Category Archives: Research and Sponsored Programs

TSU College of Business Continues Tradition of Global Excellence with AACSB Accreditation Extension

Courtesy: College of Business

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s College of Business has once again been acknowledged for its first class business school by receiving an extension on accreditation by AACSB-International, the premiere accrediting body for business schools around the globe.

“AACSB accreditation is the hallmark of excellence in business education and has been earned by less than five percent of the world’s business schools,” said Dr. Millicent Gray Lownes-Jackson, dean of the College of Business.

“To have this level of accreditation shows that the TSU College of Business has a creditable, reputable, and sustainable business school. The College of Business takes great pride in receiving this honor which involved a rigorous peer-reviewed evaluation to determine whether the College meets AACSB International standards of excellence for a quality business school.”

The College of Business has about 1,000 students and offers the Bachelor of Business Administration degree to undergraduates in accounting, business administration, business information systems, and economics and finance. At the graduate level, the College offers the Master of Business Administration (MBA) with a traditional evening, a one-year accelerated, and a one-year executive format.

“AACSB congratulates each institution on their achievement,” said Stephanie M. Bryant, executive vice president and chief accreditation officer of AACSB. “Every AACSB-accredited school has demonstrated a focus on excellence in all areas, including teaching, research, curricula development, and student learning. The intense peer-review process exemplifies their commitment to quality business education.”

To learn more about TSU’s College of Business, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/business/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

‘TSU Day at the Capitol’ a chance for lawmakers to experience university’s excellence

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Hemp research. Robotics. Innovative programs. They’re just some of the excellence Tennessee lawmakers will experience at “TSU Day at the Capitol” on Tuesday, Feb. 12.

Hemp workshop at TSU in March. (TSU College of Agriculture)

Tennessee State University administrators, faculty, students and alumni will be showcasing the university’s research and other innovative initiatives at the annual event.

TSU President Glenda Glover will kick it off with a ceremony at 10 a.m. in Senate Hearing Room II in the Cordell Hull Building. TSU visitors will have a chance to meet with lawmakers, who will see displays from some of the school’s various colleges and departments on the 8th floor of the building.

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of TSU’s College of Engineering, said TSU Day at the Capitol is “always an exciting day for TSU.”

“It allows us to display Tennessee’s investment in higher education, and the great things that are happening here at TSU.”

Products made from hemp. (College of Agriculture)

One highlight at this year’s event will be TSU’s nationally recognized hemp research. The university’s College of Agriculture has hosted several workshops on industrial hemp, cannabis plants with little of the chemical that can cause a high.

The College of Agriculture has charged a team of scientists to develop hemp production practices for Tennessee. The research projects include developing hemp nutritional products for human consumption and studying the economic viability of hemp production in Tennessee. Currently, the university is growing and evaluating 10 varieties of hemp.

“TSU wants to be at the forefront of this new interest that’s cropping up across the country,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture. “If it’s ever approved for large scale use, we have some knowledge about it and can work with the farmers.”

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of TSU’s College of Engineering, talks about life-size robotic tiger designed and built by TSU students at a previous TSU Day at the Capitol. Photo by Lucas Johnson (TSU Media Relations)

In November, several legislators toured TSU’s campus. The lawmakers received briefings and slide presentations from administrators on the university’s 2019 Legislative Priorities for funding consideration by the General Assembly. The priorities included the creation of a STEM Institute.

“With the heightened demand for diversification in the STEM work force, an institute would provide research, professional development and training in recruiting and retaining minorities in STEM programs in Tennessee and nationally,” said Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, vice president for Research and Institutional Advancement.

Rep. Harold Love, Jr., whose district includes TSU, said he hopes young people attending this year’s TSU Day at the Capitol will become more interested in the legislative process, and even try to have a voice in policymaking.

