Tag Archives: college of agriculture

TSU’s Farmer Academy Inspires New Generation of Farmers

Academy Coincides with USDA’s Support for Beginning Farmers and Ranchers

 

Krysta Harden, deputy secretary of Agriculture, addresses members of The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, and other stakeholders during her one-day visit to the University January 21. The USDA recently announced new policy changes meant to improve the financial security of new and beginning farmers and ranchers. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Krysta Harden, deputy secretary of Agriculture, addresses members of The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, and other stakeholders during her one-day visit to the University January 21. The USDA recently announced new policy changes meant to improve the financial security of new and beginning farmers and ranchers. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service)  – The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences (CAHNS) Cooperative Extension Program at Tennessee State University began hosting a “New Farmer Academy” June 16 to help inspire a new generation of farmers, ranchers and returning veterans to develop successful small farm enterprises in Tennessee.

The program, which is directed toward owners and potential owners of small acreages who desire information on how to best utilize their land and other resources to produce crops and raise livestock, meets on the third Monday of each month from June to October, with graduation set for November 17.

According to Dr. Latif Lighari, associate dean for Extension, in addition to helping familiarize beginning farmers with the new USDA policies and website, the New Farmer Academy will provide six months of intensive, hands-on training on the practical aspects of running a farm.

“We also have arranged for a mentorship program with existing successful farmers who can provide valuable tips from their own experience,” said Lighari.

The academy coincides with a recent announcement from the U.S. Agriculture Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden speaking about new policy changes meant to “improve the financial security of new and beginning farmers and ranchers,” according to a USDA news release.

In addition to the policy changes, Deputy Secretary Harden, who visited TSU in January, unveiled a new website—www.usda.gov/newfarmers—to provide a convenient resource to help those farmers and ranchers take advantage of these programs.

“New and beginning farmers are the future of American agriculture,” said Deputy Secretary Harden. “The average age of an American farmer is 58 and rising, so we must help new farmers get started if America is going to continue feeding the world and maintain a strong agriculture economy. The new policies announced today will help give beginning farmers the financial security they need to succeed. Our new online tool will provide one-stop shopping for beginning farmers to learn more about accessing USDA services that can help their operations thrive.”

In May, the USDA announced a $6 million award to universities and cooperative state extension services to develop online decision tools and other materials and train experts to educate producers about several key farm bill programs. TSU received $30,000 under this program to educate farmers on how to use the new risk reduction policies and to develop web-based decision tools.

The cost to attend the academy is $150 per person and includes all educational material and a lunch at each session. To register, contact Rhonda Ewing at 615.963.1351 or rewing1@tnstate.edu.  For more information about this program, contact Finis Stribling at 931.375.5301 or fstribling@tnstate.edu.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Extension Summer Intern Program Aims to Inspire Future Educators, Farmers

TSUGroup
The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences has selected nine student interns for the summer Cooperative Extension Program to help them learn about careers in agriculture while working with agents in the field. Those selected include: (back row, left to right) Dr. Tyrone Miller, assistant professor of Leadership and Organizational Development,  Latetricia Wilson, Kyle Ward, Ciera Scott, George Davis, and Dr. Latif Lighari, associate dean for Extension. (seated left to right) DiJuana Davis, Raynette Johnson, Passion Echols, and Stephon Brisco. (courtesy photo)

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences Cooperative Extension Program has announced the selection of nine student interns for summer 2014.

The summer extension internship program is designed to help students learn about the Cooperative Extension Program and other careers in agriculture while working with extension agents and other professionals in county offices throughout Tennessee.

“This internship is an excellent opportunity for participants to build their resumes and help improve the lives of Tennesseans over the course of ten weeks, doing everything full-time extension agents do,” said Dr. Latif Lighari, associate dean for Extension. “They’ll get the chance to teach educational programs, visit farms and homes, conduct research, attend 4-H camp, assist with county fairs, help with field days, network with local decision makers and prepare public-facing communication material, all while building the essential leadership, problem-solving, and organization skills that are necessary to succeed in extension or any other career.”

