Tag Archives: Alumni

Excitement Growing Over Tennessee State University 2016 Homecoming

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University senior Ariel Neely probably best sums up Homecoming at TSU: “It is just an exciting time of the year!”

tsu-band
TSU¹s Aristocrat of Bands is one of the highlights of 2016 Homecoming. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Hundreds of people are expected to attend the 2016 celebration, which started Oct. 9 and ends Oct. 15 with the game against Ohio Valley Conference rival Eastern Kentucky University.

This year’s Homecoming theme is “celebrating a legacy of pride and progress,” and marks TSU’s 104th anniversary.

Alums, both local and from across the country, will attend Homecoming events that include a scholarship gala, showcase of bands, parade, step show, coronation of Mr. and Miss TSU, and of course, the game.

“Homecoming is a way for family and alums to come back and see the changes on campus and what their kids or family members are really doing,” said William Johnson, a senior economics major at TSU.

He said this year’s celebration is extra special because his parents, both alums, will be attending.

“That’s just the icing on the cake for me to see them here,” Johnson said.

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A business along the Homecoming parade route showcases TSU spirit. (photo by Lucas Johnson, TSU Media Relations)

Organizers expect turnout for this year’s Homecoming to be one of the largest since the Centennial celebration four years ago.

They say reserved hotel spaces are filling up fast, and tickets to various activities are selling in record numbers.

“We are expecting a lot of people this year,” said Michelle Viera,

TSU’s assistant vice president for Events Management and chair of the Homecoming committee.

Many returning alumni say, more than anything, they’re looking forward to reuniting with old classmates and reminiscing about school days.

“First and foremost, just to fellowship,” said Nashville entrepreneur Kevin Robertson, a ’89 graduate of TSU. “It’s a family environment. I really look forward to seeing old faces and catching up.”

Burnice Winfrey (’85), and two of his three other brothers, attended TSU.

“I get to see a lot of people who come back in town,” said Winfrey, who runs a family business in Nashville. “I enjoy going to the pep rally, the game, and catching up with old professors and classmates. It’s a great atmosphere.”

To find out more about Homecoming 2016, visit www.tnstate.edu/homecoming.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Graduate and Former Track Star Markeith Price Goes for Gold in Rio; Selected to 2016 Paralympic Games

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Lack of sight is not holding back Markeith Price.

The 2012 Tennessee State University graduate, who is visually impaired, is one of more than 60 athletes chosen for the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio that start September 7.

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Markeith Price

At the team trials in Charlotte, North Carolina, July 5, Price flashed across the finish line ahead of the field in the 100-meter. He came second in the 400-meter. He will represent the United States in both competitions, in the T-13 classification for the visually impaired.

A Baltimore native, Price will join 39 other men and 26 women who will represent Team USA in track and field.

“I am extremely honored and blessed for this opportunity,” said Price, who will be making his second straight appearance in the Paralympic Games for the United States. “I have dedicated the last four years to training to run the best race to bring home the gold for the U.S.”

Price was a member of the TSU Tigers men’s track team and the 2012 London Paralympic Games where he finished 6th in the long jump and 8th in the 400-meter dash.

His former coach at TSU said she was not surprise that Price was selected, citing his work ethics and determination to always be the best.

“Markeith was an excellent athlete who worked very hard and didn’t give us any trouble,” said Chandra Cheeseborough-Guide, director of Track and Field and a former Olympian, who coached Price in his junior and senior years. “I am excited for him and to know that we have someone from TSU in the Rio games.”

Diagnosed with Optic Nerve Atrophy at age 3, Price has lived with visual impairment his entire life. The condition is caused by damage of the optic nerve.

“When I was younger, I never really knew how to describe it,” Price said. “As I got older and heard other people describe their vision, I was able to get a better understanding.”

Price recently moved back to Hagerstown, Maryland, where he started a non-profit organization called I C You Foundation, Inc., which raises money for scholarships and programs for the visually impaired. In the last three years, the foundation has given more than $20,000 to organizations such as the Maryland School for the Blind, the Tennessee School for the Blind, and the United States Association for Blind Athletes.

