Tag Archives: College of Health Sciences

TSU to become first HBCU to open student-run physical therapy/occupational therapy clinic

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will soon become the first historically black institution to have a student-run physical therapy/occupational therapy clinic.

The clinic, which is part of the College of Health Sciences, opens Aug. 30 and will be located in the basement of Clement Hall on the main campus. It will mainly handle cases like knee injuries, shoulder pain, and lower back pain. The more serious cases will be referred out to local clinics.

Doctoral student Janae Swift next to rendering of new Health Sciences Building. (TSU Media Relations)

With the original goal of servicing the community, TSU students, faculty and staff will be the initial patients. The clinic will serve as a referral source for physical and occupational therapy clinics in the area.

Dr. Rick Clark, Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy at TSU, will oversee the program, which joins 37 other student-run physical therapy clinics nationwide. Clark said the fact that the clinic is student-run is what he likes most about it.

“It’s a teaching opportunity for them,” said Clark, who was in the military for 25 years and ran multiple clinics. “I want them to not only be great therapists, but if they want to go out and start their own clinic, they now have a better understanding of what is involved in doing that.”

Clark added that the clinic’s “primary emphasis is on outpatient orthopedic and sports injuries with the ability to treat neurological conditions on a case-by-case basis.”

Janae Swift of Memphis is in her second year of TSU’s Doctor of Physical Therapy program. She is a POTUS (Preparing our Tomorrows Uniquely in STEM) and heads the12-member board of students who will operate the clinic. Swift said she plans to operate her own facility one day.

“This is an amazing experience,” she said. “I love the opportunity to serve, to give back, especially to the faculty and students, and the TSU community as a whole.”

Dr. Ronald Barredo, Dean of the College of Health Sciences, said he’s looking forward to the impact of the new clinic.

Dr. Rick Clark works with physical therapy equipment. (TSU Media Relations)

“I think it will help tremendously with regard to the local community, our campus community,” Barredo said. “The clinic would not have been possible without the support of TSU’s POTUS Fellows program, which aims to provide POTUS Fellows with opportunities that will empower them to excel in their academic programs. The plans are, once this gets into full gear, we want to extend this outward to the community; to provide care for the underserved, uninsured and underinsured.”

Clark gave a special thanks to Dr. Andrea Tyler, Director of Graduate STEM Research.

“Without her support through grant funding, the program would not be possible,” he said.

TSU is currently constructing a new state-of-the-art Health Sciences Building that’s expected to be complete next year, and the physical therapy/occupational therapy clinic will be part of it.  

“This project will not only bring together a number of excellent programs under one roof – Nursing, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Cardiorespiratory Care, and Health Information Management – but will also be a hub for collaborative practice, community service, and clinical research,” Barredo said.

The new clinic will join the Department of Dental Hygiene and the Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology as a community outreach health care clinic. The dental clinic currently provides service to nearly 600 patients a year, including faculty and students, as well as the Nashville community.

For more information about TSU’s College of Health Sciences, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/health_sciences/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Professor Janice M. Williams receives prestigious Fulbright U.S. Scholar Award

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University Professor Janice M. Williams has received a Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program award to South Africa in Dental Sciences.

Prof. Williams will lecture in the dental therapy program at the University of KwaZulu Natal as part of a project to teach students and train faculty on the integration of hybrid and online learning curriculum.

“I am very excited to receive this Fulbright Scholar Award,” Williams said. “It will ultimately help fulfill my lifelong aspiration of traveling the world and exposing myself to different cultures in hope of becoming a better me.”

Prof. Williams is one of over 800 U.S. citizens who will teach, conduct research, and/or provide expertise abroad for the 2019-2020 academic year through the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program. Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement, as well as record of service and demonstrated leadership in their respective fields.

“The College of Health Sciences is extremely proud of Prof. Williams’ accomplishment,” said Dr. Ronald Barredo, dean of the College. “As a Fulbright Scholar, she not only exemplifies the College’s vision of preparing tomorrow’s health care leaders, but also embodies the university’s motto Think, Work, Serve.”

