University’s Honors Program Celebrates 50 Years of Excellence

Former CNN news anchor and award-winning journalist Soledad O’Brien featured speaker March 26 during Honors Program Convocation

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – This academic year the Honors Program at Tennessee State University will celebrate 50 years of positive and life-long learning, scholarly inquiry, and a commitment to service.

Award-winning journalist Soledad O'Brien will be the featured speaker March 26 during the Honors program Convocation.
Award-winning journalist Soledad O’Brien will be the featured speaker March 26 during the Honors program Convocation.

The yearlong celebration will commemorate the program’s journey throughout the years, and will be capped by a visit to campus on March 26 by award-winning broadcast journalist Soledad O’Brien. The former CNN anchor will be the featured speaker at the Honors Anniversary Luncheon at 11 a.m. that will honor Dr. McDonald Williams, the first Director of the Honors Program. O’Brien will also be the featured keynote speaker during the Honors Day Convocation beginning at 1 p.m.

The Honors Convocation in Kean Hall is free and open to the public. The Honors Anniversary Luncheon is $50 per person and takes place in the Gentry Center.

O’Brien’s appearance is sponsored by the Office of Student Affairs as part of the Distinguished Lecture Speaker series.

At the convocation, notable Honors alumni will address the student body, Honors societies, Honors alumni and community members.

According to Dr. Coreen Jackson, director of the Honors Program, the primary goal of the program is to create and maintain a community of academically bright and talented students who serve as campus leaders and role models.

“The key objective is the academic enrichment of our students and working with them to achieve their goals,” she added. “We have the opportunity to teach students who are excited about learning and have the freedom to explore issues from multiple points of view. The program not only impacts the students but also the entire University.”

Other events planned for the celebration include an Honors Research Symposium to coincide with the University-wide Research Symposium March 31 through April 5. During the fall, the celebration will culminate with a special 50th Anniversary cake-cutting ceremony and an Honors Week observance.

Jackson added that the jubilee celebration kicks off with an “Honors 50 for 50” campaign to raise funds to help the program transition to an Honors College. The new college, she said, will encourage interdisciplinary programs, enhance undergraduate research in all disciplines, advising for prestigious fellowships and scholarships, develop a mentoring program to make our students more competitive, encourage lifelong learning, including a global perspective through study abroad.

“We are attempting to raise $500,000 to offset the cost of transitioning the program to a full-fledge Honors College,” added Jackson. “As a College, we will be able to highlight the importance of offering an enriched honors curriculum and to increase the University’s ability to recruit and retain high-ability students. We have a program that has a national reputation that has exceeded the basic characteristics of honors program and already meets the characteristics of an Honors College, as recommended by the National Collegiate Honors Council, the recognized leader in undergraduate honor education.”

In 1963, Dr. Walter S. Davis, then President of Tennessee State University, appointed a committee that was charged with studying honors programs and determining the feasibility of establishing one at the University. The committee recommended that TSU keep pace with other institutions throughout the country. As a result, an honors program for freshman students started in the fall of 1964. Sophomore through senior level course work was added yearly throughout 1968.

During the years since 1964, the Honors Program has continued to develop and grow, moving from a converted classroom in the Agricultural Building to the present Honors Center, located on the first floor of the Student Success Center. The center includes study areas, a computer room, conference room, classroom, multipurpose /lounge, and offices of director, associate director and the administrative assistant. Phi Kappa Phi, Golden Key and Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Societies are also housed in the Honors Center.

More important than the physical changes that have taken place, according to Jackson, are the increasingly large number of students entering the program and the achievements they are making.

“They come from many different states and countries and have a variety of majors,” she said. “Consistent with honors objectives, honors students continue to be admitted to prestigious graduate and professional schools.”

For more information on the anniversary activities or Honors Convocation featuring Soledad O’Brien, contact the Honors Program at 615.963.5731.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Fans Urged to Vote as Home Depot Kicks off Annual Retool Your School Campaign

437xNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – It’s time to vote again TSU fans, alumni, students, faculty and staff!

The annual Home Depot Retool Your School Campus Improvement Program and voting kicked off Monday, Feb. 17.  At stake is the much coveted nearly $250,000 award for campus improvement projects.

To get a share of the money, TSU must compete with other Historically Black Colleges and Universities across the country. Each school submits a brief description of projects to be considered. Winners are determined through online voting, which runs through April 14.

Awards are given out in the following grant categories: Tier I, a single $50,000 grant; Tier II, 13 $10,000 grants; and a $25,000 Campus Pride Grant for each of the three schools that receive the most votes and social media activity.

