Category Archives: Research and Sponsored Programs

Tennessee State University Remembers Founders During 2018 Homecoming

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – This is Homecoming week and today is Founders’ Day at Tennessee State University.

TSU President Glenda Glover, accompanied by keynote speaker Council Woman-At-Large Sharon Hurt, led a procession of faculty, student leaders and administrators in Kean Hall to mark the university’s 106th birthday.

President Glenda Glover presents 2018 Founders’ Day speaker Sharon Hurt with a plaque at the ceremony in Kean Hall. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The University Wind Ensemble, led by Dr. Reginald McDonald, offered selections to a cheering audience, following presentation of colors by the Air Force ROTC Color Guard.

“This is a great day for Tennessee State University,” Glover said, as she recounted events in the University’s history from its founding in 1912 to the role it plays today as a major center of education in the nation.

“From 1912 when the then-Agricultural and Industrial Normal School for Negroes, built to provide educational opportunity for blacks, opened its doors to the first 247 students, TSU has maintained a tradition of excellence in education for a diverse population.”

Student leaders and faculty join in singing the Alma Mater at the Founders’ Day program. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

In her keynote address, Rep. Hurt, president and CEO of Jefferson Street United Merchant Partnership, or JUMP, reminded the students, faculty and alumni that as members of the TSU family, they have a “rich legacy” to uphold of people who believe in self-determination.

“As you celebrate Founders’ Day, remember that you have an ancestral calling to serve and support this institution,” said Hurt, a graduate of TSU. Hurt also holds a master’s degree in non-profit leadership from Belmont University.

Miss TSU Kayla Sampson, joined by Mr. TSU Darian McGhee, gives the university history at the Founders’ Day program. (Phto by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“You are the keepers of a legacy of worldwide accomplishments and have the God-given right by virtue of your calling to glorify, magnify and fortify the legacy that you have inherited as a descendant of doctors, teachers, engineers, talk show host, etc.,” she said. “Whatever your profession, TSU gave you a purpose.”

Hurt, a recipient of several awards and recognitions, is a former board member of the Center for Non-Profit Management and past president of the Association of Non-Profit Executives Council, and is a graduate of the 2004 Class of Leadership Nashville. During her tenure as president of JUMP, Hurt has secured more than $4 million in funding from the Neighborhood Stabilization Program Grant to acquire and rehabilitate homes in the North Nashville community.

She thanked President Glover, also an alumna, for the invitation and for her own legacy of excellence in earning multiple degrees. She called on students to be more focused, and congratulated the university on the celebration of the 2018 Homecoming.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU Scholarship Gala Features Legendary Jazz Musician Roy Ayers

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Scholarship Gala will take place on Friday, Oct. 19, at the Music City Center.

The event, which begins at 7 p.m., will be preceded by a 6 p.m. reception featuring the TSU Jazz Collegians and the TSU String Orchestra. Nationally renowned actor and comedian Jonathan Slocumb will host the annual fundraising event, which will conclude with a concert featuring legendary jazz artist Roy Ayers.

“The Homecoming Scholarship Gala serves as Tennessee State University’s signature fundraising event,” Gala chairs Cassandra Griggs and Iris Ramey said in a statement. “It provides an opportunity for the university to partner with alumni, friends, employees, corporations and organizations to raise annual and endowed scholarship dollars for the outstanding students at TSU.”

The gala provides critical funds necessary to meet the significant need for student scholarships and ensures access to the relevant academic programs required to successfully educate and prepare students for the global marketplace.

This year, the gala will recognize a “stellar group” of honorees and grand marshals, including ‘Waffle House Hero’ James Shaw, Jr., who received national acclaim after he disarmed a Waffle House shooter in April. Shaw will receive a Special Presidential Recognition.

Other honorees are: Dr. Calvin Atchison, retired vice president of Development/Foundation; Dorothy Lockridge, retired vice president of Student Affairs; and Coach James Bass, retired health professor and swimming coach.

The grand marshals are: Robert Covington, NBA player with the Philadelphia 76ers; Dr. Richard Lewis, member of TSU Board of Trustees and owner of Lewis & Wright Funeral Directors; and Delorse Lewis, former executive director of TSU Development/Foundation.

For more information about the gala and how to donate, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/gala/.