Fulbrighters address critical global challenges in all disciplines, while building relationships, knowledge, and leadership in support of the long-term interests of the United States. Fulbright alumni have achieved distinction in many fields, including 59 who have been awarded the Nobel Prize, 84 who have received Pulitzer Prizes, and 37 who have served as a head of state or government.

To learn more about TSU’s College of Health Sciences, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/health_sciences/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Health Sciences dean receives highest award given by American Physical Therapy Association

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Dr. Ronald Barredo, interim dean of Tennessee State University’s College of Health Sciences, is the recipient of the highest award given by the American Physical Therapy Association.

In June, Barredo will attend an award ceremony in Chicago, where he will receive the Catherine Worthingham Fellow of the American Physical Therapy Association. The award is the highest recognition that the association can give to physical therapists, and is given to individuals “who have demonstrated unwavering efforts to advance the physical therapy profession for more than 15 years,” according to the Association’s website. 

Dr. Ronald Barredo

There are more than 100,000 members of the APTA. Of that number, only 214 have received the Catherine Worthingham Fellow. In Tennessee, only five have been given the honor.

““We are so proud of Dr. Ronald Barredo,” said Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover. “Here at TSU, excellence is our habit, and Dr. Barredo is continuing that tradition with this prestigious award. We applaud him, and thank him for his service to our university.”

Dr. Barredo, who is also professor and chair of the Department of Physical Therapy, is being recognized for his work in professional and post-professional education, particularly in the area of competency assessment.

He has been actively involved with the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy, with its focus on the assessment of entry-level competence through the National Physical Therapy Examination; the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties, with its focus on the assessment of continuing competence through specialist certification; the Foreign Credentialing Commission in Physical Therapy, with its focus on assessment of educational equivalence of foreign educated physical therapists; and the APTA Credentialed Clinical Instructor Program, with its focus on education and credentialing of clinical instructors.

“I am humbled and honored to be recognized as a Catherine Worthingham Fellow,” Barredo said. “My appreciation goes out to the faculty, staff and students at Tennessee State University, who make my life interesting, challenging, and fun every day.”

TSU is currently constructing a new state-of-the-art Health Sciences Building.

“This project will not only bring together a number of excellent programs under one roof – Nursing, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Cardiorespiratory Care, and Health Information Management – but will also be a hub for collaborative practice, community service, and clinical research,” Barredo said.

For more information about TSU’s College of Health Sciences, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/health_sciences/.

TSU Lays Foundation for Former TN Titans Cheerleader to Make Her Mark in Male-Dominated Sports Management Industry

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Sports management is a tough business, especially if you are a female, but Ashley Danielle Allen aims to change that.

“You know, it’s a male-dominated industry,” said Allen, director of player relations with a3 Athletics, a full-service sports agency representing football and golf athletes. “You are going to have to have a little bit more just to compete with the guys.”

Ashley Danielle Allen received her master’s degree in sports administration. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Trying to have ‘a little more’ to be competitive has kept the mother of three young children busy on multiple fronts. But on May 3, Allen took a break and celebrated a major achievement. She was among nearly 250 students who received degrees when Tennessee State University held its spring graduate commencement in the Howard C. Gentry Complex. Allen received a master’s degree in sports administration.

“I am really excited about receiving my graduate degree from such a great institution,” said Allen, who earned her bachelor’s degree in business at TSU in 2008. “For a longtime, I knew I wanted to go back to school. I looked at the surrounding area for competitive programs. But TSU was kind of home for me, and I received good advice, and I am glad I listened and came here.”

In addition to her master’s degree, Allen, who previously wanted to be an NFL agent, is also pursuing a law degree at Nashville School of Law. She has more than 10 years of experience in professional sports – from being an NFL cheerleader to managing player relations.

“I decided to get my master’s because I thought I wanted to be an NFL agent, and in order to be an agent you needed to be a lawyer or have a master’s degree,” said the Nashville native.

At a3 Athletics, she helps NFL and PGA players with community relations regarding activities off the field. Among them, currently, she is conducting 10 football camps for such players as Kevin King of the Green Bay Packers, Terrell Dean of the Arizona Cardinals, and Cameron Irving of the Kansas City Chiefs.

