Category Archives: Uncategorized

President Glover Shares Inspiring Message at 7th Annual Prayer Service

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover encouraged faith-based leaders and residents from across the city of Nashville at the 7th Annual Presidential Prayer Service to persevere in spite of storms.

“The storm will pass over,” said Dr. Glover, addressing the attendees gathered at Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church on Jan. 9. “We used to sing a song that says, ‘The storm is passing over. I can feel a peace down in my soul.'”

Glover served as the keynote speaker for the service, which featured a diverse group of spiritual leaders, some traveling from as far as Memphis to be a part of the program.

“As we start another semester, another year at TSU, we start it with prayer. We start it with thanks, and indeed, I am truly thankful to God for blessing me to lead such an amazing university,” she said.

TSU students Jaquel Maise and Ismael Turner participate in prayer service. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Several dignitaries and public officials shared greetings including Nashville Mayor David Briley, who spoke about TSU’s significance to the city of Nashville.

“It is pretty clear, I think, that no other institution of higher learning has created more leaders in this community than Tennessee State University,” he said. “There are thousands of engineers, teachers, business leaders and scientists that have graduated from Tennessee State University just in my lifetime that have certainly changed this city.”

Other attendees included Bishop Joseph Walker III, pastor of Mt. Zion Baptist Church; State Rep. Harold Love, Jr.; Minister Samuel X of Muhammad’s Mosque #60; Rabbi Philip Rice of Congregation Micah; and Father Dexter Brewer of Christ the King Catholic Church.

Following Glover’s address, several ministers offered prayer regarding several areas, including peace, the global community, the Nashville community, children and youth and the TSU community.

The prayers concluded with Dr. Forrest Harris, president of American Baptist College, praying fervently for Dr. Glover as various ministers gathered around her in a display of unity and support.

Rev. Aaron X. Marble, pastor of Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church, presided over the program.

The service was followed by a breakfast in the lower auditorium of the church that was open to the public.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Employee Wilson Lee’s Woodcarvings Featured at Nashville Airport

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Wilson Lee Jr. vividly remembers the Smithsonian Institute approaching him about his artwork as an undergraduate student at Mississippi Valley State University.

“One day I was sitting outside under a cottonwood tree, and a man walks up and says, ‘I am looking for Wilson Lee. Are you Wilson Lee?’ And I say, ‘What do you want with him?’ And he says, ‘I am a researcher from the Smithsonian Institute. I’ve already talked to his father. Now I want to talk to him about his carvings.’ So he showed me his credentials, and from there I did a show with the American Folklore Festival. All of this is while I am in college.”

Lee is director of the Tennessee State University One Stop Shop.  His celebrated woodcarvings are currently featured at the Nashville International Airport (BNA) as part of the 2018 Flying Solo Winter Exhibitions. Lee said he grew up in Greenville, Mississippi, going from his bedroom to his father’s woodworking shop where they restored antique furniture.

Wilson Lee Jr., director of TSU One Stop Shop

“We basically worked for the rich land owners in the Delta, so my upbringing was quite different from a lot of other African Americans in the Delta,” he said. “I knew the difference between walnut, mahogany, oak, pine and various fine woods at a very early age.”

That early training provided Lee with the foundational skills he has used to create a lifetime of art, such as that featured in Back to Now, the collection of his work on display at BNA.

“There is so much going on in the country now that reminds me of what I have already gone through,” he said. “So what I did for this show was select work from the late 60s and the late 70s and from 2018.”

The exhibit, which runs through February 24 in the Concourse C Waiting Lounge, features eight of Lee’s carvings, touching on topics ranging from gentrification to the spirit world. He said his work often speaks about injustice and is rooted in his rich heritage and culture.

Wilson Lee Jr.’s woodcarving, We Are One, which is featured in his collection Back to Now at the Nashville International Airport in the Concourse C Waiting Lounge.

“I have never been afraid to speak about injustice, and I’ve never been afraid to create work about injustice,” he said. “The fall out from that is that you won’t be listed in some settings. You won’t be invited to some places. But that’s just the price that you pay if you are willing to go this route.“

Mary Grissim, curator of arts at BNA, said the Flying Solo Exhibit features five Tennessee artists and will last three months.

