Category Archives: College of Engineering

For Tennessee State University, Southern Heritage Classic game Cancellation Not a Loss

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Although the much-anticipated 29th Southern Heritage Classic football game was canceled due to inclement weather, TSU’s spirit remained high.

The university experienced gains in recruitment, fundraising and community relations – three of TSU’s main goals at the annual gathering.

Emily Greer, Chief Administrative Officer of the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, welcomes President Glenda Glover during a guided tour of the world renowned hospital. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The game between TSU and Jackson State University scheduled for Sept. 8 was eventually called off because of inclement weather.

TSU, with a 17-11 SHC record, was looking to extend its current win streak, which stands at 6-0 over JSU. Last year, the TSU Tigers defeated the JSU Tigers 17-15 before more than 47,000 fans in the Liberty Bowl.

While there was obvious disappointment, it did not overshadow positive experiences that occurred during the weekend.

Leading up to the game, TSU officials, administrators and staff engaged in a number of activities around Memphis.  Among them, a life changing experience when TSU President Glenda Glover was taken on a guided tour of the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, the only facility in the world with a research center and a hospital in the same venue.

The TSU Aristocra of Bands participates in the 29th Southern Heritage Classic Parade in Memphis on Sept. 8. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Accompanied by former Memphis Mayor AC Wharton, and Richard Lee Snow, senior adviser for Multicultural Marketing & Business Development for St. Jude, Glover saw labs and research facilities. She also received the history on the vision of St. Jude’s founder Danny Thomas, the evolution of the hospital, as well as its partnership with African-American communities, institutions and organizations.

Hospital employees who are TSU graduates were among those who greeted Glover. Earlier, Emily Greer, chief administrative officer of the St. Jude Children’s Hospital and Research Center, received Glover.

“It was phenomenal to see all the research that’s being done to save lives,” Glover said. “I am also amazed to see the generosity of the hospital as it pertains to patients, when families’ only concern is the well-being of their child and not costs. That is truly amazing.”

TSU sophomore Rachelle Brown. (Submitted photo)

The rain also didn’t stop Tennessee State University sophomore Rachelle Brown from winning big at the Classic. Brown received the first of four $10,000 McDonald’s “True to the HBCU” scholarships, facilitated by the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. While maintaining a 3.8 grade point average, the Memphis native was active in her community: sorting and packaging food at the Second Harvest Food Bank in Nashville, Tennessee; collecting supplies for homeless women and victims of natural disasters in the Virgin Islands; and serving as a reading volunteer with Smart Baby, an organization promoting childhood literacy to children.

“I chose to attend an HBCU, for the rich education, both inside and outside the classroom,” Brown said. “I wanted to go to a college that would encourage me to step outside of my comfort zone and provide me with an atmosphere designed to promote excellence.”

Memphis WANTV Local 24 reporter Jeané Franseen interviews President Glover Sept. 7 during a morning show outside the Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium in Memphis. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

As for recruitment, officials said a number of top graduating high school seniors who attended TSU’s Memphis Recruitment Reception on Sept. 7 have signed on to attend the university next fall. They said nearly 80 percent of the students who attended the reception in the Sheraton Memphis Downtown Hotel have already met “scholarship requirements.”

“We have already received their scholarship applications, transcripts and ACT scores,” said Dr. Gregory Clark, director of high school relations and NCAA certification at TSU. To be considered for a scholarship, a candidate must have at least a 3.0 GPA and 21 or higher on the ACT.

More than 200 high school seniors from the West Tennessee area and their parents attended the standing-room-only program in one of the hotel’s reception areas.

Jovon Jones, associate director of recruitment at TSU, talks to students and parents about scholarship requirements and deadlines at recruitment reception. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

According to officials of the Office of Institutional Advancement, this year’s Alumni Mixer – a key fundraising event of the Classic week – was a big success. With President Glover and Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, vice president for Research and Institutional Advancement leading the charge, more than $20,000 was raised and nearly 20 new individuals joined the President’s Society. These are individuals who commit to contributing $1,000 or more a year.