To find out more about TSU’s overall Homecoming this year, https://bit.ly/2wYtjJG.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Hundreds Attend Fall Preview Day at TSU, several admitted on the spot

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tywan Corbitt, Jr., and Martez Cuff II have been friends since kindergarten. The two Dayton, Ohio natives have kept their close bond and encouraged each other through middle school and are now graduating seniors at Chaminade Julienne Catholic High School.

They also have plans for college, the same college.

“We are coming to Tennessee State University,” Corbitt and Cuff said in unison, as their patents listened with apparent excitement.

Tywan Corbitt, Jr., and Martez Cuff II, have been admitted to TSU for the 2019-2020 academic year. They attended Fall Preview Day with their parents. From left are: Angie Christian, Martez Cuff’s mother; Martez; Tywan, and his father, Tywan Corbitt, Sr. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The two young men were among nearly 700 high school juniors and seniors who on Saturday attended Fall Preview Day, commonly called Big Blue Explosion at TSU. Organizers said participants came from more than 15 states, including California, Michigan, Texas, Illinois and Wisconsin to learn about the university’s offerings and admission processes.

Like Corbitt and Cuff, who will major in electrical engineering and physical therapy, respectively, organizers said several students were admitted on the spot for the 2019-2020 academic year. One of them was Alani Maiden of Little Rock, Arkansas, who proudly displayed her certificate of admission as she toured the campus.

“I chose TSU because it is a highly accredited HBCU, where I know I will feel more at home,” said Maiden, a senior at Little Rock Central High School, who wants to major in nursing. “I chose TSU because it is in Nashville, an up-and-coming city. And I can see myself not only going to school in Nashville, but also living in Nashville.”

Organizers say nearly 700 high school juniors and seniors and their parents attended Fall Preview Day. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Admissions and university officials said they were very excited about the turnout at this year’s Big Blue Explosion.

“We had an awesome and exciting Fall Preview Day,” said Dr. John Cade, Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Success. “We admitted on the spot about 30 students. So we are excited about the fact that we have already started our trajectory with respect to building enrollment for the upcoming 2019-2020 academic year.”

Also excited was Anwar Turner, a TSU 2010 graduate and former drum major with the Aristocrat of Bands, whose son, Jordan, was among those admitted.

Alani Maiden, a senior from Little Rock Central High School, was one of those admitted on the spot at Fall Preview Day. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“I am absolutely excited. He has grown up in this environment like I have,” said Anwar. “I was in the band. I would bring him to football games. My family is from here. So my family and I are very excited that he’s coming here.”

Jordan, whose goal is to go into film production, wants to major in mass communications.

“I am very excited. This is where I want to go to college. I can’t wait to start,” said Jordan. “My parents have been here. My grandparents have been here. I have just been around this campus my whole life. I have been to the games; I have seen the band play. I got TSU blood in me.”

Anwar Turner, a 2010 TSU graduate and former drum major, says he is excited his son, Jordan, has been admitted to his alma mater. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Corbitt and Cuff plan to maintain their bond, and believe leaving home will not change or take them away from their goal of a quality college education.

“TSU is a great school. I have family down here. My father went to an HBCU, so it makes it all the more interesting,” said Corbitt.

“I am sure we will make it. We will encourage each other and keep each other focused,” Cuff added.

Organizers said activities for the visitors also included meetings with academic departments, TSU student organizations, campus tours, and other forms of educational entertainment.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

2018 Fall Career Fair Opens Doors to Internships, Employment for TSU Students; Record Number Attend

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University students looking for internships, full-time employment and co-op opportunities got a major break on Wednesday. More than 130 companies and potential employers converged on the main campus for the 2018 Fall Career Fair.

Representatives from government agencies, aerospace, engineering, healthcare and the entertainment industries set up tents, tables and displays in the Gentry Center Complex to network with students about career and potential employment opportunities.

Organizers said nearly 400 students attended the all-day fair.

Anthony Wadsworth, a senior electrical engineering major, right, talks to Boeing representatives about internship opportunity. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

India Brown, a junior sociology major with public health concentration, and Anthony Wadsworth, a senior electrical engineering major, were among the first students at the fair. They were both looking for internships.

“I am looking for something that’s in the health field, dealing with social work,” said Brown, a Memphis native, as she filled in an application form with Tennessee Family Solutions, Inc., a direct support group dedicated to people with special needs.

