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TSU students win Southeast Journalism Conference awards

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Seven mass communications students from Tennessee State University earned eight separate awards recently in the Southeast Journalism Conference competitions.

The awards for the best journalism in broadcast, print and online were presented during the 29th annual SEJC convention held Friday, Feb., 27 at Georgia State University in Atlanta.

In the “Best of the South” competition, Tennessee State University awards included the individual categories of:

‪‪*Best Radio News Feature Reporter – first place, Brandi Giles, Nashville,  graduated Dec. 2014

‪*Best Radio Hard News Reporter – third place, senior Chantell Copeland, Atlanta

‪*Best Radio Journalist – fourth place, Brandi Giles

‪*College Journalist of the Year – fourth place, Chantell Copeland

*Best Public Service Journalism – fourth place, seniors Anastasia Williams, Milwaukee, and Dominique Thomas

‪‪*Best News-Editorial Artist/Illustrator – seventh place, senior Courtney Mickens, Memphis, Tennessee

*Best Multimedia Journalist – eighth place, junior Delvakio Brown, Bolivar, Tennessee

‪*Best TV Hard News Reporter – ninth place, senior Carlos Mavins Jr., Houston

According to Dr. Terry Likes, Head of the Department of Communications, this is a testament to the commitment to excellence of students, faculty and the administration.

“Having students win is part of the external validation which shows our faculty are training our students to achieve at a high level,” said Likes.

The Southeast Journalism Conference is a vibrant learning community of journalists honing their craft through professional development and the Best of the South Collegiate Journalism Competition. An organization comprised of nearly 50 member colleges and universities in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee, SEJC was created to encourage greater interest in student journalism and to form closer ties among journalism schools in the Southeast United States.

The Best of the South competition recognizes individual student journalists and university publications. The competition consists of 23 individual and 8 university categories.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Meter Advisor wins Journalism Educator of the Year honor

Harriet Vaughan-Wallace
Harriet Vaughan-Wallace

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The advisor for the TSU student newspaper, The Meter, has won the 2014-2015 Journalism Educator of the Year, an honor presented by the Southeast Journalism Conference.  Harriet Vaughan-Wallace, an adjunct teaching in the Department of Communications, received the award during the conference Friday, Feb. 27, held at Georgia State University in Atlanta.

“Winning, is never about the person who won, but about how they touched others with their work,” said Vaughan-Wallace. “I am beyond humbled and thankful for this honor. A lot of work goes in to teaching our students and overseeing the newspaper. I dedicate and sacrifice a lot to do so. The fact that my students thought enough of me to nominate me, means absolutely everything to me.

‪”My mother, Dr. Verla Vaughan, a former tenured professor at Tennessee State University in the nursing department, always tried to get me to leave journalism for teaching. I fought it for many years. She taught me how to teach. She always had a laptop with her and was always meeting with her students. I guess mother knows best,” she said.

Vaughan-Wallace joined TSU in January 2012 as advisor to The Meter while teaching several classes including Print/Online 1, Print/Online II, Multimedia Reporting and Feature Writing. An award-winning, multimedia journalist, Vaughan-Wallace worked for various television stations and newspapers throughout the country and provided special event reporting for FOX and CBS network news. She now manages WTNTribune Radio where she is the lead host of the popular radio show, Pumps & Politics.

Anastasia Williams, senior Mass Communication student and Meter Managing Editor, said Vaughan-Wallace has changed her life in several of ways, and is a leader she can look up to and follow in her footsteps.

“Being a member of her class has allowed me to experience real-life situations,” said Williams. “My classmates and I have experienced the opportunity of a lifetime from being in her class.”

Senior mass communication student, Chantell Copeland, also praised Vaughan-Wallace, saying “this woman has taken educating students to another level.”

“Instead of just giving us assignments and readings to try to teach us the material, she takes on a hands-on approach,” said Copeland. “By doing this, it prepares us for what is to come, and what will be expected of us once we graduate. She cuts us no slack and turns our average classroom into an actual newsroom.”