According to Ron Brooks, associate vice president for Facilities Management, TSU has submitted three proposals for improvements around the campus. The first, a Tier I project, would create a Heritage Walk Mall similar to the Jefferson Street Gateway to Heritage Plaza that would memorialize TSU history and those associated with it. The second project, for a Tier II grant, would install an interactive information kiosk that displays TSU history, directions and general-event information.

Also on TSU’s list is a proposed project for the Campus Pride Grant to erect TSU banners along Jefferson/John Merritt Boulevard.

“It’s really important for everyone to get involved in voting and help TSU secure these funds,” said Brooks. “We are thankful for our leadership, hard work and commitment of all to move these projects forward. However, to make them a reality, we are going to have to rely on the votes from alumni, students, faculty, staff and supporters.”

According to The Home Depot, the goal of the Retool Your School program is to provide sustainable and lasting renovations to give new life to HBCUs campuses. Each year, the outpouring of support for the program from alumni, students, parents and the community grows. Since the program’s inception in 2010, more than three million votes have been cast as the HBCU community bands together for their favorite and most deserving HBCU school projects.

The Home Depot is thrilled to once again offer the Retool Your School Campus Improvement Grant available to HBCUs,” said Melissa Brown, manager of multicultural marketing at Home Depot. “It is such a rewarding program connecting with our communities and it takes school spirit to a whole new level.”

To cast your vote for Tennessee State University, visit The Home Depot link and click on Tennessee State University to vote. You can vote only once each day. Help spread the word for TSU by using the cobranded hashtag #tsuTHDRYS on Twitter and Instagram. Using these hashtags helps to increase our chances of winning the Campus Pride grant.

For more information, visit The Home Depot Retool Your School website.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Competes in Honda Campus All-Star Challenge Qualifying Tournament

Students from TSU took part in one of the regional qualifying tournaments for the Honda Campus All-Star Challenge Feb. 15 at Alabama State University. Pictured are: front row (L-R)  Brandon Bartee, Maurice Henderson, Diarra Fall. Back row (L-R) January Wisniewski, Rebecca Webber, Aurora Garvin, Amadou Fall, Joseph Patrick (courtesy photo)
Students from TSU took part in one of the regional qualifying tournaments for the Honda Campus All-Star Challenge Feb. 15 at Alabama State University. Pictured are: front row (L-R) Brandon Bartee, Maurice Henderson, Diarra Fall. Back row (L-R) January Wisniewski, Rebecca Webber, Aurora Garvin, Amadou Fall, Joseph Patrick (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The road to claim the title of America’s best in the 2014 Honda All-Star Challenge started this weekend for students from Tennessee State University when they traveled to Montgomery, Ala., for the qualifying tournament Feb. 15 at Alabama State University. Forty-eight teams from the qualifying tournaments will then advance to the National Championship Tournament in Los Angeles in April. The teams will be announced on Feb. 20.

The team, according to Dr. John P. Miglietta, professor of Political Science and coach of the TSU team, did well in the tournament, winning two out of four games.

“The students did very well, with several of them playing in their first tournament,” said Miglietta. “TSU was very competitive and the team received valuable experience. This will serve them well if we participate in the national tournament, and certainly for next year.”

Participation in the National Qualifying tournament is an essential part of the qualification process for the National Championship tournament, which will be held April 12-16. Dubbed “the Olympics of the Mind,” the Honda Campus All‐Star Challenge is a “knowledge game of quick recall” that engages the best and brightest students at HBCUs in an annual academic quiz championship. Students compete in answering questions related to pop culture, sports, history, science, current events, and literature, as well as African-American history, and general knowledge categories.

The Challenge, sponsored by Honda, is now in its 25th year. During that time Honda has awarded more than $7 million in grants to participating HBCUs, and nearly 100,000 students in 22 states have taken part.

Representing TSU this year are: Adriann N. Wilson, a junior Mechanical Engineering major from Albany, Ga.; Brandon Cantrel Bartee, junior Mechanical Engineering major from Manchester, Tenn.; Aurora Garvin, a sophomore Art major from Nashville, Tenn.; and Joseph Edward Patrick II, a junior Electrical Engineering major also from Nashville.