For Wadsworth, who was networking at the Boeing table, he was following up on a previous meeting with Boeing representatives in Washington, D.C, last summer. He is seeking his first internship.

Within minutes of arriving at the career fair, India Brown, seeking internship opportunity in the healthcare industry, was already filling out an application. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“I spoke with them at the Black Engineer of the Year Awards ceremony in Washington last summer. They directed me to the right place and I am just here to follow up,” said Wadsworth, who is from Nashville.

He may just be in luck. Boeing representatives said they were “quite” impressed with the quality and preparedness of the TSU students at the fair.

“We see a great potential here among these students,” said Edward H. Gerding, vice president and senior chief engineer for structure and mechanical systems at Boeing. “We are actually looking across the board. We are growing in all aspects of our business between engineering, supply chain and business. We are looking for engineers and people in varieties of specialties, and now is the perfect time for students that are searching for internships.”

Like Boeing, representatives from the CIA, FedEx, NASA, Regions Bank and several other corporations and employers said TSU students – dressed in dark business suits and black shoes – were very impressive in appearance, approach and presentation.

Corey L. Harrell, left, a 2001 TSU graduate now working for NASA, returns to his alma mater as a recruiter for NASA. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“We do a lot of work in terms of preparation,” said Charles Jennings, director of the TSU Career Development Center, which organized the fair. “Last week and up to yesterday, we spent time getting them ready for interviews. I see that it shows, because a lot of the employers are talking about the great turnout and how ready our students are.”

Jennings also attributed the success of the fair and the preparedness of students to the mentorship provided by alumni of the career center, many of whom returned not only as recruiters for their various companies, but also to help their younger protégés prepare for the real world.

“It is just nice to see them giving back to their institution,” Jennings said.

Nearly 30 TSU graduates who got their career start with companies through the Career Development Center, attended the fair as recruiters for their companies and to mentor their younger proteges. (Photo by Jamal Coleman, TSU Career Development Center)

In all, nearly 30 TSU graduates, who got their career start with companies through the Career Development Center, were seen sporting shirts with Alumni on a TSU blue patch affixed to the chest. One of them was Corey L. Harrell, NASA SMA engines branch chief at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

He said coming back to TSU as a “proud alum” means a lot to him. “Anytime I can get a chance to come back I always do it,” said Harrell, who has returned several times to mentor and participate in the career fair. “

For more information on future career fairs or the TSU Career Development Center, to http://www.tnstate.edu/careers/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

2018 TSU Homecoming Concert, Gospel Explosion to Feature Big Name Artists

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University welcomes rap icon Gucci Mane for Homecoming 2018.

The Billboard Music Award winner, known for hits like “I Get the Bag,” “Wake Up in the Sky,” and “Kept Back,” will headline this year’s Homecoming concert in the Gentry Center Complex on Thursday, Oct. 18. Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $25 for students, and $35 for the public.

Homecoming week runs from Sunday, Oct. 14 and culminates on Saturday, Oct. 20 with the parade along Jefferson Street, and the football game between TSU and Tennessee Tech at Nissan Stadium.

The concert, one of several entertainment events for the week sponsored by the Office of Student Activities and SUBG, will also feature big name recording artists like rappers NBA Youngboy and Jacquees, and R&B superstar Layton Green.

“We are really excited for the entertainment lineup for Homecoming 2018,” says Mon-Cherie Robinson, assistant director of student activities.  “We have an amazing lineup of entertainers that’s going to blow minds.”

According to Robinson, the week will kick off on Oct. 14 with the Homecoming Gospel Explosion featuring gospel superstars Earnest Pugh, Jonathan McReynolds, and The Walls Group. The Gospel Explosion will also be held in the Kean Hall. Show starts at 6 p.m. Admission is free for the Gospel Explosion.

Organizers say this year’s Homecoming Step Show on Friday, Oct. 19, will be the biggest ever, with all nine Greek organizations participating. They will be competing for a $1,500 grand prize, says Robinson. The step show will be held in the Gentry Center Complex beginning at 5 p.m. Tickets for students are $15, and $25 the day of. General admission is $20 in advance, and $25 the day of.

Tickets for all events can be purchased at ticketmaster.com, or the TSU Box Office in the Gentry Center Complex.

Like last year, and in addition to these student activities, Tennessee State University is gearing up for another spectacular Homecoming with a stellar group of grand marshals and honorees.