According to Dr. Terry Likes, Chair of the Department of Communications, Vaughan-Wallace has done a “terrific” job changing the culture of the Meter. “She has changed The Meter into an uplifting place to work, creating the best product seen in several years,” added Likes. “She is following industry best practices by producing news content across multiple media platforms and turning all of this into an award-winning product.”

The Southeast Journalism Conference is a vibrant learning community of journalists honing their craft through professional development and the Best of the South Collegiate Journalism Competition. An organization comprised of more than 45 member colleges and universities in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee, SEJC was created to encourage greater interest in student journalism and to form closer ties among journalism schools in the Southeast United States.

 

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TSU Chair Wins Two National Media Awards

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Debate Team Thrives at State Championship

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – It’s been a busy few months for the Forensics team at Tennessee State University and they have the proof of their endeavors. They won more than 50 awards in February alone and now boast one of the “Best Speakers” in the state.

The Forensics team continues their winning ways bringing home 50 awards during February and the "Best Speaker" in the state. Members of the team include: Top row (L-R): Aaron Walker, John Nix, Kavon Coleman, and Tyler Kinloch Bottom Row (L-R): Ricky Madden, Shaylyn Rice, Ashley Doxy, Tyra Laster, Tristan Halfacre, Kevon Graves (courtesy photo)
The Forensics team continues their winning ways bringing home 50 awards during February and the “Best Speaker” in the state. Members of the team include: Top row (L-R): Aaron Walker, John Nix, Kavon Coleman, and Tyler Kinloch Bottom Row (L-R): Ricky Madden, Shaylyn Rice, Ashley Doxy, Tyra Laster, Tristan Halfacre, Kevon Graves (courtesy photo)

This semester the 11-member team of undergraduate students have netted impressive results, bringing home awards wherever they compete. Nowhere was this more prevalent than at the recent Tennessee Intercollegiate Forensics State Championship when they placed third in the state and brought home 28 more awards. The team also placed third in combined debate and Individual Events School Sweepstakes.

More than 100 students gathered at TSU Feb. 14-15 to see who would be crowned the “best of the best” in the state. John Nix, a junior Political Science major from Franklin, Tennessee, took home the coveted first place Pentathlon speaker, qualifying him for the “Best Speaker in the State.” Nix also won numerous awards including third place Persuasive Speaking, Top Novice Persuasive Speaking, first place Poetry Interpretation, Top Novice Poetry Interpretation, first place Prose Interpretation, Top Novice Prose Interpretation, third place Impromptu Speaking, Top Novice Impromptu Speaking, NPDA Novice Semi-Finalist, and fifth place Novice NPDA speaker.

Other team winners included:

  • Kevon Graves, freshman Urban Studies major, Kansas City, Missouri – NPDA Novice Semi-Finalist, fourth place Novice NPDA Speaker
  • Kavon Coleman, junior Civil Engineering major, Grand Rapids, Michigan – third place International Public Debate Association Varsity Speaker
  • Shaylyn Rice, junior Mass Communications major, Birmingham, Alabama – second place Poetry Interpretation, second place Dramatic Interpretation, Top Novice Dramatic Interpretation, fifth place Programmed Oral Interpretation, first place Radio Broadcasting, Top Novice Radio Broadcasting
  • Aaron Walker, junior English major, Memphis, Tennessee – third place Poetry Interpretation
  • Tyler Kinloch, senior Aeronautical Engineering major, Canton, Michigan – fourth place Prose Interpretation, first place Dramatic Interpretation
  • Tyra Laster, junior Mass Communications major, Marietta, Georgia – second place Radio Broadcasting
  • Tyra Laster and Ashley Doxy, sophomore Biology and Chemistry major, Chicago – fourth place Duo Interpretation
  • Shaylyn Rice and Aaron Walker – first place Duo Interpretation, Top Novice Duo Interpretation

This was the second competition during February for the team, having earned 22 awards at the Jackson-Purchase Swing at Murray State University Feb. 6-8.

