TSU Aristocrat of Bands Ranked No. 1 Among HBCU Bands

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Tennessee State University world famous marching band has done it again. Just in time for homecoming, The Undefeated has named the TSU Aristocrat of Bands the Best HBCU marching band in America.

Ranked No. 4 in the September poll, AOB moved slightly ahead of North Carolina A&T State University to take the title, with top finishes in all categories, including No. 1 in drum major.

This is the third ESPN/The Undefeated HBCU Ranking this season. Bands are evaluated based on musicality, drill and design, percussion, auxiliary crops and drum majors. The rankings are conducted by two six-person panels consisting of current and retired band directors from HBCUs, as well as choreographers.

The AOB is not new to national or international recognition. They have performed at the White House, at NFL games, and appeared at events and performed with many other big stars.

During the recent NFL Draft in Nashville, the AOB thrilled fans with a performance on ESPN’s “First Take.” Percussionists from the band performed in the Rose Bowl Parade. The AOB performed with country music legend Keith Urban, and performed at the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio.

Lizzo, a rising star topping the charts, gave a shout out to the band recently after they performed a dynamic medley including her hit song “Truth Hurts”  at TSU’s game against Mississippi Valley State on Aug. 31, and delivered a repeat performance at the National Battle of the Bands in Houston, Lizzo’s hometown.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Gospel Legend Dr. Bobby Jones Receives Lifetime Achievement Award at Homecoming Gospel Explosion

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University alum and the man considered the father of gospel television was honored Saturday night by his peers, including gospel sensation and Grammy Award winner Kirk Franklin. Dr. Bobby Jones was celebrated for his more than 40 years of contributions to the gospel music industry and received a lifetime achievement award.

Dr. Bobby Jones’ career in gospel music and television spans more than 40 years. (Photo by TSU Media Relations)

The special recognition, made in collaboration the GMA Dove Awards, was a part of TSU’s annual Gospel Explosion in Kean Hall, kicking off the 2019 homecoming week for the university. TSU President Glenda Glover, joined by Franklin and and GMA representatives, presented the Lifetime Achievement Award to Jones.

Jones won a 1983 Dove Award for his “I’m So Glad I’m Standing Here.”

“On this very stage 60 years ago, I received my bachelor’s degree, and four years later, I received my master’s degree,” Jones recalled. “The strange thing about it is here I am receiving a lifetime achievement award on the same stage. I am so grateful for this honor.”

Franklin, known for such gospel hits as ‘Love Theory,” ‘Wanna Be Happy,” and “A God Like You,” sent fans in the the packed Kean Hall screaming when he appeared on stage with the TSU New Direction Choir for several selections.

Before appearing with Franklin, New Direction earlier opened the night with with performances that left the crowd wanting more.

Gospel sensation Kirk Franklin performs with the TSU New Direction Choir at the Gospel Explosion. (Photo by TSU Media Relations)

Other big name stars included JJ Hairston, renowned leader of Youthful Praise choir; Koryn Hawthorne, contemporary gospel singer and finalist in Season 8 of NBC’s singing competition The Voice; and James Fortune, gospel music recording artist, songwriter and producer.

Referred to as the “Ed Sullivan of Gospel Music” and a staunched supporter of TSU, Jones, a Nashville native, is an American gospel music legend. For 36 years, Jones brought gospel music to a national TV audience with his legendary Sunday morning program “Bobby Jones Gospel.” He gave big breaks to rising stars like Yolanda Adams and Kirk Franklin.

Homecoming week runs through Saturday, Oct. 19, culminating with the parade along Jefferson Street, and the football game between TSU and Austin Peay at Nissan Stadium. For more information on Homecoming go to http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/homecoming/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Dr. Levi Watkins Jr. Lecture Series to feature TSU alumna and Board member, Dr. Edith Peterson Mitchell

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The second annual Dr. Levi Watkins, Jr. Lecture Series will take place on Oct. 17 during Tennessee State University’s Homecoming week.

Dr. Edith Peterson Mitchell

This year’s featured speaker is Dr. Edith Peterson Mitchell, a TSU alumna and member of the university’s Board of Trustees. She is also a renowned cancer specialist, and retired Air Force brigadier general.

The lecture is scheduled for 2 p.m. in the Robert N. Murrell Forum in the university’s Floyd-Payne Campus Center.

The lecture series, a component of the Dr. Levi Watkins, Jr., Institute, was established to honor Watkins, a 1966 alumnus of TSU and the first African-American to be accepted into and graduate from the Vanderbilt School of Medicine. It features prominent speakers who address areas in health care and STEM to prepare students for the medical field.

In addition to the lecture series, the Institute also consists of a pre-med society and an endowed scholarship.

The late Watkins is known worldwide for being the first surgeon to successfully implant an automatic heart defibrillator in a human patient at John Hopkins Hospital.

Dr. Levi Watkins, Jr.

