Category Archives: Uncategorized

Taraji P. Henson to Share HBCU Experience with Students, Community March 24

Taraji P. Henson PhotoNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Academy Award-nominated actress Taraji P. Henson will visit the Tennessee State University campus, Tuesday, March 24 to speak to students, faculty, staff and the community about the HBCU experience and how the HBCU journey shaped her life and prepared her for her future acting career.

Henson showed her love for the performing arts while still at a young age and tried unsuccessfully to apply to a performing arts high school. Instead she attended Oxon High School, graduating in 1988.

She spent her first year in college studying electrical engineering at North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University. After failing pre-calculus, Henson transferred to Howard University, where she studied theater. At the same time, Henson was working two jobs—one as a secretary at the Pentagon and another as a cruise-ship entertainer. At Howard, she honed her singing, dancing and acting skills, proudly earning herself a “Triple Threat Scholarship.”

Henson is one of many celebrities who attended an HBCU who are now discussing the importance of Historically Black Universities and Colleges. Celebrities who have attended HBCUs include filmmaker Will Packer, who attended Florida A&M University, R&B singer Erykah Badu, who attended Grambling University, Hip-Hop performer Common, who attended Florida A&M, and Oprah Winfrey, who graduated from Tennessee State University.

Henson will address the student body and community in Kean Hall beginning at 1 p.m. followed by a master-level class in the Forum beginning at 2 p.m.

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Day at the Capitol Unveils Cutting-Edge Research, Artificial Intelligence Technology

 

TSU President Dr. Glenda Glover (center) along with State Representatives Harold Love Jr., and Brenda Gilmore cut the ceremonial ribbon in the Senate Chamber of the Capitol marking the official start of TSU Day at the Capitol. Senior members of the cabinet, along with faculty and staff members also took part in the ribbon-cuting ceremony. (photos by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)
TSU President Dr. Glenda Glover (center) along with State Representatives Harold Love Jr., and Brenda Gilmore cut the ceremonial ribbon in the Senate Chamber of the Capitol marking the official start of TSU Day at the Capitol. Senior members of the cabinet, along with faculty and staff members also took part in the ribbon-cuting ceremony. (photos by Rick DelaHaya, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – From robots that can mimic human motion, to 3-D printing capability, and the development of an advanced visualization computer assisted virtual environment called CAVE, state lawmakers today saw some cutting-edge technology being developed at Tennessee State University.

Celebrating its second “TSU Day at the Capitol” on Tuesday, the University showcased its outstanding academics and research enterprise while assuring lawmakers that state funding and other support to the University were being appropriately directed into areas that promote student learning and advancement.

“TSU Day at the Capitol gives us the opportunity to showcase the tremendous work that is going on at Tennessee State University with funding you provide to us,” President Glenda Glover told members of the State Assembly during a kickoff ceremony in the Senate Chamber. “While we are grateful for the funding, we need more support because as enrollment grows and services are increased, we will need more help to improve on existing facilities and infrastructure.”

State Representative Brenda Gilmore, (center) welcomes TSU President Glenda Glover (left) and the University to the Capitol for "TSU Day at the Capitol" while Representative Harold Love Jr., looks on.
State Representative Brenda Gilmore, (center) welcomes TSU President Glenda Glover (left) and the University to the Capitol for “TSU Day at the Capitol” while Representative Harold Love Jr., looks on.

At the kickoff ceremony, which included a ribbon cutting, State legislators joined key stakeholders, including alumni, community leaders and friends of TSU to thank President Glover, faculty staff and students for the contribution the University is making in providing quality education for students of the state and its impact on the community.

“Tennessee State University’s contribution to education in Tennessee is tremendous and needs the continued support of everyone in the state,” said David Gregory, vice chancellor for Administration and Facilities Development for the Tennessee Board of Regents. “It is good to see this level of support for the University and we are grateful that you are here to celebrate this day.”

State Representatives Harold Love Jr., and Brenda Gilmore, two graduates and staunched supporters of TSU, welcomed President Glover, faculty and staff of the University, and called on their colleagues to support TSU.

Jonathan Reynolds, a Computer and Information Systems Engineering Ph.D. student, uses software and 3-D printer to create
Jonathan Reynolds, a Computer and Information Systems Engineering Ph.D. student, uses software and 3-D printer to  create plastic chess pieces and cups. The printer can create virtually any design and was on display as part of the TSU Day at the Capitol.

