Category Archives: Uncategorized

TSU President Glover, administrators stress ‘meeting needs’ of students amid the COVID-19 pandemic in virtual meeting

 NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover assured students that TSU is dedicated to accommodating them while they finish the semester remotely as a result of the coronavirus (COVID-19). Dr. Glover and other TSU administrators held a live meeting via Zoom with over 200 student leaders on Thursday.

“I wanted to take this opportunity to just stop and make sure that we are meeting your needs,” Glover said. “We are going to do everything humanly possible to accommodate you to ensure that you succeed in spite of this very daunting challenge. It is tough for everyone across the world as we face the daily uncertainties and dangers that this virus presents. We’re going to do whatever we can to ensure that you remain whole.”

Students submitted their questions via the chat component. Topics included student refunds or credits, graduation, summer classes, and campus preparations for returning students in the fall. TSU registration opens tomorrow, and students may apply for housing now. 

Student Government Association President Katelyn Thompson of Memphis, Tennessee, said she was pleased with what she heard from Dr. Glover and other top staff.

“I’m proud of the university and student body coming together,” said Thompson, a graduating senior double majoring in criminal justice and psychology. “At the end of the day, excellence is our habit. We can’t get anywhere unless we come together.”

Charlie Green Jr., a senior from Jackson, Tennessee, agreed.

TSU President Glenda Glover addresses students in virtual meeting.

“This is a lesson for all of us,” said Green, a double major in architectural engineering and urban studies. “But Dr. Glover showed students that she’s about the business of making sure that we are taken care of and that our needs are being met.”

On March 16, TSU was the first public university in Tennessee to transition to all online classes as a precaution to contracting COVID-19. The university also canceled all campus events where large crowds are expected, and suspended all international travel through the end of April to minimize exposure to the disease. On March 23, the university ceased normal operations, allowing most employees to work remotely.

 Miss Junior Maya Howard, a business administration major, said she’s comfortable that when she returns to the university from Cincinnati, Ohio, that the campus will be thoroughly sanitized.

“I noticed as I was moving out that they were on top of making sure that everything was clean,” said Howard.

The university has continued a complete wipe down to protect the campus from COVID-19 and other diseases. TSU is using professional cleaning companies with disinfectants and sanitizing equipment to wipe down its main campus and downtown location. 

SGA President Katelyn Thompson talks to students in virtual meeting.

President Glover told students the virtual meeting will be the first of several she will hold to keep students updated on campus operations during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Since transitioning to all online instruction and telework for faculty and staff, the university has hosted several virtual student events, such as this. Last week, TSU made history by establishing a chapter of the National Music Honor Society, Pi Kappa Lambda, and inducting its first members. 

For more on campus operations affected by the coronavirus, and student information, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/covid19

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU makes history with virtual installation of National Music Honor Society

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University made history on Wednesday when it virtually established a chapter of Pi Kappa Lambda, the National Music Honor Society, and inducted its first student members.

The initial inductees into the Society of Pi Kappa Lambda are: seniors Julien Dooley, Jakori Hollinger, Natasha Machlin, Darien Phillips, Devin Pride and Andrew Walker; junior Jabril Muhammad; and graduates Michelene McKinney and Jordan Thomas.

Hollinger said the experience is one he will never forget.

“It was an honor to be a part of such a historic moment on our campus, amid troubled times,” said Holinger, a music education major from Montgomery, Alabama. “With the addition of the Lambda Delta Chapter, TSU and our Music Department will continue to remain at the forefront of excellence.”

Jakori Hollinger

The installation had to be done virtually because of the new requirements put in place as a precaution to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19). Hitting the unmute button when each of their names were called, the new members became a part of the coveted organization that recognizes students for high scholastic achievements as music majors. 

TSU President Glenda Glover, Dr. Alisa Mosley, interim vice president for academic affairs, and Dr. Robert Elliott, head of TSU’s Music Department, were among the participants in the ceremony that took place live via Zoom.

Pi Kappa Lambda Regent, Dr. Mark Wait, installed the TSU Lambda Delta Chapter and assisted in the induction into membership of the first group of candidates.

The faculty members whose names appear on the charter are: Robert Bryant, Mark Crawford, Kaylina Crawley, Robert L. Elliott, Susan M. Kelley and Ljerka Rasmussen.

