Category Archives: College of Engineering

Tennessee State University Congratulates Its Spring 2018 graduates

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Congratulations to Tennessee State University’s Spring 2018 graduates.

More than 1,000 students walked across the aisle at two separate Tennessee State University commencement ceremonies to receive their degrees in different disciplines. Both ceremonies took place in the Gentry Complex on the main campus.

TSU President Glenda Glover congratulated the graduates and parents for their achievement.

“This is your day,” Glover told the graduates. “We thank you, and we’re depending on you to continue the tradition of excellence.”

At the undergraduate commencement on Saturday, May 5, more than 800 graduates received their degrees after hearing from nationally recognized motivational speaker, Dr. Eric Thomas.

He told the graduates that each of them is born with greatness, but to achieve it requires work.

“Greatness is not free, it comes with a price tag,” said Thomas.

Among the graduates were the grandmother/granddaughter pair of Theresa Lyles, 68, and Zuri Lyles, 22, who received their bachelor’s degrees in sociology and health information management, respectively.

Also at the spring graduation, university officials posthumously presented degrees to the families of two students who died few months before they were to graduate. Bethany Morse, 34, a non-traditional student, died Feb. 2, 2018. Her bachelor’s degree was in social work. The other student, Denise McGarity Sampson, 22, died Nov. 27, 2017. She earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering.

On Friday, May 4, graduate students received their degrees after hearing inspiring words from Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, who gave the commencement address.

Bottoms, an Atlanta native who became the 60th mayor of Atlanta last December and only the second woman to be elected mayor in Atlanta’s history, told the graduates not to be afraid to share their struggles, their “scars,” because they don’t know who may be inspired by them – especially in the case of youth.

“As you enter this next season of life, think of those little boys and little girls who need to hear your stories, and be uplifted by your stories,” said Bottoms. “How you graduated from TSU, and how you got to the other side.“

Between its graduate commencement and its undergraduate commencement, TSU graduated more than 1,000 students. And officials say a “substantial number” have already gotten job or internship offers.

Among them is Emmanuel Gyang of Nashville, who received his bachelor’s degree in engineering. He is heading to Bank of America in Dallas as a systems engineer in the company’s data center.

“I feel blessed to be graduating with a job with a company like Bank of America,” he said. “I owe it to TSU for the preparation I received in the classroom and from TSU’s Career Development Center. They definitely honed me to be the person I am today. They taught me how to carry myself in a more professional manner.”

Recent data comparison shows that TSU is on an upward trajectory when it comes to job placement for new graduates.

Within three months of receiving their degrees, nearly 52 percent of students who graduated in December had received “some form of employment opportunities,” according to the Career Development Center. That’s just 6 percent shy of the national average of graduates who had jobs within six months of graduation, according to College Track, an online database that guides parents and students in college selection.

Last year, TSU received a $2 million career development grant from the United Negro College Fund. The money gave the Career Development Center staff the tools to prepare and ultimately help TSU students secure employment immediately upon graduation.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Motivational Speaker Tells Tennessee State University Graduates That Achieving Greatness Requires Work

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s spring undergraduate commencement speaker told graduates that each of them is born with greatness, but to achieve it requires work.

TSU President Glenda Glover presents a plaque to spring undergraduate commencement, Dr. Eric Thomas. (Photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

“Greatness is not free, it comes with a price tag,” said nationally-recognized motivational speaker, Dr. Eric Thomas, as more than 800 graduates in different disciplines prepared to walk across the aisle to receive their degrees.

Among the graduates were the grandmother/granddaughter pair of Theresa Lyles, 68, and Zuri Lyles, 22, who received their bachelor’s degrees in sociology and health information management, respectively. Read their story at https://bit.ly/2I9rHon.

Also at the spring graduation, university officials posthumously presented degrees to the families of two students who died few months before they were to graduate. Bethany Morse, 34, a non-traditional student, died Feb. 2, 2018. Her bachelor’s degree was in social work. The other student, Denise McGarity Sampson, 22, died Nov. 27, 2017. She earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering.

Called the “Hip Hop Preacher” for his creative style and high-energy speeches, Thomas drove home his usual message on success that “when you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, then you’ll be successful.”

To Saturday’s graduates, Thomas said “work,” “think” and “service” are the greatest assets to achieving greatness.