This year’s Homecoming begins Oct. 14 with the Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Contest. The football game between the Big Blue Tigers and the Golden Eagles of Tennessee Tech will take place on Sunday, Oct. 20, at Nissan Stadium at 4:30 p.m.

For just the second time, TSU has a Special Presidential Honoree: James Shaw, Jr. The other honorees are Dr. Calvin Atchison, retired vice president of development/Foundation Office; Mrs. Dorothy Lockridge, retired vice president of student affairs; Coach James Bass, retired health professor and swimming coach. The grand marshals are Mr. Robert Covington, NBA player with Philadelphia 76ers; Dr. Richard Lewis, TSU Board of Trustees member and owner of Lewis & Wright Funeral Directors; and Mrs. Delorse Lewis, former executive director of TSU Development/Foundation Office.

Besides the big game, another highlight of this year’s Homecoming is the Scholarship Gala on Oct. 19. The gala is the biggest single event by the university to raise scholarship money. Contributions swelled from $600,000 in 2016 to more than one million dollars last year.

This year, the gala welcomes back comedian Jonathan Slocumb as the master of ceremony. Legendary jazz artist Roy Ayers will be the celebrity entertainer.

Other Homecoming activities this year include the Coronation of Mr. TSU and Miss TSU on Oct. 17; official groundbreaking of new Health Sciences Building on Oct. 18; the Breakfast of Champions, the Charles Campbell Fish Fry, and the National Pan-Hellenic Step Show on Oct. 19; and the legendary Homecoming Parade on Oct. 20.

For more information on Homecoming 2018, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/homecoming/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU gearing up for spectacular 2018 Homecoming

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is gearing up for another spectacular Homecoming with a stellar group of grand marshals and honorees.

This year’s Homecoming begins Oct. 14 with the Robert N. Murrell Oratorical Contest. The football game between the Big Blue Tigers and the Golden Eagles of Tennessee Tech will take place on Sunday, Oct. 20, at Nissan Stadium at 4:30 p.m.

For just the second time, TSU has a Special Presidential Honoree: James Shaw, Jr. The other honorees are Dr. Calvin Atchison, retired vice president of development/Foundation Office; Mrs. Dorothy Lockridge, retired vice president of student affairs; Coach James Bass, retired health professor and swimming coach. The grand marshals are Mr. Robert Covington, NBA player with Philadelphia 76ers; Dr. Richard Lewis, TSU Board of Trustees member and owner of Lewis & Wright Funeral Directors; and Mrs. Delorse Lewis, former executive director of TSU Development/Foundation Office.

“As we reflect on many memorable moments that helped to shape our lives while matriculating at our beloved institution, our alma mater charged us to go forth and serve,” said Homecoming Chairman Grant L. Winrow. “Thus, it is only fitting that we honor another outstanding group of individuals who epitomize what Excellence and Success really look like.”

Shaw became a worldwide hero following an incident on April 22, 2018, when a gunman opened fire at a Waffle House in a Nashville suburb. Shaw wrestled the rifle away from the man and tossed it over the counter before shoving the shooter out the door.

Four people were killed and several others wounded in the shooting. However, authorities have said there probably would have been more casualties had it not been for Shaw’s actions. Immediately following the incident, Shaw started a GoFundMe campaign that raised more than $240,000 for family members of the shooting victims. Shaw has also started a foundation that seeks to address mental illness and mass community violence.

“We can only make real progress if we work together, stand collectively and care for one another,” said Shaw. “I will never let my life, or those lives we sadly lost, be in vain.”

Besides the big game, another highlight of this year’s Homecoming is the Scholarship Gala on Oct. 19. The gala, part of TSU’s weeklong Homecoming activities, is the biggest single event by the university to raise scholarship money. Contributions swelled from $600,000 in 2016 to more than one million dollars last year.

This year, the gala welcomes back comedian Jonathan Slocumb as the master of ceremony. Special entertainment will be provided by legendary jazz artist Roy Ayers.

“The Homecoming Scholarship Gala serves as Tennessee State University’s signature fundraising event,” Gala chairs Cassandra Griggs and Iris Ramey said in a statement. “It provides an opportunity for the university to partner with alumni, friends, employees, corporations and organizations to raise annual and endowed scholarship dollars for the outstanding students at TSU.”

