Category Archives: RESEARCH

Tennessee State University landscape to change in upcoming months with construction of five new buildings

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The Tennessee State University campus landscape will soon be changing. Nashville’s only public university will become a carbon copy of Music City in the next couple months as it begins construction of five campus buildings. This means construction cranes, dirt trucks, and hard hats.

TSU President Glenda Glover says the new buildings will enhance student living and improve their learning environment.

“The new projects are part of a long-term plan to improve academic programs and increase our residence hall inventory while enhancing the overall status of the university,” adds President Glover.

“We are extremely excited about the future and the new look our campus will take on with the construction. It’s been a long time coming for our students, faculty, staff and alumni.”

On slate for construction is a new Health Sciences Building, two new residence halls, the Field Research Organic Laboratory, Gateway Arch Entrance, and Alumni House and Welcome Center. Plans for several of the projects were unveiled last fall to kick-off the university’s homecoming celebration. All of the projects must be approved by the State Building Commission (SBC).

In addition to the new buildings, the university is also planning a nearly $5 million enhancement to Hale Stadium, according to Dr. Curtis Johnson, TSU’s chief of staff.

“We’re in the process of planning what that will include,” said Johnson.

Viron Lynch, TSU’s director of capital initiatives, said the Health Sciences Building is in the design phase.

“The Health Sciences building is the farthest along in the construction process, and a building designer has already been selected for the residence halls as well,” said Lynch.

“Depending on contract negotiations, design will begin within the next two months.”

The College of Agriculture is to get the new food sciences building. That project is also waiting for SBC approval, Lynch said. Also awaiting SBC approval is the TSU Alumni House and Welcome Center.

Johnson said it’s an exciting time at TSU.

“President Glover and her leadership has been working very hard with the various constituents to enhance TSU,” he said. “We’re excited about all the things that we’re going to bring for the students, the faculty, and the alumni.”

The following is a breakdown of each project:

  • The new Health Sciences Building is funded and in-design. The estimated cost of the project is $38.8 million. Groundbreaking is anticipated to occur in October 2018. The estimated completion date of the project is August 2020.
  • Two new residence halls are funded and the design team has been selected. The estimated project cost is $75.2 million. Groundbreaking could occur as early as October 2018. The estimated completion date of the project is August 2020.
  • The Field Research Organic Laboratory has received funding and is in-design. The estimated cost of the project is $340,000. Groundbreaking is anticipated to be in October 2018. The estimated completion date of the project is December 2019.
  • The Gateway Arch has been funded and currently in-design. The estimated cost of the project is $650,000. Groundbreaking is anticipated to be in October 2018. The estimated completion date of the project is August 2019.
  • The Alumni House and Welcome Center is currently in the development phase. The estimated cost of the project is $1 million. Although the project is in the planning phase, a groundbreaking could occur as early as January 2018, with a possible completion date of August 2020.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Band Members, Music Education Majors Entertain 114 Children to Celebrate Week of the Young Child

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – More than 100 area kids came to Tennessee State University’s main campus on Monday in observance of the national Week of the Young Child, April 16-20.

The event, which is usually in April, is sponsored by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and celebrates early learning, young children, their teachers and families.

At TSU, the children, ranging between ages 3-5 from North Head Start in Nashville, listened to nursery rhymes and children songs like “Old McDonald Had a Farm,” “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star,” and “Mary Had a Little Lamb,” performed by members of the Aristocrat of Bands and music education majors.

About 25 TSU students interacted with the children and demonstrated musical instruments like the clarinet, the French horn, trombone, and trumpets in the band room at the Performing Arts Center.

According to Dr. Reginald McDonald, director of Bands, the kids also participated in a demonstration of percussion instruments and saw clips of the TSU marching band.

“The joy on the kids’ faces showed that they were very happy with how they spent their time,” said McDonald.

He said the goal of the invitation and the interaction with the kids was to let the community know that “TSU’s music and band programs” are accessible.

“I believe that we should be accessible because there are others in the community who genuinely benefit from our accessibility. You never know, some of these kids might be here in a few years as members of the band just because of this experience today,” McDonald said.