Other club members attending the qualifying tournament included Amadou Fall, a junior Chemistry major, from Nashville; Maurice Henderson, freshmen Computer Science major, from Jacksonville, Fla.; Rebecca Webber, a senior Nursing major, from Nashville; and January Wisniewski, a graduate student in Computer Science, also from Nashville.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Professor to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award from Nashville Legal Community

Robert Smith, assistant professor in the Department of Criminal Justice, will receive the will receive the Z. Alexander Looby Lifetime Achievement Award from the Napier-Looby Bar Foundation Feb. 20, during the association's annual banquet. (courtesy photo)
Robert Smith, assistant professor in the Department of Criminal Justice, will receive the Z. Alexander Looby Lifetime Achievement Award from the Napier-Looby Bar Foundation Feb. 20, during the association’s annual banquet. (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Robert Smith, an assistant professor of Criminal Justice at Tennessee State University, will receive the Z. Alexander Looby Lifetime Achievement Award from the Napier-Looby Bar Foundation.

Smith will be honored during the organization’s 10th Annual Barristers’ Banquet and Award program on Thursday, Feb. 20 at the Music City Center in Nashville. The award is named after Z. Alexander Looby, who was a leading Civil Rights lawyer in Nashville along with his law partner, Avon Williams.

Smith, who teaches constitutional and criminal law at the University, will be one of four attorneys to be recognized during the annual awards banquet. During his time at the University, Smith has not only been a strong force in the classroom, but has also coached the TSU Mock Trial team since its inception in the John Marshall School of Law undergraduate competition. Additionally he conducts the CAMA: CSI/Mock Trial for high school students at TSU during the summer.

A nonprofit organization of attorneys in the Nashville legal community, the Napier-Looby Bar Association is dedicated to the advancement and development of black attorneys as well as attorneys interested in issues affecting the black community. Its membership consists of attorneys, in the private and public sectors, as well as judges, law professors, law students, paralegals and other interested individuals.

For more information about the banquet, contact the association at 615.238.6303 or info@napierlooby.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU’s Covington Named All-Star Game MVP

Robert Covington
Robert Covington

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service)  – Former Tennessee State men’s basketball student-athlete and current Rio Grande Valley Viper Robert Covington was named Most Valuable Player of the NBA D- League All-Star Game presented by Kumho Tire.

The Chicago native scored 33 points and added six rebounds and three steals in leading the Prospects over the Futures 145-142 at Sprint Arena at NBA All-Star Jam Session on Saturday night.

Covington, who signed a contract with the Houston Rockets prior to this season, has spent most of his rookie campaign with the Vipers, averaging 21.4 points in 23 games. He’s appeared in five games with the Rockets, averaging 3.8 minutes.

“It’s a great feeling being able to play well in this game in front of our GM Daryl Morey and all these others scouts and NBA people,” said Covington, whose 33 points set a new NBA D-League All-Star Game record. “I feel like I’ve gotten better during my time with Rio Grande Valley, and it’s good to see the hard work paying off in a game like this.”

Covington made 12 of 23 shots in the game, including 4 of 8 3-pointers to set the record and earn the game’s MVP.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Presents “Faces of Success” with Former Freedom Riders Feb. 20

FACES-OF-SUCCESS-001NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Pre-Alumni Council at Tennessee State University will present The TSU Faces of Success: Then and Now Thursday, Feb. 20 in conjunction with Black History Month.

The seminar begins at 7 p.m. in the Forum in the Floyd Payne Campus Center, and is free and open to the public.

Panelists include former Freedom Riders Dr. Ernest Patton, Dr. Mary Jean Smith, and Patricia Jenkins-Armstrong, who will share their experiences during the Freedom Riders Movement of the early 1960s. Additionally, former and current TSU students Trehon Cockrell-Coleman, Jasmin Garmon, Olivia Buford, and Khamaria Wright, will share their personal and professional experiences. Lauren Thomas, Miss Pre-Alumni Council, will serve as moderator.

Sponsored by the Office of Alumni Relations, the Pre-Alumni Council is a students’ first exposure to alumni activities. The primary purpose of the council is to stimulate the interest and participation of students enrolled at the University in alumni activities prior to and after graduation.

For more information on the seminar, call Seanne Wilson, Alumni Relations and Annual Giving Coordinator at 615.963.5831.

 

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Same Goals, Different Roles……More than 40 Corporations, Business Partners to Attend TSU Reverse Career Fair Feb. 20

Reverse Career Fair_FlyerNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Representatives from more than 40 corporations and business partners will be on campus Thursday, Feb. 20 when the Tennessee State University Career Development Center hosts its third Reverse Career Fair in Kean Hall.

According to the Center, the potential employers and recruiters will visit booths and displays by student organizations and colleges, to review student presentations and discuss possible employment or career opportunities.

