Category Archives: SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

TSU football player Christion Abercrombie transferred to rehab center, continuing to improve

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University football player Christion Abercrombie has been transferred to a rehabilitation center in Atlanta.

According to a release from the Shepherd Center, the 20-year-old student-athlete was moved from Vanderbilt University Medical Center on Wednesday. Before the move, he was upgraded from critical to stable condition.

Christion sustained a brain injury during Tennessee State’s football game with Vanderbilt University on Sept. 29.

He has been admitted to Shepherd Center’s Intensive Care Unit for evaluation, care and observation.

“Soon, he will move into the hospital’s Brain Injury Rehabilitation Program, where he will begin therapy under the guidance of a full team of medical and rehabilitation specialists,” according to the Center.

The facility specializes in medical treatment, research and rehabilitation for people with spinal cord injury or brain injury. Founded in 1975, Shepherd Center is a private, not-for-profit hospital and is ranked by U.S. News & World Report among the top 10 rehabilitation hospitals in the nation.

Staci Abercrombie, Christion’s mother, said at a press conference on Oct. 3 that she was optimistic about her son’s recovery because of her faith, and she reiterated that sentiment in a recent statement.

“We truly appreciate all of the love, support and prayers from everyone,” she said. “This has given the family the strength needed to be able to care for Christion. This injury was not expected, but God has prepared us and will continue to provide us with his healing power. We know that it’s a miracle that our son is here today. Please continue to pray for Christion’s full recovery.”

TSU President Glenda Glover said Christion’s improving health is “an example of what the power of prayer can do.”

“The TSU Family is extremely happy to hear that football player Christion Abercrombie is continuing to improve,” Glover said. “The news couldn’t have come at a better time than during our homecoming week. The entire TSU Family has had Christion on our minds throughout the entire planning process of the last few weeks. Again, this is great news. We ask that everyone keep praying for Christion, and his family, as he moves to the next phase of care and ultimately makes a full recovery.”

Prayer for Christion has been ongoing. Shortly after the incident, the TSU family held a prayer vigil for him, and the university’s National Alumni Association called for a special day of prayer

A GoFundMe has been set up to help Christion and his family. To donate, visit www.gofundme.com/tennessee-state-univ-athletics-dept.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU breaks ground for first new residence halls in 23 years

TSU breaks ground for first new residence halls in 23 years

 NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU President Glenda Glover helped break ground Wednesday for two new co-educational residence halls, the first of three groundbreakings taking place during Homecoming week.

TSU President Glenda Glover unveils information about new residence halls. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

Wednesday’s groundbreaking, the first for a new residence hall at TSU since 1995, took place on the lawn of the Strange Performing Arts Building. The groundbreaking for a Health Sciences Building is scheduled for 10 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 18, in the Hankal Hall Courtyard. And the groundbreaking for an Alumni Welcome Center will take place around 1:30 p.m. at the corner of 31st and John Merritt Blvd.

Construction of the residence halls was initially announced last fall after the State Building Commission approved construction of the $75.3 million project.

“We break ground this morning for student residence life,” said Glover at a ceremony before the groundbreaking. “We break this ground for student success. And we break this ground because it is altogether fitting and proper for upgrading student life on the campus of Tennessee State University.”

Dr. Tracy Ford, vice president of student affairs at TSU, said the groundbreaking for the residence halls and the other planned construction is indeed “reason to celebrate.”

“Today doesn’t just mark the groundbreaking of a physical structure, but it shines a light on the amazing future of TSU, and represents one of the many exciting and strategic changes to come,” Ford said.

Student trustee Braxton Simpson speaks at ceremony before groundbreaking. (Photo by Michael McLendon, TSU Media Relations)

Braxton Simpson, student representative on the TSU Board of Trustees, expressed similar sentiment.

“This is a very exciting moment for all of the students here at Tennessee State University,” she said.

Besides TSU’s faculty and staff, Wednesday’s groundbreaking was also attended by local and state officials.

“This is a wonderful day,” said State Sen. Thelma Harper. “TSU is No. 1!”