“When we talk about active citizen engagement and forming policy, this is a prime example of what we would like to see from all of our students at colleges and universities across the state,” said Love, a TSU alum. “This is what citizens are supposed to do, come down and be actively involved in policy formulation when laws are being passed or proposals considered.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Professor Yvonne Young “Y.Y.” Clark, “TSU Lady Engineer,” remembered

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is mourning the passing of Professor Yvonne Young “Y.Y.” Clark, the first female faculty member in the College of Engineering.

Dr. Yvonne Young “Y.Y.” Clark

Clark died Sunday, Jan. 27, at the age of 89. A mechanical engineer, she broke many barriers and shattered stereotypes to become one of the most-admired educators in the field.

“Mrs. Clark’s influence and nurturing as a mechanical engineering student is one of the reasons I decided to pursue an academic career, for which I am forever grateful,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering and a former student of Clark’s.

In 1956, Clark became the first female engineer hired as an instructor at the then-Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State University, earning the title of “TSU Lady Engineer.” She rose through the ranks, becoming an associate professor, and twice heading the Department of Mechanical Engineering for a total of 11 years.

At TSU, Clark did not only distinguish herself as an outstanding teacher in a male-dominated workplace, she became a champion for students by ensuring that they received the appropriate help they needed to better understand the material. She frowned on professors who were quick to tell students they were wrong without explaining the error and how to correct it.

“I enjoyed helping students,” said Clark in a 2016 interview when she was a Homecoming honoree. “Most teachers don’t understand, in my opinion, what to do for a student to learn. You can’t ‘brow beat’ them, but you can help them by making sure they understand the subject you are trying to teach.”

Clark retired from TSU in 2011 after 55 years of service. But she left a legacy that continues on through the many students she influenced.

“Y.Y. Clark was a trailblazer, amazing professor and mentor that inspired us to pursue our dreams and be the best engineers we can be,” said Darnell Cowan, one of Clark’s students who currently works at NASA.

Marquan Martin, director of the Identification and Access Control Center in TSU’s Office of Emergency Management, said that as a freshman at TSU “one of my greatest joys was taking graphics design under the tutelage of Professor Y.Y. Clark.”

“She challenged you, encouraged you, and she genuinely cared about every single student,” he said. “She was an amazing professor and mentor, a true gem to the Tennessee State University community. She will be remembered by all the lives she touched.”

To learn more about TSU’s College of Engineering, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/engineering/

Note: Emmanuel Freeman in the Office of Media Relations contributed to this article.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, FedEx Partner to Conduct Top Leadership Training Program

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is partnering with FedEx to reinstitute a program that trains and develops students with top leadership skills to help them be even more competitive in the workforce.

Called “Leadership TSU,” 40 students – from freshmen to seniors – with demonstrated ability to lead, have been selected as the first cohorts of the program, which kicked off Jan. 20.

LTSU, considered the highest level of leadership training at the university, with 27 learning outcomes that have been modeled around the nation, closed out about seven years ago, according to Frank Stevenson, TSU’s dean of students.

“We are bringing it back under the same idea of developing top leaders at the university.  We secured the funding and created the opportunity,” he said. “We pitched the idea to FedEx about creating an opportunity for students to learn some of their best practices, they immediately were on board.”

He said in addition to material and other support, FedEx will expose the cohorts to “some of the company’s leadership practices that fit in with what they do.” TSU faculty and national leadership training experts are also participating in the training.

Dr. Joseph Walker III, Chairmain of the TSU Board of Trustees, right, meets with Dean of Students Frank Stevenson during the LTSU cohorts’ visit to Dr. Walker’s residence. (Submitted Photo)

A component of the training program, Stevenson said, is to connect cohorts to successful individuals and groups “to share with our students and cohorts the habits of successful people.”

For instance, on Jan. 19, TSU Board of Trustees Chairman, Dr. Joseph Walker III, and his wife, Dr. Stephanie Walker, hosted the inaugural class of LTSU at their home. Dr. Joseph Walker, pastor of Nashville’s Mt. Zion Baptist Church, is presiding bishop of the Full Gospel Baptist Church Fellowship International, as well as chairman of the TSU Board of Trustees. His wife, Dr. Stephanie Walker, is a top pediatrician. They are authors of several books and publications.