The nine interns selected are:

  • Latetricia Wilson, a senior Child Development major from Memphis, Tennessee, who will intern in Shelby and Fayette Counties;
  • Raynette Johnson, a junior Agricultural Education, Leadership & Extension major from Mumford, Tennessee, who will intern in Haywood County;
  • Ciera Scott, a 2014 Family & Consumer Sciences graduate from Columbus, Ohio, who will intern in Robertson County;
  • Passion Echols, a graduate student in Agricultural Education, Leadership & Extension from Murfreesboro, Tennessee, who will intern in Bedford County;
  • George Davis, a junior Agricultural Sciences major from Memphis, who will intern with the Tennessee Deptartment of Agriculture in Davidson County;
  • Kyle Ward, a junior Agriculture Education & Extension major from Halls, Tennessee, who will intern in Williamson County;
  • DiJuana Davis, a 2014 Agricultural Sciences/Agribusiness graduate from Nashville, who will intern in Davidson County;
  • G. Stephon Brisco Jr., a junior Agricultural Sciences/Agribusiness major from Nashville via Lansing, Michigan, who will intern in Rutherford County; and
  • Ariel Harrell, a 2013 Agricultural Sciences graduate from Covington, Tennessee, who will intern with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture in Davidson County.

“Even though this is our first year offering this program we had a great pool of students to select from,” said Dr. Tyrone Miller, assistant professor of Leadership and Organizational Development and coordinator of the summer internship program. “The selected interns are exceptional, well-rounded students with strong interests in careers in cooperative extension and the agriculture industry. I am very confident that they will represent and showcase the excellent students we have at Tennessee State University and gain valuable job skills in the process.”

At the end of the ten week program, each intern will develop and present a PowerPoint presentation on their internship experience alongside the summer extension interns from the University of Tennessee.

For more information, contact Dr. Tyrone Miller at (615) 963-1843 or tmiller11@tnstate.edu.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Schedules BioFuel Technology Workshops for Middle and High School Students, Teachers

Dr. Jason de Koff (center), assistant professor of agronomy and soil sciences at TSU, shares bioenergy research with visitors recently. The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences will host a series of Biofuel Technology Workshops for middle and high school teachers and students from June 30 through July 3. (courtesy photo)
Dr. Jason de Koff (center), assistant professor of agronomy and soil sciences at TSU, shares bioenergy research with visitors recently. The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences will host a series of Biofuel Technology Workshops for middle and high school teachers and students from June 30 through July 3. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences (CAHNS) will host a series of Biofuel Technology Workshops for middle and high school teachers and students from June 30 through July 3.

The four-day teachers/adults workshop will help prepare educators to teach about the emerging field of biofuels with a focus on feedstocks, conversion and policy/management through hands-on biofuel conversion, a tour of TSU’s agricultural labs, and informational sessions from the CAHNS’ biofuel specialists.

After completion of the workshop, attendees should have a better understanding of the best resources available for teaching and be better prepared to meet state learning expectations in this area. Lodging and travel accommodations will be paid for by the CAHNS, and all participants will receive a take-home kit to conduct a biofuel lab with up to 30 students. Space is limited.

The workshops for middle and high school students will be held on June 30 and July 2, respectively, and focus on teaching basic lab techniques used in biofuel conversion and growing biomaterials used in this process through hands-on participation, and will also include a leadership development component. All participants will receive a free TSU Biofuels T-shirt.

All workshops will be free to attend, in part to a grant funded by the USDA. To apply or request more information, contact Dr. Ahmad Naseer Aziz at aaziz@tnstate.edu or (615) 963-1595; Dr. Jason de Koff at jdekoff@tnstate.edu or (615) 963-4929; or Dr. Fisseha Tegegne at ftegegne@tnstate.edu or (615) 963-5830.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Ag Majors Receive Cash Prizes for Winning Top Spots at First TSU Farm Bureau Collegiate Meet

From left (front row) Agricultural Science majors Rachel Gregory, Rickey Jackson, Leah Symonnette won top prizes at the first Farm Bureau Collegiate Discussion Meet organized by TSU. Standing, from left, are Dan Strasser, of the Tennessee Farm Bureau; Dr. John Hall, coordinator of the TSU event; and Randy Abrams, also of the Farm Bureau. (courtesy photo)
From left (front row) Agricultural Science majors Rachel Gregory, Rickey Jackson, Leah Symonnette won top prizes at the first Farm Bureau Collegiate Discussion Meet organized by TSU. Standing, from left, are Dan Strasser, of the Tennessee Farm Bureau; Dr. John Hall, coordinator of the TSU event; and Randy Abrams, also of the Farm Bureau. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Three undergraduate students from the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences at Tennessee State University took home cash prizes for their “exceptional” performance at the inaugural TSU Farm Bureau Collegiate Discussion Meet held on campus April 3.

