Tag Archives: College of Engineering

TSU Students Compete in Tennessee Academy of Science Conference

NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – More than 15 students and faculty members from the College of Engineering at Tennessee State University participated in the Centennial meeting of the Tennessee Academy of Science November 16 at Vanderbilt University and presented their on-going research in engineering and environmental science.

The College of Engineering had 10 students compete in the Engineering & Technology Section, and received three awards for first and second place finishes by competing with public and private universities in the state.

Students receiving awards included:

  • 1st Place: Heather Housel, civil and architectural engineering major; Review of Incident Transportation Emergency Evacuation Systems for Populated Areas
  • 2nd Place: Cornel Zlibut, electrical engineering major; Real Time Wireless Video Transmission Using Software Defined Radio
  • 2nd Place: Hung Wai Ho, civil and architectural engineering major; Sorption isotherm of copper and quaternary ammonia compounds to zeolite-perlite-granular activated carbon in a storm water filter

“Our engineering students continue to demonstrate a high level of technical competence, knowledge and leadership ability with their interaction with faculty, and academic performance to prepare them for the careers of the 21st century,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, Dean of the College of Engineering. “They develop outstanding research skills that transfer to the ability to think critically…which is an asset for any college graduate in any occupation.”

The Tennessee Academy of Science serves as collegial organization to promote scientific research within the state among colleges and universities. It involves faculty across the state, and also encourages the active engagement of student research and other professional development opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

The College of Engineering became active with this organization two years ago, and has since received numerous accolades based on student research presentations and posters.

Faculty researchers including Drs. Sachin Shetty, Thomas Byl, Liang Hong, Roger Painter, Dafeng Hui, and S. Keith Hargrove led the students through the conference and presentations.

NNSA Awards Research Grant to College of Engineering

NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) –The College of Engineering at Tennessee State University was one of 22 Historically Black Colleges and Universities and six Department of Energy sites to recently receive part of a $4 million grant from the National Nuclear Security Administration.

The funding launches NNSA’s new Minority Serving Institution Partnership Program, a consortium program organized to build a sustainable Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics pipeline between DOE plants and laboratories, and HBCUs.

The partnership program is designed to enrich the STEM capabilities of HBCUs in a sustainable manner that aligns with the broad interests of DOE sites and emphasizes the entire career pipeline. The partnership also provides STEM students with the cutting edge resources and technology housed at DOE facilities, ultimately increasing STEM student retention.

“Hands-on participation in research is imperative for students in the STEM field,” said Dimitri Kusnezov, NNSA’s chief scientist. “The MSIPP will provide an opportunity for students to be exposed to state-of-the-art facilities and research, creating an opportunity to expand their knowledge and further prepare them for a career in STEM fields.”

The College of Engineering will benefit from this funding with research in nano-materials.  In partnership with the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, the College will begin to examine ways to better engineer materials for capturing energy, more specifically; using platinum-based nanostructures. Research has demonstrated catalytic activity to harness energy for multiple applications, including fuel cells.

Led by Dr. Lizhi Ouyang, Assistant Professor of Physics, a team of undergraduate and graduate students will conduct experiments to advance the knowledge of catalytic novel materials, particularly in platinum-based battery research.  These efforts support the research agenda of the new TIGER (TSU Interdisciplinary Graduate Engineering Research) Institute, to advance research in cyber-security, computation, nano-materials and renewable energy systems.

“An interdisciplinary approach to address and solve problems in science and engineering is critical to shortening the product development cycle from laboratory to commercial use,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, Dean of the College of Engineering and Director of the TIGER Institute. “We are promoting STEM faculty to do more collaboration and aggressively pursue opportunities that exist with federal laboratories and industry to enhance the quality of our academic curriculums for our students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.”

The College of Engineering also recently continued a partnership with Boeing to further research of aircraft systems, providing nearly $600,000 worth of funding, and received a $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to promote research in applied mathematics and curriculum development.

The National Nuclear Security Administration was established by Congress in 2000 as a separately organized agency within the U.S. Department of Energy, and is responsible for the management and security of the nation’s nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation and naval reactor programs.

