom. Her personal touch, they say, makes her stand out even more.

“Dr. Winston shows great wisdom inside as well as outside of the classroom,” said Kimarcus Thomas, a junior Mass Communications major, who has known Winston for the last three years. “I remember having class with her for the first time my freshman year. Right then I knew that I wanted her to be my mentor. Dr. Winston strives in excellence and she pushes her students to do great things. She’s a blessing to the Mass Communications Department.”

Colleagues, especially those who have known Winston for a longer period are just as enthusiastic about her achievement, her approach to teaching and her “special touch” with students.

“I am extremely excited that Dr. Tameka Winston was selected as one of Nashville’s ‘40 Under 40’ for 2015,” said Joseph Richie, director of the Center for Media Arts and Production at TSU. “As a colleague who has witnessed her meteoric rise in higher education, she personifies what it means to be a professor, scholar and creator in the field of mass communication. Congratulations!”

“She is well deserving of this award,” another student, Brittiany Betts, a Communications major, added. “Dr. Winston is an exceptional teacher. She is someone I have grown very close to and really can talk to her about anything.”

Winston, an avid writer, is the co-author of a textbook, “Understanding the Speechmaking Process,” which is being used for a public speaking course at the University. She also developed the print journalism curriculum for the Communications department, which incorporates new media technologies and multimedia convergence.

In addition to teaching and scholarly research, Winston serves as the creator, executive producer and host for two radio programs on Sirius Satellite, “Black Docs” and “Tennessee State Talk,” which are intended to ensure active involvement in the community. The show, “Black Docs,” says Winston, offers an opportunity for a counter-narrative to the negative images of women in the media, while “Tennessee Talk” is designed to empower the TSU community and discuss matters related to the University.

As an academic auditor for the Tennessee Board of Regents, Winston says these involvements outside the classroom are all part of the combined process intended to develop students who are well rounded, by opening them to opportunities for successful careers. Winston will also be traveling to the Broadcast Education Association Conference In Las Vegas, Nevada on April 13-15, 2015 to present research.

“I strongly believe in helping students become their ‘best’ selves, identify their passion, and be able to live in their strengths,” said Winston.

The Mississippi native holds a doctorate degree and an Educational Specialist Degree from TSU. She has a Master’s Degree from Austin Peay State University, and a B.A. from Alcorn State University.

When This Nashville “40 Under 40” is not at work, she enjoys spending time with her husband and traveling.

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Journalism Students Win Six State Associated Press Awards

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) –Three Tennessee State University students captured a total of six radio and television news and sports categories awards recently in the 2014-2015 Tennessee Associated Press student contest. The awards, presented by the Tennessee AP Broadcaster and Managing Editors, were announced Saturday, March 28, at the First Amendment Center in Nashville.

Three students from TSU captured six awards recently in the Tennessee Associated Press student contest. Winners included (L- R) Ashley Parmer, Chantell Copeland and Drew Goodwin. (courtesy photo)
Three students from TSU captured six awards recently in the Tennessee Associated Press student contest. Winners included (L- R) Ashley Parmer, Chantell Copeland and Drew Goodwin. (courtesy photo)

Winners included:

*First Place College Radio, Best Radio Investigative/In-Depth Reporting: Ashley Parmer, a junior Mass Communications major from Birmingham, Alabama
*Second Place College Radio, Best Radio News Story: Chantell Copeland, a senior Mass Communications major from Atlanta
*Second Place College Radio, Best Radio Feature Story: Chantell Copeland
*Second Place College Radio, Best Radio Investigative/In-Depth Reporting: Chantell Copeland
*Second Place College TV, Best TV Sports Coverage/Program: Drew Goodwin, a junior Mass Communications major from Memphis, Tennessee
*Third Place College Radio, Best Radio Reporter: Chantell Copeland

“We have been working hard for several years to implement best practices in multimedia, open our Center for Media Arts and Production, and hire innovative faculty,” said Dr. Terry Likes, Department Chair and professor of Multimedia Journalism. “We are thrilled for our students that their hard work is paying dividends with recognition from professional journalists.”

The students competed in a variety of categories such as Best TV Radio or TV Newscast, Best Radio Reporter and Best Investigative/Indepth report. TSU competed against entrants from MTSU, Vanderbilt University, UT-Chattanooga, Lipscomb University, East Tennessee State, U-T Martin, Trevecca Nazarene University, Austin Peay State University, Belmont University, and U-T Knoxville.

