Tag Archives: college of agriculture

Holidays bring increased demand for goat meat, TSU experts say

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Looking for an alternative to turkey this Thanksgiving? Try goat meat.

Goat meat dish at Jamaicaway restaurant in Nashville. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Public Relations)

Experts in Tennessee State University’s College of Agriculture say the holidays, particularly Thanksgiving and Christmas, bring increased demand for goat meat – a national area of research for TSU.

“Just like turkey, goat is kind of a holiday meat, for a lot of different cultures,” said Dr. Richard Browning, lead goat researcher at TSU, which has received nearly half a million dollars from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to expand its research on goat meat production.

As the holiday season kicks in, immigrants, in particular, flock to butcher shops, meatpacking plants, farms, and any place that provides goat meat, according to researchers.

Ouida Bradshaw owns two Jamaicaway restaurants in Nashville and has had goat meat on her menu since she opened 14 years ago. She said this time of the year she starts to see an increase in orders for goat meat.

“There’s definitely an increase around Thanksgiving and Christmas,” Bradshaw said. “People put in special orders. They use it as one of their entrees for their Thanksgiving and Christmas celebration.”

Besides being tasty, goat meat enthusiasts say it’s a healthier choice of meat because its naturally lean, meaning it is much lower in saturated fat and cholesterol, having a naturally higher HDL count (the good cholesterol) and a naturally low LDL count (the bad kind of cholesterol), according to the National Kiko Registry. It is also lower in calories than other meats, like beef, and is easier to digest.

Whether it’s goat meat, turkey or any other holiday fixings, Dr. Sandria Godwin, a family and consumer science professor at TSU, said people should make sure they properly handle food.

For instance, if turkey is the main entrée, then she said a thermometer should be used to make sure it’s fully cooked – usually 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

But probably most important, Godwin said, is to make sure that leftovers don’t remain out over two hours.

“Some people leave food out and eat it throughout the day, but that’s not safe,” said Godwin, whose Human Sciences Department at TSU has received a $2.4 million USDA grant to study poultry and food safety.

“It should go in the refrigerator within two hours.”

For more information about TSU’s Human Sciences Department and food safety, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/familyscience/foodnutrition.aspx

For more information about TSU’s goat research, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/faculty/rbrowning/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

Small Farm Expo showcases TSU’s nationally recognized research

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – More than 300 agricultural experts, farmers and officials attended Tennessee State University’s Small Farm Expo on Thursday.

Small Farmer of the Year recipient Nicole Riddle. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

In its 13th year, TSU officials say the expo at the Pavilion Agricultural Research and Education Center (The Farm) is a way for the university and its partners on the state and federal levels to recognize the role farmers and agriculture play in the state and the nation.

“We at TSU focus our work to support the small farms and this expo recognizes the outstanding farmers with innovative ideas,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of TSU’s College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences. “Also, participants get to see the best field research of TSU scientists and personally meet federal and state Ag leadership.”

Goats in TSU research program. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The expo featured speakers and agricultural research tours with TSU faculty. Topics ranged from organic agriculture to cattle and goat research, all of which have been recognized nationally.

However, the highlight of the expo was the announcement of the Small Farmer of the Year, which went to Nicole Riddle of Maynardville, Tennessee. Riddle leased 44 acres of her parents’ land and opened her own winery in 2015.

“The Winery at Seven Springs Farm is the most successful new start rural winery in the state of Tennessee,” wrote Area Specialist Charles Morris. “In an unprecedented showing, her wines received five Concordance Gold Medals, including Best of Muscadine, and three Silver Medals at the 2015 Wines of the South Competition.”

Dr. Suresh Sureshwaran, director of the division of community education with the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, said TSU’s agricultural research over the years is impressive, particularly its goat research.

Earlier this year, TSU received a $496,328 federal grant to expand its research on goat meat production.

Dexter bull. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“Goats are becoming an important new commodity for small farmers,” Sureshwaran said. “But many in the United States don’t know how to produce, or how to sell goat. I think more research is needed, and what Tennessee State is doing is extremely good.”

TSU also has a Dexter cattle-breeding program, the only one of its kind currently in U.S. higher education. The Dexter cattle are being used to assess the potential of small-breed cattle for small-scale beef production.