“We are proud of the relationship Dr. Glover has formed with the community and members of the Assembly, something that has not always been the case in the past,” said Gilmore, chair of the Tennessee Legislative Black Caucus. “We are pleased that you are here to meet with us and to allow us to see what TSU is all about.”

Sandra D. Hunt, president of the Davidson County Alumni Association, called on her fellow former students and graduates to support the University.

“As alumni, we are the foundation of this University,” she said. “Our support maters as the backbone of this great institution. Our support is vital.”

A robot created by researchers at the College of Engineering that mimics human motions was on display during TSU Day at the Capitol.
A robot created by researchers at the College of Engineering that mimics human motions was on display during TSU Day at the Capitol.

Also speaking was Markeil Lewis, president of the Student Government Association, who thanked the legislators for taking the time to meet and celebrate with the University.

“My fellow students join me in thanking you for setting this time aside to honor our institution. We are very grateful,” Lewis said.

The TSU Day at the Capitol, which brought together nearly 300 administrators, students, faculty and staff, also included displays of different programs, giveaways, free lunch for at least two members from each legislator’s office, and visits to various committee hearings, and discussion with some key lawmakers.

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Breast Cancer Vaccine Developed by Tennessee State University Researcher and Colleagues Shows Promise in Preliminary Trial

Dr. Venkataswarup Tiriveedhi, a cancer and immunology specialist and assistant professor of Biological Sciences, works on cancer mechanism in his lab in Harned Hall at Tenessee State University. Tiriveedhi and a group of researchers from Washington University School of Medicine at St. Louis have come up with an experimental vaccine for breast cancer that appears to be safe in preliminary trials.
Dr. Venkataswarup Tiriveedhi, a cancer and immunology specialist and assistant professor of Biological Sciences, works on cancer mechanism in his lab in Harned Hall at Tennessee State University. Tiriveedhi and a group of researchers from Washington University School of Medicine at St. Louis have come up with an experimental vaccine for breast cancer that appears to be safe in preliminary trials. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A Tennessee State University scientist and a group of researchers from Washington University School of Medicine at St. Louis have come up with an experimental vaccine for breast cancer that appears to be safe in a preliminary trial.

According to a study published in Clinical Cancer Research, Dr. Venkataswarup Tiriveedhi, assistant professor of Biological Sciences in the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences, and his colleagues found that the experimental vaccine, Mammaglobin-A, was “overexpressed” in 40 to 80 percent of primary breast cancers.

Also known as MAM-A, the vaccine prompted CD8 T-cells to track and eliminate the MAM-A protein, noted Tiriveedhi. To determine the efficacy and safety of the experimental drug, he said they conducted a phase I trial involving 14 patients diagnosed with advanced breast cancer.

“The side effects from the vaccine after one year were minimal, and included rashes, tenderness, and mild flu-like symptoms,” added Tiriveedhi, who specializes in cancer and immunology.

By the one-year mark, the study revealed, roughly 50 percent of the patients showed no sign of disease progression. By comparison, only 20 percent of a similar group of 12 patients showed no signs of disease progression one year out.

The researchers, however, stressed the need for a larger and longer study, to prove the current preliminary evidence prior to its use in all breast cancer patients. They theorized that “these promising results” from initial studies could be applied not only to prevent cancer progression but also to prevent the development of breast cancer in women.

“The current one (study) is a small Phase-I trial mainly aimed at testing the safety (does no harm). But we have also found this vaccine to be highly effective against the disease. The next step is to go for larger Phase II/III studies with a higher cohort of breast cancer patients and rigorously test for efficiency, dosing, clinical outcomes, cancer stage specificity, etc.,” noted Tiriveedhi, who holds MD and Ph.D. degrees.

He called the study a “promising move forward” that is not just restricted to breast cancer, but one that can be employed in “similar strategies” to treat other cancers such as lung and colon cancers.

“The MAM-A DNA vaccine is safe, capable of eliciting MAM-A–specific CD8 T-cell responses, and preliminary evidence suggests improved PF,” the researchers concluded.

Dr. Tiriveedhi, who came to Tennessee State University about a year and half ago, started the study, “Safety and Preliminary Evidence of Biologic Efficacy of a Mammaglobin-A DNA Vaccine in Patients with Stable Metastatic Breast Cancer,” with his colleagues at Washington University before leaving to join the faculty at TSU.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU to Introduce New Center for Economic Development as University Celebrates Global Entrepreneurship Week

Center for economic development

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will celebrate its first Entrepreneurship Day on Monday, Nov. 17 with a reception and award ceremony during which the University will introduce the new Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development on the Avon Williams Campus.