“We just want to say thank you for all that you do for Tennessee State University to help keep needy students in school,” Glover said. “Your continued financial, material and other support and gifts are making a big difference in our students’ lives. We are thankful beyond measure for your support.”

During the week, Glover, accompanied by several senior university officials, also visited Power Center Academy High School and Whitehaven High School where she spoke to students and administrators, and answered questions about the importance of a college education and the programs and offerings at TSU.

Earlier on Saturday, Glover, the TSU Aristocrat of Bands, student organizations, including Mr. TSU and Miss TSU and their court, lead the 29th Southern Heritage Classic Parade in Memphis, with thousands along the route cheering on parade participants.

Next year’s Southern Heritage Classic football game is scheduled for Sept. 14.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU High Achieving Freshman Sets Sight on National Exposure, Engineering Entrepreneurship

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Kennedy Marie McCurry is aiming high. The incoming freshman wants to be known as one of the best softball players of all time, and to own an architectural engineering firm. She believes TSU is the best place to prepare her for success.

“My goal in life is to eventually play in the National Pro Fastpitch League for a couple years and then move on to owning my own architectural firm,” says McCurry, an architectural engineering major, who will play softball for TSU.

Kennedy Marie McCurry

A Gallatin, Tennessee, native, McCurry says she is no stranger to TSU. Her father, Dr. Charles McCurry, is a longtime professor of electrical engineering at the university.

“I have been around TSU almost all my life,” says the 18-year-old. “My dad was a really strong influence on me. He really pushed me toward TSU. Also, I really like the softball team, and I always knew I wanted to do something in architectural engineering. And I know that TSU has a very strong engineering program. So all signs pointed toward TSU.”

Kennedy comes to TSU with outstanding academic and athletic credentials. She enters the university with a near 3.7 grade point average, and 28 on the ACT.  At Beech High School, where she graduated last May, she was a star player on the softball team. She was twice named to the All-District Team, she made the district tournament team and earned MVP. She played on the Middle Tennessee All-State Team her sophomore year, and was named to the MaxPreps All-American Second Team her senior year.

“I have always wanted to play D-I softball. I am proud to bring my educational and athletic skills to TSU,” she says. “I chose to attend Tennessee State University because of its rich heritage, sports legacy and nationally ranked College of Engineering.”

Kennedy could not have chosen TSU at a better time. She is among a new recruit of high achievers the university targets to attract the best and brightest students, since TSU raised its admission standards about two years ago.

Saying, “TSU is no longer a school of last resort,” President Glenda Glover in 2016 announced sweeping changes that raised admission standards to attract better students. Minimum requirements for incoming freshmen went up from a 2.25 GPA to 2.5, while the ACT score remained at 19.

““Excellence remains our top priority, but we can’t be the school of last resort,” Glover said.

For Kennedy, she says TSU’s emphasis on producing well-rounded students was another attraction.

“TSU had already laid the foundation to help me get a quality education by engaging me in activities to prepare me for my college work even before classes started,” she says.

Last summer, Kennedy was among 11 high school graduating seniors who participated in the Engineering Concepts Institute in the College of Engineering at TSU. ECI is a four-week pre-college, residential program intended to prepare participants for academic success in the mathematical sciences or engineering disciplines.

“ECI also helped me to make new friends. I am excited and looking forward to the many more accomplishments I plan to have at TSU,” says Kennedy.

For more information on the engineering program at TSU, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/engineering/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Welcomes Class of 2022 at Freshman Convocation

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University Friday welcomed first-year students during the 2018 freshman convocation.

More than 1,300 incoming freshman students were inducted during the ceremony in Kean Hall.

Incoming female freshmen were dressed in white for their induction. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“I am extremely proud to welcome you to Tennessee State University,” said President Glenda Glover. “It is my honor to stand before the Class of 2022 today, not only as your president, but as a fellow TSU Tiger. You have embarked on an incredible journey. I encourage you to do your best. Do not just strive to make an A, but strive to be an A.”

Porsha Hernandez, an economics and finance major from Nashville, said the induction ceremony made her feel at home.

“I have always been a very serious student and I plan to continue that here,” she said.