Built on the success of the past two years, the reverse career fair is intended to give students the opportunity to showcase their work and talents for potential employers and business partners.

Under the theme, “Directed to Excellence,” the career fair is open to current students and alumni who are in the process of looking for an internship, co-op and other career opportunities. Tables will be set up for students to represent themselves through one of the seven colleges or student organizations.

For opportunities to win cash prizes, student organizations and colleges are encouraged to ensure professional excellence in their displays, and decorate their tables or booths to reflect the theme of the fair.

Among some of the major corporations and business partners expected at the fair this year are Honda Manufacturing of Alabama, General Electric, Regions Bank, the Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Dot Foods, BJC Healthcare, LG&E KU-Kentucky Utilities, and Laclede Gas Co., and Teach for America.

The fair is free and open to the public. It starts at 1 p.m. For more information, contact Tina Reed at 615.963.7527 or visit http://www.tnstate.edu/careers.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Communications Chair Wins National Broadcast Education Award

Likes 2010
Dr. Terry Likes is the recipient of 43 awards during his career including other honors from the National Broadcasting Society and the National Press Club.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The national awards among faculty competing in the Broadcast Education Association have been released and the Chair of the Department of Communications at Tennessee State University, Dr. Terry Likes, has won the “Best of Competition” award in the Faculty Audio Competition category.

Likes won for his report, “It Was 50 Years Ago…The Beatles:  Legacy,” which documents how it has been 50 years since the Beatles first arrived in the United States.

The report, aired on the Tennessee Radio Network in October, looks back at the music of the Beatles, the impact, their significance here in Music City, and their legacy.  The report may be found online at http://youtu.be/bjBVGSKBFeY.

“Creative activity aids what we do in the classroom,” said Likes.   “When students can see professors remain active in the industry and achieve at a high level, professors can, in turn, encourage students to seek excellence in their own student competitions.”

The BEA Festival of Media Arts is an international exhibition of award-winning faculty and student works.  This year’s winners will receive recognition and exhibition of their works during the BEA’s annual convention in Las Vegas in April.

This is the 10th BEA award for Likes.  He won the Award of Excellence in 2012 and 2013, the Best of Competition in 2005 and 2010, and the Best of Festival in 2003 and 2008, which followed his second place winning in 2007 for the same award. In 2005, Likes won his first Best of Competition award, as well as two BEA First Place awards in 1999. He has also won six regional Edward R.  Murrow awards and 17 KY/TN Associated Press awards.  He is the recipient of 43 awards during his career including other honors from the National Broadcasting Society and the National Press Club.

Since joining TSU in 2008, Likes has won 29 awards or honors while his students have won 36 awards from the TN Associated Press, Society of Professional Journalists, Southeast Journalism Conference and National Broadcasting Society.

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

White House Initiative Names TSU Student 2014 HBCU All-Star For Academics, Leadership

Jeremiah T. Cooper, a junior Computer Science major from Nashville, has been named a 2014 HBCU All-Star by the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, for his accomplishments in academics, leadership and civic engagement. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
Jeremiah T. Cooper, a sophomore Computer Science major from Nashville, has been named a 2014 HBCU All-Star by the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, for his accomplishments in academics, leadership and civic engagement. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A Tennessee State University student has been named a 2014 HBCU All-Star by the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, for his accomplishments in academics, leadership and civic engagement.

Jeremiah T. Cooper, a sophomore Computer Science major from Nashville, will serve as an ambassador of the White House Initiative by providing outreach and communication with his fellow students about the value of education and the Initiative as a networking resource.

Cooper was among 75 All-Stars selected from 445 undergraduate, graduate and professional students who submitted completed applications including transcripts, resumes, essays and recommendations. The students represent 64 HBCUs from across the nation.

In announcing Cooper and his fellow all-stars’ selection, the White House Initiative said “engaging with this next generation of leaders” who will go on to make meaningful contributions to society is crucial to the success of the community and global competitiveness of the United States.

“It is a privilege to announce these 75 students who have demonstrated a commitment to both their own academic achievement and making a difference in their communities,” said George Cooper, executive director of the WHIHBCUs. “We look forward to working with them as partners in advancing President Obama’s college completion goal.”

Cooper, a very active and community-oriented student, is on full academic scholarship at TSU with a 3.74 GPA. He is a member of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars, and a former historian and e-board member of Collegiate 100, where he mentors young people. He is a youth leader and advocate with the Mt. Nebo Baptist Church Youth Council, where among other activities, he monitors and mentors children ages 3-14.