“Wilson’s art was selected because, one, woodcarving is not that common. We don’t see a lot of entries in that area, so his was very unique in that respect,” she said. “The quality of his work is outstanding, and what I love about this program is that of the 14 million people who pass through our airport yearly, I would say the majority of these people aren’t exposed to art. They don’t go to art museums. They aren’t hanging out in art galleries. So for many of these people, this is their first exposure to fine art.”

Grissim said one of the major purposes of featuring art in airports is to distract people from the personal challenges many of them grapple with as they travel.

Mary Grissom, curator for arts at the Nashville International Airport.

“It’s very similar to art in healthcare,” she said. “You can’t imagine going in a hospital that doesn’t have art in it because art is distracting you from the tension of why you are there, whether it’s for yourself or someone else. That’s what happens in airports. This would be a grim place if there wasn’t beautiful artwork.”

Lee said his work as an artist has paralleled his work in higher education.

“My whole mission in life was to work at an HBCU (Historically Black Colleges and Universities). I wanted to do my whole tenure there,” he said. “I wanted to help these kids, so I just got my credentials, and that’s where I work. That’s where I play ball.”

Lee previously worked at TSU from 1991 until 1999 as the director of financial-aid. He has also worked at Jackson State University, Texas Southern University and Mississippi Valley State University.

Wilson Lee Jr. with his family at the Winter Flying Solo Reception at the Nashville International Airport.

“What I tell young people is, if you are passionate about something, do it. Do it when you don’t get paid. That is my philosophy,” he said. “Just keep doing it if you think that this is what you are here on Earth to do. Somebody has to leave a record; I leave a record in wood. Somebody’s got to say something about gentrification; I comment about it in wood. Somebody’s got to say something about the blues; I do it in wood.”

For more information about Wilson Lee Jr.: Back to Now and the 2018 Flying Solo Winter Exhibitions, visit www.flynashville.com.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Percussionists from TSU’s famed Aristocrat of Bands perform in Rose Parade

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Percussionists from Tennessee State University’s famed Aristocrat of Bands recently performed in the Rose Parade in Pasadena, California.

Submitted photo

Honda Corporation of America invited eight percussionists from last year’s Honda Battle of the Bands to perform in an all-star drum section for the annual parade on Jan. 1.

The percussionists are: Keyuna Bufford (senior), Jackson, Tennessee; Quintin Burton (senior), St. Louis; Delvecchio Christian (senior), Memphis; Richard Freeman (sophomore), Birmingham, Alabama; Floyd Ivy (sophomore), Memphis; Devin Pride (junior), Atlanta; Brian Watson (freshman), Nashville; and Evan Armstrong (sophomore), Nashville.

The students were guided by Derrick Greene, assistant band director who was head drum major for the Aristocrat of Bands in 2015-2016.

The band, one of TSU’s greatest ambassadors, made its eighth appearance in the Honda Battle of the Bands last year.

In 2014, the AOB became the first collegiate band ever to perform at halftime of the NFL Pro Football Hall of Fame game. The band and university made national headlines again in 2017 by accepting a special invitation from former President Barack Obama to perform on the White House Lawn.

And in 2018, the band performed with country music megastar Keith Urban during the singer’s tour stop at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville.

To learn more about the Aristocrat of Bands, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/aristocratofbands/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Siblings Establish Endowed Scholarship At TSU To Honor Parents

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will soon offer a new scholarship opportunity for residents of Columbia County, Georgia, thanks to Helen Young and her siblings.

The John and Adline Starks Memorial Scholarship Endowment Fund, named in honor of Young’s parents, will provide financial assistance to a student from Columbia County who wishes to attend TSU.

Young, a graduate of the University of Georgia, said they chose to establish the scholarship at TSU because of positive experiences with the university.

“I have been fortunate over the last six or seven years to attend a number of the TSU scholarship galas. I’ve been able to attend some of the homecoming festivities, and actually been able to meet some of the folks who are graduates of Tennessee State, and I have been so impressed with knowing their dedication to TSU,” she said. “They have a sense of family, and they really have a caring, it-takes-a-village approach to their education of students at TSU.”

Helen Young with her daughter Georgeanna A. Young, who graduated with a master’s of public health from TSU in August 2018.

Although John and Adline Starks are not TSU alums, Young’s daughter, Georgeanna A. Young, earned a master’s of public health from the university in August. Helen said she witnessed first hand the “vested interest” Georgeanna’s professors played in her success.