“We’re hoping people will see that there are alternatives to traditional livestock production,” said Dr. Richard Browning, who heads the Dexter and goat research. “The concept of having a small non-traditional breed like that is something they say might work on their farm. The same with the goats.”

Goat meat served at expo. (Photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

Regardless of the type of research, TSU junior Kayla Sampson, an agriculture science major, said the expo is beneficial because students who attend are able to learn from invited experts and officials.

“It helps broaden our knowledge during the summer,” Sampson said. “So when the school year starts, we’re a step ahead.”

For more information about TSU’s College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/index.aspx.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Agriculture students excel at Tennessee Academy of Science meeting

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Eleven Tennessee State University College of Agriculture students won awards at the 126th annual meeting of the Tennessee Academy of Science.

More than 300 students and faculty from 10 universities converged on Austin Peay State University in Clarksville for the meeting on Nov. 19.

TSU was well represented with 32 student presentations in various topics, including agriculture, botany, cell and molecular biology, ecology and environmental science, geosciences, and microbiology.

Of the 11 awards TSU students received, four were 1st place; three 2nd place; three 3rd place; and one honorable mention.

Master’s student Jeronimo da Silva was honored for serving as the chair of the Ecology and Environmental Science section, the first time a student served as chair of a section.

The Tennessee Academy of Science seeks to promote scientific research and education in Tennessee. Its 800 members are primarily from academia, with additional members from government and industry.

For more information about TAS, visit http://www.tennacadofsci.org.

To learn more about TSU’s College of Agriculture, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU job fair helps federal agriculture officials recruit graduates

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University was one of two higher education institutions selected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to help recent graduates find employment in the agricultural field.

TSU hosted a job fair on Feb. 5 that attracted 60 students from several southern colleges and universities. Alabama A&M University hosted a similar event the day before.

William Hayslett, Sr. is academic coordinator for TSU’s College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences. He said he’s honored that USDA officials selected TSU to host one of the job fairs.

“It says that we’re on their radar, and that they thought we have something to offer,” Hayslett said. “We also want to expose our students to job opportunities.”

The USDA Pathways Recent Graduates Program is a one-year program for individuals who have recently graduated and seek a career development program with training and mentorship. Applicants must apply within two years of degree completion.

The benefit of the job fairs, according to USDA officials, is that they allow individuals to apply on the spot and avoid the online process. It’s also an opportunity to ensure diversity in the selection process, said Marcus Brownrigg, deputy director at the USDA’s Center for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships.

“We were tasked to see what we could do to increase the number of diverse student interns and recent graduates we brought onboard USDA,” Brownrigg said. “And this is one of the mechanisms that we’ve been using. Going out where students actually are and taking their applications onsite is part of our overall recruitment strategy.”

Recruiters at the TSU job fair took applications for farm loan officer trainees, who undergo a year of training before full federal employment.

Lauren Brewer, who is majoring in international studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, said she’d like to get one of the positions. But she said the job fairs are also an opportunity to network.

“It’s a good way for students to come together and network with officials,” said the 21-year-old Brewer. “You just can’t get that through an email or a phone call.”

With more than 100,000 employees and 7,000 offices, USDA provides leadership on food, agriculture, natural resources, rural development, nutrition, and related issues based on sound public policy, the best available science, and efficient management.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Professor Lands Half Million-Dollar Award as Part of USDA Food Safety Grants

Research to focus on preventing foodborne illnesses in consumers

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A professor with the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences at Tennessee State University has received a $500,000 USDA grant to research new ways of preventing foodborne illness and increase the safety of the food production industry.

Dr. Ankit Patras
Dr. Ankit Patras

Dr. Ankit Patras, assistant professor of Agriculture Science received the grant as part of the USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture’s $19 million funding awards, including more than $6.7 million for antimicrobial resistance studies to 36 universities across the country including Tennessee State, through the Agriculture and Food Research Food Safety Challenge.

The AFRI Food Safety Challenge is an annual round of federal funding that, according to the USDA, “promotes and enhances the scientific discipline of food safety, with an overall aim of protecting consumers from microbial and chemical contaminants that may occur during all stages of the food chain, from production to consumption.”