More than 1,300 first-year students were inducted during the 2018 Freshman Convocation. Male students wore white shirts and blue pants, sporting TSU-supplied blue ties. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. John Cade, vice president for Enrollment and Student Success, presented the students for the induction.

“Madam President, it is my pleasure to present these young people who have satisfied all the requirements for admission to Tennessee State University as freshmen and students with advance standing,” Cade said.

With each student holding a lighted candle symbolizing “knowledge and truth,” they took the TSU Freshman Pledge, administered by the interim Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Alisa Mosley.

Females were dressed in white and males in white shirts and blue pants, sporting TSU-supplied blue ties. They pledged to commit themselves “to serious intellectual and cultural efforts” and to deport themselves “with honor and dignity to become better prepared to live a full and useful life in society.”

Trinity Young, a math major from Indianapolis, said he took the pledge very seriously.

“I am committed to being a very good student in all areas for as long as I am here,” Young said.

In addition to student representatives, speakers at the convocation included Joni McReynolds, president of the TSU National Alumni Association.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Welcomes New Male Freshmen with Third Annual ‘Tied to Success’

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University first-time male freshmen packed Poag Auditorium on the main campus on Thursday evening for the third annual “Tied to Success,” a rite of passage for all incoming male students.

Dwight Beard, President of the Nashville Chapter of the TSUNAA, left, along with Mr. TSU Darian McGhee, greets students and participants at the 2018 “Tied to Success” ceremony in Poag Auditorium. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

As a welcome into the “Big Blue Brotherhood,” the young men were given TSU blue ties with the name of the university. For those individuals who needed help tying just the right knot, university officials and community leaders were on hand to provide assistance.

Dwight Beard, president of the Nashville Chapter of the TSU National Alumni Association, was among those demonstrating the art of tying the perfect knot. He applauded the program for helping the new students assimilate into the collegiate culture.

First-time male freshmen learn the art of tying the perfect knot at the ‘Tied to Success” ceremony. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“It’s important for them to understand that wearing of the tie is essential because they will need one for job interviews,” Beard said. “They may end up with a job in the corporate world, like I did, where how you look matters.”

Before the tie tying and male bonding, TSU officials talked to the freshmen about how they should behave on campus, and in general.

“As these students embark on their college careers and prepare for the professional world, we want to help them develop good character and avoid anything that could hinder their future success,” said Frank Stevenson, TSU’s dean of students. “’Tied to Success’ is a step in that direction; we’re preparing them now.”

As Dean of Students Frank Stevenson makes opening remarks at the “Tied to Success” ceremony in Poag Auditorium, student leaders and upper class men demonstrate the look of a man dressed for business. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Bryon Keith, a human resource management major from Louisville, Kentucky, who had never tied a tie before, said he appreciates the orientation and hopes other institutions will emulate TSU.

“’Tied to Success’ is a great representation at the university, and for us as young men,” Keith said.

For the third year, State Rep. Harold Love, Jr., a TSU alum, participated in the “Tied to Success” ceremony. Senior university male administrators, deans, faculty, staff, student government association leaders and upper class students joined him.

The Men’s Initiative Office in the Division of Student Affairs helped to coordinate “Tied to Success.” All together, there are more than 1,300 first-time freshmen enrolled at TSU this fall.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Business Student Receives Three-Year $75,000 Scholarship from Toyota and Jesse Jackson PUSH Program

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Dominique Davis always thought that making good grades would be her pass to free college education. She was right! Davis will not have to worry about fees for the rest of her college career.

On July 18, Davis, a TSU sophomore business administration major, received a $75,000 scholarship offer from Toyota through the Jesse Jackson  Rainbow PUSH Excel program.

Dominique Davis

“I am pleased to inform you that you have been selected as a new Jesse Jackson Fellows Scholar and are being awarded a $25,000 scholarship for the 2018-2019 academic year,” a letter from PUSH said. The scholarship is renewable each year for a maximum of three years.

“I am so excited; this is unbelievable,” said Davis, who is from Danville, Illinois. “I have been praying for this and it finally came through.”

