Category Archives: RESEARCH

TSU Master of Science in Nursing Program Ranked No. 2 in the Nation; Highly Qualified Faculty, Flexible Schedule, Low Tuition Cited

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The graduate nursing program at Tennessee State University is among the best in the nation.

top-masters-in-healthcare-administration-best-schools-2016-264x300In a recent survey, the TSU Master of Science in Nursing degree was ranked No. 2 among the 50 Best Graduate Nursing Schools in America.

Top Master’s in Healthcare Administration, which conducted the ranking of 2016 Best Schools, said flexible scheduling, highly qualified faculty, and extremely reasonable tuition were factors that helped TSU to achieve the high ranking.

All of the TSU MSN programs – Family Nursing Practice, Holistic Nursing, and Nursing Education – are offered day and evening on campus, as well as online. Students may also choose to attend part-time or full-time, with an option to attend summer sessions to accelerate their pace.

“We are extremely excited about this high ranking,” said Dr. Maria Revell, director of the TSU MSN program. “It has taken a lot of hard work on the part of faculty, staff and students to get this program to where it is. We are extremely delighted about this national recognition.”

Currently, 314 students are registered in the TSU MSN program, making it one of the largest concentrations and student success programs on campus, Revell said.

The program has a 98 percent job placement rate for those who complete the program, she said.

“We have done course revision, we work closely with students, we have an open door policy, we have faculty who are available, accessible and who work online, and on the phone with students,” Revell said.

Kai-L Cobb will graduate from the program during TSU’s fall commencement on Dec. 10. A registered nurse for five years, she earned her bachelor’s and associate’s degrees in nursing at TSU, following in her mother’s footsteps. She said strong academic offerings and faculty/student relationships are major factors.

“One thing that really makes us successful in this program is our access to faculty,” Cobb said.  “The office visits, after-hour communication and access to my teachers through emails and phone calls, really help me, especially with my work schedule.”

Meaghan White, who will also receive her MSN degree during the fall commencement, said it is a good feeling to say, “ I graduated” from the second best graduate nursing program in the nation.

“That is a wonderful feeling to be able to say that; it’s an awesome feeling,” White added.

The high ranking of the MSN program comes on the heels of another recent major achievement for TSU.

The Wall Street Journal listed the university among its top 10 historically black colleges and universities.

The WSJ/THE College Rankings, which put TSU at No. 10, was released Nov. 21 and used categories such as academic resources and graduate outcomes to determine rankings.

For more information on the TSU MSN program and all other programs in the College of Health Sciences, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/health_sciences/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University Students Build Wheelchairs for Disabled Canines

By Emmanuel S. Freeman

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Pugsly the Pug has a new wheelchair.

Born with a spinal deformity that makes it difficult to stay on its feet, the 15-year-old Dutch mastiff has a new lease on life, thanks to a team of occupational and physical therapy students at Tennessee State University.

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The Dog Wheelchair Competition winning team members and their professors are, from left standing, Jake Armstrong, Blaine Martin, Dr. Rita Troxtel and Dr. Karen Coker. Squatting with Pugsly are, left, Reagan Worth and Erica LaFollette. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The students, along with some of their peers from the Art Department, designed a special wheelchair that allows Pugsly to take long strides without wobbling or falling.

Dr. Rita Troxtel, assistant professor of occupational therapy and Pugsly’s owner, organized a wheelchair competition that challenged the students to develop wheelchairs for disabled dogs that are low cost, lightweight and easy to maneuver.

The competition was held Nov. 29 in the university’s Floyd-Payne Student Center. About 80 students and their advisers participated.

They came up with 17 different concepts and designs that were tested on Pugsly before a panel of judges. The winning wheelchair went to Pugsly. Troxtel said the other wheelchairs in the competition will be donated to organizations that specialize in adopting or providing sanctuary for animals with disabilities.