Freshman Leah Symonette, of Mt. Juliet, took first prize and received $700; junior Rachel Gregory, of Gallatin, placed second and received $400; and Rickey Jackson, a senior from Rossville, placed third and received $200. The three Tennessee natives are all Agricultural Science majors.

Symonette and Gregory, as first and second place winners, will go on to compete in the state contest to be held at the Tennessee Farm Bureau’s Young Farmers and Ranchers Conference in Columbia, Tenn., in July.

According to Dr. John Hall, assistant professor of Agricultural Education and Leadership and coordinator of the event at TSU, Collegiate Discussion Meets are designed to simulate committee meetings with “active and thoughtful participation” from contestants.

The discussion at the inaugural TSU collegiate meet centered on: “U.S. agriculture is one of the major industries for the American economy; what can farmers do to stimulate more economic growth?”

The Tennessee Farm Bureau organized the TSU contest, while the Tennessee Farm Bureau Federation sponsored the cash prizes for top participants. Dan Strasser, director of Special Programs for the Tennessee Farm Bureau; and Randy Abrams, of the 2nd Ave. Farm Bureau Agency in Nashville, were on hand to represent the Bureau.

For more information about Tenn. Farm Bureau’s Young Farmers and Ranchers program, contact Strasser at (931) 388-7872 ext. 2214 or dstrasser@tfbf.com. For information about TSU’s Collegiate Discussion Meet, contact Dr. Hall at (615) 963-5139 or jhall33@tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

New Approach to Spatial Thinking: TSU Launches Online Master’s Concentration in Applied GIS Education

Dr. Solomon Haile (left), assistant professor of Forestry and Applied GIS and coordinator of the PSM, briefs University members and board members on the new GIS program, as Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the CAHNS, looks on. The new online terminal degree program will start next fall, and provides broad-based expertise and cutting-edge skills, combining the scientific and technical knowledge of an advance degree in GIS with business knowledge and experience. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Dr. Solomon Haile (left), assistant professor of Forestry and Applied GIS and coordinator of the PSM, briefs University members and board members on the new GIS program, as Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the CAHNS, looks on. The new online terminal degree program will start next fall, and provides broad-based expertise and cutting-edge skills, combining the scientific and technical knowledge of an advance degree in GIS with business knowledge and experience. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A new online degree concentration intended for professionals and students, who wish to advance their careers but do not plan to seek additional education at the doctoral level, will kick off at Tennessee State University next fall.

The Professional Science Master’s with a concentration in Applied Geospatial Information Sciences, which provides broad-based expertise and cutting-edge skills, combines the scientific and technical knowledge of an advance degree in GIS with business knowledge and experience, according to planners.

Designed for working professionals and full-time students, the program, which also allows participants to maintain a career while earning their degree, was necessitated by the need demonstrated by students in the current graduate certificate program, and the growing demand for well-trained professionals in the rapidly expanding GIS and Remote Sensing field.

The PSM is being coordinated between the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences; the College of Business; and the College of Public Service and Urban Affairs. Already hired professors in the three colleges will teach courses in the program.

At a ceremony Monday to launch the PSM degree program in the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, officials cited a U.S. Department of Labor Employment and Training and Administration report that shows that an additional 150,000 positions requiring geospatial-based skills will be created by the year 2020.

“This program is a marriage between science, business and technology, which makes it a highly sought-after area for opportunities in many disciplines and areas of industry,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of CAHNS. “People completing this program are highly skilled in modern technology and are equipped to analyze data, answer questions and solve problems in a cutting-edge scientific environment.”

According to Dr. Solomon Haile, assistant professor of Forestry and Applied GIS and coordinator of the PSM, the program is beneficial to many professional areas including natural resources managers, environmental engineers, architects, city planners, public health officials, and urban and regional planners.

“A transition in the availability and acceptance of the use of geospatial technology has created an accelerated demand for experts in this field in both the public and private sectors,” Haile said.