State Rep. Harold Love, Jr., a TSU graduate, lauded Dr. Glover and “all those involved in the intricacies of getting this done.”

“Residence halls represent a university’s commitment to student success just as much as other educational buildings,” Love said. “Tennessee State continues to invest in facilities to increase the opportunities for students to find a home away from home.”

For more information about the other groundbreakings and Homecoming activities, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/homecoming/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Remembers Founders During 2018 Homecoming

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – This is Homecoming week and today is Founders’ Day at Tennessee State University.

TSU President Glenda Glover, accompanied by keynote speaker Council Woman-At-Large Sharon Hurt, led a procession of faculty, student leaders and administrators in Kean Hall to mark the university’s 106th birthday.

President Glenda Glover presents 2018 Founders’ Day speaker Sharon Hurt with a plaque at the ceremony in Kean Hall. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The University Wind Ensemble, led by Dr. Reginald McDonald, offered selections to a cheering audience, following presentation of colors by the Air Force ROTC Color Guard.

“This is a great day for Tennessee State University,” Glover said, as she recounted events in the University’s history from its founding in 1912 to the role it plays today as a major center of education in the nation.

“From 1912 when the then-Agricultural and Industrial Normal School for Negroes, built to provide educational opportunity for blacks, opened its doors to the first 247 students, TSU has maintained a tradition of excellence in education for a diverse population.”

Student leaders and faculty join in singing the Alma Mater at the Founders’ Day program. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

In her keynote address, Rep. Hurt, president and CEO of Jefferson Street United Merchant Partnership, or JUMP, reminded the students, faculty and alumni that as members of the TSU family, they have a “rich legacy” to uphold of people who believe in self-determination.

“As you celebrate Founders’ Day, remember that you have an ancestral calling to serve and support this institution,” said Hurt, a graduate of TSU. Hurt also holds a master’s degree in non-profit leadership from Belmont University.

Miss TSU Kayla Sampson, joined by Mr. TSU Darian McGhee, gives the university history at the Founders’ Day program. (Phto by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“You are the keepers of a legacy of worldwide accomplishments and have the God-given right by virtue of your calling to glorify, magnify and fortify the legacy that you have inherited as a descendant of doctors, teachers, engineers, talk show host, etc.,” she said. “Whatever your profession, TSU gave you a purpose.”

Hurt, a recipient of several awards and recognitions, is a former board member of the Center for Non-Profit Management and past president of the Association of Non-Profit Executives Council, and is a graduate of the 2004 Class of Leadership Nashville. During her tenure as president of JUMP, Hurt has secured more than $4 million in funding from the Neighborhood Stabilization Program Grant to acquire and rehabilitate homes in the North Nashville community.

She thanked President Glover, also an alumna, for the invitation and for her own legacy of excellence in earning multiple degrees. She called on students to be more focused, and congratulated the university on the celebration of the 2018 Homecoming.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU football player continuing to recover, headed to rehab

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University football student-athlete Christion Abercrombie is scheduled to be discharged from Vanderbilt University Medical Center on Wednesday and transported to a rehabilitation center in Atlanta, according to TSU Athletic officials.

The Athletics Department said Tuesday that Abercrombie, who sustained a head injury in the TSU-Vanderbilt football game on Sept. 29, will be taken to the Shepherd Center, which is one of the nation’s top 10 rehabilitation hospitals for brain injuries.

Staci Abercrombie, Christion’s mother, said at a press conference on Oct. 3 that she was optimistic about her son’s recovery because of her faith, and she’s asking for continued prayer.

“We thank everyone for their love, support and prayers,” she said in a statement. “Keep praying.”

TSU President Glenda Glover said Christion’s improving health is “an example of what the power of prayer can do.”

“The TSU Family is extremely happy to hear that football player Christion Abercrombie is continuing to improve,” she said. “The news couldn’t have come at a better time than during our homecoming week. The entire TSU Family has had Christion on our minds throughout the entire planning process of the last few weeks. Again, this is great news. We ask that everyone keep praying for Christion, and his family, as he moves to the next phase of care and ultimately makes a full recovery.”