“Leadership TSU is a game changer,” Bishop Walker said. “Dr. Stephanie and I were honored to host this group of extraordinary students. Their stories are powerful and their drive for success is contagious. The future looks bright and this program will be a major contributor.”

LTSU is a one-year program. To be nominated, students must maintain a minimum 2.5 grade point average. Stevenson said the current cohorts have a combined average GPA of 3.2, and were nominated by their deans, vice presidents, and the president.

“We wanted them (nominators) to identify those students who had already exhibited incredible leadership skills, and who really celebrate the best of TSU culture in terms of how they carry themselves. We asked them to also nominate those students, who in their mind, would best benefit from this training or this opportunity,” Stevenson said.

Donovan Stewart, the current Mr. Sophomore, is a member of the reinstituted LTSU. He said he is serious-minded and happy to be a part of such a diverse group of fellow students.

“It is a great feeling to be selected,” said Donovan, a nursing major from Birmingham, Alabama. “It is a great feeling to be acknowledged, not only for academics, but also leadership. And it is a good thing to get people from different backgrounds.”

As part of their initial activities, the group will visit the Tennessee State Capitol on Feb. 1 to hear about law and policy making from top elected officials, Stevenson said. In March, they will “make a social justice learning trip” to Washington, D.C.

TSU Assistant Dean of Students, Erica Gilmore, who is also at-large council member; and Tasha Andrews, director of student activities, coordinate LTSU along with Stevenson. Andrews spoke about the caliber of students in the program and why they were selected.

“As student affairs practitioners, we really understand that being a student leader goes beyond academic excellence. It is more about being well rounded and well cultivated,” she said. “We have students with 2.7 or 2.8. Some of them may have a low GPA, but they excel in other ways. It was important that we had a very diverse group. All of those students bring leadership traits that we admire and that are unique to each of them.”

Students interested in being selected for the 2020 class of Leadership TSU should contact the Office of the Dean of Students at (615) 963-2154 or fsteven1@tnstate.edu.mailloc.

TSU Students to See Inner Workings of US Politics when C-SPAN Bus Visits Campus Jan. 15

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The TSU community, especially journalism and communications students and professors, will get a firsthand look at how one of the nation’s major news networks operates.

C-SPAN, a cable-satellite and public affairs network, whose mission is to make government more transparent to Americans, will visit the campus Tuesday, Jan 15, as part of the C-SPAN Bus “Southern Swing” Tour.

The Bus, which will make stops at other locations in Nashville, will also help celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day at events around the city on Monday, March 21. The MLK Day’s events include the Youth Rally at Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church, and the Annual Convocation at the TSU Gentry Center.

For the TSU campus visit on Tuesday, Jan. 15, the C-SPAN Bus will be located in front of the Performing Arts Center on the main campus. The event will run from 12 – 2 p.m.

“The university is thankful for this incredible opportunity for our students, especially those aspiring to be civic leaders, journalists and others, to see the principles on which this nation was built and how the constitution and laws govern everyday life,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “The C-SPAN mobile unit is a great way to bring the civics curriculum to life in an interactive manner.”

Through interactive kiosks and demonstrations aboard the award-winning state-of-the-art, 45-foot customized Bus, students and visitors will learn about C-SPAN’s in-depth coverage of the American political process and comprehensive online educational resources, including an extensive video library of close to 250,000 hours of searchable content for viewing, research and education purposes.

In addition, bus visitors will be invited to share their thoughts on what it means to be an American for C-SPAN’s “Voices from the Road” project.

Dr. Karen Russell, professor of journalism and coordinator of the mass communications program at TSU, said faculty will use this opportunity to engage with the students and incorporate that learning experience into the curriculum.

“This is a great opportunity for our students, not just our journalists and future media professionals, but for all students to get an in-depth look at a respectable, well-known news source,” Russell said. “We plan to take full advantage of the C-SPAN visit while we have them for the benefit of our students.”