President Glenda Glover posthumously presaents Denise McGarity Sampson’s degree to her family. McGarity, an engineering major, died Nov. 27, 2017. (Photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

“To activate the greatness in you, it requires you to work to achieve your dream,” he said. “Some days you might not feel like getting up but your dream will make you get up. …it will push you. With your education, you have an opportunity of a lifetime. Surround yourself with people who believe in your dream.”

Prior to Thomas’ speech, TSU President Glenda Glover congratulated the graduates and parents for their achievement.

“This is your day,” said Glover. “We thank you, and we’re depending on you to continue the tradition of excellence.”

Ra’Shunda Hackett, who received her bachelor’s degree in biology, said Thomas reiterated the lessons she learned at TSU.

“TSU’s motto is ‘Think, Work and Serve.’ This university was a dream school, and I am not disappointed that I chose to come here,” said Hackett, of Birmingham, Alabama, who came to TSU on a Presidential Scholarship. “I am extremely excited and thankful to the many at TSU who helped me along the way.”

Hackett, who serves as an AmeriCorps member with Impact America, will intern with Cigna, a global health insurance service company.

Between its graduate commencement, which took place Friday, and its undergraduate commencement, TSU graduated more than 1,000 students. And officials say a “substantial number,” like Hackett, have already gotten job or internship offers.

Among them is Emmanuel Gyang of Nashville, who received his bachelor’s degree in engineering. He is heading to Bank of America in Dallas as a systems engineer in the company’s data center.

“I feel blessed to be graduating with a job with a company like Bank of America,” he said. “I owe it to TSU for the preparation I received in the classroom and from TSU’s Career Development Center. They definitely honed me to be the person I am today. They taught me how to carry myself in a more professional manner.”

Recent data comparison shows that TSU is on an upward trajectory when it comes to job placement for new graduates.

Within three months of receiving their degrees, nearly 52 percent of students who graduated in December had received “some form of employment opportunities,” according to the Career Development Center. That’s just 6 percent shy of the national average of graduates who had jobs within six months of graduation, according to College Track, an online database that guides parents and students in college selection.

Last year, TSU received a $2 million career development grant from the United Negro College Fund. The money gave the Career Development Center staff the tools to prepare and ultimately help TSU students secure employment immediately upon graduation.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Job Outlook Shows Great Promise for Tennessee State University Graduates

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – College graduates will soon hit the market with big dreams and high expectations, and Tennessee State University is helping to make them a reality.

Focused academic preparation, combined with job readiness training and career coaching are paying huge dividends for upcoming TSU graduates.

On May 4 and 5, the university will graduate more than 1,000 students at its dual spring commencements. Officials say a “substantial number” have already received job or internship offers.

Representatives from Kroger Regional Office talk to a TSU student, right, during a recent career fair on the TSU main campus. (Phto by TSU Career Development Center)

Among them is Emmanuel Gyang of Nashville. Upon his graduation on May 5, he will be heading to Bank of America in Dallas as a systems engineer in the company’s data center.

So will Justus Watson, who graduates with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural sciences with a biotechnology concentration. The Atlanta native will join Union Pacific in the marketing and sales department in Omaha, Nebraska.

And Kevin Scott, also of Nashville, who will receive a degree in electrical engineering. Scott has potential job offers waiting for him with Lockheed Martin and AMRDEC, or the Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center.

Recent data comparison shows that TSU is on an upward trajectory when it comes to job placement for new graduates.

Within three months of receiving their degrees, nearly 52 percent of students who graduated in December had received “some form of employment opportunities,” according to the TSU Career Development Center. That’s just 6 percent shy of the national average of graduates who had jobs within six months of graduation, according to College Track, an online database that guides parents and students in college selection.

What is driving these high numbers for TSU?

“It starts with leadership,” says Dr. Tracey Ford, TSU’s vice-president for Student Affairs. “Our president, Dr. Glenda Glover, has elevated the expectation of job placement for our graduates and has charged Student Affairs to be aggressive and innovative in our approach to recruiting employers and securing internships and permanent placement for our talented students.”

More than 130 vendors, including major employers and graduate school representatives, attended the Fall Career and Job Fair on campus last October. (Photo by TSU Career Development Center)

Ford also attributes TSU’s success to the “outstanding job performance” of former students who are employed with companies around the nation and the world.