Ashley Allen was a cheerleader for the Titans from 2008-2009. (Submitted photo)

“I put on their camps and handle any appearances throughout the off season, and any appearance efforts they want to do throughout the season. A lot of the players are really focused on the game during that time,” said Allen, who also coaches the Tiger Gems at TSU. “I really love helping kids. Seeing the kids’ faces from hosting camps for players just makes me very happy.” Her children – two girls and a boy, ages 14, 7 and 4 – travel with her to the camps.

Before going into sports management, Allen was a former Titans cheerleader. After two years with the Titans in 2009, she stepped down, but stayed active with the alumni association, later handling media relations for the group.

“We worked together with the coach in terms of tryouts and other events throughout the year. I networked as much as I could, but I did not want to cheer anymore. At that point, I decided that I actually wanted to do something in the management role, especially as an agent,” said Allen.

Ashley Allen is the Director of Player Relations with a3 Athletics sports agency. (Submitted photo)

That’s when she says she decided to pursue her master’s degree, and subsequently, law school. She started work at a law firm, whose owner was also a sports agent. Allen says she would like to one day negotiate contracts for players.

“That’s my favorite in law – contract law – which is what my intention is in the long run with my law degree,” she said.

Allen said she also wants to give back to her alma mater for all she has received from TSU.

“The relations I built being in sports for over 10 years have really helped me, and I can use that as leverage for my institution,” she said. “As a way of giving back, I would love to help the university more once I leave, like seeking internship opportunities for TSU students with my agency. I love to teach, even if I have to go get my doctorate. I would love to come back and teach.”


Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

STEM Tour gives visiting high school students a taste of TSU excellence

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – More than 200 prospective STEM majors from three local high schools got a taste of Tennessee State University’s excellence on Wednesday.

Students from Antioch High, Cane Ridge and Hunters Lane participated in the 2019 TSU STEM Tour. They arrived on campus early and spent half the day visiting several of the university’s Colleges, as well as enjoying some TSU spirit.

High school students listen to Engineering instructor. (Photo by Charles Cook, TSU Media Relations).

Highlights of the day included a visit with TSU President Glenda Glover, and a special pep rally featuring the famed Aristocrat of Bands.

While many of the high school students are interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), they are also considering other majors and fields.

Ninth-grader Erick Guzman plays trumpet in the band at Cane Ridge and said he enjoyed the energy of TSU’s band.

“Man, I was hyped,” said Guzman, adding that he’s seriously considering TSU when he graduates because of the band.

Zybria Holliday wants to be a pediatrician, but the 15-year-old said after visiting TSU, she’s considering it for undergrad.

“I had a wonderful time,” she said. “TSU is great!”

The Colleges the students visited were Agriculture, Education, Engineering, Health Sciences, and Liberal Arts.

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering, talked to the students before they viewed some of the College’s research. Even though they still have a few years before graduation, he said now is the time to be thinking about attending a higher education institution.

“I’m sure all of you are bright students,” Hargrove said. “Now is the time to be thinking about what you want to do when you graduate. And I hope it’s engineering.”

High school students enjoy TSU pep rally. (Photo by Charles Cook, TSU Media Relations).

The students, who were accompanied by guidance counselors from each of their schools, also heard from other TSU officials and faculty, including Mr. Terrence Izzard, associate vice president for enrollment management, and Dr. Coreen Jackson, interim dean of the Honors College.

The guidance counselors lauded TSU for having the tour.

“The students got the opportunity to be exposed to Tennessee State, to see what’s available to them,” said Antioch counselor Tamika Reed. “A lot of times they don’t get that opportunity.”

Hunters Lane counselor Joe Levickis agreed.

“A lot of our kids are going to be applying to college and are going to be first generation students,” Levickis said. “It’s important that they get on a college campus, because it becomes more real to them. It’s also important to see people being successful, to see what their future could look like.”

Earlier this year, President Glover surprised about 20 students visiting the university with full scholarship offers. Most of the students were interested in STEM majors.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Professor Named 2015 Nashville Athena Award Winner

Dr. Kimberlee Wyche-Etheridge
Dr. Kimberlee Wyche-Etheridge

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Each year during Women’s History Month in March, Nashville, honors women leaders who inspire others to achieve excellence in their own professional and personal lives with the Athena Award.