Patras’ project, titled “Steering Innovation for Treatment of Liquid Foods to Eliminate Pathogenic Microbes and Toxins Using Low Wave-length UV Irradiation,” will aim to improve the consistency and effectiveness of UV treatments of liquid foods like juice and milk. If successful, the new and improved techniques developed by this research will extend to the food industry and allow for the less expensive, more energy efficient UV treatments to replace traditional heat treatments like pasteurization. This project is supported in part by the Aquafine Corporation, Valencia, California.

“This project will enhance the understanding of irradiation processes and accurate UV dose delivery in different liquid foods,” Patras said. “This will effectively minimize the risk of infections stemming from food contaminations.” Additionally, Patras noted that the project will “foster long-term cooperation, knowledge exchange among students, and integration between academia and industry.”

Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, recognized the opportunity for TSU the grant and the technologies will create.

“It feels great to receive this prestigious award from NIFA/USDA,” Patras said. “This will expand and strengthen our Food Bioscience and Technology program at TSU, allowing us to develop cutting-edge optical technologies and offer customized solutions to many of today’s disinfection problems in the food industry.”

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331
About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCES NEW LAND-GRANT UNIVERSITY SYSTEM-WIDE ONLINE RESOURCE

Website Provides Access to Research and Extension Impact Statements Across State and University Lines 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Last week, Tennessee State University announced the official launch of and participation in the National Land-grant Impacts website a centralized online resource highlighting the teaching, research, and extension efforts by Land-grant universities.

Specifically, the website provides access to university or regional-specific impact stories, which document the research and Extension programming planned, performed and implemented by Tennessee State University and other Land-grant universities. The website is a cooperative effort of the Land-grant universities, represents a single voice for the Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension arms of the Land-grant universities.

“The Land-Grant Impacts website is a new tool that will better inform the American people and the international community of the significant agricultural research, education and extension impacts taking place at land grant universities across our nation, which offer practical solutions to today’s critical societal challenges,” said Dr. Sonny Ramaswamy, director, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture. “The website will help policy makers and the public learn more about this work that is partially supported with NIFA funding.”

Impact statements relay the results and impact of research and Extension education programming. Information lists include contact information for university research and Extension project leads and updates on funding, project implementation, or Extension education impact.

Impact statements are categorized according to six focus areas: Food Security; Nutrition and Health; Youth, Family, and Communities; Environmental Stewardship; Agricultural Systems; and Energy and Bioproducts.

“Tennessee State University has been making a very deliberate attempt to integrate research and extension programs with academics to develop a talented and capable future workforce—particularly among African Americans,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean and director of Research and Administrator of Extension for the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences. “We have had success in recent years and continue to build our capacity, in both the human and infrastructural aspects, to become a major source of agricultural knowledge. This website will be a tremendous help in continuing that goal.”

The website also informs users about the history of the Land-grant university system and how its mission has evolved since the systems’ founding. Tennessee State University, like all Land-grant universities, is committed to a three-fold mission of teaching, research and Extension. The website fully demonstrates why teaching, research, and Extension are interrelated and how they better Tennessee State University students, improve communities in Tennessee, and benefit the nation.

Tennessee State University is one of the 238 public research universities, Land-grant institutions, state university systems, and affiliated organizations represented by The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. The Land-grant university system has affiliations in all 50 states, the four U.S. territories, the District of Columbia, Mexico, and Canada.

Tennessee State University was founded in 1912 as a result of the Second Morrill Act, which granted each state funding to charter a university with the purpose to teach agriculture, military tactics, and the mechanic arts as well as classical studies to help members of the working class obtain a liberal, practical education.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Takes Mobile Biodiesel Demonstration Unit On the Road March 9-26

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Tennessee State University Cooperative Extension program will take the Mobile Biodiesel Education Demonstration (MBED) trailer on the road this spring, making stops across Tennessee March 9-26 in an effort to provide people across the state with an up-close look at the biodiesel production process and educational information on real-world production scenarios.

Dr. Jason de Koff (center), assistant professor of agronomy and soil sciences at TSU, shares bioenergy research with visitors recently. The mobile demonstration lab will be on display throughout the year beginning March 9. (courtesy photo)
Dr. Jason de Koff (center), assistant professor of agronomy and soil sciences at TSU, shares bioenergy research with visitors recently. The mobile demonstration lab will be on display throughout the year beginning March 9. (courtesy photo)

According to Dr. Jason de Koff, assistant professor of Agronomy and Soil Sciences, the production of biodiesel fuel from vegetable oil is a viable process that can replace traditional fuel used in existing diesel engines.