He said the visit also allowed “our music education majors to get ‘live hands-on’ experience teaching general music.”

Throughout the week, Nashville community partners, departments and agencies will be making “fun” presentations to students at various schools and sites.

On Sunday, the city kicked off the week’s events at the Nashville Zoo, with Bouncy houses, table activities for the children, and of course, the “wonder of nature and animals to explore.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Spring Preview Day Helps Students Make Decision for College

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Not even heavy rains stopped hundreds of high school students and their parents from attending Spring Preview Day 2018 at Tennessee State University on Saturday.

TSU President Glenda Glover greets Jamey Gaiters, right, and her mother Nichole Gaiters at Spring Preview 2018. Jamey, a senior from Columbus, Ohio, says she coming to TSU in the fall. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Amid the early morning downpour, organizers say more than 1,200 high school seniors and juniors – from about 15 states including, California, Texas, Michigan, Illinois and Wisconsin – attended the daylong program to acquaint them with the university’s offerings and admission processes.

TSU President Glenda Glover made the rounds greeting students and families at the various booths and displays set up in the Floyd-Payne Campus Center for the visitors.

Midway through the day, Dyamond Shay, a senior from Tri-Cities High School in East Point, Georgia, had seen and heard enough. Her mind was made up.

Regardless of the rains, many Spring Preview Day visitors still chose to tour the TSU campus. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“I am definitely coming to Tennessee State University,” said Shay, who made the trip with her mother and older brother. Many graduates from her school also attend TSU.

“I just got here but from the looks of things, the staff are very supportive, and I like that and besides, it’s grounded here. I am really interested.”

Shay’s mother, Shelia James-Shay, agreed.

“She (Dyamond) is really interested in coming, and I think she will learn a lot and she will enjoy it,” Shelia said. “I am really impressed. The program has been very informative, and we are looking forward to the fall semester.”

Dyamond Shay, right, with her mother, Shelia James-Shay, says she is coming to TSU. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Activities for the visitors, according to organizers, also included meetings with academic departments, TSU student organizations,  campus tours, and other forms of educational entertainment.

“Spring Preview Day is going to be an exciting day of information and inspiration here at TSU,” Terrence Izzard, associate vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Success, said days earlier as organizers made final preparations for Spring Preview Day.

“ We feel that bringing these millennial scholars to campus, opening the doors to our classrooms, to our student life, our academic programs will give them firsthand information about the experience.”

Like Dyamond Shay, Jamey Gaiters of Columbus, Ohio, also has her mind made up.

“I really like the campus. The people are really nice and very welcoming,” said Gaiters, a senior from Licking Heights High School who wants to major in child psychology or early childhood education.

“I know for a fact that I will be attending TSU in the fall,” she said.

For more information on admission to Tennessee State University, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/admissions/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU scholarship recipients say ‘thank you’ to donors during Appreciation Program

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University scholarship recipients got a chance to say “thank you” to their donors on Friday.

Scholarship recipient Nijaia Bradley with donor, Dr. Sandra Holt. (photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

During a Scholarship Appreciation Program in Elliott Hall, students lined up to thank those who helped make it possible for them to attend TSU. A number of donors attended the event, which is in its seventh year.

TSU President Glenda Glover personally thanked the donors for their contributions in her greetings.

“Thank you for coming out and your support to TSU,” said Glover, who has an endowed scholarship at the university. “You make a significant different in peoples lives.”

Nijaia Bradley of Detroit said it’s simple; she wouldn’t be at TSU if she had not received scholarships.

“College wasn’t a possibility,” said Bradley, a sophomore majoring in child development. “I’m blessed to be here at TSU.”

Like many of the scholarship recipients attending the event, Bradley got a chance to meet her donor, Dr. Sandra Holt. It was her first time meeting Holt, who has a scholarship in her name.

“I just want to thank her,” said Bradley. “Without her scholarship, I wouldn’t be here.”

Holt said it’s a wonderful feeling to know her scholarship is helping a student to be successful.