Dr. Watkins was also a pioneer in civil rights at Hopkins. He fought to diversify the medical staff and student ranks at the hospital. His legacy of recruiting and mentoring minority students helped to change the landscape of the medical profession.

Watkins retired from Hopkins in 2013, dedicating 43 years of service to helping others. He passed away on April 11, 2015.

To see all of TSU’s 2019 Homecoming activities, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/homecoming/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

US Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue visits TSU, lauds its innovative research

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – During a visit to Tennessee State University on Monday, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue lauded the land-grant institution’s innovative research, and challenged students to “invest in yourselves.”

Perdue toured the College of Agriculture and gave a presentation to Ag students in the Farrell Westbrook Complex on the main campus.

U.S. Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue, TSU President Glenda Glover, and College of Ag Dean Chandra Reddy. (Photo by Erynne Davis, TSU Media Relations)

Following the presentation, the College gave Perdue a gift, and TSU President Glenda Glover thanked him for visiting TSU and for his support.

“We’re pleased to have you on our campus, and in our corner,” said Dr. Glover. “We’re so appreciative of all you’ve done for 1890s; you’ve taken land grants to heart.”

Including Tennessee State, the 1890 land-grant system consists of 19 universities.

In his discussion, Perdue emphasized the importance of such institutions, and encouraged students to take advantage of what they offer. He also challenged them to “stand, “ be “steadfast,” and “persevere.”

“As you stand, as you’re steadfast to your vision, and persevere for the next cause, I know that you’ll be successful,” said Perdue, who also took questions from the students.

“TSU has invested in you, USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) has invested in you, now I want you to invest in yourselves. You are provided an opportunity that many people in this life do not get.”

Emmanuel Wallace, a sophomore from Memphis majoring in agricultural sciences, was inspired by what Perdue said.

Perdue receives gift from College of Ag student. (Photo by Erynne Davis, TSU Media Relations)

“I learned to definitely stay steadfast, be confident in what you’re doing, and continue to strive for excellence,” said Wallace.

Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of TSU’s College of Agriculture, said the U.S. Department of Agriculture is very supportive of the university, so he’s pleased that the department’s top official visited TSU.

“This is awesome, because USDA supports a number of USDA scholars for us, as well as research and extension facilities at TSU,” said Reddy. “This is an opportunity for the Secretary to see firsthand how we are stewarding those resources they are providing.”

During his visit, Perdue noted TSU’s research in hemp, food safety, as well as its New Farmer Academy, the only one of its kind in Tennessee.

“You’ve got major research here,” said Perdue. “The research dollars … are being well-utilized.”

Kristin Day is among numerous TSU students who have benefitted from USDA. The junior from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, received a full-ride with an 1890 land-grant scholarship, which also guarantees an internship with a federal agency.

Before Perdue’s visit, Day, who is majoring in agricultural sciences with a concentration in agribusiness, said she looked forward to seeing him again. She said she first met Perdue last month during a visit to Washington, D.C.

“It’s an honor that he’s coming to TSU, and he wants to sit down with us and have an intimate discussion,” said Day, who hopes to one day work with USDA.

Perdue takes questions from students. (Photo by Erynne Davis, TSU Media Relations)

Last year, USDA awarded more than $2 million in teaching, research and extension capacity building grants to seven TSU professors in the College of Ag.

The College was also awarded a $450,000 grant from the USDA’s Agricultural Food and Research Initiative. It’s being used to pursue an integrated approach to mitigate antimicrobial resistance in cattle and poultry, and help establish stewardship programs for small and medium-sized ranchers.

For more information about TSU’s College of Agriculture, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

US AG secretary Sonny Perdue to visit TSU

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue will get a glimpse of innovative research and interact with top-notch students when he visits Tennessee State University on Monday, Oct. 7.

Perdue is scheduled to attend a breakfast hosted by TSU President Glenda Glover before touring the College of Agriculture and giving a presentation to Ag students at 10 a.m. in the Farrell Westbrook Complex on the main campus.

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue

Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of TSU’s College of Agriculture, says the U.S. Department of Agriculture is very supportive of the land-grant institution, so he’s pleased that the department’s top official is visiting TSU.

“This is awesome, because USDA supports a number of USDA scholars for us, as well as research and extension facilities at TSU,” says Reddy. “This is an opportunity for the Secretary to see firsthand how we are stewarding those resources they are providing.”

Kristin Day is among numerous TSU students who have benefitted from USDA. The junior from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, received a full-ride with an 1890 land-grant scholarship, which also guarantees an internship with a federal agency.

Day, who is majoring in agricultural sciences with a concentration in agribusiness, says she’s looking forward to seeing Perdue, again. She says she first met him last month during a visit to Washington, D.C.

“It’s an honor that he’s coming to TSU, and he wants to sit down with us and have an intimate discussion,” says Day, who hopes to one day work with USDA.

Last year, USDA awarded more than $2 million in teaching, research and extension capacity building grants to seven TSU professors in the College of Ag.