“It’s something that my parents taught me and it’s something that I strongly believe in, and that is giving back to the community,” Price said. “I specifically give back to the visually impaired community because I know that group of people and I know their struggle.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Single Gift of $26,000 Highlights Weekend of TSU Alumni Activities

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A single gift of nearly $26,000 capped a weekend of activities by Tennessee State University alumni to raise funds for scholarship to support students at their alma mater.

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TSU President Glenda Glover, along with Associate Vice President for Institutional Advancement Eloise Abernathy Alexis, and TSU National Alumni Association President Tony Wells, receives a check for $25,735 from member of Beta Omicron Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The Beta Omicron Chapter of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity presented the check Saturday to TSU President Glenda Glover during the halftime show of the TSU Tigers Football Team Blue and White scrimmage at Hale Stadium.

“This is amazing,” Glover said, referring to the presentation and the level of excitement in the stadium. “To see all of our alums come back for our Blue and White game and then present us a check just shows what TSU alums can do when they put their minds together and dedicate themselves to helping their university. I am just pleased to see this number of people including old friends and schoolmates just having a good time.”

Thousands, including former and current students, friends and supporters, gathered at the stadium called “The Hole” for the scrimmage, as part of the weekend of activities. The TSU nationally recognize marching band, the Aristocrat of Bands, was on hand to lead the jubilation.

This was the third year of the event called Legends Coming Home Weekend.

Tony Wells, president of the TSU National Alumni Association, said the weekend is time for alumni to come back and engage with students.

“Homecoming is when alumni come back and interact with each other,” Wells said. “But this is an effort to come back in the spring and make sure we are engaging with our students and help them with their networking. We don’t want to wait until they are ready to graduate. We want to be there to help them understand the process before they leave.”

Earlier, more than 300 participated in the Big Blue Tiger 5K Run/Walk to kick off the day on the main campus. Organizers say nearly 700 paid to register for the race although many did not plan to run.

At Hale Stadium, Crowd favorite, 101-year-old Burnece Walker Brunson, a member of the Alumni Cheerleader Association, did not disappoint. The centenarian, a member of the 1934-1935 cheering squad, showed up with her pom pom.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Alumni, Supporters Step Up in A Big Way; President’s Challenge Tops $12 Million in Giving

Memphis Reception
A cross section of alumni, supporters and staff attended the President’s Reception in the ballroom of the Case Management Inc. headquarters in Memphis. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – At the Sept. 12 Southern Heritage Classic where Tennessee State University trounced archrival Jackson State University 35-25, fans were cheering the TSU Tigers to victory on the football field, while others, especially alumni, were celebrating the “good news” about financial support to their alma mater.

At the President’s Reception the night before, hosted by Dr. Glenda Glover as part of the Southern Heritage Classic festivities, the TSU leader reported that alumni and fans’ financial giving to the university has topped $12 million since she launched the President’s Challenge January 2013, just days after taking over as president. Saying that she would lead by example, Glover presented a check for $50,000 and challenged each alumni chapter to “match my gift or follow my lead in giving to TSU.”

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Eloise Abernathy Alexis, the new associate vice president for Institutional Advancement, left, and President Glenda Glover talk to Karanja Kajanaku, editor of The New Tri-State Defender during an interview in the Peabody Hotel in downtown Memphis. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Since the challenge, which ends Sep. 30, the university has raised $12,446,000 with the Alpha Theta Network Chapter contributing nearly $260,000; Beta Omicron Chapter nearly $183,000; the Nashville Chapter nearly $146,000; the Memphis-Shelby Chapter nearly $138,000, and several other chapters bringing in almost $100,000 each. Glover reported that nine chapters and several clusters had contributed $50,000 or more in giving by June 30.

“Applaud yourselves for this groundbreaking moment in alumni giving,” Glover said, as she thanked those gathered for their support. “We are not done yet. We still have Sept. 30 to make gifts toward the President’s Challenge. We will celebrate the success of the challenge during Homecoming activities.”

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President Glover receives a check for $10,000 from Doug Sanborn, manager of Community Affairs at Miller Coors, as a donation for student support. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

She thanked several individual alumni present for their support, including Bud Reese, a TSU graduate, who donated $30,000 last year from his Case Management Inc. Foundation for student support. She also recognized CMI and its management for hosting the President’s Reception.