This year the award went to a professor from Tennessee State University who exemplifies, “leadership, superior performance, commitment to community, and unselfish assistance to women and women’s issues.”

Dr. Kimberlee Wyche-Etheridge, assistant director of Public Health Initiatives in the College of Health Sciences, received the award Thursday, March 26 during a ceremony held at the Parthenon in Centennial Park. She was selected from a talented and diverse group of 23 individuals

“It is a great honor to be named the 2015 Athena Award recipient and to have the work of my career recognized and celebrated,” said Wyche-Etheridge.

A licensed physician, specializing in family and community health, Wyche-Etheridge is responsible for improving the health and wellbeing of the Tennessee State University campus, as well as the larger Nashville community through integrating the College of Health Sciences into the community for opportunities for service and learning. She is also the founder of the public health consulting firm, WycheEffect LLC.

From its beginning, the Nashville Athena Award Program has been and continues to be a unique community-supported program, organized and sponsored through the collaborative efforts of local women’s organizations in partnership with local businesses and individual sponsors, unlike other cities which rely upon their local Chamber of Commerce. Celebrating its 25th anniversary, Athena’s spirit lives on in those individuals who use their vision and persistence to excel while reaching out and opening the way for women across Nashville and Middle Tennessee, according to the organization’s website.

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

TSU Students Travel the World for Cultural Experiences, Academic Enhancements

Students from Tennessee State University had the opportunity to visit the ancient city of Ephesus during their study abroad trip to Turkey. The students spent three weeks in country and participated in a program that balanced academics, as well as social and cultural activities. (courtesy photo)
Students from Tennessee State University had the opportunity to visit the ancient city of Ephesus during their study abroad trip to Turkey. The students spent three weeks in country and participated in a program that balanced academics, as well as social and cultural activities. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Eight students from Tennessee State University had the opportunity of a lifetime recently when they traveled nearly 6,000 miles and immersed themselves in a foreign culture to gain a unique perspective of the world around them.

For three weeks in May, students from the Colleges of Engineering and Health Sciences participated in a program that balanced academics, as well as social and cultural activities during a study abroad program in Turkey.

“We want this to be a part of a student’s TSU educational experience,” said Dr. Ali Sekmen, professor of Computer Science, who traveled with the students. “This was a very different type of academic program for our students with a lot of flexibility.”

While the classes took place on university campuses throughout the country, Sekmen said student assignments and programming practices were done in the hotels and coffee shops while they interacted with their Turkish counterparts.

“It truly was a global experience,” he added.

The students visited Istanbul, Ankara, Antalya and Izmir, and were hosted by Bilkent University (the top university in Turkey, ranking 98 in the world), Antalya International University, and Izmir University of Economics. Sekmen pointed out that the students were required to satisfy the requirements of a MayMester course, specifically Java Programming.

“Its important to remember that even though this was a cultural immersion, there is also the academic requirement,” added Sekmen. “We conducted 37.5 hours of teaching while the students took a midterm and final just as if they were back in the states.”

While students earned credits in programming, they also received the cultural experience that study abroad offers, said Sekmen. The group visited Ephesus, the House of the Virgin Mary, Topkapi Palace, Thermoses and other cultural sites.

“In each city, our students had Turkish student ‘buddies’ with whom they developed a close friendship,” he said. “The group visited university administrators, the vice governor of Antalya, and some Turkish families.

That was an important aspect of the trip for Maggie Fitts, a junior Health Science major. Studying abroad, she said, was an adventure and learning experience all in one that allowed her to gain new perspectives on academic subjects and real-world issues.

“This opportunity allowed me to study issues more in-depth from a cultural perspective,” Fitts said. “Outside the classroom, my personal education was enhanced through the daily interaction in Turkey’s culture with our host families. I can honestly say this was an experience that helped me grow personally and mentally.”

The TSU study abroad program, in conjunction with the Tennessee Consortium for International Studies, or TnCIS, offers a range of initiatives to broaden the University’s global impact and enhance educational opportunities for its students. Combined, more than 30 programs are offered to destinations across the globe.

In the past year, more than 100 students from TSU have traveled across the world, studying in, among other countries, Costa Rica, China, Colombia, India, Germany, Italy and France.