Students from the Department of Communications are no strangers to awards and accolades. Last month, students received recognition from the Southeast Journalism Conference by winning eight awards.

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU students win Southeast Journalism Conference awards

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Seven mass communications students from Tennessee State University earned eight separate awards recently in the Southeast Journalism Conference competitions.

The awards for the best journalism in broadcast, print and online were presented during the 29th annual SEJC convention held Friday, Feb., 27 at Georgia State University in Atlanta.

In the “Best of the South” competition, Tennessee State University awards included the individual categories of:

‪‪*Best Radio News Feature Reporter – first place, Brandi Giles, Nashville,  graduated Dec. 2014

‪*Best Radio Hard News Reporter – third place, senior Chantell Copeland, Atlanta

‪*Best Radio Journalist – fourth place, Brandi Giles

‪*College Journalist of the Year – fourth place, Chantell Copeland

*Best Public Service Journalism – fourth place, seniors Anastasia Williams, Milwaukee, and Dominique Thomas

‪‪*Best News-Editorial Artist/Illustrator – seventh place, senior Courtney Mickens, Memphis, Tennessee

*Best Multimedia Journalist – eighth place, junior Delvakio Brown, Bolivar, Tennessee

‪*Best TV Hard News Reporter – ninth place, senior Carlos Mavins Jr., Houston

According to Dr. Terry Likes, Head of the Department of Communications, this is a testament to the commitment to excellence of students, faculty and the administration.

“Having students win is part of the external validation which shows our faculty are training our students to achieve at a high level,” said Likes.

The Southeast Journalism Conference is a vibrant learning community of journalists honing their craft through professional development and the Best of the South Collegiate Journalism Competition. An organization comprised of nearly 50 member colleges and universities in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee, SEJC was created to encourage greater interest in student journalism and to form closer ties among journalism schools in the Southeast United States.

The Best of the South competition recognizes individual student journalists and university publications. The competition consists of 23 individual and 8 university categories.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Meter Advisor wins Journalism Educator of the Year honor

Harriet Vaughan-Wallace
Harriet Vaughan-Wallace

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The advisor for the TSU student newspaper, The Meter, has won the 2014-2015 Journalism Educator of the Year, an honor presented by the Southeast Journalism Conference.  Harriet Vaughan-Wallace, an adjunct teaching in the Department of Communications, received the award during the conference Friday, Feb. 27, held at Georgia State University in Atlanta.

“Winning, is never about the person who won, but about how they touched others with their work,” said Vaughan-Wallace. “I am beyond humbled and thankful for this honor. A lot of work goes in to teaching our students and overseeing the newspaper. I dedicate and sacrifice a lot to do so. The fact that my students thought enough of me to nominate me, means absolutely everything to me.

‪”My mother, Dr. Verla Vaughan, a former tenured professor at Tennessee State University in the nursing department, always tried to get me to leave journalism for teaching. I fought it for many years. She taught me how to teach. She always had a laptop with her and was always meeting with her students. I guess mother knows best,” she said.

Vaughan-Wallace joined TSU in January 2012 as advisor to The Meter while teaching several classes including Print/Online 1, Print/Online II, Multimedia Reporting and Feature Writing. An award-winning, multimedia journalist, Vaughan-Wallace worked for various television stations and newspapers throughout the country and provided special event reporting for FOX and CBS network news. She now manages WTNTribune Radio where she is the lead host of the popular radio show, Pumps & Politics.

Anastasia Williams, senior Mass Communication student and Meter Managing Editor, said Vaughan-Wallace has changed her life in several of ways, and is a leader she can look up to and follow in her footsteps.

“Being a member of her class has allowed me to experience real-life situations,” said Williams. “My classmates and I have experienced the opportunity of a lifetime from being in her class.”

Senior mass communication student, Chantell Copeland, also praised Vaughan-Wallace, saying “this woman has taken educating students to another level.”

“Instead of just giving us assignments and readings to try to teach us the material, she takes on a hands-on approach,” said Copeland. “By doing this, it prepares us for what is to come, and what will be expected of us once we graduate. She cuts us no slack and turns our average classroom into an actual newsroom.”

According to Dr. Terry Likes, Chair of the Department of Communications, Vaughan-Wallace has done a “terrific” job changing the culture of the Meter. “She has changed The Meter into an uplifting place to work, creating the best product seen in several years,” added Likes. “She is following industry best practices by producing news content across multiple media platforms and turning all of this into an award-winning product.”