TSU head football coach Rod Reed expressed similar sentiment.

“This is, in my opinion, a miracle that he’s being discharged after such a traumatic experience,” he said. “We’re looking forward to a speedy recovery.”

Prayer for Christion has been ongoing. Shortly after the injury, the TSU family held a prayer vigil for him, and the university’s National Alumni Association called for a special day of prayer

A GoFundMe has been set up to help Christion and his family. To donate, visit www.gofundme.com/tennessee-state-univ-athletics-dept.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Scholarship Gala Features Legendary Jazz Musician Roy Ayers

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Scholarship Gala will take place on Friday, Oct. 19, at the Music City Center.

The event, which begins at 7 p.m., will be preceded by a 6 p.m. reception featuring the TSU Jazz Collegians and the TSU String Orchestra. Nationally renowned actor and comedian Jonathan Slocumb will host the annual fundraising event, which will conclude with a concert featuring legendary jazz artist Roy Ayers.

“The Homecoming Scholarship Gala serves as Tennessee State University’s signature fundraising event,” Gala chairs Cassandra Griggs and Iris Ramey said in a statement. “It provides an opportunity for the university to partner with alumni, friends, employees, corporations and organizations to raise annual and endowed scholarship dollars for the outstanding students at TSU.”

The gala provides critical funds necessary to meet the significant need for student scholarships and ensures access to the relevant academic programs required to successfully educate and prepare students for the global marketplace.

This year, the gala will recognize a “stellar group” of honorees and grand marshals, including ‘Waffle House Hero’ James Shaw, Jr., who received national acclaim after he disarmed a Waffle House shooter in April. Shaw will receive a Special Presidential Recognition.

Other honorees are: Dr. Calvin Atchison, retired vice president of Development/Foundation; Dorothy Lockridge, retired vice president of Student Affairs; and Coach James Bass, retired health professor and swimming coach.

The grand marshals are: Robert Covington, NBA player with the Philadelphia 76ers; Dr. Richard Lewis, member of TSU Board of Trustees and owner of Lewis & Wright Funeral Directors; and Delorse Lewis, former executive director of TSU Development/Foundation.

For more information about the gala and how to donate, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/gala/.

To find out more about TSU’s overall Homecoming this year, https://bit.ly/2wYtjJG.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Nashville Public Library to host screening of documentary about legendary track coach Ed Temple and the Tigerbelles

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The city’s main library is hosting a screening of the documentary, “Mr. Temple and the Tigerbelles,” on Thursday, Oct. 18.

The screening at the Nashville Public Library at 615 Church Street is from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. and is free and open to the public. Screenings will also be held at Middle Tennessee State University and Vanderbilt University on Oct. 18.

Tennessee State University hosted the first screening of the documentary earlier this year. TSU President Glenda Glover said the documentary is an “extremely proud moment.”

“Whenever I talk with individuals about Coach Temple, I also remind them that he was a great educator as well, ensuring that all Tigerbelles earned their degrees as top student athletes,” Dr. Glover said. “The members of the Temple Documentary Fund and the filmmakers did an amazing job of documenting the remarkable accomplishments of the Tigerbelles under the leadership of Coach Temple.”

Temple was an internationally known track and field icon. He coached the TSU Tigerbelles for more than 40 years and the U.S. Women’s Track and Field team at the 1960 and 1964 Olympic Games. During that time, he produced 41 Olympians who won 23 medals, 13 of them gold. Temple passed away Sept, 22, 2016, at the age of 89. He belongs to nine different halls of fame and is one of three coaches inducted into the United States Olympic Hall of Fame.

The 40-minute documentary covers Temple and the Tigerbelles’ success during a time when the nation was embroiled in a civil rights crisis as African Americans sought equality. The film also features testimonials from historians, writers and former Tigerbelles.

Filmmaker Tom Neff, who wrote and directed the documentary, will lead a brief panel after the screening at the library.

