Category Archives: RESEARCH

Consortium at TSU brings together honors programs from local universities

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s Honors College recently hosted a retreat that brought honors programs at several local universities together for the first time.

Consortium participants. (Submitted photo, TSU Media Relations)

The National Collegiate Honors Council Nashville Honors Consortium was held Sept. 16 in the McDonald Williams Honors Center at TSU. Besides TSU, the other participating schools were: Belmont University, Fisk University and Lipscomb University.

“This is a great opportunity for our universities to come together and share knowledge, collective experiences, collaborate in service learning projects, and break down the racial and cultural divide,” said Dr. Coreen Jackson, interim dean of the Honors College at TSU and NCHC board member.

The consortium itinerary included training on servant leadership, team-building activities, philosophy of leadership, consortium planning activities, and a collective vision exercise.

The Honors directors from each school, along with their students, also participated in sharing their experience in leadership.

“This is my last year at Tennessee State University and I’ve always longed for an opportunity to interact with students from the other colleges in Nashville,” said Mikayla Jones, president of TSU’s Honors Student Council. “Platforms like this retreat should happen more often because we have so much to learn from one another.”

Leaders of the Nashville Honors Consortium plan to share their collaborative experience with the NCHC conference in Atlanta in November. The proposed panel presentation is entitled, Creating a Local Honors Consortium: an Example from Nashville, Tennessee.

“It was exciting to meet and work with this collective group of honors student leaders from Honors programs and colleges around the city,” said Dr. Tyrone Miller, associate director of TSU’s Honors College. “I think it is a great initiative and provides a good example for how other colleges can explore new possibilities for joint programming and sharing ideas in the future.”

To learn more about TSU’s Honors College, visit http://www.tnstate.edu/honors/about/welcome_page.aspx

 

About Tennessee State University

Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Tennessee State University to build new residence halls with 75 million dollar expansion

By Michael McLendon

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – New buildings to call home! That’s what future Tennessee State University students will have when two new residence halls are completed.

The $75,300,000 project is one step closer to reality following approval for construction from the State Building Commission. The plan was presented by the Tennessee Board of Regents for TSU’s student modernization program late Thursday morning.

“Anytime a university can expand its footprint, that is a definite sign of growth,” said TSU President Glenda Glover. “The additional housing will benefit our students, as well as the entire Tennessee State University family.”

With the increased expense of off-campus housing and a record-setting freshman class at TSU, President Glover stated that the new housing is critical in the recruitment and retention of students.

“New residence halls represent a remarkable recruiting tool, and add to the life of any college campus,” Glover added.

State Senator Thelma Harper, a TSU alumnae and staunch supporter of the university’s construction plan, issued a press release just minutes after the commission gave the student housing development the green light.

“Student housing has a big effect on their education,” Harper said. “Across this country, many universities have already tapped into the benefits of ‘Live and Learn’ dorm environments which ultimately attracts more students and results in increased enrollment.”

Cynthia Brooks, TSU Vice President of Business Finance, explained that the debt for the buildings will be repaid from student housing fees, and that the next steps included the design phase.

“The next step is to engage an architect who will get campus input and design the new facilities,” Brooks said.  “That process should be completed by December 2018.  Contractor bidding and selection will then occur, with actual construction projected to begin Summer 2019.”

The announcement comes at a critical time for TSU housing as more students are deciding to transition back to campus because of the high cost of living in the city of Nashville. Dr. Tracy Ford, head of Student Affairs, echoed that sentiment.

“We are extremely happy to receive this great news,” said Ford, the vice president of Student Affairs for TSU. “The university’s goal is to have the freshman class of 2020, as well as returning students, as the first occupants of these new halls.”

The residence halls additions, combined with Glover’s recent announcement of two new academic buildings, are signs of a new era of expansion at TSU. While details about the new engineering facility are yet to be disclosed, Glover informed the TSU community during the university’s opening convocation that $40,000,000 has been secured for the construction of a health sciences facility.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

B.B. King Protégé recalls Time Touring with the Late Blues Music Legend

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Just mention the name B.B. King and you will get the biggest smile out of Michael Doster.

Michael Doster

“Man I had some of the best times of my life hanging out with the legend,” said Doster, a bass player, who for more than 17 years, toured with the late Blues legend all over the world.

“We went to Europe, Asia, South America and many parts of the world playing gigs and concerts. As band members, we were a family, and that’s how he (King) referred to us because sometime we would tour together for a whole year,” Doster said.

For the last nine years, Doster has been an assistant in the Brown-Daniel Library at Tennessee State University, his alma mater, where as a student in the early 1980s, he met fellow music student Walter King, B.B. King’s nephew. The younger King introduced Doster to his uncle.

