Category Archives: RESEARCH

TSU hosts NASA Technology Infusion Road Tour

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is hosting an event this week to help make students aware of programs offered by NASA and other federal agencies.

https---cdn.evbuc.com-images-28153637-50988178194-1-originalThe NASA HBCU/MSI Technology Infusion Road Tour is April 4-5 and is an opportunity for students and university officials to learn more about the space agency’s Mentor-Protégé Program (MPP) in particular, as well as other programs.

The event will also feature key information from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the National Institutes of Health, the Office of Personnel Management, the Small Business Administration, the U.S. Department of Army and large prime contractors.

Throughout both days, there will be workshops, panel discussions and networking opportunities.

“The event allows faculty to expose their students to research at a higher level, to conferences, internships and maybe even a new career as many of the agencies and companies represented are looking to add new talent to the workforce,” said John Barfield, director of engagement and visibility in TSU’s Division of Research and Institutional Advancement.

For more information about the NASA HBCU/MSI Technology Infusion Road Tour, visithttps://sites.ed.gov/whhbcu/2016/02/05/the-2016-nasa-hbcumsi-technology-infusion-road-tour/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

TSU hosts top business leaders at Women in Leadership Symposium

By K. Dawn Rutledge

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Women across Middle Tennessee made their way to the campus of Tennessee State University for the 2nd Annual Nashville Women in Leadership Symposium on March 29.

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Mrs. Tina Reed, associate director of TSU’s Career Development Center, moderates the discussion. (By Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

The invitation-only event, sponsored by the National Diversity Council and hosted by TSU’s Department of Educational Leadership, drew close to 100 women who focused on the theme, “Be Fearless: Influence, Innovate, and Inspire.”

The half-day symposium brought together a diverse mix of successful women who discussed a number of relevant issues to give women the educational tools and support needed for personal and professional advancement.

“Leadership is what we do and what we teach in our department,” said Dr. Trinetia Repress, chair for the TSU Department of Educational Leadership. “By allowing women to learn from one another, it not only empowers us, but demonstrates through these valuable discussions and interactions that there is a common thread when it comes to the leadership challenges women experience.”

The program’s panel participants included TSU Vice President of Research and Institutional Advancement, Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, who spoke on “The Power of No.” Mrs. Tina Reed, associate director of TSU’s Career Development Center, served as moderator.

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Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, TSU Vice President of Research and Institutional Advancement, talks with an attendee. (By Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

“When we say ‘no’, it should be about fulfilling our goals, values, core beliefs, and priorities,” Crumpton-Young said. “If anything goes against those things, then ‘no’ is the right answer.”

Joining Crumpton-Young on the panel were Lauren Lane Payne, senior vice president of philanthropy at Habitat for Humanity of Greater Nashville; Ann Hatcher, vice president of Key Talent Acquisition and Development for HCA; Dr. Alkyna Finch, certified coach, author and speaker; and Vail R. Brown, senior vice president of Global Business Development and Marketing at STR. Each panelist gave perspective on topics ranging from generational mentoring and support, to authentic leadership, leveraging social media and career transition.

Ashlyn Outler, director of the Women in Leadership Symposiums for the National Diversity Council, said TSU has been a great host partner in their efforts to expand awareness in the area. This is the second year the Council has partnered with the university through Educational Leadership. In 2016, TSU’s Dr. Alisa Mosley, associate vice president for the Division of Academic Affairs, was a panelist, and Ms. Seanne Wilson, coordinator of the TSU Women’s Center, handled moderator duties.

The National Diversity Council is the first non-profit organization to bring together the private, public and non-profit sectors to discuss the many dimensions and benefits of a multicultural environment. It is currently made up of state and regional councils, the National Women’s Council, the Council for Corporate Responsibility, and the Healthcare Diversity Council.

“We have embarked on an aggressive initiative to expand our brand and this powerful leadership symposium is helping us to do that,” Outler said. “We have 25 established councils around the country and abroad, and we have been very excited about being at TSU for a second year working with Dr. Trinetia Respress to get women talking about leadership and diversity.”