President Glenda Glover created CEED as an umbrella entity to oversee the functions of the Nashville Business Incubation Center, and the Small Business Development Center in the College of Business. The goal, according to CEED Executive Director, Dr. Ruthie Reynolds, is to make the NBIC and SBDC more responsive to the needs of the business community and the university.

Through coordination and an interdisciplinary approach to entrepreneurship, CEED advances and encourages entrepreneurial excellence through business creation, economic development, management consulting, business workshops and leadership training.

BlogGEW-FlyerThe Entrepreneurship Day on Monday will kick off Global Entrepreneurship Week (Nov. 18-20) at TSU, under the auspices of the NBIC.

According to NBIC Director Angela Crane-Jones, more than 150 area college and high school students, as well as entrepreneurs, industry and community members are expected to participate in activities including seminars and workshops.

Under the theme, “From Education to Entrepreneurship: Understanding How to Make the Leap,” participants will discuss topics such as Doing Business Globally, Global Logistics, and Going Global.

Corporate and industry sponsors of the Global Entrepreneurship Week include Skanska, Caterpillar, Nissan, Business Assistance Office, UPS and Stay On The Go.

Stephen “Bubba” Miller, owner of B. Miller Recycling and a client at the NBIC since 2009, will be presented with the 2014 SBA Rising Star Award during the Entrepreneurship Day reception.

The Entrepreneurship Day reception will begin promptly at 4:30 p.m., in the Atrium of the Avon Williams Campus. For more information contact CEED at 615-963-7231.

For more information on the Global Entrepreneurship Week, contact NBIC at (615) 963-7184 or http://www.nbiconline.com/

All activities are free and open to the public.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Signs Reverse Transfer/Dual Admission Agreement with Dyersburg State

DyersburgStateCCNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has made it easier for transfer students from Dyersburg State Community College to receive the associate degree they may lack prior to enrollment at TSU.

Under a Reverse Transfer agreement signed between the two institutions October 15, students who transfer to TSU without first completing their associates degree, will now have the opportunity to use credits earned toward a bachelors degree for completion of their two-year degree. This is the first time this type of agreement has been signed between TSU and a partnering community college.

Staff from TSU and DSCC were present Oct. 15 to sign a Reverse Transfer and Dual Admission agreement between the two  institutions, including: (seated) Dr. Teri Maddox, Interim Vice President, DSCC; Dr. Karen Bowyer, President, DSCC; Dr. Kay Patterson (standing) Dr. John Ricketts, program leader in Agriculture Education, Associate Professor; Mr. William Joslin, Site Coordinator, Department of Community College Initiatives; Dr. John Hall, Associate Professor of Agriculture & Leadership Education; Dr. Sharon Peters, Executive Director of Community College Initiatives. (courtesy photo)
Staff from TSU and DSCC were present Oct. 15 to sign a Reverse Transfer and Dual Admission agreement between the two institutions, including: (seated) Dr. Teri Maddox, Interim Vice President, DSCC; Dr. Karen Bowyer, President, DSCC; Dr. Kay Patterson (standing) Dr. John Ricketts, program leader in Agriculture Education, associate professor; William Joslin, site coordinator, Department of Community College Initiatives; Dr. John Hall, associate professor of Agriculture & Leadership Education; Dr. Sharon Peters, executive director of Community College Initiatives. (courtesy photo)

According to Dr. Sharon Peters, director of the Community College Initiative Program at TSU, the agreement builds on partnerships already established with other community colleges around the state. It also helps support community college degree completion, a key component in the Drive to 55 campaign launched by the state of Tennessee that ensures at least 55 percent of Tennesseans have a certificate or degree beyond high school by 2025.

“This helps students attending the University complete their associates degree while pursuing a baccalaureate degree,” said Peters. “While we encourage our students to earn their four-year degree, we understand that students take multiple routes to completing their education. This way, they would have an associates degree which could help them in the job market or career progression.”

The agreement also creates a Dual Admission track that establishes a formal pathway for DSCC students to accumulate academic credits toward an Agricultural Science degree at TSU.

TSU’s Agricultural Sciences major includes concentrations in Agricultural and Extension Education, Food Bioscience and Technology, Agribusiness, Plant and Soil Science, Animal Science, and Biotechnology.