Upon being hired, Doster said King asked him, “Son, do you want a job? I will guarantee you two weeks, and if you leave me, give me two week’s notice.”

“It was a handshake,” Doster said, “and it lasted 17 years.”

Michael Doster, far left corner, standing, appears with B.B. King during a performance at Club Ebony in Indianola, Mississippi. (Courtesy photo)

For his time with King, Doster, whose stage name was “Mighty Mike,” has been invited as an honored guest at the 3rd Annual B.B. King Day Symposium at Mississippi Valley State University on Sept. 7, and to participate on a panel about the “Chitlin Circuit Years.”

A special reception in Doster’s honor will follow the symposium at the historic Club Ebony in Indianola, Mississippi’s last Chitlin’ Circuit club, and a famous King hangout back in the day.

In a letter inviting Doster, Dr. Alphonso Sanders, of the B.B. King Recording Studio, wrote: “Your appearance and intellectual contribution is paramount to achieving music history and continuing the legacy of B.B. King.”

Doster’s current boss, Dr. Murle Kenerson, dean of Libraries and associate professor, said TSU is “extremely fortunate” to have the musician on staff because of his years of experience as a band member with the “world’s greatest performer.”

“In his 17 years with B.B. King, Michael traveled the world,” Kenerson said. “His worldly experience adds a unique aspect to his work in the library, especially when interacting with students who are potential music majors, and information seekers in general who are interested in the life and times of B.B. King.”

Prior to King, Doster toured with various musical acts, including three years with gospel legend, Dr. Bobby Jones, but it is his time with King from 1985 – 2002 that gives him the fondest memories. He recorded with King on some of his biggest hits, including the Grammy winning albums “Live at San Quentin,” “Blues on the Bayou,” and “A Christmas Celebration of Hope.”

Doster also performed with King on television shows such as “B.B. King and Friends,” “The Cosby Show,” “Jazz Central,” and in PBS’ 1999 “In Performance at the White House” for President Bill Clinton. He appeared with King in the films “Next of Kin,” and “Heart and Soul.”

“B. B. King was a kind and compassionate man. He was demanding to work for, but very fair,” said Doster, who returned every summer to play in the ‘Mississippi Homecoming’ that King hosted in honor of late civil rights leader Medgar Evers, at Club Ebony.

King died May 2015 at age 89.

“I am just extremely honored to be invited to such a historic event as the King Day Symposium,” Doster said. “The fact that I am able to be on a panel to discuss my experiences with him and my work at an HBCU, just mean so much to me.”

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Top Army officer talks to students, faculty about civilian research opportunities in military

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A top Army officer visiting Tennessee State University talked to students and faculty on Thursday about civilian research opportunities in the military.

Maj. Gen. Cedric Wins speaks to group. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Maj. Gen. Cedric T. Wins oversees the U.S. Army’s Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM). With more than 14,000 employees, RDECOM performs nearly all of the Army’s basic and applied research and technology development.

Of RDECOM’s employees, 13,800 are civilians, of which 11,000 are scientists and engineers.

“It’s very common that many of the Fortune 100 companies are visiting our campus doing recruiting,” said Dr. S. Keith Hargrove, dean of TSU’s College of Engineering. “Our responsibility as faculty is also to expose students to other careers beyond the Fortune 100. That includes … the federal government, more specifically the branches of the military.”

Wins said recruitment of college students is beneficial to RDECOM down the line because of an “aging workforce where people are going to be able to transition out.”

“The large majority of my workforce is civilian, so there’s a lot of opportunity there for people who have decided that they want to serve, but they don’t want to serve in uniform for whatever reason,” Wins said.

RDECOM has several centers and laboratories that focus on research that includes armament, aviation and missiles, communications-electronics, and chemical threats.

A number of students at TSU have taken advantage of internships and other programs RDECOM offers, according to TSU research officials.

Akinwunmi Joaquim, a TSU graduate engineering student, said he’s considering one of the internships.

“I believe it will help me in what I’m doing,” said Joaquim, adding that RDECOM’s chemical research directly relates to his study of biosensors. “I’m going to tell my friends about RDECOM, and try to give them opportunities as well.”

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU ready for total solar eclipse, scientist believes historic event will spark new interest in astronomy, research

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – A Tennessee State University scientist believes the total solar eclipse on Monday will spark new interest in astronomy and TSU’s nationally recognized research.

Dr. Geoffrey Burks is an astronomer and associate professor of physics at TSU. He said the Aug. 21 event is once-in-a-lifetime, but its impact will probably be long lasting, particularly in the minds of youngsters.

“It’s just so rare to be able to see something in your lifetime where the sun is covered up in the middle of the day,” Burks said. “They’ll remember this a long time.”