“When you meet young people like this, who are eager to do … it’s worth whatever it takes to see these young people make it,” said Holt, a former director of TSU’s Honors College. “That’s why I give.”

Junior Madison Brown of Memphis, Tennessee, said the scholarship he received from the TSU Foundation made it possible for him to get a higher education..

“I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for you,” said Brown, a computer science major who has an internship with Google. “I appreciate you a lot.”

Ben Northington, director of fiscal affairs for the TSU Foundation and institutional advancement, said more than 650 students received scholarships this year totaling close to $2 million.

“We look forward to our donors interacting with the students who have benefited from their respective scholarships,” said Northington. “This event is to tell each of our donors thank you.”

For information on how to support the TSU Foundation or make a scholarship donation, please go to http://www.tnstate.edu/foundation/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Agriscience Fair provides opportunities to learn, recruit

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Students from area high schools got a chance to showcase their agriculture projects at Tennessee State University’s inaugural Agriscience Fair on Thursday.

Ali Bledsoe, a ninth-grader from Clarkrange High School in Fentress County, receives a check for $500 for taking first place in the plant science category. Presenting the check are Dr. Samuel Nahashon, chair of the Department of Environmental Sciences, left; Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture; and Dr. John Ricketts, TSU Ag professor and fair organizer. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Close to 100 students in grades 9-12 participated in the event sponsored by TSU’s College of Agriculture. The students, from 11 counties, made presentations in categories that included food and nutritional sciences, plant sciences, animal sciences, agricultural engineering and biotechnology. The presentations in each category were judged, with first place winners receiving $500, and $250 for second place.

While the fair was a chance for students to showcase their work, organizers said it was also an opportunity for students to see what TSU has to offer, and hopefully draw them to the university.

“There’s so much out there we do in terms of research, in terms of addressing national priorities,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of TSU’s College of Agriculture. “A lot of times the young people in the school systems don’t know that. So we’re trying to get them to our place … and see how we can blend their goals with what we have here.”

Dr. John Ricketts, a TSU Ag professor and organizer of the fair, said the students got a chance to interact with some of the College of Agriculture’s faculty and discuss topics related to their areas of interest.

“So, in addition to recruiting, it’s really helping them with their research interest in the areas they’re studying,” Ricketts said.

Tenth-grader Elise Russ showcases presentation on diabetes and eating healthier. Russ says she plans to attend TSU. (photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Elise Russ, a 10th-grader from Hillsboro High School in Nashville who was a presenter at the fair, said she plans to attend TSU and major in agriculture. She said she’s been inspired to work in that field after spending time gardening with her grandmother.

“I like agriculture,” said Russ, whose presentation was about diabetes and eating healthier. “I used to always be in the garden with my grandmother; I just loved doing that with her.”

One of the winner’s at the fair was Ali Bledsoe, a ninth-grader from Clarkrange High School in Fentress Country. She got first place in the plant science category for her presentation about “organic matter in the soil.”

Bledsoe said a large part of her interest in agriculture is due to her older brother, who was in Future Farmers of America, or FFA.

“He introduced me to this,” said Bledsoe, who is also in FFA. “He did a project sort of like this his freshman year.”

To learn more about TSU’s College of Agriculture, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Bottoms, Renowned Motivational Speaker Eric Thomas to Speak at TSU’s Dual Spring Commencements

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, and nationally recognized motivational speaker Dr. Eric Thomas will be the commencement speakers at Tennessee State University’s dual spring graduation ceremonies.

Mayor Bottoms will speak on Friday, May 4, at the graduate commencement ceremony in the Howard C. Gentry Complex, beginning at 5 p.m.

On Saturday, May 5, Thomas will address undergraduate students in Hale Stadium. The ceremony will begin at 8 a.m. In case of rain, the undergraduate commencement will be at the Gentry Complex and will start at 9 a.m. Overflow for the event will be in Kean Hall.

Overall, more than 1,000 undergraduate and graduate students will receive degrees in various disciplines.