Davis is one of only 10 students from a group of 20 semi-finalists to be selected for the scholarship made possible through a partnership between Toyota and Rainbow PUSH Excel. Applicants must be engineering or business majors, have a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average, with demonstrated participation in community service, and must show need for financial assistance.

As part of the scholarship, Toyota offers successful applicants the opportunity to work at one of their facilities across North America to gain valuable real-world experience, as well as be paired with mentors from Toyota management to help guide the students through the next three years of college. Davis is currently an intern with Nissan in Nashville.

Davis, who has a 3.8 GPA with a concentration in supply chain management, said a family member told her about the scholarship program.

“I immediately said this is a great opportunity,” Davis said. “So I filled out the application and sent it in. I got a call back to go the next step, which included an interview with Toyota. I passed the application phase with the Jesse Jackson committee. I got another call back. And I got the scholarship.”

The third of four children, Davis said from elementary school she always made all A’s.

“Coming out of high school my GPA was great. I told my parents we are not going to pay for college,” Davis said, but her plan did not quite materialize the first year. Although she could have received a full ride to any college in Illinois, Davis said she chose TSU, out of state. As a result, funds she received were not enough to cover her full out-of-state fees.

“We had to take out a loan in my freshman year, and that was hard because my sister had just graduated from the University of Illinois-Champaign, and my parents were stretched,” she said.

Davis said she chose TSU because of the HBCU experience. All through elementary to high school, she had attended predominantly white schools.

“I wanted to attend an HBCU,” said Davis, who credits her parents and her late grandfather for the motivation to do well. “I wanted to get a feel of the culture and Tennessee State felt like home. It felt like the right move to come here. It has been a great experience.”

Davis’ goal is to own a charter school.

“I want to start my own charter school to help kids and make sure they have opportunities that so many other kids may not have,” she said.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Admissions Staff, Deans Engage MNPS Guidance Counselors About Offerings and Programs at the University

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – As a new school year begins, deans, admissions officials and staff are spreading the word about the quality educational opportunities at Tennessee State University.

On July 25, more than 90 Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools guidance counselors gathered at TSU for a training day. TSU officials used the opportunity to remind the counselors about the affordable cost of education at the University. They talked about programs and offerings, internship and study-abroad opportunities, that nearly 85 percent of students get employment immediately after graduation, and that a high number of graduates are accepted in graduate schools.

Participants at the MNPS training workshop visit displays of paraphernalia from the various TSU colleges. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

For the last eight years, MNPS has partnered with TSU to host the (elementary through high school) guidance counselors during their one-day annual workshop and training that precedes the opening of schools early next month.

Since the counselors serve as a direct link between their schools and the university, the goal is to encourage them to steer their students and potential graduates toward post-secondary education at TSU, said Terrence Izzard, associate vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Success.

“We offer an affordable, quality education that prepares our students with the necessary skills and competencies to be successful,” Izzard said. “We offer disciplines that prepare students to be global leaders, to impact the world and to be successful in their careers of choice.”

Izzard’s remarks were followed by deans of the various colleges, who gave brief remarks on the uniqueness of their offerings and programs.

Dr. Gloria Johnson, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, talks to guidance counselors about programs and offerings in her college. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“We want your students,” said Dr. Gloria Johnson, dean of the College of Liberal Arts. “We want students who are creative, inquisitive, and students who are not sure what they want but have big dreams, because we can help them work that out.”

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering, and Dr. Lonnie Sharpe, dean of the College of Life and Physical Sciences, talked about the “unique” STEM programs and research opportunities available to students who are interested in the sciences.

“A great number of students we have in our college come from the Nashville community; we want you to work with us to bring on board more of those students,” said Sharpe. “As a student in our college, you get a lot of great opportunities, including international research experiences, where students get involved in research in a prestigious foreign institution. They get a chance to study, research and come back and present their research here at home.”

Presentations were also made by the deans of the colleges of Agriculture, Business, Education, Health Sciences, and the Honors College.

According to Dr. Gregory Clark, director of High School Relations and NCAA Certification, nearly 21 percent of TSU’s enrollment comes from Metropolitan Nashville Public High Schools.