“It was just overwhelming to see that kind of emphasis put on my child,” Helen said. “I think it’s just an incredible testament to the administration at Tennessee State University, as well as the alumni.”

Betsy Jackson Mosley, executive director of the TSU Foundation, said the endowed scholarship will be awarded to students beginning in 2021.

“Endowed scholarships like this one will help students for years to come. And then they also leave a legacy for family,” Jackson said. “It’s really good that particular families who have members to attend or deep connections to TSU are able to recognize their loved ones this way and know that it will always be here.”

Helen, who along with her sister Roberta integrated the Columbia County School System in the 1960s, said her parents would have been proud to be connected to the legacy of an institution like Tennessee State University.

“I know my parents would have never been able to get into the University of Georgia when they were of age to go to college because of the color of their skin,” she said. “The only options they would have had would have been a historically black university or some small community college, maybe.”

John Henry and Adline Beatrice Starks were born and reared in rural Edgefield County South Carolina. John served in the military during WWII and was a Baptist minister. Adline, a homemaker, was a devoted wife and mother who taught her children how to work hard and lead productive lives. Helen said her parents taught them to “speak up when they saw injustice and not back down in the face of adversity.”

Helen Young serves as the assistant vice president for shared services center operations at Parallon Business Solutions, a subsidiary of Hospital Corporation of America responsible for providing services in the areas of revenue cycle, group purchasing, supply chain, technology, workforce management, and consulting services.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU President, Board Chairman and Administrator among Nashville’s 10 Most Powerful African-Americans

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Three individuals that have prominent roles with Tennessee State University have made Music City’s power list for African-Americans. President Glenda Glover, the university’s Board of Trustees chairman, Dr. Joseph Walker III and Metro Councilwoman Tanaka Vercher are among Nashville’s 10 most powerful African-Americans in the recent edition of the Nashville Voice, an online publication.

Dr. Glover ranked No. 4, followed by Walker at No. 7 and Councilwoman Vercher at No. 9, respectively. The individuals named span a number of industries, from local government and banking to faith-based leadership and education. Criteria was based on: capacity, responsibility, singularity, respectability and consistency.

“They have made a career out of using their power and influence for the greater good of the urban community in Nashville,” according to the Nashville Voice.

Dr. Glover, who is also the international president of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, has led TSU since 2013. Under her leadership as the university’s first female president, student enrollment has continuously ranked among the highest amid the nation’s historically black colleges and universities. TSU has also experienced a significant increase in alumni fundraising, research dollars and academic offerings with her at the helm. Since taking over Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, she orchestrated a successful and historic philanthropic campaign for HBCUs by raising over $1.2 million in 24-hours for the institutions.

In addition to being chairman of TSU’s Board of Trustees, Walker is senior pastor of Mt. Zion Baptist Church, which has three locations in Nashville. He is also presiding bishop of the Full Gospel Baptist Church Fellowship International. Additionally, he serves on the board of directors for Meharry Medical College and Citizens Savings Bank.

Councilwoman Tanaka Vercher, who is also associate director of financial aid at TSU, chair’s the Metro Council’s Budget and Finance Committee. She is arguably the most powerful person on the Council, overseeing the city’s $2.2 billion budget.

To see the Nashville Voice story, visit http://www.thevoicenashville.com/news-politics/nashvilles-10-most-powerful-african-americans-2018/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Helps Students Explore Ancestry

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – This holiday season, Erica Conn will get a gift from Tennessee State University she has longed to receive most of her life. Thanks to a new service being offered by the Office of International Affairs, Conn will trace her ancestry.

“I’m not sure where I am from, and my ancestry is not readily available to me because my ancestors were slaves,” she said.  “So my history for the most part is hidden.”

A senior office assistant in OIA, Conn is currently pursuing a master’s degree in public administration at the university. When she heard OIA would be collaborating with Helix, a personal genomics company, to provide ancestry DNA testing services for TSU students and members of the surrounding community, she convinced the office to let her volunteer as a tester so she could tell other people about the product.

Erica Conn

“I just think that it is super important for African Americans, but not just African Americans, anyone and everyone, to know where they are from, who their ancestors are, and what the commonalities are,” she said. “What are the norms from the particular culture? How can they draw from those things, and how can they be better because of those things?

Mark Brinkley, director of International Education in OIA, said helping students explore their ancestry is part of TSU’s initiative to help them become more comfortable with their culture.