Wyomia Tyus, a former Tigerbelle and the first person to win a gold medal for the same event in consecutive Olympics (1964 and 1968), will sign her book at the event.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

TSU kicks off 2018 Homecoming with 31st annual Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Contest

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University kicked off this year’s Homecoming with the 31st annual Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Contest on Sunday.

The event, which was free and open to the public, was held in the Floyd-Payne Campus Center on the main campus. Cash prizes of $1,200, $800 and $500 were awarded respectively for first, second, and third place winners in freshman and upperclassman divisions.

There were 23 participants this year. The freshman winners were: Bryanna Scott, 1st place; Norel McAdoo, 2nd place; and Jamir Jackson, 3rd place. In the upperclassman division, Ashanti Holland claimed 1st place; Sydni D. Daniels, 2nd; Tayneria Gooden, 3rd; and Elijah J. McNutt received a $100 bookstore gift certificate for 4th place.

Before the contest, TSU President Glenda Glover charged the participants to “do your best.”

“You’re here because you’re competent, you qualify, and you’re ready,” she said. “Be excellent in all that you do. We honor you, we salute you, and we thank you for your participation.”

The contest, established in 1988, is named in honor of the late Robert N. Murrell, a longtime administrator and dean of men at TSU. It encourages students to develop skills in research, writing and oratory.

“This is the 31st event, and I’m most grateful to all of you who played a part in making this happen, and for all of you who are here today,” said Ms. Barbara Murrell, whose late husband the event honors.

In 1993, the TSU Homecoming Committee incorporated the oratorical contest into the official Homecoming schedule of activities, and established the Homecoming theme as the theme for the contest. This year’s theme is: “Visions of Excellence with a Spirit of Success.”

Dwight Beard, president of the Nashville Chapter of the TSU Alumni Association, encouraged the participants to maintain the passion they conveyed in their speeches.

“You are our future,” Beard said. “The baton is in your hand. Win that race.”

Following the oratorical contest, TSU’s Homecoming events continued with the Gospel Explosion in Kean Hall gymnasium. The concert, which was also free, featured hit artists Jonathan McReynolds, Earnest Pugh, and The Walls Group.

Other Homecoming highlights throughout the week include the Coronation of Mr. and Miss TSU, Oct. 17; Ralph Boston Golf Tournament, Dr. Levi Watkins, Jr. Symposium, and Homecoming Concert, Oct. 18; and the Greek Step Show and the Charles Campbell Fish Fry, Oct. 19.

On Friday evening, TSU has planned a stellar Scholarship Gala at the Music City Center. This year, the Gala welcomes back comedian Jonathan Slocumb as the master of ceremony. Special entertainment will be provided by legendary jazz artist Roy Ayers. Proceeds from ticket sales and sponsorships are used to provide financial assistance to students.

Homecoming will conclude Oct. 20 with the Homecoming Parade from 14th and Jefferson Street to 33rd and John Merritt Boulevard, and the big football matchup between the Tigers and the Golden Eagles of Tennessee Tech at Nissan Stadium.

For more information about Homecoming activities, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/homecoming/documents/HomecomingSchedule.pdf

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Hundreds Attend Fall Preview Day at TSU, several admitted on the spot

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tywan Corbitt, Jr., and Martez Cuff II have been friends since kindergarten. The two Dayton, Ohio natives have kept their close bond and encouraged each other through middle school and are now graduating seniors at Chaminade Julienne Catholic High School.

They also have plans for college, the same college.

“We are coming to Tennessee State University,” Corbitt and Cuff said in unison, as their patents listened with apparent excitement.

Tywan Corbitt, Jr., and Martez Cuff II, have been admitted to TSU for the 2019-2020 academic year. They attended Fall Preview Day with their parents. From left are: Angie Christian, Martez Cuff’s mother; Martez; Tywan, and his father, Tywan Corbitt, Sr. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The two young men were among nearly 700 high school juniors and seniors who on Saturday attended Fall Preview Day, commonly called Big Blue Explosion at TSU. Organizers said participants came from more than 15 states, including California, Michigan, Texas, Illinois and Wisconsin to learn about the university’s offerings and admission processes.