Founded in 1918, Pi Kappa Lambda is an honor society dedicated by its founders to the fostering of scholarly inquiry and artistic accomplishment in the field of music. Of the approximately 70 honor societies recognized by the Association of College Honor Societies, PKL is one of the oldest, and it is the only music group so recognized.

TSU’s Department of Music supports a full range of vocal and instrumental performance opportunities, including the orchestra, string ensemble, Tennessee State University Choir, Meistersingers, symphonic and concert band, two jazz ensembles, percussion ensemble, pep band, the world-renowned Aristocrat of Bands marching band, and a host of small vocal and mixed ensembles.

To learn more, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/music/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU on the frontline in COVID-19 prevention with production of protective masks for healthcare professionals and hand sanitizer

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is helping in the global fight against the novel coronavirus (COVID-19). The University is stepping to the forefront and using its educational platform to make protective face gear for doctors, nurses and other medical personnel.

Headband designed by TSU 3D printing machines. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations).

TSU is also sharing information on how families can make their own hand sanitizer while producing the germ fighting solution for campus police.

The Tennessee Higher Education Commission has asked TSU to use its 3D printing machines to help design a portion of the mask, which has three components: plastic shield, headband and elastic band. The College of Engineering is leading the campus effort to produce the protective gear, which also includes the College of Agriculture and Library Services.

Reporters from all four Nashville TV stations, as well as WPLN (NPR), came out on March 24 to see demonstrations by TSU professors and grad students.

“We are currently fabricating several of the headbands to donate to THEC,” says Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of Engineering. “We have faculty, staff and students involved in making this product from four different sites at TSU. We hope to collectively support the state’s effort to mitigate and limit the spread of COVID-19.”

TSU grad students Oluwatosin Fagbuyi (left) and Rotimi Joaquim discuss printing technology with WPLN reporter. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The masks will be used to protect Tennessee medical professionals, like nurses and doctors, who are on the front lines caring for individuals with the virus. In Italy, the country with the second highest number of COVID-19 cases, more than 20 doctors have reportedly died and thousands of other health workers have been infected since the outbreak.

Oluwatosin Fagbuyi is one of the graduate students helping to make the headbands using the 3D technology. He says he could not pass up the chance “to help save lives.”

“It’s nice to feel like I can help,” says Fagbuyi, who is majoring in mechanical and manufacturing engineering. “It’s an opportunity I couldn’t turn down.”  

In addition to helping with the mask, the College of Agriculture is also making hand sanitizer and sharing instructions on how individuals can make their own. The college is also producing the alcohol-based solution to make available for campus police.

Dr. Sudipta Rakshit in the College of Agriculture talks to reporters about making hand sanitizer. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“There is such a shortage because of the virus,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture. “The idea is to help people make their own sanitizer in case they can’t get it commercially.”   

The process includes mixing ingredients such as isopropyl alcohol and hydrogen peroxide. But Ag officials say the main goal is to keep the percentage of alcohol greater than 60 percent. 

For information about TSU operations amid the COVID-19 pandemic, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/covid19.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU employees begin teleworking to ward off spread of COVID-19

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University employees began working remotely on Monday to help prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).  University officials said the move is in-line with directives from the Mayor and Governor in an effort to curtail the spread of the virus. TSU employees were told last week and began making arrangements for teleworking on Thursday and Friday.

“TSU’s modified operations plan, which includes employees teleworking, is in-line with the Mayor and Governor’s directive for individuals to stay home when possible,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. 

Employees with Campus Police, Emergency Management and Facilities Maintenance will continue working on campus. All individuals on campus or coming to TSU should self-quarantine and contact their healthcare provider if they feel sick.

The University has enhanced its cleaning and sanitizing process and will continue a campus wide wipe down of academic buildings and residence halls. TSU began online instruction for all students on March 16, almost all students have left the campus.

The University recently learned that a student has tested positive for COVID-19. 

The individual, who did not live on campus, has been at home in self-isolation for a number of days while receiving the necessary care to treat their condition. No further information is being given about the individual for privacy reasons.

The University has compiled a list of individuals who were in contact with the student, and is in the process of notifying them. 

For more information on campus operations and student information, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/covid19.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU allowing students to go home and finish semester online as a precaution to COVID-19

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is allowing students to return home and finish the semester online as a precaution to the spreading coronavirus (COVID-19). Online classes started Monday.

University officials announced last Thursday that TSU was transitioning to online learning. In a correspondence to students, TSU President Glenda Glover stated the decision was in the best interest of the university, as both the federal government and State of Tennessee have declared a state of emergency.