He added that the program, which is further strengthened by an advisory board of actively engaged employers from industry, business, government and non-profits, will “contribute to the University’s mission by producing graduates with advanced training in the cutting-edge interfaces of science and management.” Board members, he said, provide advice to the faculty on curriculum, assist with internships and placement, as well as help to identify projects.

“PSM offers students training in science and the opportunity to develop workplace skills highly valued by employers,” Haile said.

The PSM, a “non-thesis” program, offers courses entirely online, and an internship with real-world experience. It requires the completion of 36 semester credit hours, and at least 300 internship hours under the supervision of an applied GIS practitioner, Haile said. Participants in the program must maintain no less than a 2.75 GPA. Like any graduate program, applicants must have a first degree at the baccalaureate level and a grade point average of 2.75 on a 4.00-point scale is required for admission. Applications must be processed through the College of Graduate Studies and Research.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

College Hosts Annual CAHNS Week April 7 – 11

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences (CAHNS) at Tennessee State University will host the sixth annual CAHNS Week celebration from April 7-11 with activities that highlight the importance of agriculture in Middle Tennessee and the importance of the programs offered at the college.

CAHNS Week provides each department in the College with a forum to highlight student and faculty success stories, and draw attention to important issues in their respective fields. Additionally, one day is dedicated specifically to students with a career fair and a cookout. The week culminates with an awards luncheon recognizing the outstanding contributions of students, faculty and staff.

The week will kick off Monday, April 7 when the College formally announces a new Professional Science Master’s program in Applied Geospatial Information Sciences at 1 p.m. in the Farrell-Westbrook auditorium.

Other events during the week include:

  • Family and Consumer Sciences Day takes place on Tuesday, April 8, and features an “Encouraging Outdoor Play” fashion show, and a “Fruit and Friends” puppet show at 10 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., respectively in the Farrell-Westbrook auditorium, and a “Healthy Environment/Healthy Citizens” panel discussion at 11:20 a.m. in the Agricultural Information and Technology Center.
  • Biological Sciences Day, also takes place on April 8, and features a continental breakfast at 8 a.m. in McCord Hall. Departmental research posters will be on display from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Dr. Hugh Fentress, assistant professor of biological sciences, will provide the keynote lecture at 1:15 p.m. in Holland Hall, room 110.
  • Student Day takes place Wednesday, April 9 with a career fair taking place in the Farrell-Westbrook auditorium from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. Employers participating include All About Care, Farm Service Agency, State of Tennessee, Tennessee Department of Agriculture, Tennessee Farmers Co-op, National Agricultural Statistics Service, and Natural Resources Conservation Service. A student cookout will be held on the Farrell-Westbrook plaza from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Minorities in Agriculture Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS) will host a professional development workshop in the Agricultural Information and Technology Center beginning at 4 p.m. The workshop will host a panel discussion titled “The Unspoken Truths about Professionalism.”
  • Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Day takes place Thursday, April 10, and features keynote speaker Hubert Hamer, Director of the USDA NASS Statistics Division and TSU alumnus, at 1:30 p.m. with a reception to follow.
  • The College Recognition Day and the CAHNS Awards Luncheon takes place Friday, April 11 in the Farrell-Westbrook auditorium. RSVP is required to attend.
  • Chemistry Day, due to a scheduling conflict, will be held in the Boswell Science Complex on Thursday, April 17, and features a career fair from 9 a.m. until noon, tours of the Chemistry Dept. from 9:15 a.m. until10 a.m., demonstrations from 10 – 11 a.m. in room 122, a “Chemistry Challenge” game from 11 a.m. until noon in room 112, and a guest lecture from Dr. Ned A. Porter of Vanderbilt University at 2:30 p.m. in the Boswell auditorium. Student research posters will also be displayed throughout the Boswell Complex.

For more information visit www.tnstate.edu/agriculture or contact Brett Seybert at 615.963.5708.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Dean Reddy Reappointed to National Advisory Board on Ag Research, Extension and Economics

Dr. Chandra Reddy
Dr. Chandra Reddy

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, Tom Vilsack, has announced the reappointment of TSU’s Dr. Chandra Reddy to another term on the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education and Economics Advisory Board.

Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, has served on NAREEEAB since 2010 when he was first appointed by Secretary Vilsack. The new appointment ends Sept. 30, 2016.

NAREEEAB, a 25-member board, provides advice to the Secretary of Agriculture and land-grant colleges and universities on top priorities and policies for food and agricultural research, education, extension and economics.

According to a USDA announcement, the board also “seeks stakeholder input on important agricultural issues from a broad and diverse variety of persons and groups across the nation,” which helps the Secretary determine priorities that guide the nation’s agricultural research, outreach, education and economy.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, Trevecca Nazarene Recognized by Metro Nashville as City’s First Recipients of Tree Campus USA Award

Students from Tennessee State University plant a red maple tree Sunday, October 6, 2013, on campus as part of a celebration recognizing the University as a leader in conservation and sustainability. TSU received the Tree Campus USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation, and just recently received the Tree Campus USA Award. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
Students from Tennessee State University plant a red maple tree Sunday, October 6, 2013, on campus as part of a celebration recognizing the University as a leader in conservation and sustainability. TSU received the Tree Campus USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation, and just recently received the Tree Campus USA Award. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

Nashville, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – On Thursday, March 20, Tennessee State University and Trevecca Nazarene University were recognized as the city’s first recipients of the Tree Campus USA award during Nashville’s Annual Arbor Day Celebration.

Each university was honored for having earned this designation by showcasing their dedication to the campus environment and efforts to create green forests within the city.

Tennessee State University College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences’ Dr. Latif Lighari, associate dean for Extension, and Dr. De’Etra Young, assistant professor and Extension Specialist in Urban Forestry, were on hand to accept the recognition.

“This [recognition] is a great honor for TSU and the College,” Lighari said. “It speaks for our environmental sensitivity and concern for campus beautification. This would not have been possible without the hard work of Dr. Young.”

In October 2013, the University received the Tree Campus USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation, a national program created in 2008 to honor colleges and universities for effective forest management and engaging staff and students in conservation goals. At that time, TSU joined 194 institutions across the country taking part in the national program.

TSU achieved the designation by meeting Tree Campus USA’s five standards, which include creating a tree advisory committee, a campus tree-care plan, dedicated annual expenditures toward trees, an Arbor Day observance, and student service-learning projects.

Nashville celebrates Arbor Day annually to promote the proper planting and preservation of trees for environmental enhancement. During this year’s Arbor Day ceremony, local Nashvillians were honored for their service and commitment to the city, trees were planted in honor and memory of five local citizens, and local fifth grade students from Harding Academy and Two Rivers Middle School were awarded for their “My Favorite Tree” student essays. Additionally, Nashville Mayor Karl Dean was presented the Alice Ann Barge Award for Urban Forestry Excellence for his commitment to making Nashville one of the South’s greenest cities.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

State Legislature’s “Ag Day on the Hill” to Feature TSU Agricultural Research, Extension March 24-25

biodiesel-lab_blog-1024x682
Dr. Jason de Koff’s Mobile Biodiesel Education Demonstration lab will be on display at the “Ag Day on the Hill” celebration on March 24-25. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences at Tennessee State University will be a prominent player in this year’s “Ag Day on the Hill” celebration Monday, March 24 and Tuesday, March 25.

The celebration at Legislative Plaza, which coincides with what Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has proclaimed “Agriculture Day” in Tennessee, is part of the annual national observance to recognize the important contributions of farmers and forestland owners to the state and nation.

According to a Tennessee Department of Agriculture release, on Monday at 5 p.m., the official start of the celebration, two General Assembly joint resolutions will be presented to honor Dr. George Washington Carver, and the 100th anniversary of the Smith-Lever Act, which established the Cooperative Extension Service. Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the CAHNS, and other prominent TSU representatives are expected to speak.

Festivities on Tuesday will begin at 8 a.m. with a silent auction, to benefit Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee and Tennessee’s Ag in the Classroom educational program. This will be followed by the traditional cow-milking contest between the House and the Senate.

Festivities will also include displays and expositions by various agricultural institutions, farmers and other stakeholders from across the state and the nation, the release said.

Several TSU entities, projects and representatives will be on hand to provide educational materials and demonstrations. They include the Otis L. Floyd Research Center in McMinnville, Cooperative Extension, Dr.  Suping Zhou’s Pathogen-free Organic Strawberry project, Dr. Dharma Pitchay’s Hydroponic Production method, and Dr. Jason de Koff’s Mobile Biodiesel Education Demonstration.