The Center for American Progress, an independent nonpartisan policy institute, reports that women continue to lag substantially behind men when it comes to their representation in leadership positions. According to the CAP, while women make up 50.8 percent of the U.S. population and 47 percent of the U.S. labor force, they represent only 14.6 percent of executive officers, 8.1 percent of top earners, 4.6 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs and only 16.9 percent of Fortune 500 board seats.

“It is our hope that we can develop a long-term relationship with the National Diversity Council,” Repress said. “By working with this event, we hope to continue the important dialogue about the challenges women face in leadership.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

TSU, Cheekwood, Nashville Mayor Announce Partnership to Offer Students Paid Internships

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A partnership between Tennessee State University, Cheekwood and the mayor’s Opportunity Now program will provide paid internships and hands-on horticultural training to TSU students interested in careers in the environment.

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President Glenda Glover makes remarks following the announcement of the TSU partnership with Cheekwood and Opportunity NOW. (Photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, TSU President Glenda Glover, and Jane MacLeod, Cheekwood president and CEO, announced the partnership Wednesday at a news conference at the Cheekwood Estate and Garden.

The partnership is part of a Cheekwood Career Readiness Initiative, designed to “inspire a new generation of horticulturalists and outdoor educators,” according to MacLeod.

It offers horticulture/landscape training and job skills development. Interns also receive one-on-one mentoring with leading horticultural experts, access to nationally acclaimed plant collection, and paid compensation.

“It is just great to see Tennessee State University and Cheekwood, two great institutions in our city to form this partnership that can lead to long-term jobs or careers in horticulture,” said Barry, whose Opportunity Now initiative aims to provide young people ages 14-24 in Davidson County access to employment.“

President Glover said with new concepts and advances in the field of horticulture, Cheekwood provides the necessary training environment and job-skills opportunity for TSU students.

“As a premier land-grant institution with an outstanding college of agriculture, TSU takes this partnership very seriously” Glover said. “TSU ranks among the best schools for job placement and we tell our students that a degree earned from TSU will land you gainful employment. That is why this partnership is so important. It helps us to continue our commitment to excellence.”

In welcoming remarks, MacLeod said the partnership with TSU and the mayor’s Opportunity NOW program was part of a strategic effort to raise appreciation and awareness for horticulture particularly among students as a career.

“This effort is also part of Cheekwood’s commitment to reach further out in the Nashville community to support initiatives to better our city, and engage with an increasingly diverse audience,” MacLeod said. “We are extremely glad to work with TSU in furthering these initiatives. The first TSU students who interned with us were exceptional and show great interest in learning what was put before them.”

Tariq Muhammad, a junior plant and soil science major, is one of three TSU students from the College of Agriculture who interned at Cheekwood as part of the partnership. He said the experience was quite different from what is taught in the classroom.

“It was amazing just to work with people who really love to do what they do,” said Mohammad, who worked in the gardens. “That was really a motivation for me. People were always there to help you. I was able to learn so much – the esthetics, the upkeep of the gardens.”

Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the TSU College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Sciences, referred to Cheekwood as a ‘jewel in Nashville’ that is very beneficial to TSU.

“They (Cheekwood) are so focused on horticulture which is one of our main focuses at Tennessee State University,” Reddy said. “We are so excited to enter this agreement with them. We are also thankful to President Glover, who has been on the forefront with Cheekwood and the mayor in getting this partnership together, which will not only benefit our students but also our faculty.”

Other TSU students who participated in the six-week internship at Cheekwook are: Jill Mullican, senior, Plant Sciences; and Whitney “Abby” Anderson, sophomore, Agricultural Education.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Honors Convocation Speaker Obie McKenzie Challenges Honors Students to make wise decisions, ‘dare to dream’

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University Honors Convocation speaker Obie McKenzie challenged TSU students to make wise decisions, and “dare to dream.”

McKenzie, named by Black Enterprise magazine as one the 75 Most Powerful Blacks on Wall Street, is managing director of BlackRock, Inc., the largest publicly traded investment management firm in the United States.

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Honors Convocation speaker Obie McKenzie, TSU President Glenda Glover, and TSU Presidential Scholar Jaquantey Bowen

McKenzie joined TSU faculty and staff, as well as students’ family and friends, in honoring the university’s best and brightest in Kean Hall gym on Tuesday.