“Seventy percent of our student population is African-American,” he said. “The proposition of study abroad is, as we say, ‘Why don’t you go and experience another culture?’ That becomes even more challenging when our students don’t know their own culture.”

To assist students with the process of exploring their ancestry, Brinkley said OIA has developed more programs focused on visiting the continent of Africa, as well as following the African diaspora.

“It’s a historic fact that 12.5 million people of African descent left Africa in the slave trade. Ten million arrived to the Americas. Only 400,000 came to what we call the United States,” he said. “That means that this African diaspora is really immense, and almost anywhere we go, Brazil in South America, the Caribbean, there is a heavy African influence from the ships stopping their before they got to the United States.”

Brinkley said some of the study abroad experiences currently being planned include Senegal, South Africa, Denmark, Mexico and Peru.

Conn, who is awaiting her test results, said she eventually hopes to visit her homeland.

“I will solve the mystery of where I am from and who my ancestors are, but as far as getting there, it’s going to be a bit costly, so I will start working,” she said. “I am going to Africa with my church in 2020, but we know that Africa is a large continent, and I’m not sure where I am from, so the place where we are going may not be remotely close to where I am from.  But I intend to go there, and try to find out as much information as I can.”

Mark Brinkley

Brinkley, whose test revealed that he is 80 percent West African, 16 percent European, 2 percent South African and 2 percent other. said the ancestry testing helps students answer two of the three fundamental questions they ask in their programs: Who am I? How do I know? How do I interact with others?

“It was very interesting this past summer when we were in South Africa. I opened up my welcome to them by saying, ‘I’m coming back home,’ because I know who I am, and I also know how I know that,” he said.

The Office of International Affairs is located on the first floor of Holland Hall. For more information about TSU’s Study Abroad and Exchange Programs as well as ancestory testing, contact Mark Anthony Brinkley at mbrinkley1@tnstate.edu or (615) 963-7660.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tree lighting ceremony a festive event for TSU family, community

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Members of the Tennessee State University family, as well as the community, turned out last Tuesday night for the university’s festive tree lighting ceremony.

TSU President Glenda Glover with Miss TSU Kayla Sampson and Mr. TSU Darian McGhee. (Photo by Ramona Whitworth)

“This tree, this TSU tree, symbolizes light, life, and love,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “We light this tree, and pray for a happy and joyful holiday season.”

Before the tree lighting, TSU’s Aristocrat of Bands provided some holiday spirit, and hot chocolate was available to help attendees stay warm. The cold temperature, however, didn’t seem to keep those in attendance from having a good time.

Patricia Milton, who drove from Hendersonville, Tennessee, with her 9-year-old granddaughter, said she looked forward to the event, which also had a visit from Santa Claus.

(Photo by Ramona Whitworth)

“I think it’s a wonderful thing to do in the neighborhood,” Milton said.

TSU freshman Andrea Davis agreed.

“It’s a way to make the university more engaged with the community,” said Davis, who will travel home to Washington, D.C. next week. “It also makes me look forward to Christmas.”

TSU will continue to spread holiday cheer when it hosts the Toys for Tots event on Dec. 15. The event will be held in Kean Hall on the main campus from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Note: Feature photo taken by Charles Cook (TSU Media Relations).

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Ag researchers work to make sure turkeys safe to eat

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – As people across the country prepare for Thanksgiving, researchers at Tennessee State University are making sure the turkeys consumers eat are safe.

Dr. Sam Nahashon

The researchers in the university’s College of Agriculture are using probiotics (cultivated beneficial microorganisms) to fight pathogens, including salmonella, which is involved in a current outbreak in turkeys.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the outbreak started in November 2017. As of Nov. 5, this year, 164 people have been infected. The agency reminds people to properly cook and handle turkeys this holiday season.

Dr. Sam Nahashon is professor of poultry science at TSU, and chair of the Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. He said the current Ag research would reduce or exclude pathogens in the intestinal tract of turkeys or chickens by feeding them the cultivated beneficial microorganisms through feed and/or water.

Dr. Fur-Chi Chen

“It just takes a few harmful microorganisms in our body to cause a disease,” said Nahashon. “Our goal is to reduce salmonella and campylobacter in poultry.”

Added research professor Dr. Fur-Chi Chen: “The whole idea is using the beneficial bacteria to feed into the poultry, and during the production, they can prevent the salmonella.”