The event will also feature for the first time the Drive to Feed the World Tour, a unique, interactive road show traveling the nation to heighten awareness about world hunger and sustainable food production.

Tennessee has 76,000 farms representing 10.8 million acres in production. More than half of the state, 14 million acres, is in mostly privately owned hardwood forests. Tennessee’s top agricultural commodities include cattle, soybeans, corn, poultry, cotton, timber, greenhouse and nursery products, dairy products, wheat, tobacco and hay. The industry has a $66 billion a year impact on the state’s economy and supports nearly 337,900 jobs.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Receives More Than $2.6 Million Grant for Research, Teaching, Extension

Dr. Ahmad Aziz, associate professor of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, carries on an experiment with graduate assistant Abdul Mujeed Yakubu, in his lab. Dr. Aziz received a teaching grant for his research on bio-energy/biofuel and natural resources. (courtesy photo)
Dr. Ahmad Aziz, associate professor of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, carries on an experiment with graduate assistant Abdul Mujeed Yakubu, in his lab. Dr. Aziz received a teaching grant for his research on bio-energy/biofuel and natural resources. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Coming on the heels of a soon-to-be dedicated multi-million dollar, state-of-the-art biotechnology center, agricultural research, extension and teaching at Tennessee State University have received a major boost with new funding from the federal government.

On Wednesday, Feb. 26, the University received a $2.6 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to support capacity-building endeavors.

The amount was part of 76 grants totaling $35 million awarded to 21 Historically Black Colleges and Universities or 1890 institutions to support research, teaching and extension activities through the USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture program.

This achievement for TSU is the result of the success of six grant proposals submitted by faculty members or project directors and their collaborators in the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, in addition to funding received for NIFA programs.

In the last four year, TSU has been one of the leading 1890 grantees, usually ranking in the top three spots. This year is no different, with University officials and students expressing their excitement about the institution’s success rate.

“We are quite pleased with the success of our faculty in garnering these USDA funds to build our Ag program,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of CAHNS. “These funds help to build capacity in new areas of agricultural research, teaching and outreach, as well as help in remodeling and building research facilities.”

Alison Leathers, a graduate student in Agricultural Education, Leadership and Extension from Preston, Minn., described the new funding along with the upcoming biotechnology center as “positives” that will enhance learning in new areas of research and awareness.

“I think the new money and building will certainly help to expand the amount of knowledge and expertise we have in the college by having more labs and more equipment that will help my fellow students and me,” Leathers said.

In announcing the grants Wednesday, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said the goal was to build on efforts that foster strong partnerships with the 1890 community, ensure equal access to USDA programs and services, and support educational opportunities for the next generation of farmers and ranchers.

“For nearly 125 years, the 1890 land-grant institutions have played a vital role in ensuring access to higher education and opportunity for underserved communities,” said Secretary Vilsack. “These competitively-awarded grants support high quality research, teaching and Extension activities and support the continued leadership of 1890 institutions in the fields of agriculture, the environment and public health.”

Faculty members (or project directors) who led the proposal submissions that resulted in the research, teaching and Extension grant awards, and their research focus are:

  • Dr. Karla Addesso, assistant professor of Chemical Ecology – Sustainable agriculture – $299,751 (Research)
  • Dr. Dafeng Hui, assistant professor of Biological Sciences – Bio-energy/biofuel and natural resources; Global climate change – $299,874 (Research)
  • Dr. Fur-Chi Chen, associate professor of Food Science – Food Safety – $299,999 (Research)
  • Dr. George Smith, assistant professor of Landscape Architecture – Water quality – $249,797 (Extension)
  • Dr. Janice Emerson, associate professor and director of the Center for Prevention Research – Childhood Obesity – $248,886 (Extension)
  • Dr. Ahmad Aziz, associate professor of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences – Bio-energy/biofuel and natural resources – $150,000 (Teaching)

Additionally, TSU received about $1.1 million NIFA award through the 1890 Facilities Grant Program, with Dr. Reddy as the PI. The fund will be used to remodel the Ferrell Westbrook Building with new laboratories for recently hired agricultural faculty.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.