McKenzie, a 1967 TSU graduate, reflected on his younger days, noting that he enjoyed college life, but also took his course work seriously, which helped him gain success in the workplace. He also said he took control of his thoughts, and advised students to do the same, because that’s where their “destiny begins and where their dreams are actualized.”

“Be careful of words that come out of your mouth and take control of your thoughts because (they are) your most important possession,” said McKenzie, a former TSU Student Government Association president, who is currently on TSU’s board of trustees.

He also encouraged them to be bold.

“Please dare to dream,” McKenzie said. “Your dreams begin today.”

More than 3,330 students on the Dean’s List, or students with 3.0 GPAs or higher, were honored at the convocation. Of that number, 287 made the President’s List. These are students with perfect 4.0 GPAs.

Presidential Scholar Jaquantey Bowen, who graduates in December, was among those honored.

Bowen wants to put an end to heart disease, which has killed many of his relatives and is responsible for nearly 610,000 deaths in America each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

He plans to become a cardiovascular surgeon, and he’s well on his way.

With a perfect 4.0, Bowen has set his sights on Harvard University. He has been accepted into the highly competitive Harvard BWH Stars Program for Summer Research, an intensive, eight-week program in research methods and practice for underrepresented minority college and first-year medical students.

During Bowen’s freshman year at TSU, just around his 18th birthday, his maternal grandfather died from heart disease, the same disease that claimed his paternal grandfather’s life and several others in his family.

“From that day forward, I vowed to put an end to heart disease,” said Bowen, who will receive a bachelor’s degree in biology with concentration in cell and molecular biology and a minor in chemistry. “I solidified my career choice to become a cardiovascular surgeon. I have strived for excellence and maintained nothing less than an ‘A’ in every course I have taken.”

Also honored were members of the University-Wide Honor Societies, Student Leadership Awards recipients, the Top Graduating Seniors, and recipients of private scholarship awards, such as the Dr. McDonald Williams Scholarship, named after the founder of the Honors Program.

“Today we are honoring honors students and recognizing you for your academic achievement,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “Honors classes are difficult and require a lot of research and time. For 53 years, TSU has been committed to mentoring and motivating students to pursue academic excellence through the Honors Program. We thank you for excellence.”

McKenzie told the students that current geopolitics and technological changes demand that they remain focused to be successful.

“If your mind is messed up with a whole bunch of thoughts that are not going to contribute to where it is that you are trying to go, your destiny is being messed up by what you are thinking,” McKenzie said. “Remember, your word becomes your action; your action becomes your habits; your habits become your character; and your character becomes your destiny.”

Dr. Coreen Jackson, interim dean of the Honors College, thanked McKenzie for inspiring the students, and lauded them for their achievements.

“These students are an example of what hard work is all about,” she said. “We are excited to give them this well-deserved honor.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Honors College Produces Students Who Impact the World; Annual Convocation Set for March 28

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Jaquantey Bowen and Ayana Wild want to change the world.

They are among more than 3,000 students with grade point averages of 3.0 or higher who will be recognized when Tennessee State University honors its best and brightest students during the annual Honors Day Convocation on March 28.

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Jaquantey Bowen

Bowen, a Presidential Scholar who graduates in December, wants to put an end to heart disease, which has killed many of his relatives and is responsible for nearly 610,000 deaths in America each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Bowen plans to become a cardiovascular surgeon, and he’s well on his way.

With a perfect 4.0 GPA, Bowen has set his sights on Harvard University. He has been accepted into the highly competitive Harvard BWH Stars Program for Summer Research, an intensive, eight-week program in research methods and practice for underrepresented minority college and first-year medical students.

During Bowen’s freshman year at TSU, just around his 18th birthday, his maternal grandfather died from heart disease, the same disease that claimed his paternal grandfather’s life and several others in his family.

“From that day forward, I vowed to put an end to heart disease,” said Bowen, who will receive a bachelor’s degree in biology with concentration in cell and molecular biology and a minor in chemistry. “I solidified my career choice to become a cardiovascular surgeon. I have strived for excellence and maintained nothing less than an ‘A’ in every course I have taken.”

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Ayana Wild

Wild, who has been on the Dean’s List since entering TSU, wants to be a university professor, like her parents.