Leone Dunn is a senior communications major from Omaha, Nebraska. She is also news editor of the TSU student newspaper “The Meter.” She believes that many of her fellow students do not have a good understanding of the current political climate and how it affects them.

“I believe that the C-SPAN Bus visit will be extremely beneficial because it will give students an opportunity to be engaged in an interactive way,” Dunn said. “This is certainly going to open doors for a lot of people to see what actually is going on and give them a better understanding of how politics affects there daily life.”

A C-SPAN release said in addition to Tennessee, the “Southern Swing” Tour, over eight weeks, will make stops in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. Partnering with Comcast, the C-SPAN Bus will also visit Antioch High School while in Tennessee to engage students, teachers, community members and elected officials.

“We are excited for the opportunity to meet, engage and share our resources with residents along our ‘Southern Swing’ and hearing from people about what being an American means to them,” said Heath Neiderer, C-SPAN marketing manager. “Some of the cities on this tour haven’t seen our Bus in many years. We hope they enjoy their experience aboard our interactive mobile classroom and discover new ways of keeping well-informed.”

Below are the times and locations of the C-SPAN Bus stops in Nashville for the MLK Day:

Monday, January 21, 2019 

7:45 AM – 10 AM     MLK Day in Nashville – Youth Rally 

Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church                                                         2708 Jefferson St., Nashville, TN 37208

 11 AM – 12:30 PM   MLK Day in Nashville – Convocation      

 Gentry Center at Tennessee State University                                    3500John A. Merritt Blvd., Nashville, TN 37208

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

New scholarships, higher research designation highlight spring Faculty and Staff Institute

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover welcomed back faculty and staff on Monday to news of more scholarships for students and national recognition in research.

TSU President Glenda Glover speaks at spring 2019 Faculty and Staff Institute. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. Glover informed employees at Monday’s Faculty and Staff Institute for the spring semester that TSU will be receiving millions of scholarship dollars under the recently passed U.S. Farm Bill, and that the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education moved the university up to an elite R2 designation in research.

“These are exciting times for TSU as we create our on future,” said Glover. “I’m proud to serve as president of TSU. Thank you for all you do.”

TSU is among 19 land-grant universities that will each receive millions of dollars under the Farm Bill, most of which will be used for scholarships, according to Tennessee State officials.

The availability of scholarship funds in the legislation is significant, officials say, because previous Farm Bills restricted the money to research and extension.

“This is really a landmark occurrence,” said Dr. Alisa Mosley, interim vice president for Academic Affairs at TSU. “Because of the work of the HBCU presidents and lawmakers, a great deal of that money is going to be directed to scholarships, which helps students progress.”

Mosley said TSU hasn’t been told exactly how much it’s receiving, but she said it’s “in the millions.”

TSU employees attend Faculty and Staff Institute. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The Farm Bill also authorizes the establishment of three Centers of Excellence among the land-grant HBCUs, as well as legalizes hemp production, which will greatly benefit TSU because of its current nationally recognized hemp research.

TSU’s College of Agriculture has charged a team of scientists to develop hemp production practices for Tennessee. The research projects include developing hemp nutritional products for human consumption and studying the economic viability of hemp production in the state.

Currently, the university is growing and evaluating at least 10 varieties of hemp.

“The advantage for us is that we’re already in the game,” said Dr. Chandra Reddy, dean of the College of Agriculture. “There are private entities within Tennessee that have been lobbying the state Legislature (on hemp), and they have been in contact with us.”

As for the new Carnegie designation, TSU officials say the upgrade will make the university more competitive among its peer institutions.

There are three Carnegie classifications: R1 (highest research activity); R2 (higher research activity); and R3 (moderate research activity).

Of the 102 historically black colleges and universities, 11 (including TSU) now have a R2 designation. TSU is among four of the state’s six four-year public institutions with that designation.

“There’s a recognition that we’re doing good scholarly research that will support our academic endeavors,” said Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, vice president for Research and Institutional Advancement at TSU. “I think it will help raise our reputation, our visibility. I’m excited.”