“We want to remind these guidance counselors that TSU is Nashville’s university,” said Clark. “We need all of their students. We provide all the programs that millennial students need. Many of these counselors have furthered their education at TSU, which is a testament to the quality of our programs.”

Ursula Reed, a guidance counselor at Martin Luther King Magnet High School, says her TSU preparation gave her a strong foundation. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Ursula Reed is a guidance counselor at Martin Luther King Magnet High School. She holds a bachelor’s degree in family and consumer science, and a master’s degree in school counseling, both from TSU.

She said the preparation she received from TSU gave her a strong foundation as a “young professional.”

“This is where I received what has prepared me to be a productive school counselor,” said Reed, who has been a counselor since receiving her graduate degree in 2007. “I talk to students about TSU. A good number of students from MLK come each year to TSU.”

TSU admissions staff and deans presented at the guidance counselors’ workshop on Wednesday. Pictured are, from left, Dr. Gregory Clark, Director of High School Relations and NCAA Certification; Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, Dean of the College of Engineering; Erynne Davis, Director of Digital Media; and Terrence Izzard, Associate Vice President of Enrollment Management and Student Success. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. Megan Cusson-Lark, MNPS executive director of School Counseling, said she appreciates the partnership between TSU and metro schools.

“We enjoy being on campus and finding out additional information about various departments at the university,” Cusson-Lark said. “Our partnership has grown to where for the second straight year we will hold our college fair together with TSU at the Gentry Complex (in September). We are really appreciative and thankful for the partnership and we are excited that it has grown.”

In addition to student recruitment, teacher recruitment is another link between TSU and Metro Schools. The University remains a key pipeline to recruiting Metro and area teachers.  Recent reports show that for the past five years, TSU has been one of the top teacher preparation programs in the state, providing exceptionally qualified candidates for teaching positions, not only across Tennessee and the southern region, but right here in the university’s backyard with MNPS.

 

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

STEM Students Broaden Their Knowledge in International Research During China Visit

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Three Tennessee State University students this summer combined education with leisure for an exciting visit thousands of miles across the globe.

Shaniqua Jones, Christine Mba and Whitney Nicole Russell, all senior STEM majors, spent part of their summer in China participating in an international research experience on the “Development of Next Generation Biomaterials for Dental Bone Reconstruction/Regeneration.”

Shaniqua Jones, left, Christine Mba and Whitney Nicole Russell spent more than three weeks in China participating in an international research project. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Jones, Mba and Russell are part of the Tennessee Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation program at TSU. They joined students from the University of Memphis in a research collaboration between UofM and faculty and students at Donghua University in Shanghai. An internal review team in the UofM College of Engineering selected the TSU students to participate. The visit lasted from June 4-29.

In addition to Shanghai, the group also visited Beijing, the Chinese capital, and toured entertainment, cultural and historic places like religious shrines and temples, the Great Wall of China and the Forbidden City.

“It was a fun experience,” said Russell, a biology major from Murfreesboro, Tennessee. “I gained a lot of insight on things I didn’t know.”

Jones, a mechanical engineering major from Toledo, Ohio, who has been recognized as a “Dean Scholar Researcher” for advancement in engineering research, said the summer experience helped in her quest to understand global engineering and medical problems.

TSU students Shaniqua Jones, left, and Whitney Nicole Russell, right, sip Chinese tea with a fellow research participant from the University of Memphis. (Photo submitted)

Dr. Lonnie Sharpe, dean of the College of Life and Physical Sciences, said the China trip was part of the university’s effort to engage students in international experience, not only in research, but also to expose them to the world around them.

“We are excited about our students going, and we are glad that great things came out of the trip,” Sharpe said.

Dr. Dee Green is the director of the TLSAMP program at TSU. She said international research experiences, such as the China project, provide visiting undergraduate students the opportunity to “engage in high quality collaborative research” with mentorship from researchers at a host lab. The experience is also a motivation for participants to pursue graduate studies, Green said.