“I am inspired by my father and mother and many great professors I met at TSU,” said Wild, who graduates in May with a double major in computer science and math. “Through teaching, I want to be able to change the future of the computer science industry, as well as inspire students to make career choices that impact the world.”

Wild has a 3.9 GPA. She has been accepted into the graduate program at Vanderbilt University, with a research assistantship. Her older brother is pursuing a Ph.D. in clinical psychology at Vanderbilt, where her father also teaches. Her mother is a professor of chemistry at TSU.

As high achievers, Bowen and Wild are following in the footsteps of a select group of TSU honors graduates who have gone on to impact the world in remarkable ways in education, medicine, technology, and many other areas.

Among them, Dr. Glenda Glover, TSU’s current president, who earned a degree in math, and one of only two female educators in the United States with a Ph.D., JD and CPA combination. Some others are the late Dr. Levi Watkins, a 1966 graduate of the program, who revolutionized the medical world with the creation and implantation of the Automatic Implantable Defibrillator; and Jesse Russell, a 1972 graduate recognized as the father of digital cellular technology.

Another is Obie McKenzie, a 1967 graduate who will be the keynote speaker at this year’s Honors Convocation.

McKenzie is managing director at BlackRock, Inc., the largest publicly traded investment management firm in the United States, and a member of Tennessee State’s board of trustees.

“We are excited about Mr. McKenzie coming to bless us as our guest speaker,” said Dr. Coreen Jackson, interim dean of TSU Honors College. “He has walked this road. He has blazed the trail for us. This allows other students to see him as a mentor, and as a role model.”

TSU officials say the 3,331 students to be honored at this year’s convocation is a 42 percent increase in the number of students who made the Dean’s List the previous year. Of that number, 287 made the President’s List. These are students with perfect 4.0 GPAs.

“We are ecstatic about the great number of students who have achieved the Dean’s List during this period,” Jackson said. “It shows that Tennessee State University students are getting serious about their school work, and are working diligently to achieve excellence in the classroom. We just want to honor them and let them know that TSU is behind them, supporting them.”

Fore more information on the 2017 Honors Day Convocation, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/honors/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Students Win Top Honors at research conference

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University students recently won top honors in research presentations at the Research Association of Minority Professors 36th annual Conference in Atlanta.

RAMP is an educational and scientific research organization that provides opportunities for minority professors to engage in culturally relevant research projects.

Undergraduate and graduate students from member institutions are also invited to the association’s annual conference to present research projects.

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TSU student and faculty representatives at the RAMP 36th Annual Conference were, from left, T’Shana Carter, Germysha Little, Allen Ezigbo, Dr. Clara Young-White, Dr. Lucian Yates, III, Shabnam Brady, Sarah Iriogbe-Efionayi, Dr. Keisha Bryan, and Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young. (Submitted Photo)

This year, six TSU students were among 18 students selected from across the nation to make presentations at the RAMP conference last month at Clark Atlanta University. Three students placed, with one winning second place in the undergraduate category. TSU took the prizes for second and third places among graduate presenters.

Several TSU professors and administrators, including the university’s chief research officer, Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, accompanied the TSU students. The professors also presented at the conference.

For student research, Germysha Little, a senior biology major, earned second place for “An Investigation of the Experiences of Underrepresented STEM Graduate Students.”

In the graduate category, Shabnam Brady, a doctoral student in the Department of Psychology, won second place for her presentation on “The Assessment of Underrepresented Minority Student Experiences in STEM Graduate Program.”

A presentation on “Examining Early Childhood Education Teachers’ Understanding of Self-Regulation Skills” won third place for Sarah Iriogbe-Efionayi, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

“Our students were outstanding,” said Dr. Clara Young-White, chair of the Department of Teaching and Learning, and immediate past-president of RAMP. “It was very important for our students to participate in these presentations because it gives them the opportunity to connect with other students and professors.”

Young-White said TSU will host the conference next year.

“We are bringing the conference here because we want more TSU students to participate in the competition,” she said.

Students interested in presenting at the RAMP conference must submit a 2,000-word abstract of their work that addresses issues and concern for minority populations. A committee that selects the presenters reviews the abstracts.