For more information about TSU’s College of Agriculture, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/agriculture/.

To learn more about research at TSU, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/research/admin/contact.aspx.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

 

TSU Administrators Attend National Leadership Institute of HBCU Leaders

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Two Tennessee State University administrators were among a cohort of 24 mid- to senior-level administrators from historically black colleges and universities across the nation who attended a four-day leadership workshop in Austin, Texas.

Tiffany Bellafant Stewart, assistant vice president for Enrollment Management and Student Success, and Dr. Erin Lynch, research director for the Center of Excellence for Learning Sciences, participated in the Higher Education Leadership Foundation Institute at Huston-Tillotson University from December 13 – 16.

Called the “Theta cohort,” participants received an intimate, interactive, professional, and personal development experience that provided each fellow with a unique and valuable opportunity to assess personal vocation and leadership skill. The institute also allowed fellows to reaffirm a continuing commitment to HBCUs and identify and enhance the essential qualities for a successful tenure as a principled and effective leader and senior administrator.

Tiffany Bellafant Stewart, left, and Dr. Erin Lynch were among 24 cohorts who attended the HELF institute in Austin, Texas. (Courtesy Photo)

“The Higher Education Leadership Foundation institute was a transformative experience, both personally and professionally,” said Stewart. “The knowledge and wisdom shared by current and past presidents of historically black colleges and universities was enlightening and motivational in moving the needle forward to support students in their pursuit of obtaining college degrees from HBCUs.”

For Lynch, she said to be surrounded by colleagues who also deeply believe in the role and value of HBCUs in higher education reminded her “there is still much work to be done for our students.”

“During the four-day program, we were challenged with learning new ways to approach our collective missions as HBCUs,” she said. “We were reminded that as a collective, we are more impactful on student learning than as individuals.”

Steward and Lynch said TSU students will directly benefit from relationships developed at the institute by augmenting partnerships for external funding opportunities through research engagement and scholarship funding.

“Those relationships and experience reinvigorated my passion for HBCUs and fortified my commitment to excellence for TSU students,” Stewart added.

For more information on Enrollment Management, and the Center of Excellence for Learning Sciences, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/emss/ and http://www.tnstate.edu/learningsciences/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU, Faith Community and City Officials to Begin New Year with 7th Annual Prayer Service

NASHVILLE (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University and the Nashville faith-based community will begin the New Year with a morning of prayer during the 7th Annual Presidential Prayer Service on Wednesday, Jan. 9, at the Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church.

The service will begin at 8 a.m. in the church located at 2708 Jefferson Street. It is open to all university students, faculty, staff, alumni, community members and the public.

Leaders from faith-based communities across metro Nashville and Davidson County will participate in the service. As in the past, local and state leaders, including the mayor of Nashville, are also expected to speak. The service is a show of support for TSU President Glenda Glover and the university as the spring semester begins.

Senior Pastor Aaron Marble and the Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist church are hosting the event for a seventh straight year. The church has special meaning for Dr. Glover, who attended there as a student at TSU.

Glover is completing her sixth year as the first female president of TSU.

Following the service, the public is invited to attend a reception in the Fellowship Hall.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Legacy of TSU alum, adjunct professor Getahn Ward continues through scholarship

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A year after his death, Getahn Ward continues to be remembered, and those who were close to the Tennessee State University adjunct professor do not expect him to be forgotten.

Sunday, Dec. 16, was the one-year mark of Ward’s death. He was a longtime adjunct in TSU’s Department of Communications and a proud alum of the university. He was also a business reporter at The Tennessean for nearly 20 years.

Shortly after his death, a scholarship in the Communications Department was set up in Ward’s name, and the department’s multimedia newsroom was also named after him.

The new scholarship is the first endowed scholarship in the history of the department.

“This scholarship represents a man who devoted much of his life to the field of journalism and to the education and success of students at Tennessee State University,” said Dr. Tameka Winston, Communications Department chair, and associate vice president of Research and Institutional Advancement.