Bottoms, an Atlanta native who was elected mayor last December, became only the second woman to be elected to that post in the city’s history.

A highly accomplished lawyer and successful public servant who advocates for high quality public education, job opportunities and economic growth, Bottoms is expected to inspire TSU graduate students to set high goals for their future.

Bottoms is a member of the State Bar of Georgia, the Atlanta Chapter of Jack and Jill of America, the Dogwood City Chapter of The Links, Inc., and the Atlanta Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

She is a graduate of Florida A&M University and Georgia State University College of Law.  Alongside her public service career, Mayor Bottoms has maintained a private law practice for more than 20 years, and has served as general counsel for a multi-million dollar business, as well as a Judge (Pro Hoc) in Fulton County State Court.

Dr. Thomas, the undergraduate commencement speaker, is a critically acclaimed author, world-renowned speaker, educator and pastor. His “electrifying voice-over talent” is reportedly credited with propelling the Miami Heat to victory in the NBA Finals in 2012.

Called the “Hip Hop Preacher” for his creative style and high-energy messages, Thomas is expected to inspire the graduates with his message on success driven by his famous quote, “When you want to succeed as bad as you want to breathe, then you’ll be successful.”

Thomas has a long commitment to community activism, which began with his award-nominated GED program that led to his non-profit, Break The Cycle; I Dare you, and a plethora of other ministerial and educational endeavors. The culmination of those efforts resulted in the development of “The Advantage Program” at Michigan State University in 2003. The program targets high-risk college students by improving their study habits and increasing their retention rates. He is also the creator of International Urban Education Consulting, a non-profit organization committed to finding solutions to closing the achievement gap in urban schools through “goal-framing and reformation” in student learning.

Thomas holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees and a Ph.D. in Educational Administration from Michigan State University.

For more information on commencement, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/records/commencement/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Inaugural AgFest kicks off week of college activities at TSU

By Joan Kite

Nashville, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – More than 100 students, staff, and faculty members attended the College of Agriculture’s inaugural AgFest at Tennessee State University on Monday.

TSU College of Ag Dean Dr. Chandra Reddy (right), and horse trainer Jerry Williams, Jr., wth his Tennessee Walking Horse. (photo by Joan Kite, TSU Media Relations)

The event took place on the university’s main campus in the circle in front of the College. Participants were treated to opportunities to feed goats, pet a Dexter bull, take selfies with a prancing Tennessee Walking Horse, examine scientific equipment, and mingle with friends.

“It’s a beautiful day,” said Lauren Stevens, an agriculture graduate student who attended with her fellow classmates.

Ag Professor John Ricketts, who organized the visit by horse trainer Jerry Williams, Jr., and his Tennessee Walking Horse, also arranged to have the Agricultural Education Mobile Laboratory parked on the Circle. The classroom on wheels provides mobile lessons about agricultural literacy.

Emily Hayes, a graduate student and assistant with the College’s nationally recognized goat research, said before AgFest that she was looking forward to it.

“The AgFest is a great opportunity for people to actually see all … these groups together, and see all of the work we’ve done as an entire ag department,” said Hayes.

Earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded more than $2 million in teaching, research and extension capacity building grants to seven TSU Ag professors.

The funds will be dedicated to developing research and extension activities designed to increase and strengthen food and agricultural sciences through integration of teaching, research and extension.

AgFest marks the beginning of events all week at the College of Agriculture. On Tuesday, students participated in the Amazing Race, an agricultural scavenger hunt. On Thursday, high school students were to participate in the College’s first Agri-science Jackpot Fair, where a $500 first place and $250 second place prize will be awarded.

To learn more about TSU’s College of Agriculture, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Children’s day event a learning experience for youngsters and TSU students, organizers say

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Youngsters from several local schools and day cares will converge on Tennessee State University’s indoor practice facility on Wednesday, April 11, to participate in activities leading up to the Week of the Young Child.

Each April, the National Association for the Education of Young Children designates a week to focus on children. This year, April 16-20 is designated.