According to Mark Brinkley, director of Study Abroad & Exchange Programs, students gain real-life experience on the global stage through the study abroad program.

“This is very consistent with the University’s position on enhancing global educational opportunities for our students,” said Brinkley. “This is a transformational experience for most students. It gives them an opportunity to expand their critical-thinking skills, and to look at the world a little differently through the lens of someone else from another country.”

For more information on education abroad, contact the Office of Diversity and International Affairs at 615.963.7660.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

A promise fulfilled: Mother Follows Daughter’s Footsteps to College Degree

Janet-Holly_Blakemore
Janet Blakemore (left) made a promise to daughter, Holly (right) that she would finish her degree once Holly obtained her graduate degree from Tennessee State University. It is a promise Janet will fulfill when she graduates from the University Saturday, Dec. 14. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) –Janet Blakemore always wanted to get her college degree. But sometimes life throws you a curve and your personal aspirations are put on hold while you take care of the things that are most important.

Such as family.

Janet was a single mom to daughter Holly, who grew up in a home where education was important, especially since some of her relatives attended Tennessee State University, and she witnessed first hand all that the University had to offer.

“She would hear all the stories that my mom and her sister would tell about their experience,” said Janet. “She basically grew up on campus attending parades and football games, and she just knew it was the school for her.”

Janet, who works for the State of Tennessee Secretary of State’s office, would do anything to make sure her daughter had the opportunity to attend TSU. Divorced when her daughter was just a year old, she worked more than one job, taking on modeling assignments at locations around Tennessee.

“I wanted Holly to have the opportunities I never had,” she added. “I tried to instill in her a strong work ethic, that anything was possible if you put your mind to it. I told her I would work so she could get work.”

Because of the nature of their relationship, Janet and Holly became extremely close said Janet, so close in fact, even though they were mother and daughter, they were also like best friends.  “It was almost a oneness of spirit that was made of deep devotion, sacrifice and pain,” she beamed.

Holly eventually was accepted, and graduated from TSU in 2003 from the College of Health Sciences with a degree in Speech Language Pathology. She decided to pursue her graduate degree almost immediately.

Janet was extremely supportive of her daughter as Holly worked her way through graduate school. But she always had a nagging feeling that she wished she had completed her degree.

“I had gone to business school but it wasn’t the same,” she said. “Something was just missing.”

At one point Holly became frustrated and stressed while completing the last few classes on her master’s degree in Speech Pathology. Janet made a promise to her daughter that she never thought Holly would remember.

“I told her to finish what she started and if she did, I would go back to school and finish my degree,” Janet added, chuckling. “I never in a million years thought she would remember.”

But she did, and a promise is a promise.

“We have come from a long line of women who have been successful, and I was determined to make sure she had the same opportunity she provided for me,” said Holly. “On graduation day in 2006, I looked at her and told her, ‘your turn.’”

Janet enrolled in 2009 in the Urban Studies program in the College of Public Service and Urban Affairs, and found herself in an unfamiliar position…back in the classroom with “kids” half her age.

“I walked mom to class the first day,” said Holly. “It was a such a role reversal. She didn’t want to admit to it, but she was really nervous and I wanted to be there for her just as she had been for me. It was one of my proudest moments with my mom.”

The past four years have not always been easy, Janet said. She has dealt with personal set backs, finding the time to be a full-time student, and dealing with the demands of work. Everywhere she went she was loaded down with books so she could study, including her second job and the beauty shop.

“I’ll admit, at 55 years old it has been a tough journey,” Janet remarked. “I started out slow taking six hours and eventually built up to 12-18 hours, which was really tough. But I’ve loved every minute of it. Without the support of my daughter, the faculty at the University, and my supervisor at work, this would not have been possible.”

According to Janet, when she graduates on Saturday, Dec. 14, it will validate all her hard work, the negative criticism she received, and most importantly, that she keeps her word.

‘This has been such a blessing to me,” she said. “By obtaining this degree, it validates me in a family that believes in education. I will now be a part of the TSU family.”

But more importantly, Janet added, it validates her relationship with her daughter.

“It’s all about promises made and promise kept, she added. “There is nothing more important than that.”

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.