“The process can go a long way toward helping ease the financial burden of fuel costs,” said de Koff, who is leading the tour. “It is possible [farmers] could become totally self-sufficient in diesel fuel use.”

Accompanying Dr. de Koff to provide specific expertise will be Mobile Biodiesel team members Chris Robbins, Extension associate for farm operations; Dr. Prabodh Illukpitiya, assistant professor of Natural Resource and Energy Economics; and Alvin Wade, associate Extension specialist for Community Resources and Economic Development.

The workshops will include discussions on the following topics:

  • Introduction to Biodiesel Production
  • Feedstocks for Biodiesel Production
  • Biodiesel Production Demonstration
  • Economics of Small-Scale Biodiesel Production
  • Federal Assistance Programs for Biodiesel Production

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Date and locations for the March workshops include:

Date: Monday, March 9
Time:  6 p.m. (dinner provided)
Location: Fayette County Fire Training Room / 18 North Hiawatha Street / Somerville, Tennessee
Registration Contact: Jeffrey D. Via / 901-465-5233 or jvia@utk.edu

Date: Thursday, March 12
Time: 11 a.m. (lunch provided)
Location: East Tennessee Livestock Center / 2121 U.S. 11 / Sweetwater, Tennessee
Registration Contacts: John Goddard / 865-458-5612 or jgoddard@utk.edu or Jonathan Rhea / 423-442-2433 or jrhea@utk.edu

Date: Thursday, March 19
Time:  6:30 p.m. (dinner provided)
Location: Franklin County Extension Office / 406 Joyce Lane / Winchester, Tennessee
Registration Contact: John Ferrell / 931-967-2741

Date: Thursday, March 26
Time: 6 p.m. (dinner provided)
Location: Dyer County Extension Office / 151 Everett Ave. / Dyersburg, Tennessee
Registration Contact: Tim Campbell / 731-286-7821

To register to attend, contact Dr. Jason de Koff at (615) 963-4929 or jdekoff@tnstate.edu.

A USDA NIFA Capacity Building Grant funds TSU’s Mobile Biodiesel Education Demonstration.

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Fruit Tree Pruning and Grafting Subject of TSU Third Tuesday Field Days Workshop February 17

third tuesdayNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences Cooperative Extension Program at Tennessee State University hosts February’s edition of Third Tuesday on Feb. 17. The event takes place from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. at the Agricultural Research and Education Center at 3101 River Road in Ashland City, Tenn.

This month’s program is “Pruning and Grafting Fruit Tree Crops” and will feature two workshops and demonstrations. They include:

  • “Grafting Techniques for Fruit Trees” by Dr. Dilip Nandwani, TSU associate professor of Organic Agriculture; and
  • “Tools and Techniques: Fruit Tree Pruning Basics” by Christopher Robbins, TSU Extension Associate for Farm Operations.

The registration fee is $15 and includes lunch. To register or request additional information, contact Dr. Dilip Nandwani at 615.963.1897 or dnandwan@tnstate.edu. Visit http://www.tnstate.edu/extension/Third%20Tuesday.aspx for updates, future announcements, and complete 2015 schedule.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

USDA Selects Two Tennessee State University Students to Attend National Summit

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Two students from Tennessee State University have been selected to attend a national conference sponsored by the United States Agriculture Department aimed at introducing university students to future trends, scientific research and agricultural policy in today’s real-world environment.

Alexis Allen (left), a junior concentrating in Agribusiness, and Alison Leathers (right), a graduate student concentrating in Agricultural Education, Leadership & Extension, share a moment with Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, upon the USDA announcement sending the pair to Virginia. Allen and Leathers  are among only thirty students selected from across the country to attend the USDA’s 2015 Agricultural Outlook Forum.
Alexis Allen (left), a junior concentrating in Agribusiness, and Alison Leathers (right), a graduate student concentrating in Agricultural Education, Leadership & Extension, share a moment with Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, upon the USDA announcement sending the pair to Virginia. Allen and Leathers are among only thirty students selected from across the country to attend the USDA’s 2015 Agricultural Outlook Forum.