“Our students who have become great employees at these world-renowned companies are making such an impact that it causes the employers to want to continue to recruit at Tennessee State University,” says Ford.

Last year, TSU received a $2 million career development grant from the United Negro College Fund. The money gave Career Development Center staff the tools to prepare and ultimately help TSU students secure employment immediately upon graduation.

Bethany Beaty, talent acquisition specialist at Enterprise Holdings, Inc., who has hired several TSU graduates over the years, says, “TSU students are very realistic and very ambitious.”

“They always have a drive, and always willing to start at the bottom and work their way up,” says Beaty.

Collectively, the success of Gyang, Watson and Scott and the many other upcoming graduates is a clear reflection of TSU’s “aggressive and innovative” approach to job skills readiness and placement, says Charles Jennings, director of the Career Development Center.

According to Jennings, relationships with employers have been a major factor for TSU’s success. For instance, a career fair in October – one of the largest in recent years – brought more than 130 companies on campus, “all looking to hire our students.” Among major companies at the fair were Apple, Microsoft, Ford Motor Company and Health Career Connections.

“I will have to say we are doing some outstanding work here at TSU in terms of our outreach with employers, not only within the Nashville area, but nationwide,” says Jennings.

Gyang, who interned with Bank of America last year, says he’s “anxiously” waiting for his July start date with the corporate giant.

“I feel blessed to be graduating with a job with a company like Bank of America,” he says. “I owe it to TSU for the preparation I received in the classroom and from the Career Development Center. They definitely honed me to be the person I am today. They taught me how to carry myself in a more professional manner.”

Watson and Scott share Gyang’s sentiments.

“I am pretty excited about this opportunity,” says Watson, the outgoing vice-president of the Student Government Association, who said an interaction at an Agriculture Future of America leadership conference helped him to land the job with Union Pacific.

“A lot of how TSU prepared me made that moment possible. Motivations from my advisors in the College of Agriculture, along with outstanding mentors, and participating in different organizations on campus were helpful. Without TSU, I know for sure I would not have been ready for this opportunity.”

For more information on the TSU Career Development Center, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/careers/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Chemistry Day 2018 Gives High School Students Exposure to Advanced Scientific Research, Labs

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s 15th annual Chemistry Day drew a positive reaction from area high school students.

Held in the Alger V. Boswell Science Complex on April 12, Chemistry Day also included a career fair where graduates met with potential employers and interacted with graduate program representatives.

About 75 students from Hillsboro HIgh School attended Chemistry Day 2018 at TSU. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The daylong program, including a guest lecturer, was organized by the Department of Chemistry in the College of Life and Physical Sciences, in collaboration with the TSU Chemistry Graduate Student Association.

It gave graduate students the opportunity to showcase their research in poster presentations, while visiting high school students – mainly from Nashville’s Hillsboro High School this year – toured the various labs, participated in chemistry demonstrations, and a game of “chemistry Challenge.”

“Chemistry Day is part of our recruitment effort, which also helps us to showcase our programs, and gives students an opportunity to meet potential employers,” said Dr. Mohammad R. Karim, chair of the Department of Chemistry. “We also include high school students for them to see what we have and that we exist. In high school they may learn about chemistry, but they do not know what the details are.”

Nafisa Hamza, a graduating senior, left, discusses her research project with a visiting high school student. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Mohammad said bringing in high school students “for early exposure” also helps to dispel the myth that chemists can only work in certain places.

“We want them to know early on that there is an array of different areas for careers and work for people with chemistry backgrounds,” he said.

Mollie Summers, a 10th-grader from Hillsboro High School, said she wants to become a neurosurgeon, but knows very little about what becoming a surgeon entails. She said listening to TSU professors and seeing the different demonstrations in the labs gave her a better understanding of the importance of chemistry in her future endeavor.

“I know the basics of chemistry, like atomic numbers, stuff we talk about in the chemistry class at school, but touring these labs has opened my eyes to a whole different world,” Summers said.

Representatives from 11 companies and organizations set up booths in the Boswell Science Complex lobby to talk to students about internship and job opportunities.

Kara Allen is manager of Recruitment and University Relations at Aegis Science Corporation. This was her sixth year attending Chemistry Day. Over the years, her company has hired “a lot of graduates” of the TSU chemistry program.