Award winners included:

Friday, Feb. 6 – National Parliamentary Debate Association tournament (NPDA)

  • Fifth place team sweepstakes in NPDA
  • Tyler Kinloch and Barbra Dudley – semifinalists in Novice NPDA
  • John Nix and Kevon Graves – quarterfinalists in Novice NPDA
  • Tyler Kinloch – fifth place novice NPDA speaker
  • Barbra Dudley, sophomore economics major from Indianapolis – eighth place Novice NPDA speaker

Saturday, Feb. 7 – MSU Swing

  • Third place Small School Sweepstakes
  • John Nix – fourth place Extemporaneous Speaking, first place Poetry Interpretation, sixth place Pentathlon Speaker
  • Shaylyn Rice – sixth place Poetry Interpretation
  • Kevon Graves – fourth place novice Extemporaneous Speaking

Sunday, Feb. 8 – Alumni swing

  • Second place Small School Sweepstakes
  • John Nix – fourth place Persuasive Speaking, first place Poetry Interpretation, sixth place Pentathlon Speaker
  • Tyler Kinloch – sixth place Dramatic Interpretation
  • Shaylyn Rice – first place Radio Broadcasting
  • Kevon Graves – third place Novice Impromptu Speaking, first place Novice Extemporaneous Speaking
  • Shaylyn Rice and Aaron Walker – fifth place Duo Interpretation

The TSU Forensics Team closed out the month attending the Rock & Roll Swing at Bowling Green State University in Ohio, Feb. 27-March 1.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

African-American History and Culture Conference set for February 13 at TSU

LCAAHClogo2NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Room) – The 34th annual Nashville Conference of African-American History and Culture will take place Friday, Feb. 13, at the Tennessee State University Avon Williams campus.

Co-sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts, and the Metropolitan Historical Commission, the conference will focus on the educational and musical legacies of Nashville’s African-American community. For more than 30 years, the award-winning conference has brought together historians, students, educators, community leaders and others interested in African-American history and culture.

The 2015 conference continues the long-standing tradition of focusing on unsung heroes in Tennessee’s cultural history from slavery through the 20th century. Those highlighted at this year’s conference include John McCline, a former slave at Cloverbottom Plantation in Donelson, who escaped from bondage, worked for the Union Army in the Civil War, and eventually found a new life in the American West. Also highlighted during the daylong conference is journalist, author and educator Samuel Yette, an English graduate from Tennessee State University, who became an influential and sometimes incendiary voice on civil rights, and was the first African- American Washington correspondent for Newsweek.

Along with McCline and Yette, the life and work of King Daniel Ganaway will also be explored. Ganaway, an African-American from a Rutherford County family, was an award-winning photographer, working in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Chicago. His portraits were exhibited during the 1920s and 1930s in Los Angeles, Chicago, and as part of the Harmon Foundation’s traveling exhibit of African-American artists.

This year’s speakers include Belmont University professor and noted author, Dr. Sybril Bennett, who will speak to the lessons of the Underground Railroad and how its innovative network can be adapted for networking in the 21st century, and Tennessee State University historian, Dr. Carroll Van West, who will present “Where giants walked: American Baptist College and Selma’s voting rights movement.”

Building on the conference’s long-standing commitment to honoring the contributions of African Americans to city’s cultural scene, the Nashville Public Library’s Wishing Chair Productions will stage “Anasazi the Spider,” in honor of the rich story-telling traditions of the African-American community.

Conference participants will also have the opportunity to view the winning student video documentaries from the 2014 Tennessee History Day competition. Honored for the best projects in African- American history, middle- and high-school students and their teachers will show their documentaries shorts from the 2014 Nashville Conference Committee competition.

The conference takes place Friday, Feb. 13, beginning at 9 a.m. at the Avon Williams Campus of Tennessee State University. Registration is $20, and includes admission to all speakers and performances, additions to the Profiles of African-Americans in Tennessee series, and other publications. Lunch and parking are also included. To register visit www.nashville.gov/mhc, or call 615.862.7970.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

10th Research Forum for the Arts draws largest crowd, most participants

This year's winners for the Research Forum for the Arts included (l-r) Kendra Thompson, Barris Johnson, and Tyla Daniels. (courtesy photo)
This year’s winners for the Research Forum for the Arts included (l-r) Kendra Thompson, Barris Johnson, and Tyla Daniels. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Students from the departments of Art, Communications and Music at Tennessee State University had the opportunity to present individual works research and scholarly inquiry to fellow students and faculty Nov. 18 during the 10th Research Forum for the Arts.