Other Homecoming activities this year include the Coronation of Mr. TSU and Miss TSU on Oct. 17; official groundbreaking of new Health Sciences Building on Oct. 18; the Breakfast of Champions, the Charles Campbell Fish Fry, and the National Pan-Hellenic Step Show on Oct. 19; and the legendary Homecoming Parade on Oct. 20.

The parade will be from 14th and Jefferson Street to 33rd and John Merritt Boulevard.

For more information about Homecoming activities, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/alumni/homecoming/documents/HomecomingSchedule.pdf

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU, Metro Schools Partnership Brings More than 5,000 on Campus for Area’s Largest College Fair

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – High school seniors PatriĆyonna Rodgers and Jaida Dunlap have made up their minds: they’re going to be Big Blue Tigers.

Rodgers and Dunlap say TSU’s close proximity to home, the HBCU family experience, and strong academic programs make TSU “number one” in their college selection.

“I am very interested in TSU,” said Rodgers, a top student at John Overton High in Nashville with a 4.27 grade point average who wants to study pre-law and journalism. “My mom’s best friend went to TSU. She really loved the college experience, and I heard that TSU has a very outstanding communications program.”

TSU President Glenda Glover talks to a student and her mother at the MNPS College Fair in the Gentry Complex. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

For Dunlap, a track star at East Nashville High School, she wants to bring her talent to TSU.

“I hear you have a very good track program, and I want to join the track team,” said Dunlap, who plans to major in political science with a minor in criminal justice. “I have a lot of friends who come here and they tell me it is a real good place to come to if you want to be close to home. It is a family-oriented school.”

Rodgers and Dunlap were among more than 5,000 middle and high school students and their parents who attended the annual Metro Nashville Public Schools College Fair in the Gentry Complex at TSU on Sept. 20. This is the second straight year TSU has hosted the fair. It is also the first university or college to host the fair in its decades-long history, according to TSU and MNPS officials.

More than 180 colleges, universities and post-secondary institutions from across the nation took part in the fair to offer students the opportunity to review information on admissions and financial aid, as well as college life and programs to help them decide their choice of college or university.

PatriĆyonna Rodgers, a top student at John Overton High School, and her mother, Shenell Gilliam-Rogers, inquire about programs in the TSU Honors College, at the MNPS College Fair. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

TSU President Glenda Glover was among TSU and metro school officials who attended the fair. She said hosting the fair at TSU highlights the partnership between the university and MNPS.

“This is an exciting opportunity for Tennessee State University,” Glover said. “Having this at TSU gives us an opportunity to showcase the campus and what we have to offer. I am excited to see our various colleges and departments here participating.”

MNPS Chief of Schools, Dr. Sito Narcisse, said the Metro schools are excited to partner with TSU to host the college fair. He said TSU has been a major partner and the biggest pipeline for teachers in the entire system.

“TSU has been a great partner, and we appreciate how the university has supported us like today with thousands of kids and their parents attending this fair,” Narcisse said.

Dr. Gregory Clark, TSU’s director of High School Relations, helped to coordinate the fair, along with Dr. Megan Cusson-Lark, MNPS’ executive director of school counseling.  Clark said the university is excited to welcome so many institutions from across North America.

“TSU and metro public schools have done it once again,” Clark said. “This is an excellent recruitment opportunity. In particular, the opportunity to see this many students in our house at one time is outstanding.”

For information on admission at TSU, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/admissions/.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Student Employment Fair Offers Opportunity for Work-Study, Part-Time Job Seekers

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Koseyona Scott and Michelle Williams are only freshmen, but they are already looking for jobs to help with college costs and other needs.

“It is really something I am concerned about and I don’t want to burden my parents,” says Scott, a business major from Urbana, Illinois, who owes a balance on her first semester tuition.

TSU students Koseyona Scott and Michelle Williams, right, talk to Kroger associate resource managers Matthew Kirby and Marilyn T. Bell. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

“I am looking for a part-time job, even though my parents don’t want me to work in my freshman year,” added Williams, a business major from Memphis, Tennessee.

Scott and Williams may just be in luck. The two friends, who met just recently, were among hundreds of fellow students who attended a student employment fair on Sept. 18 organized by the TSU Career Development Center.

Nearly 30 companies, businesses, organizations and campus offices set up tents, tables and displays in Elliott Hall to discuss part-time and work study opportunities with TSU students.