“We are here to talk about positions that are open,” said Allen. “TSU has a great chemistry program. We hire a lot of your undergraduate and graduate students. For the high school kids, we want to get them interested in our careers and sciences early through internship programs.”

William Taylor, a junior communications major and member of the TSU Student Advisory Board, right, mans the Career Services Center display at Chemistry Day in the Boswell Science Complex. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

At this year’s Chemistry Day, more than 15 research projects presented in posters were on display, dealing with topics from cancer research to compounds found in industrial petrochemicals, and effective drug delivery system in the treatment of HIV-associated neurological disorders.

Nafisa Hamza, of Nashville, who graduates in May, was one of the research presenters. Her topic was: “Signaling Pathways Involved in Tributyltin-Induced Increases in Interleukin 6 Production by Lymphocytes.”

She said her research, which could lead to treatment for cancer, is trying to understand the effect of the organic compound Tributylin on the human immune cells.

“The current study aims to determine whether TBT utilizes MAPK signaling pathways (ERK 1/2, p38) to cause alterations in IL-6 production,” Hamza said.

Dr. Renã A.S. Robin, a chemistry professor at Vanderbilt University, was this year’s Chemistry Day guest lecturer.  Her research focus is in the study of the aging process and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s.

For more information on TSU’s chemistry program, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/chemistry/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Spring Preview Day Helps Students Make Decision for College

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Not even heavy rains stopped hundreds of high school students and their parents from attending Spring Preview Day 2018 at Tennessee State University on Saturday.

TSU President Glenda Glover greets Jamey Gaiters, right, and her mother Nichole Gaiters at Spring Preview 2018. Jamey, a senior from Columbus, Ohio, says she coming to TSU in the fall. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Amid the early morning downpour, organizers say more than 1,200 high school seniors and juniors – from about 15 states including, California, Texas, Michigan, Illinois and Wisconsin – attended the daylong program to acquaint them with the university’s offerings and admission processes.

TSU President Glenda Glover made the rounds greeting students and families at the various booths and displays set up in the Floyd-Payne Campus Center for the visitors.

Midway through the day, Dyamond Shay, a senior from Tri-Cities High School in East Point, Georgia, had seen and heard enough. Her mind was made up.

Regardless of the rains, many Spring Preview Day visitors still chose to tour the TSU campus. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“I am definitely coming to Tennessee State University,” said Shay, who made the trip with her mother and older brother. Many graduates from her school also attend TSU.

“I just got here but from the looks of things, the staff are very supportive, and I like that and besides, it’s grounded here. I am really interested.”

Shay’s mother, Shelia James-Shay, agreed.

“She (Dyamond) is really interested in coming, and I think she will learn a lot and she will enjoy it,” Shelia said. “I am really impressed. The program has been very informative, and we are looking forward to the fall semester.”

Dyamond Shay, right, with her mother, Shelia James-Shay, says she is coming to TSU. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Activities for the visitors, according to organizers, also included meetings with academic departments, TSU student organizations,  campus tours, and other forms of educational entertainment.

“Spring Preview Day is going to be an exciting day of information and inspiration here at TSU,” Terrence Izzard, associate vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Success, said days earlier as organizers made final preparations for Spring Preview Day.

“ We feel that bringing these millennial scholars to campus, opening the doors to our classrooms, to our student life, our academic programs will give them firsthand information about the experience.”

Like Dyamond Shay, Jamey Gaiters of Columbus, Ohio, also has her mind made up.

“I really like the campus. The people are really nice and very welcoming,” said Gaiters, a senior from Licking Heights High School who wants to major in child psychology or early childhood education.

“I know for a fact that I will be attending TSU in the fall,” she said.

For more information on admission to Tennessee State University, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/admissions/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Bottoms, Renowned Motivational Speaker Eric Thomas to Speak at TSU’s Dual Spring Commencements

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, and nationally recognized motivational speaker Dr. Eric Thomas will be the commencement speakers at Tennessee State University’s dual spring graduation ceremonies.

Mayor Bottoms will speak on Friday, May 4, at the graduate commencement ceremony in the Howard C. Gentry Complex, beginning at 5 p.m.