TSU Integrates College of Engineering with Community and Industry Needs

NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – Since arriving to Tennessee State University in 2009, Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, Dean of the College of Engineering, has remained focused on growing the College of Engineering in research activities, student achievement and resource development to contribute to the needs of the state of Tennessee to produce more engineers.

As an alumnus of TSU in mechanical engineering, he has worked in industry and as a researcher at three major federal research laboratories.  He decided to pursue a career in academia to continue to impact and grow the number of underrepresented groups in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) occupations, such as engineering. As the state of Tennessee struggles to attract and produce more STEM professionals to grow a more educated workforce, he believes academic institutions must continue to play a major and strategic role to meet this urgent and important economic challenge.

Recently, Dean Hargrove discussed the mission of the College, its future and how it serves the community and the state.


TSU News Service: How old is the College of Engineering?

Dean Hargrove: The Division of Engineering was established in 1948, and has emerged for more than half a century to include several engineering and technology programs. It was changed to a School of Engineering in 1951, and graduated its first student in Civil Engineering a few years later.  The School of Engineering was one of six original engineering programs established at an HBCU (Historically Black College & University).  The school later added electrical, mechanical and architectural engineering.  In some respects, our engineering program represents the historical significance of the founding of TSU as “Tennessee Agricultural & Industrial State Normal College”.

TSU News Service: What are the current programs in the College of Engineering?

Dean Hargrove: The College of Engineering now has four accredited engineering programs that offer Bachelor of Science degrees: Architectural, Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering.  We have the only accredited engineering programs at a public university in Middle Tennessee.  We also have an accredited program in Computer Science, Aeronautical & Industrial Technology, and recently added Mathematical Sciences.  The college provides a graduate degree for working professionals (Master of Engineering), and the Master of Science, and unique PhD degree in Computer & Information Systems Engineering (CISE).  This program helps prepare graduates for careers in systems engineering with the defense industry and the IT field.

TSU News Service: What kind of research initiatives is the College pursuing?

Dean Hargrove: The College of Engineering has been engaged in several emerging research areas.  More specifically, with recent research grants and contracts in cyber-security with the Air Force and the Department of Homeland Security, we are developing solutions relative to detecting cyber attacks within the cloud environment, and with mobile phones.  Other research is being conducted in sensor networking, robotics, intelligent health monitoring, transportation systems, environmental remediation, and aircraft seat design with organizations such as Boeing, Army Research Laboratory, EPA, Rolls Royce, and the Tennessee Department of Transportation.  Our research activities enhance our undergraduate programs via laboratories and faculty expertise.  We recently opened a new laboratory to focus on research themes promoted by the National Academy of Engineering and supported by the National Science Foundation.

TSU News Service: How is the College involved in the community?

Dean Hargrove: TSU has a long history of community service and civic engagement.  In fact, it is part of our motto “Think – Work – Serve”. The College of Engineering is collaborating with the Pencil Foundation to support schools such as Stratford Magnet STEM High School.  We are assisting them with the development of a simulation and gaming laboratory, and working with the middle school STEM Preparatory Academy (charter school) to help with tutoring and mentoring students.  We are also part of the Go-Green Nashville Initiative to promote energy efficient homes, and Hands-On Nashville.

TSU News Service: What are the future goals for the College?

Dean Hargrove: Our goals are consistent with the strategic initiatives of Tennessee State University.  We want to continue to provide access to students from diverse communities, promote academic quality, enhance our research funding that complements our curriculum, and be engaged with improving our quality of life.  The College also promotes gaining a global education with its study abroad program. We had several students go to China, Korea and Germany during this past summer. We also want to expand our facilities in the future to increase enrollment and partnerships with local businesses and other academic institutions.  As employment opportunities grow in healthcare, Information Technology, and manufacturing in the automotive industry, we plan to continue to prepare graduates with the necessary skills in programming, critical thinking, and innovative technologies to help industry grow within the state and make them more business competitive.  It is also critical that we continue to support the state’s STEM Initiatives in K12 and higher education.