TSU’s Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, which is part of the College of Agriculture, and TSU’s Center for Learning Sciences is hosting the event during College of Agriculture Week.

Dr. Margaret Machara, associate professor of human sciences, is the coordinator of TSU’s Day of the Child event, which involves participation from a number of the university’s departments.

She said students and faculty in each department have been asked to develop activities for the children related to their respective areas of study. Organizers say the event provides a learning experience for both kids and college students, particularly those in a program like early childhood.

“We have college students that get to put into practice the things they are learning with actual children (3 to 5-year-olds) in the community,” says Machara. “So they’re learning on their level, and the children are getting an early grasp on material and getting a love for learning in higher education at the same time.”

Last year, more than 250 kids participated in TSU’s Day of the Child event.

Among them was 4-year-old Gavin, and his mother, Natasha Winfrey, who said the kids seemed to benefit from the activities.

“I think it’s good to get the kids started early, to see all the specialties that are available to them when they get older,” she said.

For more information about the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/degrees/family_consumer_purpose.aspx.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Nashville native Kevin Scott says attending his hometown university was the best choice for college, finds success at TSU

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – When it comes to education, Kevin Scott has no other choice but to succeed.

“My parents didn’t play. Growing up at home my grades always came first,” says Scott, a Nashville native who has a passion for building, tinkering and fixing things.

Scott’s passion is no accident. He was raised around people who were “always building or fixing things.” His father owns a mechanic and towing business that he inherited from Kevin’s grandfather.

Kevin Scott

“That’s where my interest in electronics started, being able to create and play with emerging technology,” says Scott, a senior electrical engineering major at Tennessee State University.

In May, Scott will graduate from TSU with a degree in electrical engineering and a concentration in computer engineering. He has potential job offers waiting for him with aerospace research and engineering giants like Lockheed Martin and AMRDEC or the Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center, upon graduation.

Scott says the “strong and highly accredited” engineering program at TSU made his decision to stay local very easy. At TSU, he maintained the same high academic zeal he had always had. He is completing his engineering program in four years, which ordinarily lasts five years.

“I have been blessed with great professors and mentors at TSU who have been very nurturing and show personal interest in my success,” says Scott, who will be graduating with a near 3.5 grade point average.

An Academic standout at Nashville’s John Overton High School, Scott credits strong TSU disciplines and early preparation for his success. At Overton, Scott was part of the STEM Academy, and a member of the Technology Student Association, which helped him to develop the fundamentals of engineering, robotics and programming.  He had earned 12 college credit hours by the time he graduated high school. He was awarded a Presidential Scholarship to attend TSU, from where both his parents – Kevin, Sr., and Joy Scott – had graduated.

“The scholarship was a sign that I should stay locally and take advantage of the opportunity I had been blessed with,” says Scott. “In fact I had always been involved with TSU and many of my family members had also attended TSU.”

A member of the Honors College, Scott is the Student Branch Chair of the Institute of Electrical/Electronic Engineers, member of the National Society of Black Engineers, and Eta Kappa Nu Zeta Kappa Chapter Electrical Engineering Honor Society. He is also a teaching assistant, and Lab Manager for STEM Scouts by Boy Scout of America.

“This journey through Tennessee State University has been a life-changing experience. From the connections I have made, the opportunities that I have been granted, and from the education I have received, coming into this final stretch of my undergraduate degree, I know that I am ready to THINK, WORK, SERVE, and LEAD,” says Scott.

Dr. Coreen Jackson, interim dean of the Honors College and one of those Scott credits for his success, says, “Kevin is one of those rare people whose achievement and ambition are way beyond his years.”

“Kevin has done an exceptional job in his academics at Tennessee State University,” says Jackson. “He has had excellent training in his engineering classes, received personal mentorship from his professors in the College of Engineering and the Honors College, and is well prepared to make his mark on the world.”

Over his college career, Scott also received recognitions and scholarship awards from the Music City Bowl Tradition of Service, the NFL Retired Players Inspiration, IBM Master The Mainframe Part 2 Completion, and the National Society of Collegiate Scholars.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.