On Saturday, May 5, Thomas will address undergraduate students in Hale Stadium. The ceremony will begin at 8 a.m. In case of rain, the undergraduate commencement will be at the Gentry Complex and will start at 9 a.m. Overflow for the event will be in Kean Hall.

Overall, more than 1,000 undergraduate and graduate students will receive degrees in various disciplines.

Bottoms, an Atlanta native who was elected mayor last December, became only the second woman to be elected to that post in the city’s history.

A highly accomplished lawyer and successful public servant who advocates for high quality public education, job opportunities and economic growth, Bottoms is expected to inspire TSU graduate students to set high goals for their future.

Bottoms is a member of the State Bar of Georgia, the Atlanta Chapter of Jack and Jill of America, the Dogwood City Chapter of The Links, Inc., and the Atlanta Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

She is a graduate of Florida A&M University and Georgia State University College of Law.  Alongside her public service career, Mayor Bottoms has maintained a private law practice for more than 20 years, and has served as general counsel for a multi-million dollar business, as well as a Judge (Pro Hoc) in Fulton County State Court.

Dr. Thomas, the undergraduate commencement speaker, is a critically acclaimed author, world-renowned speaker, educator and pastor. His “electrifying voice-over talent” is reportedly credited with propelling the Miami Heat to victory in the NBA Finals in 2012.

Called the “Hip Hop Preacher” for his creative style and high-energy messages, Thomas is expected to inspire the graduates with his message on success driven by his famous quote, “When you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, then you’ll be successful.”

Thomas has a long commitment to community activism, which began with his award-nominated GED program that led to his non-profit, Break The Cycle; I Dare you, and a plethora of other ministerial and educational endeavors. The culmination of those efforts resulted in the development of “The Advantage Program” at Michigan State University in 2003. The program targets high-risk college students by improving their study habits and increasing their retention rates. He is also the creator of International Urban Education Consulting, a non-profit organization committed to finding solutions to closing the achievement gap in urban schools through “goal-framing and reformation” in student learning.

Thomas holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees and a Ph.D. in Educational Administration from Michigan State University.

For more information on commencement, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/records/commencement/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Nashville native Kevin Scott says attending his hometown university was the best choice for college, finds success at TSU

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – When it comes to education, Kevin Scott has no other choice but to succeed.

“My parents didn’t play. Growing up at home my grades always came first,” says Scott, a Nashville native who has a passion for building, tinkering and fixing things.

Scott’s passion is no accident. He was raised around people who were “always building or fixing things.” His father owns a mechanic and towing business that he inherited from Kevin’s grandfather.

Kevin Scott

“That’s where my interest in electronics started, being able to create and play with emerging technology,” says Scott, a senior electrical engineering major at Tennessee State University.

In May, Scott will graduate from TSU with a degree in electrical engineering and a concentration in computer engineering. He has potential job offers waiting for him with aerospace research and engineering giants like Lockheed Martin and AMRDEC or the Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center, upon graduation.

Scott says the “strong and highly accredited” engineering program at TSU made his decision to stay local very easy. At TSU, he maintained the same high academic zeal he had always had. He is completing his engineering program in four years, which ordinarily lasts five years.

“I have been blessed with great professors and mentors at TSU who have been very nurturing and show personal interest in my success,” says Scott, who will be graduating with a near 3.5 grade point average.

An Academic standout at Nashville’s John Overton High School, Scott credits strong TSU disciplines and early preparation for his success. At Overton, Scott was part of the STEM Academy, and a member of the Technology Student Association, which helped him to develop the fundamentals of engineering, robotics and programming.  He had earned 12 college credit hours by the time he graduated high school. He was awarded a Presidential Scholarship to attend TSU, from where both his parents – Kevin, Sr., and Joy Scott – had graduated.

“The scholarship was a sign that I should stay locally and take advantage of the opportunity I had been blessed with,” says Scott. “In fact I had always been involved with TSU and many of my family members had also attended TSU.”

A member of the Honors College, Scott is the Student Branch Chair of the Institute of Electrical/Electronic Engineers, member of the National Society of Black Engineers, and Eta Kappa Nu Zeta Kappa Chapter Electrical Engineering Honor Society. He is also a teaching assistant, and Lab Manager for STEM Scouts by Boy Scout of America.