Iriogbe-Efionayi said her interactions at the conference were beneficial.

“It (the conference) was a treat for me,” she said. “I was able to meet and interact with students and professors with the same background and interest in preschool education.”

Other TSU student presenters were Lydia Davis, a political science major; T’Shana Carter, chemistry; and Allen Ezigbo, elementary education.

Other faculty members and administrators who attended the conference included Dr. Lucian Yates, dean of Graduate School and Research; and Dr. Kisha Bryan, assistant professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU Students, Professor Attend Harvard Conference on Politics and Civic Engagement

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Two TSU students and a professor from the College of Public Service participated in a recent national conference at Harvard University.

The National Campaign for Political and Civic Engagement took place earlier this month at the Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics.

It focused on identifying the causes of the divisiveness following the 2016 presidential election, as well as strategies to bridge the gaps between all Americans.

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Mikala Hodges, a TSU Political Science major, participates in an open discussion at the conference. (Photo by Harvard University Institute of Politics)

Jalen Jennings, a junior urban studies major, and Mikala Hodges, also a junior majoring in political science, were among 70 students from 28 colleges and universities from across the United States who attended the conference.

The mission was to create a nationally coordinated program, Reconnect America.

Dr. Cara Robinson, interim chair of TSU’s Department of Social Work and Urban Affairs, accompanied the students. She said the students’ experience at the conference gave them the skills necessary to move civic activity on campus through academics and community service programs.

“Jennings and Hodges bring a personal passion, steady leadership, and commitment to assisting students and other stakeholders in moving public discourse and action forward and into a prominent place at TSU,” Robinson said. “The opportunity to work with students on civic and political engagement initiatives is a core purpose of the urban studies program and the College of Public Service.”

At the conference, students heard from prominent speakers such as Doris Kearns Godwin, veteran presidential historian, and David Gergen, veteran political analyst and advisor to three former U.S. presidents.

They noted the importance of having unifying leaders as a key to bridging the political divide, adding that young people have a vital role to play in closing the gap.

Jennings said he enjoyed meeting students from across the country and hearing their thoughts.

“We all have different views, [but] you come together and you find that in some ways we have the same ideas in some areas,” he said.

Jennings, who took part in a breakout group that focused on social media, added, “We are trying to come up with different ideas to make sure news gets published to social media sites that is more credible.”

Since 2003, the alliance has held annual conferences to identify collaborative projects, foster engagement in electoral politics, assist students in pursuing careers in public service and provide a foundation in civic education.

“The College of Public Service is very proud of this partnership, especially as we are the only HBCU,” said Dr. Michael Harris, dean of the college.  “It allows our students the opportunity to work with students from across the United States on enhancing citizenship, leadership and civic engagement, a core value that we instill in our students.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU graduate student Kyra Bryant wins thesis award

By K. Dawn Rutledge

The Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools has awarded the Graduate Student Master’s Thesis Award to Tennessee State University student, Kyra Bryant.

Bryant recently completed a Master of Civil and Environmental Engineering and is currently pursuing a doctorate in Computer Information Systems Engineering at TSU.

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TSU graduate student Kyra Bryant explains research at a recent Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools meeting. (submitted photo)

Among member institution graduate students from across the state of Tennessee, Bryant received the award on Feb. 8 for her research on hurricanes and storm surge search models with the purpose of making prediction more accurate. The title of her thesis was “The Rise and Fall of the Drag Coefficient in Wind Stress Calculations for Hurricane Wind Speeds with a Case Study.” It was published last fall (2016) in the Journal of Marine Science Engineering.

Dr. Muhammad K. Akbar, assistant professor in the Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Department, served as Bryant’s faculty advisor.

Akbar said that when a hurricane is brewing in the deep ocean, the tasks of emergency management become encumbered. They must forecast the hurricane’s wind track and strength for the entire duration through its landfall and beyond. They use the forecasted wind field to predict the incoming storm surge to coastal areas, and use it to set-up evacuation plans. Since the hurricane’s path and strength dynamically changes, the process must be modeled every few hours until the hurricane is two to three days away from landfall. One of the primary variables that influence storm surge simulation is the stress generated on the ocean by hurricane winds, which is approximated using air density, wind speed, and drag. The drag coefficient is typically calculated from an empirical correlation, which has been debated and researched by many scientists for more than half a century. Bryant’s thesis examined and summarized scientific research on the drag coefficient correlations.