“Agriculture is a major industry in northwest Tennessee and this dual admission agreement is a keystone of the partnership,” added Peters. “We are excited to provide additional education opportunities while providing more choices for aligning associate degrees with bachelor’s degrees through our College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences.”

The agreement with Dyersburg State comes on the heels of an agreement with Southwest Tennessee Community College last month, which now brings the total number of agreements between TSU and community colleges across the state to seven, and along with DSCC and STCC, includes Volunteer State, Nashville State, Columbia State, Chattanooga State and Motlow State Community Colleges.

The partnerships with community colleges, such as DSCC around the state, help students transfer seamlessly to the University to complete a four-year degree. Under the Community College Initiative, students have more options to move them along through their educational career.

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Mother, daughter share legacy of Miss TSU crown

A mother and daughter from Tennessee State University share a common bond. Mother Patsy Whitmon Thomas (left) was Miss TSU 1981-82, while her daughter, Samantha Thomas is the current Miss Tennessee State University 2014-2015.
A mother and daughter from Tennessee State University share a common bond. Mother Patsy Whitmon Thomas (left) was Miss TSU 1981-82, while her daughter, Samantha Thomas is the current Miss Tennessee State University 2014-2015.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – There are many things that mothers and daughters share at some point in their lives. Mothers enjoy the experience of lending their favorite earrings to their daughters to wear during prom. Many can’t wait to pass down the family heirloom handed from given generation-to-generation as “something old” for the doting daughter-bride. And, when their daughters have children of their own, mothers adore nothing more than handing out motherly advice, sharing family recipes and caring for their grandchildren.

These are just some of the joys of a mother-daughter relationship every mother imagines. But one Tennessee State University mother has experienced a little extra special moment that will provide a lifetime of memories for both mother and daughter.

Last spring, Nashville native Samantha Thomas was elected the 2014-2015 Miss Tennessee State University. Why was this so special? Because Patsy Whitmon Thomas, Samantha’s mother, wore the crown 33 years earlier as the 1981-1982 Miss Tennessee State University. It marked the first time in the university’s history that a mother-daughter legacy has worn the coveted crown in one of the university’s top student leadership roles.

“Truthfully, I did not know whether she was going to win or lose,” Patsy said. “I was so torn up about it; I didn’t even make it to the pageant. I was driving when I heard the news and just started crying driving 30 miles per hour on a 70-mile-per hour highway. People were passing me by wondering if I was okay. I felt like this was Divine intervention because I never encouraged or cultivated any of my children to do anything that I or their father did as students. I just never put that kind of pressure on my children.”

Patsy, a three-time graduate of TSU, with bachelor and master degrees in Health and Physical Education, and a doctorate in Educational Administration and Supervision, said during her reign as Miss TSU her focus was on addressing accountability and excellence among the student body. She said her daughter has taken her own independent route and has really not asked for advice on how to handle herself as Miss TSU. Patsy said she has witnessed how her daughter is dealing with the leadership role and is very proud of her.

“She [Samantha] is handling it pretty well by herself,” Patsy said. “I simply tell her to listen, respect the opinions of others and to be flexible, which doesn’t mean you have to compromise your standards. It is important we all learn that we can have differences, but not be indifferent.”

Samantha’s path to the Miss TSU post began during her service as Miss Freshman in 2011-2012. She then began working on campus as part of the Student Government Association becoming the only female Representative At-Large elected during her sophomore and junior years. When she decided to run for the position of Miss TSU going into her senior year, she wanted to give her all and said she wanted to demonstrate that the role was “more than a position or title, but a lifestyle.”

“While this is the most memorable year of my college experience, I don’t want to get distracted with the hype of things. I must remember why I’m here – and that’s to get an education,” Samantha said. “My goal is simply to be a positive example. I’d like to be remembered for Sam who did everything for TSU that she could. I want to help TSU and get to know my peers. I want to be known as the person who really worked hard and loved all my fellow students as the individuals they are.”

Patsy remembers fondly her time at TSU. Like her daughter, she was an active part of campus life serving as Miss Junior, as a member of the Student Government Association, being named to Who’s Who, and as an Honors student joining Gamma Beta Phi National Honors Society.

“I feel that other students who have parents who have graduated from TSU should also pursue leadership roles to impact change, and growth for our children – not just African-American children, but globally and to instill the value of family,” she said.