A team of two occupational therapy and two physical therapy students came up with the winning design made of PVC pipes, with two big back wheels and two smaller front wheels for turning; a push handle, and stretch fabric with four round openings for the feet.

“Pugsly is grateful for his new wheels,” Troxtel said.

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Another team of competitors fit Bugsly in their invention, a two-wheeler. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. Karen Coker, assistant professor of physical therapy and one of the judges, said the winning design “offered ease of getting in with just one person.”

“The fabric is flexible and soft; it won’t poke anywhere, and the wheelchair has a push handle so that the owner won’t have to bend over,” Coker said. “It is the perfect mix.”

Blain Martin, a graduate physical therapy major, was on the winning team. He said the goal was to develop a wheelchair that was easy to use.

“We all collaborated and we had a group message going in,” Martin said. “We met up several times to make sure we were on the same page with our project. It was great teamwork.”

Other winning team members were Reagan Worth, occupational therapy; Jake Armstrong, physical therapy; and Erica LaFollette, occupational therapy.

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The other wheelchairs in the competition will be donated to organizations that specialize in adopting or providing sanctuary for animals with disabilities. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Second-year graduate occupational major Amber Alexander’s team did not win, but she was impressed with the exercise.

“Participating in this competition gave use some real-world exposure to our various disciplines,” she said.

Mike Carter, a Ph.D. physical therapy student, said he enjoyed the teamwork.

“Collaboration was great in our group,” Carter said. “In fact, one of the guys in the group was skilled in making things. He actually has a shop where he builds all kinds of stuff. So this was right up his alley.”

Dr. Hamid Hamidzadeh, head of TSU’s Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Department, lauded organizers for having the competition.

“It’s a good opportunity for them to get hands on experience,” said Hamidzadeh, who was also a judge. “The students will really get the opportunity to go beyond the limit of the classroom.“

Troxtel said the skills the students learned from creating the dog wheelchairs will transfer to developing technology for humans.

“The TSU OT department is considering purchasing a 3D printer to build prosthetic limbs,” she said. “I also plan to hold a competition again next year, but it will focus on building assistive technology for human use.”

For more information on TSU’s various therapy programs in the College of Health Sciences, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/health_sciences/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Agriculture students excel at Tennessee Academy of Science meeting

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Eleven Tennessee State University College of Agriculture students won awards at the 126th annual meeting of the Tennessee Academy of Science.

More than 300 students and faculty from 10 universities converged on Austin Peay State University in Clarksville for the meeting on Nov. 19.

TSU was well represented with 32 student presentations in various topics, including agriculture, botany, cell and molecular biology, ecology and environmental science, geosciences, and microbiology.

Of the 11 awards TSU students received, four were 1st place; three 2nd place; three 3rd place; and one honorable mention.

Master’s student Jeronimo da Silva was honored for serving as the chair of the Ecology and Environmental Science section, the first time a student served as chair of a section.

The Tennessee Academy of Science seeks to promote scientific research and education in Tennessee. Its 800 members are primarily from academia, with additional members from government and industry.

For more information about TAS, visit http://www.tennacadofsci.org.

To learn more about TSU’s College of Agriculture, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU engineering students are making sure Nashville bridges are safe

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – How safe are the bridges in Metro Nashville that you drive across everyday?

The answer may be in the work Tennessee State University engineering students are doing around the city.

A team of six graduate and undergraduate students, along with their professors from the Departments of Civil and Architectural Engineering, recently conducted a study on five bridges around the Nashville Fairgrounds to assess their structural integrity.

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Kevin Nguyen, a graduate civil engineering major, left, and Abram Musinguzi, a Ph.D. student in systems engineering, are two of six TSU students and their professors assessing bridges around the Nashville Fairgrounds to ensure their structural integrity. (Courtesy photo)

As part of the fairgrounds improvement project, the students’ findings were submitted to the city’s structural engineers and will be used to determine future use of the bridges.