“Today’s fair is intended to help those students who have work-study funds but have not found a work-study position yet,” says Charles Jennings, director of the Career Development Center. “For those students who are not work-study eligible, we have off-campus employees that are here too to provide our students with part-time opportunities.”

Kroger, which has hired several TSU students and graduates in the past, was one of those looking for part-time employees.

“We have many opportunities across all of our departments,” says Matthew Kirby, a Kroger associate resources manager. “We have 21 stores in the Nashville, Brentwood areas that are looking for cashiers, customer service representatives, as well as stocking and pharmacy clerks. We also have management opportunities for those majoring in management.”

Mitzi Bruner, director of human resources of Tennessee Community Services Agency, says her agency is looking for students to fill five part-time positions.

“We are looking to hire part-time employees for a program starting here in Nashville, with the Department of Correction,” says Bruner.

Among other companies, organizations, offices and agencies represented at the fair were:  Bass Pro Shop, Boy Scouts of America, Burlington, LOFT, Sherwin Williams, At Home Healthcare, Total Wine, St. Luke’s Community House and VF Workwear. Representing TSU were: Police Department, Student Success Center, Research and Institutional Advancement, Student Conduct and Athletics.

For more information on career and employment opportunities, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/careers/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

For Tennessee State University, Southern Heritage Classic game Cancellation Not a Loss

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Although the much-anticipated 29th Southern Heritage Classic football game was canceled due to inclement weather, TSU’s spirit remained high.

The university experienced gains in recruitment, fundraising and community relations – three of TSU’s main goals at the annual gathering.

Emily Greer, Chief Administrative Officer of the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, welcomes President Glenda Glover during a guided tour of the world renowned hospital. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

The game between TSU and Jackson State University scheduled for Sept. 8 was eventually called off because of inclement weather.

TSU, with a 17-11 SHC record, was looking to extend its current win streak, which stands at 6-0 over JSU. Last year, the TSU Tigers defeated the JSU Tigers 17-15 before more than 47,000 fans in the Liberty Bowl.

While there was obvious disappointment, it did not overshadow positive experiences that occurred during the weekend.

Leading up to the game, TSU officials, administrators and staff engaged in a number of activities around Memphis.  Among them, a life changing experience when TSU President Glenda Glover was taken on a guided tour of the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, the only facility in the world with a research center and a hospital in the same venue.

The TSU Aristocra of Bands participates in the 29th Southern Heritage Classic Parade in Memphis on Sept. 8. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Accompanied by former Memphis Mayor AC Wharton, and Richard Lee Snow, senior adviser for Multicultural Marketing & Business Development for St. Jude, Glover saw labs and research facilities. She also received the history on the vision of St. Jude’s founder Danny Thomas, the evolution of the hospital, as well as its partnership with African-American communities, institutions and organizations.

Hospital employees who are TSU graduates were among those who greeted Glover. Earlier, Emily Greer, chief administrative officer of the St. Jude Children’s Hospital and Research Center, received Glover.

“It was phenomenal to see all the research that’s being done to save lives,” Glover said. “I am also amazed to see the generosity of the hospital as it pertains to patients, when families’ only concern is the well-being of their child and not costs. That is truly amazing.”

TSU sophomore Rachelle Brown. (Submitted photo)

The rain also didn’t stop Tennessee State University sophomore Rachelle Brown from winning big at the Classic. Brown received the first of four $10,000 McDonald’s “True to the HBCU” scholarships, facilitated by the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. While maintaining a 3.8 grade point average, the Memphis native was active in her community: sorting and packaging food at the Second Harvest Food Bank in Nashville, Tennessee; collecting supplies for homeless women and victims of natural disasters in the Virgin Islands; and serving as a reading volunteer with Smart Baby, an organization promoting childhood literacy to children.

“I chose to attend an HBCU, for the rich education, both inside and outside the classroom,” Brown said. “I wanted to go to a college that would encourage me to step outside of my comfort zone and provide me with an atmosphere designed to promote excellence.”

Memphis WANTV Local 24 reporter Jeané Franseen interviews President Glover Sept. 7 during a morning show outside the Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium in Memphis. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

As for recruitment, officials said a number of top graduating high school seniors who attended TSU’s Memphis Recruitment Reception on Sept. 7 have signed on to attend the university next fall. They said nearly 80 percent of the students who attended the reception in the Sheraton Memphis Downtown Hotel have already met “scholarship requirements.”