Despite her initial hesitation to attend TSU, because she thought it was too close to home, Samantha said she is glad she made the choice. She has served as a University Ambassador for three years, and is also an Honors student holding memberships in the Phi Eta Sigma, Golden Key, Phi Kappa Phi and National Society of Collegiate Scholars Honor Societies.

“I love TSU, and it [experience] has definitely taught me how to go out there and get it for myself,” Samantha said. “The faculty and staff are so inspirational. They help mold you, and it makes you so ambitious and hungry for success. You learn to exhibit confidence and to be humble in your interactions with others.”

Her stellar academic performance has afforded her the financial support needed to complete her education. For the fourth year, she has received the Academic Higher Achievement Scholarship.

“My scholarship has been the biggest blessing because that hardship is not on me or my family,” said Samantha, a Dental Hygiene major and member of the Undergraduate Student National Dental Association. “I want to go to dental school which is very expensive, so the scholarships I have received at TSU are a blessing for me. I don’t have to worry about how I’m going to pay for school.”

The spirit of giving is something the Thomas family has long practiced. Patsy said the family often takes mission trips, and continues to give back to TSU through a scholarship established in her late father’s name. Additionally, Samantha is imparting the importance of giving back to her fellow students as well as the significance of thanking donors.

“Every little bit helps,” she said. “If you can’t write a check for $500, then give $20.”

While both Patsy and Samantha share the glory of the crown, they also share a distinct TSU legacy in other respects. Patsy’s father, the late Sam Whitmon, a 1948 TSU graduate, was a respected educator, coach and former athletics director at the university. He was also instrumental in establishing the university’s baseball team and taught biology for many years. Additionally, the Thomases are part of the tradition of high-stepping majorettes boasting three generations with Patsy’s mother, Dorothy Mallory, a 1950 graduate, dancing for the Big Blue, as well as Patsy during her junior and senior years, and now Samantha as part of the “Sophisticated Ladies.”

“It’s really an honor to be in this position because so many people remember my mom and grandfather,” Samantha said. “It’s great when the alumni make the connection and they start sharing stories about them [my family]. It does my heart good to be associated with people who are remembered so fondly.”

Patsy and Samantha will celebrate in grand style with students, alumni and the community as part of TSU’s Homecoming Week activities during The Coronation for Mr. and Miss TSU. The event will take place Wednesday, Sept. 24, 7 p.m. in Kean Hall, located on the main campus. For more information, call (615) 963-5085.

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Alum Donates $30,000 for Student Support as President Glover Gives Upbeat Report on Progress at the Institution

President Glover, joined by Director of Alumni Relations, Cassandra Griggs, left; and Betsy Jackson, Director of University Foundation, receive a check for $30,000 from Roosevelt Bud Reese as his personal donation to Tennessee State University for student support. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)
President Glover, joined by Director of Alumni Relations, Cassandra Griggs, left, and Betsy Jackson, Executive Director of University Foundation, receives a check for $30,000 from Roosevelt Bud Reese as his personal donation to Tennessee State University for student support. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Just minutes after Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover gave a cheerful report of progress at the institution and thanked alumni and friends for their support, a former student stepped up with a sizable individual donation to his alma mater.

Roosevelt Bud Reese, who earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees at TSU, presented the President with a check for $30,000 from his CMI Foundation for student support, and challenged his fellow alumni to follow suit by giving to the University.

“We applaud your generosity and continued support of TSU,” Dr. Glover told Reese during a reception given by the President Friday night at the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Memphis. “We are grateful for this gift that will be used to provide quality education for our students.”

In addition to Reese, many of his family members have either earned degrees or are current students of TSU. His brother, Stanley, Business Administration; daughter Candice, Business Administration; and son Chris, Criminal Justice, have all graduated. Grandson Shawn is currently an Aviation Management major at TSU.

“Tennessee State University has educated my whole family, and this is just a way to give back,” Reese said. “As a two-time graduate of TSU, I know what quality education can lead to, and I just want to make sure others get the opportunity I was afforded.”

Earlier, President Glover told the gathering of alumni, corporate and individual supporters, friends, faculty and staff that the University was making tremendous progress from improvements in recruitment, retention and graduation, to enhancements in campus safety and emergency management.

“Enrollment for the new academic year is now more that 9,000, and TSU is the only TBR institution that has not experienced a drop in enrollment for two years in a roll,” Dr. Glover told the gathering to a rousing applause. “We have also initiated programs to help students stay in school and graduate on time.”