“This journey through Tennessee State University has been a life-changing experience. From the connections I have made, the opportunities that I have been granted, and from the education I have received, coming into this final stretch of my undergraduate degree, I know that I am ready to THINK, WORK, SERVE, and LEAD,” says Scott.

Dr. Coreen Jackson, interim dean of the Honors College and one of those Scott credits for his success, says, “Kevin is one of those rare people whose achievement and ambition are way beyond his years.”

“Kevin has done an exceptional job in his academics at Tennessee State University,” says Jackson. “He has had excellent training in his engineering classes, received personal mentorship from his professors in the College of Engineering and the Honors College, and is well prepared to make his mark on the world.”

Over his college career, Scott also received recognitions and scholarship awards from the Music City Bowl Tradition of Service, the NFL Retired Players Inspiration, IBM Master The Mainframe Part 2 Completion, and the National Society of Collegiate Scholars.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Spring Preview Day 2018 to Attract Record Participation

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A record number of participants are expected to attend Spring Preview Day 2018 at Tennessee State University on April 14, organizers say.

The Office of Enrollment Management and Student Success says more than 1,200 high school seniors and juniors from across the nation will attend the one-day event in the Floyd-Payne Campus Center. That’s up from the previous record 800 who attended last year’s Spring Preview Day.

Hundreds of high school seniors and juniors and their parents tour academic departments and other sites during Spring Preview Day 2017. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The visiting students and their parents and relatives – from about 15 states including, California, Texas, Michigan, Illinois and Wisconsin – will have the opportunity to see the campus during springtime, as well as acquaint them with the university’s offerings and admission processes.

Activities for the visitors, according to organizers, will also include meetings with academic departments, TSU student organizations, campus tours, entertainment by the world-renowned Aristocrat of Bands, and the Big Blue Tiger Spring Blue & White Football Game in Hale Stadium.

“Spring Preview Day is going to be an exciting day of information and inspiration here at TSU,” says Terrence Izzard, associate vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Success.

“As a university, it is important to us that millennial scholars get to see firsthand what we offer here at TSU. We are concerned about their preparation to be global scholars and so we feel like bringing them to campus, opening the doors to our classrooms, to our student life, our academic programs will give them firsthand information about the experience.”

Spring Preview, a major recruitment effort by the university, started several years ago as a “junior preview day,” to give juniors a jumpstart on recruitment, but it has “slowly turned into a day for seniors as well to complete their admission requirement,” says Everett Jolly, TSU’s director of recruitment.

Spring preview is one of several campaigns aimed to recruit the best and brightest, say TSU officials. Last year, those campaigns led to the recruitment of the largest incoming freshman class in school history (1,500 first-year students), a 17 percent increase over the previous year’s freshman enrollment. The “Class of 2021” came in as one of the most academically qualified classes in the school’s history, with an average 3.07 GPA.

Spring Preview Day 2018 comes on the heels of “Experience TSU,” yet another innovative recruitment campaign that just ended in four major markets – Atlanta, Birmingham, Memphis and Nashville – that aims to meet students where they are.

TSU President Glenda Glover led the campaign to meet potential students face-to-face to ensure their commitment to attend TSU.

These recruitment efforts follow sweeping changes Glover announced in 2016 that raised admission standards, as the university moved to increase retention and graduation rates. Minimum requirements for incoming freshmen went up from a 2.25 GPA to 2.5, while the ACT score remained at 19.

Izzard says “Experience TSU” was a way of “personally congratulating these students for applying and being accepted” to TSU.

“We wanted to personally welcome them to the TSU family and let them know of all the wonderful opportunities to grow and learn while here at Tennessee State University,” says Izzard.

Spring Preview Day will kick off at 9 a.m. in Kean Hall. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2GWLXJ0.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Toasts Its ‘Points of Pride’ During Ceremony in Downtown Nashville, Launches Website to Engage Alumni

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Calling them its ‘Points of Pride,’ Tennessee State University Thursday night recognized local alumni achievers during a ‘Toast To TSU’ at First Tennessee Park in downtown Nashville.

President Glover toasts fellow Points of Pride at the Toast of TSU. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations.)

Points of Pride are TSU graduates or former students who are prominent and emerging leaders with universally recognized success in their fields, and who have made a positive impact on the TSU brand and community.