The Southeast Journalism Conference is a vibrant learning community of journalists honing their craft through professional development and the Best of the South Collegiate Journalism Competition. An organization comprised of more than 45 member colleges and universities in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee, SEJC was created to encourage greater interest in student journalism and to form closer ties among journalism schools in the Southeast United States.

 

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TSU Chair Wins Two National Media Awards

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Department Chair Wins Two National Media Awards

Likes 2010NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The national awards among faculty competing in the Broadcast Education Association have been released and TSU’s Chair of the Department of Communications, Dr. Terry Likes, has won in the Faculty Audio Competition: Best of Competition: “The alarm clock for your favorite tv show: The theme song.”

Likes’ report aired on the Tennessee Radio Network in 2014. The report shows when people think of their favorite songs of all time, most forget the obvious choices from an overlooked category: television theme songs. This program explores the popularity of TV theme songs, the Nashville connection and what the future is for these theme songs in popular culture.

“When students can see professors remain active in the industry and achieve at a high level, professors can, in turn, encourage students to seek excellence in their own student competition,” said Likes. “It is part of the teacher-scholar method.”

This is the second award Likes has received for this program. Earlier this month, the documentary was selected for exhibition from the National Broadcasting Society. A formal announcement of winners will occur at the NBS national convention in March.

The BEA Festival of Media Arts is an international exhibition of award-winning faculty and student works. Winners will receive recognition and exhibition of their works during the Broadcast Education Association’s annual convention in Las Vegas in April.

This is the eleventh Broadcast Education Association award for Likes.  He is the recipient of 55 awards during his career including other honors from the Associated Press and the National Press Club.  Since joining TSU in 2008, Likes has won 39 awards or honors.

BEA is an international academic media organization, driving insights, excellence in media production, and career advancement for educators, students and professionals. The association’s publications, annual convention, web-based programs, and regional district activities provide opportunities for juried production competition and presentation of current scholarly research related to aspects of the electronic media. Established in 1955, the BEA serves more than 2,500 professors, students and media professionals at approximately 275 college and university departments and schools.

 

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Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Chair Wins Two Prestigious Edward R. Murrow Awards

Likes 2010NASHVILLE, Tenn.  (TSU News Service) – The Radio Television Digital News Association has announced that a communications professor at Tennessee State University has won two regional Edward R. Murrow Awards for excellence in electronic journalism.

Dr. Terry Likes, Chair of the Department of Communications and Professor of Multimedia Journalism, won the awards in two separate categories, including Audio News Documentary—“In Our Memory, the Soundtrack to News:  How News Events Shape Music,” and Audio Sports Reporting, “We Will Rock You: The Branding of Sports Music.”

Both programs aired on the Tennessee Radio Network.

“It is an honor to represent TSU in this regard and to continue to enhance my reporting skills for the benefit of our students,” said Dr. Likes. “It helps in the classroom when students can see professors remain active in the industry, achieve at a high level.  This helps us encourage students to seek excellence in their own student competitions, as TSU students are doing with evidence of tremendous recent success including 17 Southeast Journalism Conference awards and 9 Tennessee Associated Press student awards this year alone.”

These awards mark the seventh and eighth regional Murrow Award received by Dr. Likes having won Murrows in 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, and two in 2012.   Likes is the recipient of 52 awards during his career including honors from the Broadcast Education association, the Tennessee Associated Press, Kentucky Associated Press, National Broadcasting Society and the National Press Club.

This year, RTDNA awarded 661 regional Edward R. Murrow Awards in 14 categories, including Overall Excellence, Breaking News, Investigative Reporting, and Website.  RTDNA received more than 4,000 entries during the 2014 awards season, surpassing 2013 by more than 500 entries and setting an all-time record for entries in what proved to be one of the most competitive Edward R. Murrow Awards seasons in RTDNA history.

Dr. Likes competed in Region 8 against other entries from Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia. Regional winners automatically become eligible for the national awards competition, which will be judged in June. The national Edward R.  Murrow Awards will be presented in October at the RTDNA Awards Dinner in New York.

The Radio Television Digital News Association has been honoring outstanding achievements in electronic journalism with the Edward R. Murrow Awards since 1971. Murrow’s pursuit of excellence in journalism embodies the spirit of the awards that carry his name. Murrow Award recipients demonstrate the spirit of excellence that Edward R. Murrow made a standard for the broadcast news profession.

A complete list of the 2014 Regional Edward R. Murrow Awards winners can be found at rtdna.org.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.