“Concerns pertaining to the coronavirus COVID-19 are affecting all of us and continues to worsen,” said Dr. Glover. “Within the last 48-hours, the country has changed drastically, as the number of U.S cases continue to be confirmed.”   

TSU will close all residence halls and apartments on Saturday, March 21. The university will evaluate requests from students with extenuating circumstances that need more time to make arrangements. Housing officials said those requests will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Students will continue their classes in an online format and there is no requirement to live on campus.

As further precaution, the University has canceled all campus events where large crowds are expected, as well as suspended all international travel through the end of April to minimize exposure to the disease. TSU has made these decisions to ensure the safety and health of the campus family. 

The university will provide more information on campus operations as decisions are made.     

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Volunteers from across city come to TSU Ag farm to help clean up tornado damage

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Volunteers from across the City of Nashville came to Tennessee State University’s agricultural farm on Monday to join the TSU family in cleaning up damage from last week’s tornado.

The storm system that hit northwest and east Nashville shortly after midnight last Monday spawned the tornado that damaged portions of TSU’s campus. However, the university’s Ag farm was devastated, with five structures destroyed. Several livestock were also killed.

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of TSU’s College of Engineering and one of the cleanup leaders, helps remove debris. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee, as well as other state officials and lawmakers, surveyed the damage last week.

“We appreciate all the support the community is showing TSU,” said Dr. Curtis Johnson, the university’s chief of staff.

Dwight Beard is president of the Nashville Chapter of the TSU National Alumni Association. He said seeing people come from all over the city to help TSU is “awesome!”

“It shows the love of the community,” said Beard, who helped clean up tree limbs and debris in other parts of the campus soon after the tornado hit. “It shows people coming together, and that’s what we should do.”

Among the volunteers were representatives from the Nashville Predators hockey team, which recently partnered with TSU to help raise money for student scholarships.

People line up to register to volunteer. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“The Predators actually closed our office today and sent staff to volunteer at different locations throughout the city to help with tornado relief,” said Robin Lee, the Predators’ director of sponsorship service.

Many of TSU’s own helped in the cleanup effort.

TSU football coach Rod Reed agreed.

“It’s important that as an employee we take responsibility to also help rebuild our own workplace and facilities,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of TSU’s College of Engineering, and one of the cleanup team leaders.

Volunteers help with cleanup. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“It’s extremely important for us to get out and show our presence,” said Reed, who brought about 10 football players to help clean up.

Ben Owen of Oak Hill School, a private Christian institution in Nashville, came with five other co-workers.

“We’ve got a heart for service,” said Owen, who is director of technology at the school. “We heard of the need over here, so we organized and came over.”

Cleanup on the farm was expected to continue on Tuesday and Wednesday. For information about how to help, contact the Office of Emergency Management at 615-963-1489.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee surveys storm damage at TSU

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee visited TSU on Tuesday to survey damage caused by a tornado that touched down near the university’s main campus.

Storm damage on TSU agricultural farm. (Photo by Travis Loller/AP)

The storm system that hit northwest and east Nashville shortly after midnight on Monday spawned the tornado that severely damaged structures on Tennessee State University’s agricultural farm. Three of four buildings were totally destroyed, and the welfare of the animals is a priority. TSU agriculture officials said two calves were killed and several goats injured.

Other parts of the campus received damage to signs and building rooftops, as well as downed power lines, uprooted trees and other debris. The university has suspended power to structures with the most damage as a safety precaution. 

Gov. Lee surveyed the worst damage, which was at the farm.

“Our thanks to Gov. Bill Lee for touring TSU and assessing the damage,” said TSU President Glenda Glover.

Dr. Curtis Johnson, TSU’s chief of staff, said state officials are working with the university to assess the damage, which he said could have been worse.

“Nobody was injured,” said Johnson.

TSU’s agricultural farm is known for its nationally recognized goat research, as well as cattle research. Dr. Richard Browning, TSU’s lead goat researcher, echoed Johnson’s sentiment in regard to damage.

“It could have been worse,” said Browning.

TSU students are on spring break this week, but a few are on campus and are safe.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU exceeds goal of ‘$1 Million in 1 Month’ during historic campaign for student scholarships with contributions over $1.7M

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Hundreds of Tennessee State University students will receive scholarships to continue their education after the university exceeded its goal to raise $1 million during the month of February. The total collected hours before the deadline on Saturday, February 29, was $1,702,674. 