The dean of the College of Engineering said the involvement of the students in the project is part of Mayor Megan Barry’s “innovative” vision and strategy to get more high school and college students working on real-world projects that enhance their skills and employability.

“TSU and the College of Engineering are playing an integral part of this strategy by providing our students with practical experience that complements their classroom learning,” Hargrove said.

Abram Musinguzi, a Ph.D. student in systems engineering, is the student coordinator on the project.  He said part of the inspections involve measuring the bridges’ dimensions to identify any structural damage, or distress, and compile a report.

“The purpose of the project is to assess if there is any need for renovation or repair of the bridges,” Musinguzi said.

Dr. Farouk Mishu, professor and interim chair of the civil and architectural engineering department, is one of two faculty members who worked with the students.

“These bridges have been here for a very long time,” Mishu said. “We are assessing them to see what kind of remediation we need to do to make them safe. This gives the students real-world experience before they graduate.”

Overseeing the students and their professors’ work was a field engineer from the fairgrounds project management team, who said he is impressed with the student’s skill level and attention to detail.

“What they are doing is pivotal to deciding what kind of money will be spent on either the repairing, the removing or replacing of these bridges,” said Jonathon Schneider of the project management team. “Their performance is remarkable.”

The students’ work is not TSU’s first involvement with the fairgrounds improvement project.

Last year, Hargrove served as a member of the review team appointed by Mayor Barry to make recommendations for the $12 million renovation of the fairgrounds.

Other students on the bridge project were: Kevin Nguyen, a graduate student majoring in civil engineering; and undergraduates SiVon Jiles, civil engineering; Matthew Miller, architectural engineering; Dwight Pullen, architectural engineering; and Darren Evans, civil engineering.

Dr. Catherine Armwood, assistant professor of civil and architectural engineering, was the other faculty member on the project.

For more information about TSU’s College of Engineering, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/engineering/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Course helps TSU employees prepare for emergencies

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is making sure its faculty and staff are prepared to handle emergencies.

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TSU employees participate in emergency preparedness course. (submitted photo)

More than 20 people attended a two-day course – Campus Emergencies Prevention, Response and Recovery – on the university’s campus Nov. 15-16.

The purpose of the course was to provide campus leaders with an understanding and ability to navigate difficult aspects of dealing with campus emergencies – both natural and human-caused events, including acts of violence.

“The expectations are for individuals who participated in this training to better enable university employees to aid the university in the event of an emergency,” said Dr. Curtis Johnson, TSU’s associate vice president for administration. “It’s also important that these persons spread the word about what they received here, and encourage others to get this training.”

The course consisted of small, problem-based, integrated group activities that required a coordinated, integrated approach to solve. Through tabletop scenarios, course participants observed a developing incident and responded in a manner consistent with currently established campus and jurisdictional emergency operations procedures.

TSU Police Captain Tony Blakely said the course was enlightening.

“One of the most important things as a captain over patrol that I got out of this training was a refresher,” Blakely said. “Time to time, we as professionals do need a refresher. The training was excellent, and I hope we have more of it.”

The course was led by representatives from the National Center for Biomedical Research and Training at Louisiana State University. The agency provides training to emergency responders throughout the United States and its territories.

For more information about NCBRT, visit https://www.ncbrt.lsu.edu.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Professional Development Group Presents Discussion on National Leadership Crisis


NASHVILLE, Tenn.
(TSU News Service) – A vision, collective destiny and the ability to motivate people to work together to accomplish extraordinary things are what distinguish a great leader, a public policy expert told a TSU gathering Nov. 16.

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Dr. Michael Harris, Dean of the College of Public Service, says a good leader is not arbitrary and capricious, as he addresses a forum on leadership. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. Michael Harris, dean of the College of Public Service and a nationally syndicated columnist, told participants at a forum organized by the TSU Staff Senate that the only way to transform is by having a clear vision of “where you want to take the people you lead.”

“A good leader makes decisions, not arrive at conclusions, and must not be arbitrary and capricious,” Harris said. “They must be grounded in values and integrity that lead the vision and the collective destiny.”