“So much of what students produce in their classes in these departments is creative in nature such as a play, performance or exhibit,” said Dr. Terry Likes, Chair of the department of Communications. “This forum is a way to showcase the research conducted in these disciplines.  Our turnout was the biggest and best to date.”

Seven undergraduate and two graduate students gave oral presentations in the Recital Hall at the Performing Arts Center before moving to the rotunda for judging of nearly 30 poster presentations.

Several faculty members from each department served as judges, including Adam Key from communications, Kerry Frazier from the department of music, and Samuel Dunson from the art department.

The winners received prize money for the competition, and included $100 to the best graduate student oral presenter, $100 to the best undergraduate student oral presenter and $50 to the best poster presentation.

This year’s winners were:

  • Best Graduate Student Presenter: Barris Johnson, Music, “The Music of the Tennessee Centennial Exposition”
  • Best Undergraduate Student Presenter: Kendra Thompson, senior, Communication Studies, “What’s Your Style: Communication Styles of Adults without Siblings”
  • Best Poster Presenter: Tyla Daniels, senior, Mass Communication, “#HBCU?”

The Research Forum is sponsored annually by the Office of Sponsored Programs and Research.  For more information, contact Nannette Martin, Office of Sponsored Programs and Research at nmartin@tnstate.edu.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU History Professor, Author Wins Humanities Fellowship to Study Medieval Religious Spaces in England

Dr. Elizabeth Dachowski
Dr. Elizabeth Dachowski

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A Tennessee State University History professor will participate in a four-week seminar on “Arts, Architecture and Devotional Interaction” at the University of York in York, England, this summer.

Dr. Elizabeth Dachowski is one of 16 teachers selected nationwide as National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Scholars to attend one of 30 seminars and institutes supported by the NEH.

The Endowment is a federal agency that supports enrichment opportunities at colleges, universities and cultural institutions each summer to help faculty work in collaboration and study with experts in humanities disciplines.

Dachowsky, author of First Among Abbots: The Career of Abbo of Fleury, who also teaches world history and upper-division courses in pre-modern Europe, said the seminar will focus on medieval religious spaces.

“York’s archival resources will be very useful in my current research project, which grew out of my book on Abbo of Fleury,” Dachowski said. “Recent research on how communities used spaces is very exciting, and this seminar will give me a chance to develop materials that will fill out my medieval and early modern history courses.”

Her research interests include ecclesiastical politics in France around the year 1000, cross-cultural interactions in monastic communities, and hagiographical writings as historical sources.

At the York Seminar, Dachowski will work on cross-cultural interactions among medieval monks, as well as study the alien priories and cells of Yorkshire, and search for references to foreign monks in English houses.

“York is an incredible city, and I’ve long thought that it would be a great base for exploring the historical sites of Britain,” Dachowski added.

Topics for the 30 seminars and institutes offered for college and university teachers this summer include Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia: literature, the arts, and cinema since independence; American Maritime People; America’s East Central Europeans: migration and memory; arts, architecture, and devotional interaction in England, 1200–1600; black aesthetics and African diasporic culture; and bridging national borders in North America, among others.

According to the NEI, the nearly 437 summer scholars who participate in these programs of study will teach over 113,925 American students the following year

Additionally, Dachowsk and her fellow scholars participating in the summer program will each receive a stipend of $3,300 to cover travel, study and living expenses.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU History Professor Receives Scholar Excellence Award For Work in African Studies

Dr. Adebayo Oyebade
Dr. Adebayo Oyebade

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Dr. Adebayo Oyebade, professor of History at Tennessee State University, was the recipient of the Senior Scholar Excellence Award for Research and Teaching during the annual Africa Conference held recently at the University of Texas, Austin. Presented April 5, the award recognizes deserving scholars who have made a mark in the field of African studies.

Oyebade received the award due to his “intellectual interests in the nexus of African security and international relations, including Africa’s placement in the United States’ foreign policy,” and for “advancing scholarship on African historiography and the African Diaspora” according to the award citation. He was also recognized as a superior educator in a broad range of Africa-oriented topics such as pre-colonial, colonial and post-colonial Africa.