“The exposure also broadens our students’ cultural awareness, professional development and networking skills,” she said.

Before leaving for China, Mba, a biology major from Memphis, Tennessee, with interest in a cure for cancer, said her research and lab experiences have helped her navigate and understand different laboratory settings and protocols with ease.

“I look forward to the opportunity to conduct research alongside experienced professors in China, while expanding my knowledge base and gaining an enhanced perspective of the culture,” she said.

Russell added that the visit gave them a better understanding of the people and culture of China.

“The professors and students we worked with were extraordinarily nice,” she said.  “They helped us engage in the culture and were just very welcoming.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

New AKA International President donates $50,000 earmarked for TSU and other HBCUs

By Kelli Sharpe

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Newly installed Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated International President Dr. Glenda Glover has sent a clear message that education will remain a priority for the service organization, especially supporting the nation’s historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs).

Dr. Glover unveiled her vision that she believes will take the sorority’s efforts to greater heights, for greater impact during AKA’s international conference held recently in Houston, Texas. Her administration’s new initiative, HBCU for Life: A Call to Action and signature program College Admissions Process, also known as #CAP, will promote and market HBCUs, and encourage students to attend HBCUs. The college president donated $50,000 to the sorority‘s Educational Advancement Foundation to further emphasize her commitment. The funds are earmarked for Tennessee State and other HBCUs.

“I believe the best and most effective way to lead is by example,” said Glover. “My donation was two-fold. One, it emphasized how serious I am about the sustainability of HBCUs, not just as the president of Tennessee State, but also as an alumna. Two, I wanted to energize the membership about our new initiative. A call to action indicates something must happen immediately.”

“As the president of Tennessee State University, an HBCU, I witness first-hand the challenges our students and institutions face because the revenue streams once available have been systematically decreased or eliminated altogether, and they need our financial support more than ever to remain thriving and sustainable. HBCUs are a prominent part of this country’s DNA.”

Dr. Glover added that Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority being established on an HBCU campus as the nation’s first African American female Greek-lettered organization makes the new HBCU initiative even more special.

Glover began her tenure as International President under the theme of “Exemplifying Excellence Through Sustainable Service,” which will run from 2018-2022. Members will implement the following initiatives for the next four years:

Target 1: HBCU for Life: A Call to Action. We will continue our emphasis on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). We will promote and market HBCUs, encourage students to attend HBCUs, and provide financial support to HBCUs.

Target 2: Women’s Healthcare and Wellness. We will raise community awareness about critical health issues impacting the quality and longevity of the lives of African-American women. The primary focuses will be Breast Cancer Awareness and Prevention, Heart Health, Nutrition and Wellness, and Care for the Caregivers.

Target 3: Building Your Economic Legacy. We will emphasize financial planning, asset accumulation, and wealth building including savings and investment, managing debt, and improving credit. We also will focus on supporting and encouraging African-American businesses through entrepreneurship and “The Black Dollar 365,” where we will be intentional in patronizing African-American businesses all year long.

Target 4: The Arts! We will expose students to arts enrichment and culture by focusing on the arts and celebrating the contributions of African-American artists. Program initiatives will showcase talent through the exploration of writers, entertainers and various other visual and performing artists and media.

Target 5: Global Impact. Through global partnerships, we will collaborate with organizations that provide assistance in international areas populated with people of color, including supporting organizations engaged in initiatives that assist refugees and their families integrate into American life.

Signature Program, #CAPSM, which is the abbreviation for the College Admissions Process, focuses on motivating and assisting students through the college entry process. It is a hands-on approach designed to facilitate college admission from researching various institutions and submitting applications through the completion of the enrollment process.

Nashville will be the host city for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority’s Leadership Conference under Glover. The conference averages  between 8,000 to 10,000 attendees.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU receives $20,000 in Scholarship funds in honor of Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover as 30th International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated

By Kelli Sharpe

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University has begun to reap the benefits of its president’s dual role of leadership for the university and as international president of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated. Dr. Glenda Glover was presented a $20,000 check for the Glenda Baskin Glover-Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated 30th International President Scholarship fund at TSU during her installation activities in Houston, Texas.