“We have already received their scholarship applications, transcripts and ACT scores,” said Dr. Gregory Clark, director of high school relations and NCAA certification at TSU. To be considered for a scholarship, a candidate must have at least a 3.0 GPA and 21 or higher on the ACT.

More than 200 high school seniors from the West Tennessee area and their parents attended the standing-room-only program in one of the hotel’s reception areas.

Jovon Jones, associate director of recruitment at TSU, talks to students and parents about scholarship requirements and deadlines at recruitment reception. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

According to officials of the Office of Institutional Advancement, this year’s Alumni Mixer – a key fundraising event of the Classic week – was a big success. With President Glover and Dr. Lesia Crumpton-Young, vice president for Research and Institutional Advancement leading the charge, more than $20,000 was raised and nearly 20 new individuals joined the President’s Society. These are individuals who commit to contributing $1,000 or more a year.

“We just want to say thank you for all that you do for Tennessee State University to help keep needy students in school,” Glover said. “Your continued financial, material and other support and gifts are making a big difference in our students’ lives. We are thankful beyond measure for your support.”

During the week, Glover, accompanied by several senior university officials, also visited Power Center Academy High School and Whitehaven High School where she spoke to students and administrators, and answered questions about the importance of a college education and the programs and offerings at TSU.

Earlier on Saturday, Glover, the TSU Aristocrat of Bands, student organizations, including Mr. TSU and Miss TSU and their court, lead the 29th Southern Heritage Classic Parade in Memphis, with thousands along the route cheering on parade participants.

Next year’s Southern Heritage Classic football game is scheduled for Sept. 14.

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU High Achieving Freshman Sets Sight on National Exposure, Engineering Entrepreneurship

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Kennedy Marie McCurry is aiming high. The incoming freshman wants to be known as one of the best softball players of all time, and to own an architectural engineering firm. She believes TSU is the best place to prepare her for success.

“My goal in life is to eventually play in the National Pro Fastpitch League for a couple years and then move on to owning my own architectural firm,” says McCurry, an architectural engineering major, who will play softball for TSU.

Kennedy Marie McCurry

A Gallatin, Tennessee, native, McCurry says she is no stranger to TSU. Her father, Dr. Charles McCurry, is a longtime professor of electrical engineering at the university.

“I have been around TSU almost all my life,” says the 18-year-old. “My dad was a really strong influence on me. He really pushed me toward TSU. Also, I really like the softball team, and I always knew I wanted to do something in architectural engineering. And I know that TSU has a very strong engineering program. So all signs pointed toward TSU.”

Kennedy comes to TSU with outstanding academic and athletic credentials. She enters the university with a near 3.7 grade point average, and 28 on the ACT.  At Beech High School, where she graduated last May, she was a star player on the softball team. She was twice named to the All-District Team, she made the district tournament team and earned MVP. She played on the Middle Tennessee All-State Team her sophomore year, and was named to the MaxPreps All-American Second Team her senior year.

“I have always wanted to play D-I softball. I am proud to bring my educational and athletic skills to TSU,” she says. “I chose to attend Tennessee State University because of its rich heritage, sports legacy and nationally ranked College of Engineering.”

Kennedy could not have chosen TSU at a better time. She is among a new recruit of high achievers the university targets to attract the best and brightest students, since TSU raised its admission standards about two years ago.

Saying, “TSU is no longer a school of last resort,” President Glenda Glover in 2016 announced sweeping changes that raised admission standards to attract better students. Minimum requirements for incoming freshmen went up from a 2.25 GPA to 2.5, while the ACT score remained at 19.

““Excellence remains our top priority, but we can’t be the school of last resort,” Glover said.

For Kennedy, she says TSU’s emphasis on producing well-rounded students was another attraction.

“TSU had already laid the foundation to help me get a quality education by engaging me in activities to prepare me for my college work even before classes started,” she says.

Last summer, Kennedy was among 11 high school graduating seniors who participated in the Engineering Concepts Institute in the College of Engineering at TSU. ECI is a four-week pre-college, residential program intended to prepare participants for academic success in the mathematical sciences or engineering disciplines.

“ECI also helped me to make new friends. I am excited and looking forward to the many more accomplishments I plan to have at TSU,” says Kennedy.

For more information on the engineering program at TSU, go to http://www.tnstate.edu/engineering/

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 8,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.