TSU President Glenda Glover

TSU President Glenda Glover expressed her gratitude and appreciation to everyone that made a contribution. 

“This wouldn’t be possible without the unprecedented support of alumni, faculty, staff and our corporate partner, the Nashville Predators, along with the faith-based community and many others,” said Glover.  “Because of your unwavering support, hundreds of young men and women will be able to continue their educational journey here at TSU.”  

Campaign Chairman Jamie Isabel also expressed gratitude to the Predators, as well as the hard work of the campaign committee, and Dr. Glover’s leadership.

“I am grateful that Dr. Glover challenged the alumni to think outside of the box and begin a new year and a new decade with the mindset of giving,” said Isabel, a TSU alum. “The campaign has been a very big success, and we are excited about the results.”

The campaign to raise $1 Million in 1 Month during Black History Month laid the foundation for the historic partnership between TSU and the National Hockey League’s Nashville Predators. It is the first known partnership between an HBCU and the NHL, and coincided with the league’s Hockey is for Everyone initiative in February. 

Joni McReynolds, president of the TSU National Alumni Association, said she’s proud of the way alumni responded.

“I know this will definitely help our students,” said McReynolds. “They are in such need because the state does not provide us with as much money as they used to. “

TSU alum Charles Galbreath of New York City is among the many alumni who contributed to the campaign.

“It’s important for the students to see that we don’t forget about what their needs are after we leave,’ said Galbreath. “I think that the energy that everyone is coming together with is everything we learned at TSU; that Big Blue spirit, to continue to take care of our school even after we’re gone.”

TSU President Glenda Glover with Nashville Predators President and CEO Sean Henry, along with $1 Million in 1 Month Campaign Chairman Jamie Isabel and TSU student leaders following the kickoff announcement in early February. (Submitted photo)

Money raised from the campaign will provide both merit-based and need-based scholarships for TSU students. Approximately 500 scholarships will be awarded to students in an average amount of $2,000. About 90 percent of TSU students receive some form of financial aid.

TSU freshman Jacob Taylor is one of them. The Memphis, Tennessee, native said he probably would not be at TSU if he did not currently have a scholarship.

“My mother has a good salary, but she doesn’t make enough to put me through school,” said Taylor, a health sciences major. “Having that extra money to pay for college really does a lot, because it takes stress off students.”

Junior Sydney Morehouse of St. Louis, Missouri, agreed.

“There are a lot of students that need financial aid,” said Morehouse, who is also majoring in health sciences. “Some of my friends are close to the finish line, but they don’t have funds to pay for their tuition and graduate. I want them to graduate. They are the future doctors, lawyers and physical therapists. So scholarships from the $1 Million in 1 Month campaign will really be beneficial.” 

The Predators organization made the first donation to the campaign, as well as an additional $100,000 of in-kind assets to help spread awareness to the initiative, which includes providing TSU students with internships.

“With the help of the most passionate fan base in all of sports and the Nashville Predators organization, we are proud to partner with Tennessee State University on this life-changing education initiative,” said Predators President and CEO Sean Henry. 

Nashville Predators mascot, and TSU mascot. (Submitted photo)

In addition to the kickoff event with the Nashville Predators, the university engaged the TSU family with various challenges. The Alpha Theta Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. claimed victory in the Alumni Chapter Challenge with a contribution of $16,305, and they also won the TSU Divine Nine Fraternity and Sorority Challenge with a donation of $21,627. In the Staff/Faculty Challenge, TSU staff won with a contribution of $10,393.

Campaign activities also included the TSU Sunday Day of Giving, along with the Dialing for Dollars telethon that took place the last Sunday of the month, and involved the faith-based community. The pledges for the telethon exceeded $60,000. The goal was $25,000. The TSU College Challenge was the final campaign challenge between the eight academic units. Gifts for this activity are still being calculated.  

TSU students played a major role in bringing in donations as well. Over 100 students staffed a phone bank to make evening calls to alumni during the campaign and participated in the telethon as callers or as a part of the production to live stream the event. 

To learn more about the campaign, visit www.tnstate.edu/1million1month

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Equips Students For Top Careers In Health Sciences

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s College of Health Sciences has thriving programs that prepare students for six of the top 25 best healthcare jobs listed in a recent article published by U.S. News & World Report.