“I feel very blessed and humbled to be selected for this very prestigious recognition,” Cooper said about his selection as an HBCU all-star, adding that a cousin and his parents encouraged him to apply. “I was ecstatic to hear the news. When I applied I was confident of my ability but I wasn’t sure I would be selected. I am thankful that I did.”

In a letter congratulating Cooper for his selection, the White House Initiative noted his outstanding credentials.

“Your superb achievements in academics, leadership and civic engagement have once again set you apart from other applicants. The White House Initiatives on Historically Black Colleges and Universities is delighted that you will represent your school and the initiative as an all-star student who will graduate as a leader from one of the nation’s finest HBCUs,” the letter stated.

Cooper’s (Computer Science) department head and advisor, did not mince words when he heard about his student’s selection as an HBCU all-star.

“Jeremiah is an exceptional student with a strong academic background who is actively involved in NASA-funded research activities in our department,” said Dr. Ali Sekmen.”

He described Cooper as a team player and a mentor who is involved in projects that require not only technical but also “very critical soft skills” such as working in teams and effective communication.

“Jeremiah sometimes assists our faculty in teaching some of our computer programming classes, while also serving as a mentor to some of our freshmen. He is an active member of our Game Programming Group,” Sekmen added.

According to the White House Initiative’s announcement, over the course of the next year, Cooper and his fellow all-stars, using social media and their relationships with community-based organizations, will share “promising and proven” practices that support opportunities for all young people to achieve their educational and career potential.

In addition, the 45 female and 30 male All-Stars will participate in regional events and web chats with the deputy director of the WHIHBCUs, other Initiative staff and professionals from a wide range of disciplines.  They will also have opportunities to engage with other scholars to showcase individual and collective talent across the HBCU community.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Forensics Team Finishes Fourth At Weekend Tournament

The TSU Forensics Team captured fourth place in the Large Entry Sweepstakes of the MSU Ruby Krider and Alumni Swing Invitational Tournaments Feb. 7-9. The team also captured 18 individual awards during the two-day tournament. Team members included: (Left to Right) Delvakio Brown, Barbra Dudley, Tyler Kinloch, Artrisa Fulton, Janet Jordan, and Michael Thomas (courtesy photo)
The TSU Forensics Team captured fourth place in the Large Entry Sweepstakes of the MSU Ruby Krider and Alumni Swing Invitational Tournaments Feb. 7-9. The team also captured 18 individual awards during the two-day tournament. Team members included: (Left to Right) Delvakio Brown, Barbra Dudley, Tyler Kinloch, Artrisa Fulton, Janet Jordan, and Michael Thomas (courtesy photo)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Members of the TSU Forensics Team traveled to Murray State University and talked their way into a fourth place finishes in the Large Entry Sweepstakes of the MSU Ruby Krider and Alumni Swing Invitational Tournaments Feb. 7-9. The team also captured 18 individual awards.

“This is an amazing win, especially with so many new members on the team,” said Shaunté Caraballo, director of Forensics. “We couldn’t be more thrilled.”

Results from “Ruby Krider” Swing, Saturday, Feb. 8:

  • First year team member, senior, Michael Thomas won third place in the Pentathalon, a special award for individuals who compete in five or more events. This is the most difficult category to win. Thomas also won third place in Radio Broadcasting, first place in Novice Impromptu, and first place in Novice Persuasive Speaking.
  • Sophomore Mass Communications major, Delvakio Brown won fourth place in Radio Broadcasting, third place in Novice Impromptu, and fourth place in Novice Prose Interpretation.
  • Freshman Accounting major, Janet Jordan took second place in Novice Poetry.

Results from the Alumni Swing, Sunday, Feb. 9:

  • Michael Thomas won first place in Radio Broadcasting, second place in Novice Impromptu, second place in Novice Persuasive, and sixth place in Varsity Programmed Oral Interpretation.
  • Delvakio Brown won third place in Radio Broadcasting and third place in Novice Prose Interpretation.
  • Freshman Economics major, Barbra Dudley, won seventh place in Novice Impromptu.
  • Janet Jordan won third place in Novice Poetry Interpretation.
  • Junior Aeronautical Engineering major, Tyler Kinloch not only served as coach for Radio Broadcasting, but also won sixth place in Varsity Prose Interpretation.

The Forensics team will now head to East Tennessee State University to compete in the Tennessee Intercollegiate Forensics Association Championships Feb. 14-16.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

 

 

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.