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Nearly 30 staff participated in the forum organized by the Staff Senate in the Student Success Center. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Organizers said the one-hour presentation aimed to examine the current global and national leadership crisis facing the nation. It included a scientific analysis of leadership and its elements based on years of experience and research.

Called “Leadership 101,” the presentation answered questions such as “What is leadership?” “Who is a leader?” “Why should I care?” and “Can leadership be improved?”

“The goal was to provide and support staff participation in any educational and training opportunities which enhance job performance and wellness,” said Jamal Coleman, chair of the Staff Senate Professional Development and Education Committee. “Dr. Harris’ presentation was excellent.”

Nearly 30 staff members attended the forum in the Student Success Center.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU to Host National Conference of Honors Programs; More than 400 Top Students to Attend

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University will host the 2016 National Association of African-American Honors Programs Conference Saturday, Oct. 29 at the Nashville Airport Marriott Hotel.

The three-day conference will include a gala on Monday, Oct. 31 in the Howard C. Gentry Complex on TSU’s main campus.

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TSU President Glenda Glover, left, receives an award from NAAAHP President Coreen Jackson following Dr. Glover’s keynote address at the organization’s 2015 conference at the Gaylord Opryland Resort and Conference Center. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

More than 400 of the nation’s best and brightest students and representatives from 31 historically black colleges and universities will network, debate, participate in academic competitions, and present scholarly research. A graduate and career fair with representatives from more than 40 top graduate schools and companies from across the country will also be held for participants.

This is the second consecutive conference being held in Nashville. It marks the 25th anniversary of the NAAAHP, founded in 1990 to address the “specific needs” of honors education for African-American students. Last year’s conference was held in partnership with Fisk University.

“We are excited to once again bring the national conference to Nashville,” said Dr. Coreen Jackson, president of the NAAAHP, who is interim dean of the TSU Honors College. “We are indeed grateful to President Glenda Glover and Tennessee State University for hosting the 25th anniversary.”

Under the theme, “Celebrating 25 Sterling Years of Academic Distinction,” Jackson said Honors directors, deans and faculty at the conference will also engage in roundtable and panel discussions about best practices in Honors administration.

“This year’s theme is designed to commemorate the vital role NAAAHP has played in supporting Honors education within HBCUs and Predominantly Black Colleges and Universities for 25 years,” Jackson said.

To register or to obtain more information about the conference, visit  www.naaahp.org. Tickets for the gala are $85 per person and $25 for students with ID can be purchased at www.naaahp.org or at the Eventbrite link https://www.eventbrite.com/e/naaahp-2016-25th-anniversary-gala-tickets-28406159588?aff=erelpanelorg.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, Google partner to help prepare computer science students for the workforce

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University and Google have partnered to help prepare students for a competitive workforce.

TSU is one of 10 historically black colleges and universities participating in the Google in Residence Program, which uses the technology giant’s engineers to teach introductory computer science classes, as well as help students further develop soft and technical skills.

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Dr. Ali Sekmen, chair of the Department of Computer Science

“The Department of Computer Science students are in high demand with strong technical and soft skills,” said Dr. Ali Sekmen, who chair’s the department. “The GIR program will further make our program and students stronger with understanding of state-of-the-art technical skills and intense interview processes of top software engineering companies.”

Google said in a statement that it’s pleased to be at TSU “as part of our commitment to encouraging greater diversity in the tech sector.”

“We’ve been impressed with Dr. Sekmen’s commitment to his students and look forward to our continued partnership with the TSU CS faculty through the Google in Residence Program,” the company said.

The Google team at TSU consists of a tech programs specialist and an instructor who teaches an introduction to computer science course, which Google helped develop. The Google instructor and a computer science faculty teach three sections of the course together.