The jobs included as part of the magazine’s 2020 Best Health Care Jobs list, are: nurse practitioner, speech language pathologist, registered nurse, physical therapist, occupational therapist and respiratory therapist.

Dr. Ronald Barredo, Dean of the College of Health Sciences, says there will always be a great need for these healthcare jobs.   

“The good thing about healthcare is as long as there is sickness in the world, we will always have a job,” says Barredo.

Tierney Curtis (Photo Submitted)

Tierney Curtis, a graduate student in the occupational therapy program, says attending TSU gives her a great advantage as a future healthcare professional.

“Nashville is already a booming healthcare city so most of your clinical work and opportunities include going out into the Nashville community, and meeting people and making connections,” says Curtis, who received an undergraduate degree in health sciences from TSU in 2018. “I think the health sciences program at TSU is one of the best here in Nashville because they offer so many programs. We have professors that are here to help you that have been across different spans of healthcare.”

A West Memphis, Arkansas native, Curtis says she hopes to stay in Nashville after she graduates from TSU and work at a hospital in acute care, or work in pediatrics with outpatients, or in the school system.

Future Physical Therapist Zachary Prudoff says although he enjoys working with amputees, he is unsure what area of physical therapy he wants to explore as a profressional.

Zachary Prudoff, a doctoral candidate in the TSU Department of Physical Therapy,checks a patient’s blood pressure before administering a mobility test. (Photo Submitted)

“I think as I go through more classes, I get to understand the profession as a whole a little bit more, and it starts to help clue me in on what type of patients I might like to work with in the field, says Prudoff, who is a doctoral candidate in the department of Physical Therapy.

He says developing relationships with faculty is extremely important.

“In grad school, especially in physical therapy, our teachers are sometimes our greatest resources and it’s very important to foster a relationship of communication and mutual respect. They have been out in the field and practicing. They know things that you don’t know for sure, and they are there to help you.”

Barredo says all six of the programs that made U.S. News & World Report’s 2020 Best Healthcare Jobs list are accredited at TSU. He says the programs in the TSU College of Health Sciences are in high demand.

“We’ve always had a lot more applicants than there are slots in the program, some more than others,” says Barredo, who is a recipient of the Catherine Worthingham Fellow of the American Physical Therapy Association, the association’s highest award. “For example, in physical therapy last year we had about 200 applicants for only 36 slots, and that’s true for most every program.”

Dr. Ronald Barredo (Photo by TSU Media Relations)

This fall each of the six health sciences programs noted in the study, with the exception of the speech language pathology program which already has a clinic at the TSU Avon Williams Campus, will relocate into a new $38 million facility. 

Barredo says the shared space will provide opportunities for students to get a more comprehensive view of  the collaborative roles of health science professionals.

“Right now we are all separated in different buildings. So now there will be a lot more interpersonal collaboration in terms of patient care, research and service activities,” he says. “Instead of us doing things separately, we will be more consolidated and able to demonstrate that there is a lot more to healthcare than physical therapy, for example.”

Antoinette Duke, associate director of the TSU Career Development Center, says students such as those in the College of Health Sciences can visit the university’s career center to utilize a wide array of resources to prepare for life beyond TSU.

Antoinette Duke, associate director of TSU’s Career Development Center, advises student during 2020 Spring Internship Fair. (Photo by TSU Media Relations)

“We are doing everything in our power to partner with student organizations, the faculty, the staff and the professors to help them encourage our students to utilize this service that is there for them,” says Duke. “We have several resources to help prepare them.  For instance, if the student is not prepared for interviewing, one of the resources we have is Interview Stream. It allows our students to tap into that service to practice before they meet with a potential company or employer.”

For more information about the TSU College of Health Sciences, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/health_sciences/

For more information on the TSU Career Development Center, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/careers/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a  premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs, and seven doctoral degrees.  TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville, Tennessee.  With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students  with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

$1 Million in 1 month student spotlight

“Scholarships are important because they give students an opportunity to get an education when they don’t have the means to pay for it themselves. They put students on the workforce radar who might not be otherwise. The $1 Million in 1 Month Campaign shows both students and parents, and anybody in general, how the university views the need for students to get an education.”
– Paul Johnson, Jr., Mechanical Engineering
To give to the $1 Million in 1 Month campaign, text “TSU1MIL” to 41444 or visit http://www.tnstate.edu/president/1mil6.aspx