The CDC recommends handling raw turkey carefully, including washing hands before and after preparing or eating turkey. Cooking raw turkey thoroughly (to an internal temperature of 165°F, measured by placing a thermometer in the thickest part of the bird) will help prevent food poisoning.

TSU Ag professor Elyse Shearer said frozen turkeys should also be fully defrosted, preferably in the refrigerator over several days, and they should not be washed to prevent the spread of bacteria.

Dr. Elyse Shearer

“Also, make sure that no utensils or supplies that came in contact with the raw turkey touch other food items to prevent cross-contamination of harmful pathogens,” said Dr. Shearer, who works in the College of Ag’s Department of Family and Consumer Sciences.

TSU’s College of Agriculture has received millions of dollars from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to research poultry and promote food safety.

To learn more about the College of Agriculture’s food safety research, visit

http://www.fightbac.org/food-safety-education/dont-wing-it/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Choir part of uplifting performance with Carrie Underwood at CMA Awards

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Members of the Tennessee State University Choir joined a Nashville ensemble in an uplifting performance with megastar Carrie Underwood at the 52nd Country Music Association Awards Wednesday night.

Submitted photo.

The choir members and Portara Ensemble sang with Underwood on her timely hit song, “Love Wins,” during the show at Bridgestone Arena.

“It is an absolute honor to sing with an artist the caliber of Carrie Underwood on national television and it was really meaningful for us to sing a song with a text that encourages unity, in this time of incredible division and strife,” said Dr. Susan Kelly, TSU’s choral director.

It was the TSU Choir’s second performance at the CMAs. The group performed on the awards show last year, and students said before last night’s performance that they were excited the university was getting another opportunity.

“I’m really excited,” said choir member Destiny Pennington, a freshman from Detroit. “It’s something that I’ve never done before and have always wanted to do.”

Junior DeMicheal Martin agreed.

“It’s exciting, and it’s also an opportunity to showcase our great university,” said Martin, of Memphis.

Kelly said the opportunity to sing at the CMAs again is a testimony to the hard work of the students and the success they’re having.

“The choir program has grown so much over the past three years and I am delighted that they are beginning to get opportunities and recognition in the Nashville community,” she said.

Dr. Robert Elliott, chair of TSU’s Department of Music, shared similar sentiment.

“The CMAs are a hallmark of excellence in Nashville; so is TSU,” he said. “Dr. Kelly and her students once more do all of us at TSU proud.”

The choir’s performance will be TSU’s second encounter with country music stardom this year. In August, the university’s famed Aristocrat of Bands performed with superstar Keith Urban at Bridgestone Arena during his tour stop in Nashville. The band was featured as a part of Urban’s closing hit song, “Wasted Time.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Choir to grace the CMA Awards once again

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Members of the Tennessee State University Choir will once again be performing at the Country Music Association Awards Wednesday night.

The choir performed at the 51st CMA Awards last year, and students and faculty say they are looking forward to doing it again at the show scheduled for 7 p.m. at Nashville’s Bridgestone Arena.

“I’m really excited,” said choir member Destiny Pennington, a freshman from Detroit. “It’s something that I’ve never done before and have always wanted to do.”

Junior DeMicheal Martin agreed.

“It’s exciting, and it’s also an opportunity to showcase our great university,” said Martin, of Memphis.

Last year, the choral students appeared as backup singers to some of the biggest names in country music, including Carrie Underwood, Darius Rucker, Keith Urban, Garth Brooks and Reba McEntire. The students were invited along with the Portara Ensemble, to kick off the awards show, which was broadcast live on national television from the Music City Center.

Dr. Susan Kelly, the choir’s director, said the opportunity to sing at the CMAs again is a testimony to the hard work of the students and the success they’re having.

“The choir program has grown so much over the past three years and I am delighted that they are beginning to get opportunities and recognition in the Nashville community,” Kelly said.

Dr. Robert Elliott, chair of TSU’s Department of Music, shared similar sentiment.

“The CMAs are a hallmark of excellence in Nashville; so is TSU,” he said. “Dr. Kelly and her students once more do all of us at TSU proud.”

The choir’s performance will be TSU’s second encounter with country music stardom this year. In August, the university’s famed Aristocrat of Bands performed with megastar Keith Urban at Bridgestone Arena during his tour stop in Nashville. The band was featured as a part of Urban’s closing hit song, “Wasted Time.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.