Like Corbitt and Cuff, who will major in electrical engineering and physical therapy, respectively, organizers said several students were admitted on the spot for the 2019-2020 academic year. One of them was Alani Maiden of Little Rock, Arkansas, who proudly displayed her certificate of admission as she toured the campus.

“I chose TSU because it is a highly accredited HBCU, where I know I will feel more at home,” said Maiden, a senior at Little Rock Central High School, who wants to major in nursing. “I chose TSU because it is in Nashville, an up-and-coming city. And I can see myself not only going to school in Nashville, but also living in Nashville.”

Organizers say nearly 700 high school juniors and seniors and their parents attended Fall Preview Day. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Admissions and university officials said they were very excited about the turnout at this year’s Big Blue Explosion.

“We had an awesome and exciting Fall Preview Day,” said Dr. John Cade, Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Success. “We admitted on the spot about 30 students. So we are excited about the fact that we have already started our trajectory with respect to building enrollment for the upcoming 2019-2020 academic year.”

Also excited was Anwar Turner, a TSU 2010 graduate and former drum major with the Aristocrat of Bands, whose son, Jordan, was among those admitted.

Alani Maiden, a senior from Little Rock Central High School, was one of those admitted on the spot at Fall Preview Day. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“I am absolutely excited. He has grown up in this environment like I have,” said Anwar. “I was in the band. I would bring him to football games. My family is from here. So my family and I are very excited that he’s coming here.”

Jordan, whose goal is to go into film production, wants to major in mass communications.

“I am very excited. This is where I want to go to college. I can’t wait to start,” said Jordan. “My parents have been here. My grandparents have been here. I have just been around this campus my whole life. I have been to the games; I have seen the band play. I got TSU blood in me.”

Anwar Turner, a 2010 TSU graduate and former drum major, says he is excited his son, Jordan, has been admitted to his alma mater. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Corbitt and Cuff plan to maintain their bond, and believe leaving home will not change or take them away from their goal of a quality college education.

“TSU is a great school. I have family down here. My father went to an HBCU, so it makes it all the more interesting,” said Corbitt.

“I am sure we will make it. We will encourage each other and keep each other focused,” Cuff added.

Organizers said activities for the visitors also included meetings with academic departments, TSU student organizations, campus tours, and other forms of educational entertainment.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU kicks off 2018 Homecoming with 31st annual Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Contest

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will kick off this year’s Homecoming with the 31st Annual Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Contest on Sunday.

The event, which is free and open to the public, starts at 3 p.m. in the Floyd-Payne Campus Center on the main campus. Cash prizes of $1,200, $800 and $500 will be awarded respectively for first, second, and third place winners in freshman and upperclassman divisions. There are 23 participants this year.

The contest, established in 1988, is named in honor of the late Robert N. Murrell, a longtime administrator and dean of men at TSU. It encourages students to develop skills in research, writing and oratory.

In 1993, the TSU Homecoming Committee incorporated the oratorical contest into the official Homecoming schedule of activities, and established the Homecoming theme as the theme for the contest. This year’s theme is: “Visions of Excellence with a Spirit of Success.”

Dr. Jacqueline Mitchell, chair of the Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Committee, said the contest is a good recruitment tool.

“These students work hard,” Mitchell said. “They’re going to show people around the country that TSU is quality, and our students are quality. When you hear our students speak, there are other students and parents in the audience who say, ‘I want my child to come to TSU.’”

Following the oratorical contest, TSU’s Homecoming events continue with the Gospel Explosion in Kean Hall gymnasium at 6 p.m. The concert, which is free, will feature hit artists Jonathan McReynolds, Earnest Pugh, and The Walls Group.

Other Homecoming highlights throughout the week include the Coronation of Mr. and Miss TSU, Oct. 17; Ralph Boston Golf Tournament, Dr. Levi Watkins, Jr. Symposium, and Homecoming Concert, Oct. 18; and the Greek Step Show and the Charles Campbell Fish Fry, Oct. 19.