“Ms. Bryant presented a case study using some of the commonly used drag coefficients, along with one of her own, to hind cast the Hurricane Rita (2005) storm surge and compare the results with observed data,” Akbar said, adding that she is performing more studies to develop drag coefficient correlations that can be used to predict hurricane storm surge accurately as part of her Ph.D. program.

“Receiving the Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools (TCGS) Thesis Award is a great honor for Ms. Bryant, and all of us at Tennessee State University,” Akbar continued. “It is an encouragement and motivation for us to advance the research to the next level. The outcome of the research will serve a huge coastal population of the world threatened by tropical storms annually. Even a single life saved through this research outcome would give us a sense of accomplishment.”

The Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools is committed to excellence and recognizing the exceptional work of Tennessee graduate students. TCGS’s graduate student thesis award is presented annually to recognize scholarly achievement in graduate students at a member institution of the Tennessee Conference of Graduate Schools.

“We are extremely proud of Kyra, her faculty advisors, and the entire engineering faculty,” said Dr. Lucian Yates, III, dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Research.

“This award is a reflection of the expectations and demands of the curriculum in engineering and the dedication of our students,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering. “We are proud of her recognition for this award, and strongly support her continuing study in the graduate program in engineering.”

This is not the first time Bryant has had the opportunity to share her research. Last year, she presented at the Emerging Researchers National Conference in STEM in Washington, D.C. where she interacted with other scholars from around the nation. She has also presented at TSU’s annual research symposium, receiving 3rd place for her work. Additionally, she has the 14th Estuarine Coastal Modeling Conference (ECM14) under her belt, a national conference attracting people from all over the world doing coastal modeling research.

Bryant said she chose TSU because it was the only institution engaged in such research.

“I don’t know of any other university in Tennessee doing hurricane research,” she said. “There are only one in eight professors in the U.S. teaching this program, and I’m very fortunate to be here.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

Mooo over beef and chicken! There’s a demand for goat meat in the U.S., and TSU is leading research to produce more of it

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – So much for where’s the beef? These days, its where’s the goat meat?

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Emily Hayes, a TSU graduate student and research assistant, among some of the breeding does. (photo by Joan Kite, TSU Public Relations)

Nationwide, agriculture researchers say there’s a demand for goat meat because of a growing population of ethnic groups within the United States that consume it, not to mention an increasing number of Americans who are choosing goat over other meats, like chicken and beef, because it’s healthier.

To meet the demand, much of the goat meat now in the U.S. is imported from other countries. But Tennessee State University is leading research that seeks to boost goat production in the U.S.

“I probably give 10, 12 talks a year across the country on the research,” said Dr. Richard Browning, the lead goat researcher in TSU’s Agriculture Department. “We have a lot of ethnic groups that have goat as a main part of their diet, and that’s why there’s a demand for goat meat. But we don’t produce enough here.”

According to the most recent statistics from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, all goat inventory in the U.S. on Jan. 1, 2016, totaled 2.6 million, down 1 percent from 2015.

“Right now, we are importing way more meat than what is being sold within the United States,” said Emily Hayes, a TSU graduate student and research assistant.

TSU’s research herd is comprised of approximately 250 breeding does representing diverse sets of Boer, Kiko, Spanish, Myotonic and Savanna genetics. The university began its goat research in 2002, and TSU officials expect to be awarded federal money from the USDA this year to expand their research.

Browning said much of the research focuses on breed characterization and genetic evaluations.

“Our primary target is female fitness in the doe population, in the breeding herd,” he said. “We’re looking for animals that are able to stay healthy and reproduce with limited inputs.”

The research is shared with producers, farmers, to help them be more effective in their goat production.

TSU junior Moet McFall is focusing on goat reproduction and recently presented her research at the 2017 American Society of Animal Science Southern Conference. While she enjoys the opportunity to help producers, she also appreciates the hands-on experience she believes will benefit her in the workforce.