“It was an honor to be recognized by a group of my peers for my contribution to the academic study of Africa and its Diaspora,” said Oyebade.

This is the 10th year the award has been presented by the conference, which has been held annually for the past 14 years at the University of Texas, Austin. The conference is one of the largest academic gatherings of scholars of Africa and African Diaspora, and draws students and scholars from all over the world. This year, more than 150 scholars attended representing universities from Africa, Europe, Asia, Latin America and North America.

Oyebade joined the faculty at TSU in 2002 as an associate professor of History and was promoted to full professorship in 2007. His work has been recognized through several grants and fellowships including the Franklin D. Roosevelt Institute, a Ford Foundation fellowship, and funding from the Harry Truman Library Institute.

He received a similar accolade, “Research and Creativity Excellence Award,” in November 2013 from the University of North Carolina during a conference on African Historiography.

A noted author, Oyebade has written more than eighty scholarly articles, chapters and reviews. In addition, he has published eight books including his latest, The United States’ Foreign Policy in Africa in the 21st Century.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

‘Songwriters in the Round’ Showcases TSU Musicians’ Original Works March 25

SongwritersintheRoundNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – In the spirit of the Nashville songwriting community, students from Tennessee State University will take part in the 6th Annual Songwriters in the Round, Tuesday, March 25. Free and open to the public, the event takes place in the Performing Arts Center Recital Hall beginning at 7 p.m.

Hosted by the Department of Music’s Commercial Music program, the concert will showcase the writing talents of student-singer songwriters at the University. Songwriters will share their inspiration behind the creative process of writing songs.

According to Dr. Mark Crawford, associate professor and coordinator of the commercial music program, many performers do not write their own material and rely solely on professional songwriters. This program is formatted to allow songwriters to step out into the spotlight and be seen and heard by the public.

“The concert brings TSU music students along with faculty who will perform and accompany themselves the songs they have composed,” said Dr. Mark Crawford, associate professor and coordinator of the commercial music program. “Concert attendees will experience pure music, no hype, while each student performs their original songs and play their own instruments.”

This year’s event will feature Nathan Clay, a freshman Commercial Music major from Nashville in his first showcase; and Charity Ward, a senior Interdisciplinary Studies major and Music minor from Detroit, who began singing as a little girl. She picked up the guitar at age13 and soon began writing songs.  She has performed with Robert Glasper, Angie Stone, Eric Roberson, and PJ Morton.

Also taking part in the showcase is Daniel Mireee, a Liberal Arts Music major from Detroit and who now calls Nashville home. He currently owns and operates several independent record labels and studios. He has written and published more than 50 songs and produced more than 15 albums for artists all around the globe. He has also written several musical plays for Christian audiences.

The event also showcases the talents of Cierra Fleming, a Commercial Music technology major and Mass Communication minor from Denver, who is in her first showcase. She is a current member of Grammy U, a unique and fast-growing community of college students who are pursuing a career in the recording industry. Her goals include owning her own music publishing company, and becoming a successful songwriter, producer and engineer. 

Rounding out the showcase is Aliah Aiken, a trained flautist, vocalist and songwriter from Decatur, Ga. The Commercial Music major has been writing songs since the age of 11. In addition to songwriting, Aiken has been principal chair of the TSU Wind Ensemble for three consecutive years. She was also the 2012 winner of the BET College Tour Sing Off, and will be a featured Concerto Soloist at the 2014 HBCU National Band Directors Consortium in Atlanta. This is her first songwriter showcase.

The Commercial Music program at TSU is first and foremost a music degree, in which students study various careers and business practices of the music industry. Upon completion of the program, students receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Music with a Concentration in Commercial Music.

Because it is a music degree, commercial music students study piano, music theory, music history, as well as enroll in private applied lessons, seminar, present a recital, and participate in one of the Commercial Music ensembles. The ensembles perform at local schools and various civic events throughout the Nashville area, and have even performed on the Bobby Jones gospel music television show.