Glover applauded the TSU Foundation team, including the staff of the Office of Institutional Advancement, Board members and “all who help each and every day to make this kind of effort possible.” She introduced Eloise Abernathy Alexis as the new associate vice president for Institutional Advancement.

Glover said while the SHC weekend of activities and frenzy about the game was the talk of the town around Memphis, the annual gathering is also an opportunity to talk about scholarship, recruitment, student achievement and giving to the university.

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Hundreds of TSU fans cheer on their team Saturday at the Southern Heritage Classic in the Liberty Bowl. More than 48,000 spectators watched as TSU trounced Jackson State University 35-25 for their fourth straight victory over JSU. (Photo by John Cross)

“As president of Tennessee State University, I take great pride in our student-athletes, cheerleaders and the band members who compete and perform in the Southern Heritage Classic game and the many other students who attend,” Glover said. “We feel it is important that in the midst of fun, food and football, we take time to gather here in Memphis to check in on one another about the well-being of TSU and the students we serve.”

On Thursday evening, the Memphis native was presented with a special gift at the Classic VIP Party hosted by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton.

“It always gives me a special good feeling and pleasure to welcome Dr. Glenda Glover, one of our own, who is making a big difference as president of Tennessee State University,” Wharton said.

Glover also met with several news organs for one-on-one interviews about the direction of TSU and the university’s role in ensuring quality higher education for all.

At the half-time show of the Southern Heritage Classic, attended by more than 48,000 fans, a representative of Miller Coors  presented President Glover with a check for $10,000 for student support.

The win in Saturday’s game, the fourth consecutive, improves TSU to 15-11 in the Southern Heritage Classic.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

California Post Office Renamed for Late TSU Alum

Courtesy of the Vallejo Times-Herald          

Philmore Graham
Philmore Graham

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – An alum from Tennessee State University was always one to bring two opposing sides together. Even in his death, he was able to unite California Republicans and Democrats.

And because of this and his involvement in his community, a building in Vallejo, California now bears his name…the Philmore Graham Post Office.

With the unveiling Saturday, March 14, of a plaque dedication and ceremony, U.S. Rep. Mike Thompson’s crusade came to fruition, to the delight of about 150 of Graham’s family, friends and well-wishers.

Graham, who graduated from TSU in 1962 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical and Metallurgical Engineering, dedicated his life to serving others, and in 1966, founded what would later become the Continentals of Omega Boys and Girls Club in a building coincidently, next to the newly renamed post office.

“There is no one more deserving of this recognition than Philmore Graham and I am proud that we were able to pass legislation to rename our post office in his honor,” said Thompson. “Mr. Graham was a veteran, a patriot, a mentor and a leader. He dedicated his life to helping others succeed, and he made our community a better place to live and raise a family. It’s only fitting that we honor his memory by forever naming our post office after Philmore Graham.”

Thompson joined Mayor Osby Davis, Omega executive director Rey Amador, Post Office Bay Vallejo District Manager Jeffrey Day, Postmaster Anthony Daniels, Graham’s daughter, Deidre Graham, and son, Montoya Graham, in honoring the local icon who died June 12, 2014 at 75.

U.S. Rep. Mike Thompson, right and Bay Valley District Manager of the USPS Jeffrey Day, left,  along with Deidre Graham and her brother Montoya unveil a plaque renaming the Springstowne Center Post Office after Philmore Graham. (Photo courtesy of CHRIS RILEY—VALLEJO TIMES-HERALD)
U.S. Rep. Mike Thompson, right and Bay Valley District Manager of the USPS Jeffrey Day, left, along with Deidre Graham and her brother Montoya unveil a plaque renaming the Springstowne Center Post Office after Philmore Graham. (Photo courtesy of CHRIS RILEY—VALLEJO TIMES-HERALD)

Thompson, a Democrat for California’s 5th congressional District, said it “took an act of Congress” to get his bill passed. Literally. He had to convince the other 52 state legislators “from both sides of the aisle” to sign on. If one challenged Graham’s qualifications, the bill was done. Plus there was that minor detail of getting it signed by President Obama.

“Before you name a post office, you better be pretty certain this is someone worthy of that honor,” said Thompson, who previously passed bills renaming a Yountville post office after a Congressional Medal of Honor recipient and a Napa post office after a Superior Court judge “who set the gold standard of what people should be like. And Philmore falls into that category.”