The inaugural group of TSU Points of Pride, among them Shannon Sanders, Grammy Award Winning Producer, Songwriter and Music, Retired 4-star General LLoyd “Fig” Newton, and President Glenda Glover, include individuals with achievements in arts and entertainment, athletics, business, education, engineering and science, government healthcare, law and the military.

TSU Foundation Board Chairman Dwayne Tucker gives remarks at the Toast of TSU. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

“This is certainly a remarkable event and a memorable way to recognize the outstanding contributions of our alumni to not just TSU, but also to the world and their communities,” said Glover. “I am glad to be a Point of Pride for our great university. I say thank you on behalf of all of us.”

Event organizers say this new category of recognition was created to honor and extend the university’s alumni legacy of achievement.

“Among these individuals are unsung alumni that you don’t hear about who are doing marvelous things in their fields, industries and in their communities,” said Cassandra Griggs, director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving.

Eight of the newly recognized TSU Points of Pride, who were present, were each presented with a poster-size photograph of themselves, and a toast from the audience.

“It’s a wonderful feeling to know that someone cares about the fact that you care enough to do your best everyday,” said Kevin Williams, former president and managing director of General Motors Canada, and member of the TSU Foundation Board. “A recognition like a point of pride from the university is something that will go with me for my lifetime, something that certainly gives me a lot of pleasure in knowing that my small efforts are making a difference.”

TSUNAA President Joni McReynolds with her Points of Pride poster at the reception. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Other Points of Pride toasted were Dwayne Tucker, human resource executive and chairman of the TSU Foundation Board; Dwight Beard, owner of Beard Property Management and president of the TSUNAA Nashville Chapter; Dr. Harold Love, Jr., member of the Tennessee House of Representative and pastor of Lee A.M.E Church; and Uchendi Nwani, entrepreneur, motivational speaker, lecturer and author.

Also toasted was Joni McReynolds, retired generalist with the Central Intelligence Agency and president of TSUNAA.

To view the full list of the 50 Points of Pride, go to https://www.tsupointsofpride.com/

At Thursday night’s Toast to TSU, organizers also launched the official Points of Pride website where alumni can “regularly engage,” nominate future Points of Pride, as well as donate to the university.

TSU alumni and friends toast the new Points of Pride. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

The website is an informative and interactive way to provide feedback on alumni experiences and interests, as well as to register for events and make contributions to support the next generation of the university’s students referred to as “rising stars.”

According to Griggs, the Toast to TSU is a partnership between the TSU Foundation, the National Alumni Association, and the Nashville Chapter to encourage the estimated 24,000 alumni in the Nashville metropolitan area to become informed, involved and invested. Thirteen of the inaugural Points of Pride are from Nashville.

This local effort is being spearheaded by the Nashville Chapter and President Beard.    Foundation Board Chairman Tucker is leading the national effort to education alumni and chapters of the importance of directing funds raised in the name of the University to the TSU Foundation.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

International Investment Executive and TSU Graduate to Speak at Honors Day Convocation March 20

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University honors students will hear from one of their own when the university recognizes its best and brightest at the annual Honors Day Convocation in Kean Hall on Tuesday, March 20.

Malick Badjie, a member of the TSU Honors College (Honors Program) and a 2003 graduate with a bachelor’s degree in political science, will be the keynote speaker.

About 2,800 students with grade point averages of 3.0 or higher will be recognized. Of that number, 301 are on the President’s List. These students have maintained a 4.0 GPA throughout their matriculation, according to Dr. Coreen Jackson, interim dean of the Honors College.

TSU President Glenda Glover, faculty, and administrators will be on hand to congratulate the honors students.

Badjie is the executive director and head of Africa for Robeco, an international asset management firm with headquarters in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. He is the company’s team leader responsible for the investment, sales, strategic and commercial decision and wholesale business in the Africa region.

Badjie has more than 15 years of experience in the investment and institutional asset management industry, and in working with institutional clients in Africa, the Middle East and Asia Pacific.

Prior to joining Robeco, Badjie held senior positions with the investment firm of BlackRock as head of institutional business. He was responsible for the strategic development and business management for BlackRock in sub-Sahara Africa that lead to growth in institutional business from $80 million to $14 billion in client asset in just five years.

Badjie holds an MBA in finance from The Warwick Business School at the University of Warwick.

For more information on the Honors Day Convocation, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/honors/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.