Tag Archives: Bishop Joseph W. Walker III

TSU Board of Trustees Completes First Year; University Marks 106th Anniversary

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Tennessee State University Board of Trustees recently wrapped up its first year, and celebrated the university turning 106.

At its third meeting June 21 on the main campus, Board members, along with President Glenda Glover, cut a cake to mark the founding of the university. TSU’s actual birthday was on June 19.

Cake marking the 106th birthday of Tennessee State University. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

“One hundred and six years is a long time to be around,” said Glover, herself a 1974 graduate of TSU. ” We’re still growing, and we don’t plan to stop anytime soon,” Glover said.

Chairman, Bishop Dr. Joseph Walker III, lauded the achievements of the Board of Trustees and the university in the last year.

“It’s been a great first year,” Walker said. “I think the university is moving in the right direction. For me, it’s an honor to serve as chair, because I’m able to see firsthand the spirit of the school, and to see the resilience of these students. The students are really the customers. At the end of the day, it’s really about the students. It’s about the quality of experience you provide for them.”

Glover said the university has accomplished a lot under the new Board.

“We’ve accomplished quite a bit this first year,” Glover said.” This new structure has worked for TSU. We’re raising the academic bar.”

At Thursday’s meeting, Board members recognized the seating of Braxton Simpson, who replaced Sydnie Davis as the student representative on the Board. Simpson is a rising junior majoring in agricultural sciences, with a 4.0 GPA.

“I feel really great being a part of the Board,” Simpson said. “As a student, I feel like my role is to be able to represent the student voice and to try to get students’ concerns brought to the table. I think that’s very important.”

Before adjourning, Board members, President Glover, cabinet and all in attendance gave retiring Vice President of Business and Finance Cynthia Brooks a standing ovation and congratulations for her years of service to the university. Brooks, whose last day is June 30, joined TSU in 1992 after working with the state for several years.

To learn more about the TSU Board of Trustees, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/board/trustees.aspx

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Financial Literacy Conference provides valuable advice

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development held its 4th Annual Financial Literacy Conference on March 23.

Dr. Bishop Joseph Walker, III (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

The one-day conference at the Avon Williams Campus brought together banking and economic development experts, tax planners, and the mayor’s Office of Economic Opportunity and Empowerment.

They discussed alternative financing, understanding credit, budgeting, student loan management, steps to buying a home, and causes of bankruptcy, among other topics.

Organizers said the conference will benefit people from all walks of life, including students, people looking for business ideas, retirees and those approaching retirement.

Dr. Ruthie Reynolds, director of CEED, said, “We are suffering because we don’t know how to use money,” adding that financial literacy must be priority “in our educational system.”

Dr. Bishop Joseph Walker, III, senior pastor of Mount Zion Baptist Church, was the keynote speaker.

He cited several key areas to financial planning that include: Having the right mindset by focusing on things that appreciate in value; living within your means; understanding delayed gratification; and educating yourself about money.

“Too often people put emphasis on depreciating assets because they make us look good, but add no value in terms of our future,” said Walker, who is also chairman of TSU’s Board of Trustees. “The kind of car you drive, the clothes you wear, the jewelry you wear – those things have depreciating value. They lose value the moment you buy them.”

Sponsors of the conference include Fifth Third Bank (which brought its eBus), Capstar, Regions Bank, United Way, Suntrust, NAFI, Pinnacle, Renasant Bank, Financial Empowerment Center, and the Nashville mayor’s office.

For more information about the Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/ceed/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Do not Settle for Average, TSU Commencement Speaker Tells more than 700 Graduates

Kayla Arroyo (left), Academic Excellence Award recipient, shares a candid moment with TSU President, Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover during the commencement ceremony Dec. 14 in the Gentry Center.
Kayla Arroyo (left), Academic Excellence Award recipient, shares a candid moment with TSU President, Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover during the commencement ceremony Dec. 14 in the Gentry Center. (photo by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn., (TSU News Service) – Saying that average breeds mediocrity, Tennessee State University’s fall commencement speaker told nearly 700 graduates on Saturday to be part of a world that demands excellence.

“Don’t be a victim of a world that settles for average,” said Bishop Joseph W. Walker III, pastor of Nashville’s Mt. Zion Baptist Church. “Many settle for average because average is easy. As you enter the next chapter of life, you are about to enter a world that will challenge you at every turn and you must be ready to make the hard choices to be at the top of what you aspire to be.”

Walker, recognized by EBONY on the magazine’s “Power 100” list as one of the nation’s most influential African-American leaders, applauded the graduates for their determination to complete their university journey, urging them to “use that same determination” to be the best.

Bishop Joseph W. Walker III (left) , pastor of Nashville’s Mt. Zion Baptist Church, receives a plaque of appreciation from TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover. Walker provided the commencement address for the Fall 2013 graduation ceremony. (photo by John Cross, TSU Creative Services)
Bishop Joseph W. Walker III (left) , pastor of Nashville’s Mt. Zion Baptist Church, receives a plaque of appreciation from TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover. Walker provided the commencement address for the Fall 2013 graduation ceremony. (photo by John Cross, TSU Creative Services)

“Press your way until you can be at the top of the world. It didn’t matter how you got here or where you came from. It is your determination to defeat average that has you graduating today,” said Walker, leader of the 28,000-member Mount Zion Baptist Church, which he started pastoring in 1992 with 174 members.

Among those who graduated on Saturday were 440 who received undergraduate degrees, 219 received graduate degree, while 45 received doctoral degrees. Nine graduate students received education specialist degrees, and eight received graduate certificates.

Reflecting on his own climb through the education ladder and professional life, Walker, who holds a Doctorate of Ministry from Princeton University, told the graduates to watch out for skeptics along the way, pointing to many who doubted he would amount to anything.

“In high school because I was an overactive kid, they said I had attention deficit, but I went on and not only finished high school, but I completed my college work at Southern University in three years, earned my master’s degree at Vanderbilt, and went on to become the youngest in my class to get a doctorate at Princeton.

“Don’t allow anyone to hold you back. You can accomplish anything you set your mind to. If I can do it, you can do the same,” Walker, a Baton Rouge, La., native, who has authored and co-authored eight books, told the graduates, to repeated thunderous applauses. “Do not forget to say thank you to those who were there with you along the way,” he added.

TSU President, Dr. Glenda Glover, presiding at only her second commencement since taking the helm about a year ago, congratulated the graduates on their accomplishment, and also applauded them for their determination.

“You have endured and prepared yourself to reach this goal which may have seemed unattainable, but you stuck with it,” Dr. Glover said. “You must always remember that you did not accomplish this goal all by yourself. There were parents, relatives, friends and mentors who helped you along the way. Remember to thank them.”

Later, Dr. Glover thanked Bishop Walker for a “wonderful and inspiring” speech.

“You have certainly inspired not only these graduates but all of us here today are encouraged and moved by your words. We thank you,” Dr. Glover added.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.