Thompson was a state senator when he befriended Graham and knew the club’s patriarch well.

“He was the kind of guy you would follow anywhere. He was a great leader and had a great vision for Vallejo and, most importantly, the youth of Vallejo,” Thompson said.

It’s significant having a post office named after Graham, said Thompson.

“The post office will always be here. A donut shop or bagel shop or ice cream parlor can be out of business tomorrow. A post office is always going to be in a community,” he said.

Davis, a friend of the Graham family for more than 40 years, gave a brief — but emotional — tribute.

“I was thinking how special this moment is,” Davis said. “I was thinking how big a grin Philmore would have on his face. I know how proud he would be. This is really an honor.”

Deirdre Graham, Philmore’s daughter up from her Southern California home, called the ceremony “a joyous occasion.”

“I never thought I’d be standing in front of a post office that would be named after my father,” she said. “I feel like the most blessed daughter in the world. Today is a priceless moment.”

Montoya Graham relayed a conversation he had with his father about death.

“He always told me, ‘Son, don’t be worried about death. If you just do the right thing in your life, in your death, you will be remembered.’”

Philmore Graham graduated from Tennessee State University and accomplished graduate studies at UCLA and Cal-Berkeley. He was a commissioned officer in the U.S. Air Force, receiving an honorable discharge in 1965. Two months later, he accepted a position at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard where he would receive several Superior Accomplishment awards.

Graham was the first and only African American supervisor in the Nuclear Engineering Department’s history on Mare Island.

Since he began the Continentals of Omega club, Graham was honored as the NAACP Outstanding Citizen of the Year, Good Neighbor Award, Salute to America Lifetime Merit Award, Profile of Excellence Award, Martin Luther King Jr. Humanitarian Award, the “Who’s Who” among Black Americans, and multiple awards as Omega Man of the Year and Citizen of the Year.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Alumna and Longtime Media Expert Named Executive Vice President at RLJ Entertainment

Traci Otey Blunt
Traci Otey Blunt

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Traci Otey Blunt, a 1990 cum laude graduate of Tennessee State University, has been named executive vice president of marketing and corporate affairs at RLJ Entertainment Inc., a premier independent owner, developer, licensee, and distributor of entertainment content and programming.

In her new role, Blunt will oversee the company’s marketing, public relations and investor relations, as well as the promotion of the newly launched RLJE Urban Movie Channel, a digital channel that will feature urban-themed movies showcasing drama, documentaries, comedies, horror and stage plays.

For the last six years, Traci served as senior vice president of corporate communications and public affairs at The RLJ Companies, the holding company of RLJ Entertainment. Prior to joining RLJ Companies, the veteran media, political, and public affairs specialist served as a deputy communications director to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during the 2008 presidential campaign.

In announcing Blunt’s appointment, the founder of RLJ Companies and Chairman of RLJ Entertainment, Robert L. Johnson, said she has proven to be an invaluable executive in promoting and executing the business goals and objectives of The RLJ Companies.

“I believe appointing her (Blunt) to RLJE as Corporate EVP to perform these functions, as well as focus heavily on the marketing and promotion of UMC is an ideal fit,” said Johnson, who is also founder of Black Entertainment Television. “I am confident that with Traci joining the RLJE management team, her expertise will be beneficial to the company as a whole and help our strategic launch of UMC.”

Blunt, who earned a bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice from TSU, serves on several boards, including Malaria No More, ColorComm, and the National Black Caucus of Local Elected Officials Foundation. She is also a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc.

“This job is every job I’ve ever had all rolled into one,” Blunt once said upon her appointment as senior vice president at The RLJ Companies. “I always say that I’m never going to leave.”

RLJ is the holding company for 13 diverse business entities ranging from automotive, private equity, financial services, to sports and entertainment.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Haslam Appoints TSU Alumnus as Judge for Tennessee Court of Appeals

ArmstrongK03rsNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has appointed an alumnus from Tennessee State University to the Tennessee Court of Appeals, Western Section.

Chancellor Kenny W. Armstrong of Memphis, Tennessee will replace Judge Holly Kirby, who has been appointed to the Tennessee Supreme Court. The appointment is effective Sept. 1.