As a measure to reduce financial burden on students, Dr. Glover reported on the University’s Book Bundle initiative, a digital cutting-edge program aimed at lowering the cost of traditional textbooks. The plan allows freshman and sophomore students to buy “e-books” (downloaded on a tablet) for general education classes, saving students up to $735 per semester.

On retention and graduation, the President spoke about the University’s new Take 15 initiative that encourages students to take at least 15 credits each semester to graduate in four years, as well as the 3+1 program, a dual (college/high school) enrollment program.

Dr. Glover also announced the TSU Community College Initiative aimed at creating a seamless transition of two-year degree holders to TSU. Through this initiative, Dr. Glover said, TSU is reaching out to all 13 community colleges around the state to develop long-lasting partnerships and relationships through “2+2” or dual enrollment efforts.

“Just yesterday, we signed a Student Transfer Partnership Agreement with Southwest Tennessee Community College right here in Memphis, my home town,” she said

In other areas that also drew cheers from the gathering, including state lawmakers and community leaders, the President disclosed that the University has raised more than $9.5 million in giving to the University since she arrived on campus about 18 months ago.

“Our corporate partners, community stakeholders, alumni, faculty, staff and individuals have been very generous and supportive of our plea for support,” said Dr. Glover, who presented a check for $50,000 to her alma mater as her “first order of business” when she became president in 2012, challenging other alumni to follow suit.

“We thank you for your support and for buying into our vision to make TSU the best it can be,” Dr. Glover added.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University to Sign Memorandum of Understanding with Southwest Tennessee Community College

Agreement to Build Partnership, Pipeline of Students to TSU

 

UpdatedFullLogoNASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will soon make it easier for West Tennessee community college students to attend the University and transfer all credits when TSU and Southwest Tennessee Community College sign an agreement to provide greater educational opportunities and services for students transferring between institutions.

swLogoThe two institutions will sign a Student Transfer Partnership Agreement Thursday, Sept. 11 that guarantees all the courses Southwest students complete on the Tennessee Transfer Pathways (TTP) will be accepted at TSU and count toward a baccalaureate degree. The agreement also awards 10 two-year full TSU scholarships in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines.

The signing ceremony will take place on Southwest’s Macon Cove Campus in the Bornblum Library as part of TSU’s community outreach during the Annual Southern Heritage Classic celebration.

According to TSU President Glenda Glover, TSU has always had a strong presence in the West Tennessee area. The University, she said, wants to continue to build on the strong partnerships established in West Tennessee, and will now build stronger ties with SWTCC. The agreement strengthens the pipeline of students from the region to the University.

“We are excited to expand our educational opportunities for residents in the western part of the state and beyond,” said Dr. Glover. “They will have additional choices for aligning associate degrees with bachelor degrees through Tennessee State University. The relationship we are establishing is about the two institutions empowering our students to be successful.”

The terms of the agreement include the awarding of 10 two-year full TSU scholarships in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. The scholarships begin fall 2015 and include tuition, room and board. The partnership also contains a dual admissions component that builds on the Tennessee Transfer Pathways, which was designed to help community college students plan for transferring to a Tennessee public university, such as TSU, to complete their baccalaureate degree.

According to University officials, TSU is now creating more partnerships and programs with community colleges, such as SWTCC around the state to help students transfer seamlessly to the University to complete a four-year degree. Under the Community College Initiative, students have more options to move them along through their educational career.

Dr. Sharon Peters, director of the Community College Initiative Program, said the new initiative “just makes sense and is truly one of those win-win situations for everyone involved.”

“More and more students are choosing to pursue community college, as opposed to a university, right out of high school or as a nontraditional student because community colleges tuition costs are 50 percent less than four-year institutions,” said Peters. “Once they get their associate degree they will enter TSU as a junior and spend two years here, providing them with an opportunity to get their four-year degree from TSU.”

According to a report from the National Center for Education Statistics, as of fall 2012, 40 percent of all college undergraduates were enrolled in community colleges. TSU, added Peters, is committed to partnering with the Tennessee community colleges to create programs and initiatives focused on increasing the number of students prepared for transfer to the University.

“These programs and initiatives raise student achievement levels, close achievement gaps and successfully prepare a diverse population of students for academic and professional success,” said Peters. “Transfer preparation programs provide services such as regular and sustained advising, mentoring and early identification to improve student outcomes.”

According to Peters, the University is reaching out to all 13 community colleges around the state to develop long-lasting partnerships and relationships. Currently there are agreements with Volunteer State, Nashville State, Columbia State, Motlow State Community Colleges, and soon Southwest Tennessee Community College. There are hopes to sign agreements with four additional institutions within the next year.