The College was also awarded a $450,000 grant from the USDA’s Agricultural Food and Research Initiative. It’s being used to pursue an integrated approach to mitigate antimicrobial resistance in cattle and poultry, and help establish stewardship programs for small and medium-sized ranchers.

For more information about TSU’s College of Agriculture, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Career Fair Opens Doors to Internships, Employment for TSU Students

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University students looking for internships, full-time employment and co-op opportunities got a major break on Oct. 2. More than 100 companies and potential employers converged on the main campus for the 2019 Fall Career Fair.

TSU student Shaun Anderson, a business administration major, right, talks to Dell representatives at the Career Fair. In the photo are, from left, Bonnie McKissack, Senior Sales Leader; Tiffany C. Perry, Inside Global Sales Manager (TSU alum); Shaheed Whitfield, Recruiter (TSU alum); Elizabeth Casey, Recruiter; and Shelton Cammon, Recruiter. (Photo by Erynne Davis, TSU Media Relations)

Representatives from government agencies, aerospace, engineering, healthcare and the entertainment industries set up tents, tables and displays in the Gentry Center Complex to network with students about career and potential employment opportunities.

Many have scheduled follow-up interviews with students on the TSU campus.

Officials said nearly 500 students attended the all-day fair, organized by the TSU Career Development Center in the Division of Student Affairs.

Micaih Mayfield, a junior mechanical engineering major, and Oluwatosin Fagbuyi, a graduate student, also in electrical engineering, were among those looking for career opportunities. Mayfield was looking to land an internship, while Fagbuyi, who graduates in May, was looking for a co-op or full-time employment.

Micaiah Mayfield, a junior mechanical engineering major, talks to representative of BWX Technologies. She said she received many positive responses from companies. (Photo by Erynne Davis, TSU Media Relations)

“Everything looks very promising,” said Mayfield, of Nashville, who made several stops, leaving her resume at each point. “A lot of people asked for my resume, they looked over it and asked a lot of questions about my career goals.”

For Fagbuyi, who was very optimistic about landing an opportunity, he said going after companies this early before his May graduation was a good effort.

“I count myself lucky to be able to get this opportunity to attend a career fair,” said Fagbuyi, who received an internship in his undergraduate years as a result of the career fair. “From what I have seen today, I will absolutely get something from it, thanks to the TSU Career Development Center for preparing us.”

Frank Stevenson, associate vice president for Student Affairs and dean of students, said the goal of the fair was to “share some of our amazing students” with these companies and the world.

“We are really excited about these corporations and companies that are here to meet students that TSU produces,” said Stevenson. “It is nice to see them so excited about interacting with our students.”

Major sponsors included General Electric, Altria, LG&E and KU Energy, Humana, Innophos, Inc., and Dell, which was to meet the next day with seven students who received on-the-spot preliminary interviews at the fair. Regions Bank is a standard sponsor. Like many of the other sponsors, hiring TSU students is not new for Dell. At the tech giant’s table during the fair, two of the company representatives and recruiters were TSU graduates, who got their start from the career fair.

Alexander Sellers, Systems Engineering Manager at Boeing, right, who earned two degrees at TSU, received his start from the career fair. He returned as a recruiter and to mentor his young protégés. (Photo by Erynne Davis, TSU Media Relations)

Tiffany C. Perry, inside global sales manager for North America at Dell, earned a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from TSU. She said coming back to her alma mater to recruit is just one way of trying to give back.

“It’s been an awesome day for me,” said Perry. “I am thankful for this opportunity. I am even happier to know that the candidates that came to our table were just incredible, they were prepared and represented TSU well.”

Alexander Sellers, systems engineering manager at Boeing, was one of those representing his company at the fair. He talked about the preparation he received, the importance of the career fair and the excitement to be back on the TSU campus, where he earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the College of Engineering.

Antoinette Duke, Associate Director of the TSU Career Development Center, left, presents a plaque to representatives of GE in appreciation of their support as major sponsor of the career fair. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

“The career fair is integral for any student’s progression,” said Sellers, who was first hired by Lockheed Martin as a result of the career fair. “TSU is going to provide you the foundation of think, work, serve, and your classwork. But you have to get connected, and this is what that is all about.”

Antoinette Hargrove Duke, associate director of the Career Development Center, said the fair is an opportunity to properly “position our students.”

“We have spent most of the year preparing our students, getting them job ready,” Duke said. “So, at this career fair, it is our opportunity to partner the two (students and companies) together in hopes that we can increase our chances of making sure when our students graduate that they land employment that’s going to match the education that they have received.”

Duke was also glad to see former students and alumni of the career center who return as mentors and recruiters to help their younger protégés prepare for the real world.

“It is just nice to see them giving back to their institution,” she said.

Duke presented each of the major sponsors with a plaque in appreciation of their support to TSU and the Career Development Center.

For more information on the TSU Career Development Center, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/careers/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.