For more information on the Songwriters in the Round concert, contact Dr. Mark Crawford, coordinator of the commercial music program, at 615.963.5210 or macrawford@tsntate.edu.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU’s PAC House Productions Goes Hollywood with “Voices of War”

Mark Schlicher (left), operates a camera jib during the filming of Voices of War, a documentary about life at Travellers Rest Plantation during the Civil War. PAC House Productions at Tennessee State University produced the 20-minute documentary that will debut Nov. 23 at the museum. (courtesy photo)
Mark Schlicher (left), operates a camera jib during the filming of Voices of War, a documentary about life at Travellers Rest Plantation during the Civil War. PAC House Productions at Tennessee State University produced the 20-minute documentary that will debut Nov. 23 at the museum. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A short 10 miles from the steps of Tennessee State University stands a living museum that pays tribute to one of the bloodiest battles to take place during the Civil War.

Travellers Rest, a plantation and now a museum located at Harding Place and Interstate 65, saw some of the fiercest fighting during the two-day Battle of Nashville, where approximately 6,000 Confederate soldiers were killed, captured or considered missing in action. The battle decimated the southern forces in Nashville and was literally fought on the front lawn of the plantation.

Today, students from TSU’s PAC House Productions are bringing that history back to life with the documentary, Voices of War.

The Department of Communications student-led production company helped write, direct and produce the 20-minute documentary for the historic landmark’s new exhibit, The Battle of Nashville: History Unfolds at Travellers Rest, which debuts Nov. 22 at the museum.

According to Melissa Richie, director and editor of Voices of War and advisor to PAC House Productions, the project began a year and a half ago when she and Dr. Donald Page, professor of Communications, where asked to participate in creating media for the historic landmark’s new exhibit. After countless hours of collaboration with Travellers Rest on writing the script, pre-production began last spring with filming this fall. Now in its final phase, the documentary is ready for debut at the museum.

“Of all the colleges and universities in middle Tennessee, the Board of Directors commissioned the students from PAC House Productions at Tennessee State to produce this documentary,” said Richie, who also serves as assistant professor of Mass Communications at the University. “That really says a lot about the capabilities we have and the quality of work our students produce. This short documentary will rival anything you might see at the Smithsonian or any other Civil War museum.”

The documentary, filmed over five days at the Travellers Rest Plantation, cast more than 30 Civil war re-enactors, including men, women, children and horses sporting period-correct costumes, and depicts life on the plantation during the Battle of Nashville.

According to MC Potts, producer of the documentary, the hard part was the coordination of “all the moving parts.”

“It was very stressful and made for some extremely long days,” said Potts, a senior from Columbus, Ohio majoring in Theater and Communications. “The filming began the end of October, which is a very busy time of year at the plantation, and for the re-enactment community. All the students on the production team worked hard putting this together and we are very proud of the final product.”

Besides the production crew, others lending their talents to the documentary include Tennessee Governor, Bill Haslam, who provides the video epilogue, and Maj. Gen. Terry “Max” Haston, Adjutant General of the Tennessee National Guard, who portrays Andrew Johnson. Tennessee National Guard Assistant Adjutant General, Maj. Gen. Robert Harris, portrays Isham Harris who was the Governor of Tennessee from 1857 until 1862, and Col. (ret.) Randy Harris, public affairs director for the Tennessee National Guard, who lends his voice for character narration for the documentary.


(As seen on Fox 17 morning News)

PAC House production members that worked on the documentary included Micah Wickre and Chris Garner, directors of photography; Jonathan Starks and Justin Dixon, assistants of photography; assistant directors Jasmine Scarber and Ariana Heslup; special effects editing by Tervell Smith; crew members Sean Jenkins and Thema Dial; set photographer and crew member JaQuita Stewart; and actors Carrington Edwards, Tyree Taylor and Porshia Edwards.

Travellers Rest is the oldest house open to the public in Nashville. Built in 1799, it was home to several generations of the Overton family. In December 1864 it served as the headquarters for the Confederate Army under Gen. John Bell Hood. Covering nearly 1,050 acres, some of the heaviest fighting took place on the second day of the Battle of Nashville at Peach Orchard Hill on the plantation grounds. Today the plantation is a living piece of American history depicting life before and after the Civil War.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.