These new relationships and initiatives, Peters added, are programs that specifically focus on the Community Colleges and their needs, but also the needs of the larger community. And with Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam’s “Drive to 55” education initiative, TSU is prime to help lead the way for not only higher education, but for workforce and economic development.

“Of course we want to see growth in the number of transfer students that choose TSU, and a growth in the number of partnerships. More importantly we want to see partnerships between community college faculty and university faculty whereby they engage in joint research and curriculum design,” Peters said. “These types of partnerships benefit the students, the community and the state in our effort to insure that the majority of our citizens have a college degree.”

 

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Upcoming TSU Gala More Than Glitz and Glamour

Annual event to raise scholarship dollars for students with real needs

 

 

Lauren Wiggins
Lauren Wiggins

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Lauren Wiggins says she learned a life lesson in high school that continues to follow her even today. That lesson: people aren’t concerned about your excuses. The Atlanta native recalls a high school teacher telling her, at age 14, that she displayed the actions of a criminal because she skipped classes or arrived late. Wiggins says her explanations fell on deaf ears.

“Whenever I was late or missed class, I would let the teachers know I had been up all night taking care of my brothers or in the emergency room with them,” explains Wiggins. “I have a 19-year-old brother who is severely disabled, and a 15-year-old brother who is diagnosed with Autism and ADHD [Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder]. I’m the oldest of three, and I have been changing diapers since I was five years old.”

Wiggins says her oldest brother has cerebral palsy, epilepsy and a cerebral shunt.

“My brother has the mind of a six-month-old. His body has continued to grow since birth, but his brain hasn’t. At times all I could do was just hold him when he cried. He’s unable to communicate and is completely immobile. My choice was easy in high school, family is first.”

Today, the 21-year-old Wiggins is a rising senior at Tennessee State University with a 3.8 GPA as a Public Health major. She received a full music scholarship to TSU following high school. However, after her sophomore year, she had to make another tough decision regarding her education and family. Wiggins decided to give up the scholarship.

“Dropping out [of college] was never an option, but I was needed at home. This conflicted with my commitment to the marching band and wind ensemble. I enjoyed being in the band, but my parents are older and needed help taking care of my brother. I had to rush home several times when my mom called and said her back was out from getting him in and out of bed or his wheelchair.”

2014 Scholarship Gala
Click to Buy tickets today!

Wiggins knew giving up the scholarship meant her family would have to struggle to pay tuition, but she was determined to stay at TSU. The University has been a part of her family for three generations. Through persistence, she found out about the TSU Foundation and was awarded a scholarship that covered nearly all her expenses for the upcoming fall semester.

“This scholarship has helped immensely, and heightened my desire to give back to Tennessee State, for other students who deserve a second chance.”

On Friday, Sept. 26, Tennessee State will hold its annual scholarship gala honoring long-time educators Drs. McDonald and Jamye Williams. Both have ties to some of TSU’s most notable alumni, including Oprah Winfrey. The event will also honor alumnus and former football player Claude Humphrey, one of the newest members inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Dr. Sharon Peters, Gala co-chairman, says while the event will honor these individuals, the primary mission is to raise funds to help students who need money to stay at the University. Students like Wiggins are one of many examples why the gala is so important.

“The gala provides the needed support for students to enroll at the University who may not otherwise have the funds to attend or who may fall short financially,” adds Peters, also director for TSU’s Community College Initiative Program. “A majority of our students need financial aid and without the help of many of our donors, these students would not have the opportunity to attend college.”

This will be TSU President Glenda Glover’s second scholarship gala while serving as the leader of one of the nation’s top HBCUs. Last year’s event had record attendance. According to University officials, more than 600 students were helped with $1.7 million worth of scholarships during the 2013-14 academic year. This represented a 76 percent increase in donations from the previous year and the University was able to award up to $965,000 in private scholarships.

“I am confident that our donors- employees, alumni, corporate partners, and friends of the University will continue to give and partner with us for this year’s scholarship gala,” says President Glover. “We have students with real needs, and the Foundation, along with the Office of Student Enrollment, has done a tremendous job in matching students with dollars. Every dollar counts and will make a difference in a student’s life. It begins with them receiving a quality education at Tennessee State.”

Wiggins says that’s exactly what she’s receiving at TSU – a quality education that has afforded her the opportunity to have internships with environmental watchdog Green Peace and the Centers for Disease Control. She beams with pride when asked what the future holds.