“Chancellor Armstrong has an impressive record of service, and I am pleased to make this appointment,” Haslam said in a news release June 18. “His experience in public and private practice as well as at the state and federal level will serve the Western Section well.”

Armstrong, 66, has been a trial judge in Shelby County Chancery Court since September 2006. He was clerk and master of Shelby County Chancery Court from January 1997-August 2006. Armstrong was recipient of the Charles A. Rond Memorial Award for Outstanding Judge of the Year in Shelby County in 2012.

“I appreciate Governor Haslam’s confidence in me, and I look forward to serving my state in this new role as an appellate judge,” Armstrong said.

A Munford, Tennessee native, Armstrong was in private practice in Memphis from June 1978-December 1996. He served as legal officer in the United States Air Force from June 1974-June 1978 at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas and Blytheville Air Force Base in Arkansas. He was an assistant U.S. attorney in the criminal division of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington from August 1973-June 1974.

Armstrong earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering at Tennessee State University in 1970 and received his juris doctorate from Duke University School of Law in Durham, North Carolina, in 1973. Armstrong and his wife, Verline, have two adult children, daughter Shani and son Brian.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Day On the Hill Gives State Lawmakers Look into Tennessee State University Programs, Successes

Dr. Glenda Glover (center) joins state legislators, TSU students, faculty and staff, along with community supports, during a special ribbon-cutting ceremony to declare "TSU Day on the Hill."  (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Dr. Glenda Glover (center) joins state legislators, TSU students, faculty and staff, along with community supporters, during a special ribbon-cutting ceremony in the Senate Chamber to declare “TSU Day on the Hill.” (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Coming just hours before President Glenda Glover’s third Town Hall Meeting tonight where she will report on progress at Tennessee State University, the institution was celebrated today with proclamations and presentations during a special program at the State Capitol.

Called TSU Day on the Hill, the program recognized the institution for its outstanding academics, research, athletics, and importance to the education goals of Tennessee.

State legislators joined key stakeholders, including alumni, community leaders and friends of TSU to thank President Glover, faculty staff and students for making the University one of the best.

“Tennessee State University is a very critical component of our effort to develop educated citizens for our state and nation,” said Sen. Bo Watson (R-Hixson), Senate Speaker Pro Tempore, who acquainted the TSU visitors with the legislative process.

“We encourage you to make these visits frequently to see what we do here,” Sen. Watson said, adding, “When you come here you bring us information that makes us work better along with you to develop citizens who are more informed and educated.”

During a special ribbon-cutting ceremony in the Senate Chamber to officially declare “TSU Day on the Hill,” President Glover said she was glad to bring the University community to the State Capitol.

“By us coming here, we want our people to see what you do, and for you, our lawmakers, to see how the decisions you make affect what goes on at Tennessee State University,” said Dr. Glover. “We thanked you for this opportunity and the recognition you gave TSU.”

Dr. Glover encouraged the lawmakers to continue support for the Complete College Tennessee Act, which she said, determines funding level for TBR institutions.

Also speaking in the Chamber were Devonte Johnson, president of the TSU Student Government Association; Rep. Brenda Gilmore (D-Nashville); Sen. Thelma Harper (D-Nashville); Rep. Larry Miller  (D-Memphis), president of the State Black Caucus; Rep. Harold Love Jr. (D-Nashville); and Sandra Hunt, president of the Nashville Chapter of the TSU National Alumni Association.

Later, Rep. Love, on behalf of his fellow legislators, presented the TSU Women’s Track and Field Team with a special proclamation for becoming the 2014 champions of the Indoor Ohio Valley Conference.

“The General Assembly finds it necessary to recognize these outstanding young women of the Tennessee State University Tigerbelles who have, through their hard work, dedication and determination, achieved this success as champions of the Ohio Valley Conference,” the proclamation said.

Also receiving a special recognition with a proclamation was the TSU football team for their outstanding performance in the 2014 season. TSU, which went 9-3, finished the season second in the Ohio Valley Conference. It also had a record 12 players selected to all-conference teams.

The TSU Day on the Hill, which brought together more than 200 administrators, students, faculty and staff, also included displays of different programs, giveaways, free lunch for at least two members from each legislator’s office, and visits to various committee hearings, and discussion with some key lawmakers.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.