The scholarship was established to celebrate Glover taking the helm of AKA, the nation’s oldest African American female Greek-lettered service organization, and to highlight her role as TSU’s first female president.

“I am so grateful to the members of our great sisterhood that work at Tennessee State, along with the current and former members of our Alpha Psi Undergraduate chapter for creating this scholarship fund for deserving students here at the university,” said TSU President Glenda Glover.

“The generous donations from sorority members for the scholarship fund align with Alpha Kappa Alpha’s new initiative HBCU for Life: A Call to Action. I’ve charged chapters to donate $10 million to these institutions over the next four years. Of course this is personal for me as the president and alumna of an HBCU. HBCUs are an essential part of this country’s DNA. The new leadership of AKA is committed to the sustainability of all our HBCUs.”

Dr. Glover donated $50,000 to the AKA Educational Advancement Foundation for the sorority’s HBCU initiative during her installation ceremony. She made that same commitment of a $50,000 donation to TSU when she became president of the university in 2013.

Glover’s theme for the next four years, 2018-2022, with AKA is “Exemplifying Excellence Through Sustainable Service.” She will lead the prestigious 110-year old organization, of nearly 300,000 members and over 1,000 chapters located throughout the world, with a platform comprised of five program targets, a signature program and seven international community service impact days designed to advance AKA and underscore the organization’s commitment to service.

Target 1: HBCU for Life: A Call to Action. We will continue our emphasis on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). We will promote and market HBCUs, encourage students to attend HBCUs, and provide financial support to HBCUs.

Target 2: Women’s Healthcare and Wellness. We will raise community awareness about critical health issues impacting the quality and longevity of the lives of African-American women. The primary focuses will be Breast Cancer Awareness and Prevention, Heart Health, Nutrition and Wellness, and Care for the Caregivers.

Target 3: Building Your Economic Legacy. We will emphasize financial planning, asset accumulation, and wealth building including savings and investment, managing debt, and improving credit. We also will focus on supporting and encouraging African-American businesses through entrepreneurship and “The Black Dollar 365,” where we will be intentional in patronizing African-American businesses all year long.

Target 4: The Arts! We will expose students to arts enrichment and culture by focusing on the arts and celebrating the contributions of African-American artists. Program initiatives will showcase talent through the exploration of writers, entertainers and various other visual and performing artists and media.

Target 5: Global Impact. Through global partnerships, we will collaborate with organizations that provide assistance in international areas populated with people of color, including supporting organizations engaged in initiatives that assist refugees and their families integrate into American life.

Signature Program, #CAPSM, which is the abbreviation for the College Admissions Process, focuses on motivating and assisting students through the college entry process. It is a hands-on approach designed to facilitate college admission from researching various institutions and submitting applications through the completion of the enrollment process.

A native of Memphis, Tennessee, Glover’s higher educational development began as a student at TSU where she earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics with honors. She earned her Master of Business Administration Degree in accounting at Clark Atlanta University and her Doctor of Philosophy in business and economics business from George Washington University. Glover earned her Juris Doctor Degree from Georgetown University Law Center. She is a certified public accountant, a licensed attorney, and one of a handful of African-American women to hold the Ph.D.-CPA-J.D. combination in the United States.

Professionally, Glover has amassed over 25 years of success in the academic and business arenas. Since assuming the leadership helm at TSU in 2013, the University has attained increases in academic program offerings, corporate and community partnerships, as well as alumni giving. While dean of the College of Business at Jackson State University from 1994 to 2012, Glover led the college through the accreditation process and spearheaded the implementation of the nation’s first Ph.D. program in business at a HBCU. From 1990 to 1994 Glover served as the chairperson of the Department of Accounting at the Howard University School of Business. She has also served as Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of an engineering firm, a tax manager at a major public utility company, and an accountant with a Big-Four CPA firm.