Dr. Karen Dunlap, a former TSU adjunct professor and colleague of Ward, said the impact he had in the classroom and in the community as a reporter is “lasting.”

“He left an excellent impression,” said Dunlap. “The scholarship is important because it is a name that will remain before students. And they will learn about him; they will have a model in him as they go forward as journalist.”

Dwight Lewis, a former Tennessean editor who worked with Ward, agreed.

“He gave his all,” said Lewis. “I hope students will look at his life and say, I want to be like Getahn Ward.”

To contribute to the Getahn Ward Endowed Scholarship Fund, visit

https://epay.tnstate.edu/C20204_ustores/web/classic/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCTID=401&SINGLESTORE=true.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

High achieving sophomore seeks to help others obtain success, excellence

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – When she was in high school, Amiya Ingram motivated her peers to be successful. Come graduation time, she wanted to find a higher education institution that would do the same, and Tennessee State University won her heart.

“I felt the family-oriented environment as soon as I came to tour TSU,” says Ingram, now a sophomore. “I knew it was the place for me.”

Amiya Ingram

A native of Huntsville, Alabama, Ingram fully embraces TSU’s tagline: “Excellence Is Our Habit.” The mechanical engineering major has a 3.3 grade point average, and she’s also a member of the Aristocrat of Bands’ Royal Elegance Flag Corp. Her freshman year at TSU, Ingram was selected to be a member of the Ron McNair Scholars Program, as well as the Blue Scholars Entrepreneurship program.

She says what she likes most about TSU is the care and concern she receives from administrators and faculty. Despite their busy schedules, they make time to listen to students, to mentor them.

“I have a good relationship with my dean,” says Ingram, who is a former president of the TSU chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers. “You get to have one-on-one relationships with people that are usually hard to get to.”

Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of the College of Engineering, says there’s more to students’ “education than in the classroom and laboratory.”

“We hope to develop a more complete TSU graduate, one that possesses leadership skills, has a global consciousness and awareness, and technical competence,” says Hargrove. “Ms. Ingram demonstrates that educational journey as an engineering student, and we believe she reflects the mission of Tennessee State University … to Think-Work-Serve!”

Dr. Reginald McDonald, director of the famed Aristocrat of Bands, agrees with Hargrove, which is why he sends his students a motivational quote each morning.

“I want them to know that I am like them in that I had a lot of professors/teachers who took interest in me as a person,” says McDonald.

Ingram says she appreciates McDonald’s attentiveness.

“He treats us like we’re his kids,” she says. “He keeps my head up, keeps me going.”

Ingram says such attention by Hargrove, McDonald and others at TSU motivates her even more to do what she can to assist fellow students, like helping them find internships.

“I’ve had a few internships,” says Ingram, who will be traveling to New York City this summer to intern at Bank of America in global information systems technology.

“I like to help people find internships that match them, or research opportunities. I also try to act as an encourager for people.”

Ingram says she also enjoys community activities similar to the prom dress drive she initiated her senior year in high school.

“We basically got everyone to bring in their old prom dresses, and we gave them back to the community,” says Ingram, adding that such events also serve as a recruitment tool by “creating a personal relationship with individuals who are thinking about attending Tennessee State University.”

Ingram is among a new recruit of high achievers the university is targeting to attract the best and brightest students, since TSU raised its admission standards about two years ago. Minimum requirements for incoming freshmen went up from a 2.25 GPA to 2.5, while the ACT score remained at 19.

Ingram says she loves the changes TSU is making, such as recent groundbreakings that include construction of two new residence halls and a state-of-the-art Health Sciences Building.

She says she constantly boasts about the university because she wants prospective high school graduates to experience the “excellence” that she now does.

“Tennessee State University has been a stepping stone to success,” says Ingram. “I brought my hard-work mentality to the university and they provided the opportunity, and for that I say thank you.”

To learn more about TSU’s College of Engineering, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/engineering/.

To read more about the Aristocrat of Bands, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/aristocratofbands/.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 7,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.