“I’ve lived my life around my brother’s health and wouldn’t change one single thing. I am happy to be alive and not a burden on my parents. I believe my future is bright and I owe it to my future alma mater TSU.”

Following graduation, Wiggins has her eyes set on Yale University where she plans on obtaining master’s degrees in Public Health and Environmental Science. Eventually, she hopes to pursue a Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology.

Call 615.963.5481 or visit www.tnstate.edu/scholarshipgala for more information on how you can help students like Lauren Wiggins through the 2014 Scholarship Gala. The gala takes place at Music City Center and tickets are available now to purchase.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 42 undergraduate, 24 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Announces 2014 Homecoming Week Activities

University Celebrates Tradition of Excellence

HomecomingScheduleCover
READ the full Homecoming Schedule

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will hold a week full of exciting events September 21-27 as community members, alumni and friends of the University come to Nashville to celebrate Homecoming 2014.

Homecoming is a rich, always anticipated tradition of the TSU community. Each fall, Tigers of all generations return to campus to reconnect and share memories. This year, alumni, family and community members will take part in Celebrating the Tradition of Excellence.

“There’s nothing like a Big Blue Homecoming. We look forward to welcoming all of our distinguished alumni back to the University for an exciting week filled with special memories, camaraderie and cheerful giving,” said Cassandra Griggs, director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving. “This is the opportunity for alumni to see how their alma mater continues to positively transform the lives of its students, and learn about the outstanding academic programs, talented students and campus enhancements.”

HC7While TSU has cherished and maintained certain Homecoming traditions, it has also moved forward across the century, finding new ways to celebrate pride in the institution, its students and alumni. Innovations that have sprung up over the years include the parade, pep rally, Homecoming Court, tent parties and many additional campus activities.

The annual Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Contest will officially kick off Homecoming week on Sunday, Sept. 21 beginning at 3 p.m. in the Robert N. Murrell Forum in the Floyd Payne Campus Center. The Gospel Concert rounds out the evening, beginning at 6 p.m. in Kean Hall in the Floyd Payne Campus Center.

HC6Student events highlight Monday, Sept. 22 when the Courtyard Show takes place in Welton Plaza starting at 11 a.m., followed by the Battle of the Residence Halls at 7 p.m. in the Floyd Payne Campus Center Keane Hall gymnasium.

The All-White Glow Tent party will take place on Tuesday, Sept. 23 in Welton Plaza beginning at 7 p.m. The Coronation for Miss TSU and Mr. TSU takes place Wednesday, Sept. 24 in Kean Hall. Wednesday’s activities conclude with the non-Greek organizations’ Yard Show beginning at 9 p.m. in the Averitte Amphitheater.

Homecoming continues Thursday, Sept. 25 with the Agriculture and Home Economics Hall of Fame Banquet and Induction Ceremony at the Farrell-Westbrook Complex at 7 p.m. A Homecoming concert in the Gentry Complex starts at 7 p.m. and features August Alsina and Juicy J. Hosted by Lil Duval. Tickets are $15 in advance or $20 at the door for the general public. The evening concludes with the Alumni White-Out Mixer at the Sheraton Music City Hotel Ballroom.

HC1Friday, Sept. 25 kicks off with the traditional Charles Campbell Fish Fry at 11 a.m. on the President’s Lawn, followed by Pep Rally at 11:30 in Hale Stadium. The TSU National Pan-Hellenic Step Show begins at 5 p.m. at the Gentry Complex. Hosted by actress LisaRaye, tickets are $10 for students in advance, $15 at the door.

The evening concludes with the “Evening of Honors” Scholarship Reception and Gala beginning at 6 p.m. at the Music City Center. The night will honor TSU football great and Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee, Claude Humphrey, and Honors program educators Drs. McDonald and Jamye Williams, who have made advancing education and student success a priority during their more than 30 years at TSU. The evening will also address the needs of students to make sure they have the proper funding to acquire a college education to pursue their career goals and aspirations.

Saturday, Sept. 27 starts with the Homecoming Parade beginning at 9 a.m., followed by the Showcase of Bands at noon at Hale Stadium. The Homecoming football game between TSU and FAMU kicks off at 6 p.m. at LP Field.

View the 2014 Schedule and the campus map. For more information, contact the Office of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving at 615.963.5381.

 

 

Department of Media Relations
Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With nearly 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 22 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.