Glover was initiated into the Alpha Psi Chapter at TSU in 1971. A committed life member of AKA with over four decades of leadership and service, Glover has served in several capacities, including International Vice-President, International Treasurer, and Treasurer to the Educational Advancement Foundation. She also has served as president, vice-president, and treasurer of Beta Delta Omega Chapter in Jackson, Mississippi, and as president and vice-president of Alpha Psi Chapter as an undergraduate student.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Executive MBA students have earth shaking experience in Japan

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Participants in Tennessee State University’s Executive MBA program experienced much more than they expected during their recent visit to Japan as part of an 11-day global immersion program.

The 10-member group, which returned to the U.S. June 22, were among those who felt the earthquake that registered 6.1 on the Richter scale.

“It was indeed the most frightening experience of my life,” said Grant Winrow, a member of the group and special assistant to the President of TSU.  “What only lasted 10-15 seconds, felt like 10-15 minutes.”

TSU Executive MBA global immersion participants gather for a photo during their visit to CMIC Holdings Company in Japan. Seated, from left, are: Stefania Placentini, Leah Sarnicola, Janet Blakemore, Joyce Barbour, Anita Sykes-Smith and Tonya Kilpatrick. Standing, from left, are: Marrecco Johnson, Grant Winrow, Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, Philip Trella (Executive In Residence), Frederick Cawthon, CMIC Holdings’ Senior Management Executive Officer Phiilippe Auvaro, Dr. Melvin Johnson (Faculty), and Anis Mnif (EMBA Program Director). (Submitted photo)

The quake hit the Japanese city of Osaka at about 8:15 a.m., on June 18, the ninth day of the immersion program, but was felt 27 miles away in Kyoto where group members were having breakfast.

“We were at the hotel … and all of a sudden, the ground started shaking,” said Anis Mnif, group adviser and director of Graduate Studies in the TSU College of Business. “Since our hotel was located above a train station, we thought it was a train. To our surprise, it was not. The hotel crew came to us and said, ‘Hey, follow us but don’t panic.’”

Fortunately, no one in the group was injured, and they still made the most of their visit.

The global immersion program is part of the 12-course inaugural EMBA program intended to give participants real-world, real-life experience of international culture and business operation.

TSU Executive MBA students, program dcirector and faculty member visit a shrine during their 11-day global immersion visit to Japan. (Submitted Photo)

A business faculty member, an industry executive board member to the College of Business, and the EMBA program director led the visit. As part of their experience, participants were immersed in the Japanese culture through food cuisine, visiting historical temples and shrines. They also visited five leading corporations and held discussions on topics such as R&D and emerging trends in the automotive industry; core business and global development strategies and prospects for growth; and communications, public relations and marketing in Japan. Companies visited included Coca Cola, Mitsubishi, the Ritz Carlton, SAMCO and CMIC Holdings.

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering and a student in the EMBA program, said the global immersion was very enriching.

“We learned about global business operations, consumer behavior, mergers and acquisitions, and marketing strategies,” Hargrove said. “These definitely add to the outstanding credentials and knowledge obtained in the innovative and experienced-based EMBA program.”

In addition to Kyoto, the group also visited Tokyo, and Kamakura, Nashville’s Japanese sister city.

According to Mnif, the global emersion experience is an optional component of the EMBA program. As part of the Global Residency course offered during the summer, program participants have the opportunity to spend 10 days studying outside the United States to broaden their understanding of leadership in a global economy and to experience firsthand the business practices and cultures of a foreign country. For those students who cannot travel, they have the option of taking the Global Challenges Class at TSU, Mnif said.

Dr. Melvin Johnson, professor of economics and the only EMBA faculty on the trip, said Japan was selected because of its unique and deep history and culture, and as “a global leader in innovation and business development strategies.”

“Japan’s natural barriers of unique heritage, language and business culture and customs create a challenging and positive learning experience for students that sharpen their abilities to operate successfully worldwide,” said Johnson, who is also a former president of TSU.

Philip Trella, an Executive In Residence, also accompanied the group.

Other EMBA students on the global immersion visit were: Joyce Barbour, Janet Blakemore, Frederick Cawthon, Marrecco Johnson, Tonya Kilpatrick, Stefania Placentini, Leah Sarnicola and Anita Sykes-Smith.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.