While the introductory class is mainly for freshmen, both Google team members provide assistance to all students to help prepare them for opportunities in the tech field. TSU officials say they hope the prep will increase internship and employment opportunities for TSU computer science students not only with Google, but companies like IBM and Microsoft.

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove is dean of TSU’s College of Engineering, which includes the Computer Science Department. He lauded the Google-TSU partnership, saying it could help fill the nearly 1,300 IT-related job openings in the Nashville metropolitan area.

“The growth of the IT field here has been phenomenal,” Hargrove said. “We have an opportunity with our computer science program that offers to help fill that workforce need here in Middle Tennessee and contribute to the growth in the city.”

TSU computer science major Ryan Stubbs of Newark, New Jersey, said mock interviews he’s had with the Google instructor have been particularly helpful.

“I know what to prepare for,” said Stubbs, a senior. “The instructor is a great resource.”

Timothy Darrah of Hutchinson, Kansas, agreed. The senior computer science major believes the insight and real-world experience provided by the Google team at TSU is especially beneficial to freshmen.

“When I came in as a freshman, I didn’t know what the end of the road looked like,” he said. “Seeing what they (freshmen) can do, what they can become, it provides a lot of motivation for them to exceed and do better than what they normally would.”

Google is a multinational, publicly traded organization built around the company’s hugely popular search engine. Google’s other enterprises include Internet analytics, cloud computing, advertising technologies, and Web app, browser and operating system development.

To learn more about TSU’s Department of Computer Science, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/computer_science/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

TSU President Glenda Glover announces initiatives to continue ‘legacy of excellence’

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover outlined new initiatives she says will continue a “legacy of excellence” at the 104-year-old institution.

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TSU President Glenda Glover discusses Impact 20/20 initiative at news conference. (photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. Glover held a press conference on Oct. 14 during Homecoming week to discuss Impact 20/20, which includes new governance, academic excellence, and capital improvement and infrastructure enhancements.

“This is an exciting time for TSU as we celebrate a legacy of pride and progress,” said Glover, referring to this year’s Homecoming theme.

In the area of governance, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam announced two days earlier the eight appointees to the newly created TSU state governing board, which aims to give the university – and the other four-year state institutions – increased autonomy to support student success as the state continues an initiative to have 55 percent of Tennesseans with a degree or credential by 2025.

“We are pleased with the men and women the governor has selected, and look to the leadership of the full General Assembly to approve them,” Glover said.

She also announced TSU is raising its admission standards and enhancing student success initiatives to increase retention and graduation rates. Beginning the fall of 2017, all students must have a 2.5 GPA and a 19 on the ACT for admission to TSU. The previous admission scores were 2.25 or a 19 on the ACT for in-state students, and a 2.5 or 19 ACT for out-of-state students.

“We’re glad that we’re raising the bar here at Tennessee State University,” said Student Government Association President Aarian Forman. “We want to continue to be an institution of great quality. I think the new admission standards will help further this agenda to help us do that.”

The academic component also includes an Executive MBA Program offered through the College of Business next year, as well as establishment of TSU centers for Social Justice and Equality; Economic Policy Institute; Law Enforcement Education; a Center of Excellence for Ethics; and Emergency Management Institute.

As for capital improvement and infrastructure enhancement, Glover announced construction of a new Health Sciences building, as well as plans for new residence halls, an on-campus stadium, and a project that will encompass more than 80 acres along the Cumberland River.

“With a mixed use concept, Cumberland City will be an educational, technology, health, commercial, and residential engine that will allow TSU to be a major participant in the economic boom that is Nashville,” Glover said.

In 2012, TSU contributed $610 million to the Nashville economy, statistics show.

“We’re very proud of the economic value that Tennessee State University brings to the city and to the state,” said state Rep. Brenda Gilmore, whose district includes TSU.

Joni McReynolds, president of TSU’s National Alumni Association, agreed.

“We are so proud of the things TSU is doing, and we’re going to be here to sponsor you, and help raise money,” she said.