On Friday evening, TSU has planned a stellar Scholarship Gala at the Music City Center. This year, the Gala welcomes back comedian Jonathan Slocumb as the master of ceremony. Special entertainment will be provided by legendary jazz artist Roy Ayers. Proceeds from ticket sales and sponsorships are used to provide financial assistance to students.

Homecoming will conclude Oct. 20 with the Homecoming Parade from 14th and Jefferson Street to 33rd and John Merritt Boulevard, and the big football matchup between the Tigers and the Golden Eagles of Tennessee Tech at Nissan Stadium.

For more information about Homecoming activities, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/homecoming/

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

2018 Fall Career Fair Opens Doors to Internships, Employment for TSU Students; Record Number Attend

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University students looking for internships, full-time employment and co-op opportunities got a major break on Wednesday. More than 130 companies and potential employers converged on the main campus for the 2018 Fall Career Fair.

Representatives from government agencies, aerospace, engineering, healthcare and the entertainment industries set up tents, tables and displays in the Gentry Center Complex to network with students about career and potential employment opportunities.

Organizers said nearly 400 students attended the all-day fair.

Anthony Wadsworth, a senior electrical engineering major, right, talks to Boeing representatives about internship opportunity. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

India Brown, a junior sociology major with public health concentration, and Anthony Wadsworth, a senior electrical engineering major, were among the first students at the fair. They were both looking for internships.

“I am looking for something that’s in the health field, dealing with social work,” said Brown, a Memphis native, as she filled in an application form with Tennessee Family Solutions, Inc., a direct support group dedicated to people with special needs.

For Wadsworth, who was networking at the Boeing table, he was following up on a previous meeting with Boeing representatives in Washington, D.C, last summer. He is seeking his first internship.

Within minutes of arriving at the career fair, India Brown, seeking internship opportunity in the healthcare industry, was already filling out an application. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“I spoke with them at the Black Engineer of the Year Awards ceremony in Washington last summer. They directed me to the right place and I am just here to follow up,” said Wadsworth, who is from Nashville.

He may just be in luck. Boeing representatives said they were “quite” impressed with the quality and preparedness of the TSU students at the fair.

“We see a great potential here among these students,” said Edward H. Gerding, vice president and senior chief engineer for structure and mechanical systems at Boeing. “We are actually looking across the board. We are growing in all aspects of our business between engineering, supply chain and business. We are looking for engineers and people in varieties of specialties, and now is the perfect time for students that are searching for internships.”

Like Boeing, representatives from the CIA, FedEx, NASA, Regions Bank and several other corporations and employers said TSU students – dressed in dark business suits and black shoes – were very impressive in appearance, approach and presentation.

Corey L. Harrell, left, a 2001 TSU graduate now working for NASA, returns to his alma mater as a recruiter for NASA. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“We do a lot of work in terms of preparation,” said Charles Jennings, director of the TSU Career Development Center, which organized the fair. “Last week and up to yesterday, we spent time getting them ready for interviews. I see that it shows, because a lot of the employers are talking about the great turnout and how ready our students are.”

Jennings also attributed the success of the fair and the preparedness of students to the mentorship provided by alumni of the career center, many of whom returned not only as recruiters for their various companies, but also to help their younger protégés prepare for the real world.

“It is just nice to see them giving back to their institution,” Jennings said.

Nearly 30 TSU graduates who got their career start with companies through the Career Development Center, attended the fair as recruiters for their companies and to mentor their younger proteges. (Photo by Jamal Coleman, TSU Career Development Center)

In all, nearly 30 TSU graduates, who got their career start with companies through the Career Development Center, were seen sporting shirts with Alumni on a TSU blue patch affixed to the chest. One of them was Corey L. Harrell, NASA SMA engines branch chief at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

He said coming back to TSU as a “proud alum” means a lot to him. “Anytime I can get a chance to come back I always do it,” said Harrell, who has returned several times to mentor and participate in the career fair. “

For more information on future career fairs or the TSU Career Development Center, to http://www.tnstate.edu/careers/

Department of Media Relations

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About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.