Alexis Allen, a junior concentrating in Agribusiness, and Alison Leathers, a graduate student concentrating in Agricultural Education, Leadership & Extension, are among only 30 students selected from across the country to attend the USDA’s 2015 Agricultural Outlook Forum February 19-20 in Arlington, Virginia.

The Forum, titled “Smart Agriculture in the 21st Century,” is not only designed to introduce students to contemporary agribusiness, future trends, scientific research, and agricultural, as well as give them the chance to lay the groundwork for a future in agriculture, hear speakers from diverse backgrounds, and help them expand their opportunities in their chosen fields.

“This is an excellent opportunity for two of our best and brightest students,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences. “This forum will allow them to network with some of the USDA’s top officials, leaders in the agricultural industry and their peers from across the country. It will also help set them up for successful futures in agriculture.”

The USDA selected 20 university junior and senior students from across the country to attend the conference based on an essay on “Agriculture as a Career,” and 10 graduate students based on their essay, “The Greatest Challenge Facing Agriculture over the next Five Years.” The students were selected from 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, and Non-Land-Grant Agricultural and Renewable Resources Universities.

Allen, from Detroit, came to TSU in the fall of 2014 after completing an associate’s degree at Wayne County Community College. She is excited about the opportunity to attend the conference and would eventually like to work as a food inspector, either through the USDA or the private sector.

“I think I am most looking forward to the diversity and depths of topics that will be presented,” said Allen. “I hope to gain more in-depth understanding to supplement the things I’m learning in class at TSU.”

Leathers, from Preston, Minnesota, received her Bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, and is looking forward to the forum and the opportunities it will create toward helping her achieve her career goal of becoming an Extension agent and a third-generation farmer.

“It will be an excellent learning experience and opportunity to network and meet students and important agricultural leaders,” she said. “I am excited to represent TSU and advocate for our land-grant university system.”

 

RELATED STORIES

TSU’s Roy Bullock inducted into George Washington Carver Public Service Hall of Fame

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU’s Roy Bullock inducted into George Washington Carver Public Service Hall of Fame

Dr. Roy Bullock
Dr. Roy Bullock

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A professor from Tennessee State University has been recognized for his public service and contributions to the rural farming community. Dr. Roy Bullock, professor of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, received the accolades when he was inducted into the George Washington Carver Public Service Hall of Fame.

The public service award, presented to Bullock December 7, is given to those individuals whose work mirrors the philosophy of world-recognized scholar George Washington Carver – “the greatest good for the greatest number of people.”

The award recognizes teaching and research accomplishments that improve the quality of life for clientele served by land-grant institutions such as Tennessee State University. The award ceremony is part of the annual Professional Agricultural Workers Conference in Tuskegee, Alabama.

Bullock is the first recipient of the prestigious award from Tennessee State University and the first in the state. The award was first presented in 1984.

“This is a great honor to receive this distinction,” said Bullock, who also serves as the Extension state program leader for Agriculture and Natural Resources. “Very few people have received this award.”

Dr. Latif Lighari, associate dean for Extension in the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, expressed pride in and gratitude for Bullock’s many years of service to the college and the farming community.

“This is a great honor for the TSU Cooperative Extension Program to have one of our senior faculty recognized with this prestigious distinction,” Lighari said. “This recognition is given only to people with a remarkable record of success in extension, outreach and university engagement.”

As for the future, Bullock says that he is focused on spending the rest of his career focusing on rebuilding the farming population, which is vital to the nation’s future.

“We need to replenish the aging farmer with the young vibrant farmer through whatever means necessary,” he explained. “If farming fails, everything fails.”

Bullock, a graduate of Class VIII of the National Extension Leadership Development (NELD) Program, has written more than 30 Extension publications. In his current position, he provides leadership to county agents who focus on small farmers in all 95 Tennessee counties. He is a 2009 recipient of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities’ Excellence in Extension Award, the Presidential Distinguished Service Award (2001), the University of Tennessee Program of Distinction Award for Small Farms (2004), the Blue and White Gala Award for Outstanding Program in Small Farms (2006), and the Award of Excellence for Exceptional Programming for Southern Regional Extension Forestry (2006).

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.