“Hands-on research looks really good,” McFall said. “You can learn in a classroom, but hands-on experience is what most jobs look for. They want to see that you’ve actually put what you’ve learned to the test.”

Whether goat meat is produced in the U.S. or imported, researchers and restaurant owners who sell it say part of the draw to goat meat is its healthy appeal.

IMG_0954
Delicious dish of goat meat at Jamaicaway restaurant in Nashville. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations).

Goat meat is naturally lean, meaning it is much lower in saturated fat and cholesterol, having a naturally higher HDL count (the good cholesterol) and a naturally low LDL count (the bad kind of cholesterol), according to the National Kiko Registry. It is also lower in calories than other meats, like beef, and is easier to digest.

Dr. Sandria Godwin is a family and consumer science professor at TSU, as well as a registered dietician. She has worked with Dr. Browning to produce goat meat recipes.

“It is definitely a healthier choice,” Godwin said.

Ouida Bradshaw owns two Jamaicaway restaurants in Nashville and has had goat meat on her menu since she opened 14 years ago.

“Over the years, it has become a very popular entree,” said Bradshaw, who has been featured on the Food Network. “A lot of people come from far away just to get goat meat.”

Heritage Foods USA is an online butcher based in Brooklyn, New York, that supports farmers who raise livestock, including goats. Its cuts are sold to customers in all 50 states, as well as carried in 130 restaurants from New York City to Los Angeles.

The company is an advocate for more U.S. production of goat meat.

“Goats are environmentally low-maintenance and easy to raise,” said Patrick Martins, co-founder of Heritage Foods. “Goat is actually the most widely consumed meat in the world – and America is slowly learning what the rest of the world already knows – that goat meat is delicious, lean, versatile, healthy, and sustainable.”

To learn more about Tennessee State’s goat research, visit:http://www.tnstate.edu/faculty/rbrowning/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

TSU President Glenda Glover says university focused on student success, no longer a ‘school of last resort’

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – TSU President Glenda Glover says the university is focused on student success, and is no longer a “school of last resort.”

logoThe president was part of a panel of educators, community and business leaders that spoke at a Black History Month luncheon on Feb. 8 organized by Cable Nashville, a leadership organization for women’s professional advancement.

The theme of the event was “Leadership Vision in Challenging Times.” Besides Glover, the panel featured the presidents of Nashville’s other historically black higher education institutions: Fisk University, Meharry Medical College, and American Baptist College.

Glover said, as an HBCU, Tennessee State has always opened its doors to all students, even those rejected by other institutions. But she said the university has shifted its focus “exclusively” to student success.

“Excellence remains our top priority, but we can’t be the school of last resort,” Glover said.

In October, Glover announced that TSU is raising its admission standards and enhancing student success initiatives to increase retention and graduation rates. Beginning this fall, all students must have a 2.5 GPA and a 19 on the ACT for admission to TSU. The previous admission scores were 2.25 or a 19 on the ACT for in-state students, and a 2.5 or 19 ACT for out-of-state students.

“The day is over when you can call and say, ‘I have a good student with a 1.9 GPA and has promise,’” Glover said. “Well, this may not be the time you want to apply to TSU. We are raising standards because I believe that quality attracts quality.”

Janet Rachel, a member of Cable and a 1977 graduate of TSU, attended the luncheon. She said she fully supports Dr. Glover’s “bold” decision on student success and the spike in admission standards.

“I believe that at the core of helping blacks succeed is not just education but quality education,” said Rachel, who is the talent acquisition manager for diversity relocation and career navigation at Vanderbilt University. “I am really glad about what I am hearing from Dr. Glover. I hope the alumni will step up and become more engaged and more involved.”

The other HBCU presidents on the panel were Dr. James E.K. Hildreth, Meharry Medical College; Dr. Forrest E. Harris, Sr., American Baptist College; and Frank Sims, Fisk University.

Susan Allen Huggins, president and CEO of Cable, said it was important to bring the HBCU presidents together because of the partnership and the important role their institutions play in the community in terms of diversity and molding minds.

“We (Cable) were founded because of our strong understanding of and belief in the importance of diversity and inclusion,” Huggins said. “The Nashville community wouldn’t be what it is without these historically black institutions and the tremendous contributions they are making.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.