Glover also emphasized during the press conference that TSU is continuing to strengthen campus security.

“New Police Chief Greg Robinson has been dedicated to bringing additional enhancement to our Police Department,” she said. “Public safety is paramount, and we will treat it as such.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU in the Smithsonian, Participates in Dedication of the National Museum of African-American History and Culture

WASHINGTON, D.C. (TSU News Service) – The ringing of a historic bell from Virginia, donated as a symbol of freedom, heralded the opening of the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African-American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 24.

Thousands from all walks of life, including statesmen, Freedom Riders, Tuskegee Airmen, ordinary citizens and a 99-year-old woman whose father was born a slave and died a doctor, assembled on the National Mall to see the grand opening of a museum 100 years in the making.

The 400,000-square-foot building, sitting next to the Washington Monument, contains artifacts and collections donated by families, individuals, and institutions, including Tennessee State University. TSU donated gold medals, championship trophies and track cleats, as well as photographs and portraits of TSU trailblazers and coaches from the university’s rich athletic history, including legendary TSU Track and Field Coach Ed Temple who died on Sept. 22 at the age of 89.

TSU President Glenda Glover, who led a delegation to the weeklong ceremonies marking the dedication, expressed thanks and appreciation to the museum’s curators for including items from TSU.

“These are treasured collections from our institution’s history and we are grateful for the exposure they will receive,” Glover said. “Now, the whole world and visitors to this magnificent museum will get to see some of Tennessee State University’s past and our strive to uphold the American history through our contribution to the collections here.”

The museum, observers said, chronicles one of the most profound narratives in America’s identity by exploring the country’s history, its present, its greatest shame – slavery – and its people’s greatest triumphs.

President Obama said the museum provides a context for the “debate of our time and our history.”

“African-American history is not somehow separate from the American story,” he said. “It is not the underside of the American story. It is central to the American story.  It was a narrative that was messy and full of contradictions as all great stories are.”

While only a limited number were able to access the museum’s sold-out grand opening, officials estimate the inauguration ceremony unfolded before 7,000 official guests and thousands more spectators. Speakers included Congressman John Lewis, who advocated for an African American history museum for years, and former President George W. Bush, who signed the 2003 law authorizing the construction of the museum.

TSU Associate Professor of African American and Public History, Dr. Learotha Williams, Jr., said the museum represents a grand effort to tell a more complete story of the American Experience through the eyes of a people who were an integral, yet underappreciated and marginalized part of the narrative.

“As I looked at the beautiful structure with its golden hue, I thought about the passage from Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man that referenced the ‘Black Dope,’ the invisible but key ingredient in the company’s Optic White Paint. Without it, the paint would not have its allure, its beauty,” Williams said.  “For me, this is what this museum represents.”

He called the museum the “most important of all the spaces” on the National Mall.

Chandra Cheeseborough-Guice, a former two-time TSU Olympian and current director of track and field, donated memorabilia that’s part of the TSU collection in the museum.

“It is such an honor to be a part of the Smithsonian museum,” Cheeseborough-Guice said. “I am still elated and in awe about the honor. I just want to thank God for allowing me to really follow coach Temple’s footsteps as a history maker.”

In addition to the TSU collection, the museum’s nine floors contain three history galleries covering slavery through present day, including the #BlackLivesMatter movement; a theater named for donor Oprah Winfrey, a TSU graduate; culture galleries featuring African-American icons of music, theater, film and television; and a Contemplative Court, where visitors can reflect on what they’ve seen.

“Hopefully this grand occasion allows the rest of the nation to come out and see a building that’s not just for African Americans, it’s for all of America,” said Master Sgt. Donald Sparks of Houston, who just finished a yearlong deployment in Iraq. “I’m just elated and can’t express how much joy and gratitude I have to be here today and witness history.”

Please click link for museum Quick Facts, Visiting Hours, and Frequently Asked Questions.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 undergraduate, 25 graduate and seven doctoral programs. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.