TSU will have eclipse viewing events to recognize the historic day. They are planned from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hale Stadium on TSU’s main campus, and at Avon Williams, the university’s downtown campus. The event at the stadium will include comments from TSU President Glenda Glover, NASA engineer Dr. Virginia Tickles, TSU researchers, as well as performances by TSU’s Aristocrat of Bands. There will also be free food.

“It’s going to be a fun day,” said TSU Dean of Students Frank Stevenson. “We want it to be a day that you will remember where you were on this day. It will also be an opportunity to showcase a little bit of Tennessee State University.”

During a solar eclipse, the moon passes between the sun and Earth and blocks all or part of the sun for up to about three hours, from beginning to end, as viewed from a given location.

Typically, there are two solar eclipses each year somewhere on the Earth, but most of the time the very narrow path of the total eclipse is a shadow over the ocean.

The one occurring on Aug. 21 is unique because it crosses the entire United States, and Nashville is the largest city within the entire eclipse’s path.

The last time a total solar eclipse could be seen from Nashville was July 29, 1478, according to NASA. After Aug. 21, the next one visible from Nashville will be on Aug. 16, 2566.

“This is a big thing,” said Willie Moore, a junior civil engineering major at TSU. “I want to make sure I am in the right place to see it.”

Burks said the Aug. 21 eclipse might also draw more attention to astronomy research. At TSU, its research and astronomy professors have received national recognition. The university owns and operates eight robotic telescopes at the Robotic Observatory Center in the mountains of southern Arizona.

In 1999, a team led by TSU astronomer Greg Henry announced the discovery of a shadow of a planet crossing a distant star. The discovery made national and international news, and was lauded by then President Bill Clinton.

“I want America to know about your enormous contributions to research,” Clinton said the following year at a higher education leadership banquet in Washington, D.C. “I want every American to know … Tennessee State astronomers made the world’s first direct detection of a planet orbiting another star.”

Last year, Dr. Henry was part of a team of astronomers who discovered an extrasolar planet scientists say has the most eccentric orbit ever seen.

Highlights of the planned TSU eclipse events on Monday include:

  • Safe viewing presentation (Hale Stadium, 10:20 a.m.)
  • NASA speaker-Dr. Virginia Tickles (Hale Stadium, 12:05 p.m.)
  • The Solar Eclipse: What’s Happening Now? (Hale Stadium, 12:30 p.m.)
  • TSU Aristocrat of Bands performs (Hale Stadium, 12:45 p.m.)
  • Words from TSU President Glenda Glover (Hale Stadium, 1:10 p.m.)
  • Full solar eclipse; viewing also on plaza of Avon Williams Campus (1:27 p.m.)

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

TSU welcomes new Tigers to the Big Blue family on freshman Move-In Day

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Lamonjae Romey got several offers from colleges and universities, but after learning about Tennessee State University and visiting its campus, the Big Blue sealed the deal.

TSU President Glenda Glover greets new freshmen. (Photo by Courtney Buggs, TSU Media Relations)

“When we came here the first time, I just fell in love with the campus,” said Romey, an Indianapolis native who plans to major in nursing. “Right then, I decided that this is where I want to be.”

Romey was among about 1,500 new freshmen that arrived at TSU on Wednesday for Freshman Move-In Day.

“It’s always a pleasing sight to see new students and their families join our university family as they come to us as freshmen,” said TSU President Glenda Glover.

President Glover greeted many of the new students personally as she stood at the entrance of several residence halls during the move-in.

“It’s very important for these students to have a good start to the best college experience possible. I want them to study hard and do their best. Our move-in event is the first step to that experience. It’s a family thing like the slogan on our volunteer T-shirts read (display),” Glover said.

New TSU freshman Lamonjae Romey (center) with her mother, Latochia Rice (left), and grandmother, Doris Rice. (Photo by Emmanuel Freeman, TSU Media Relations)

Freshman Shelby Sellers said she’s looking forward to attending TSU. She and her family drove about nine hours from Wisconsin on Wednesday. Sellers, who plans to major in biology, said what really attracted her to TSU was the kindness she was shown by faculty and staff when she visited the university.

“They seem to want to help you in everything; give guidance,” she said. “I really like the culture.”

Freshman Megan Davis of Knoxville, Tennessee, agreed.

“I could tell that the professors really care about students’ success,” said Davis, who plans to major in occupational therapy. “And I like the overall community.”

During the move-in Wednesday, a number of parents praised the helpfulness and organization of TSU’s staffers. Megan’s mother, Denise Davis, said she believes her daughter will be in good hands.

“My daughter just kept saying, ‘Mom, I really want to go to Tennessee State,’” Denise Davis said. “We came up for a couple of visits, and TSU sealed the deal.”

New TSU freshmen and their families enjoy some tasty barbecue. (Photo by John Cross, TSU Media Relations)

Dr. Tracey Ford, vice president of student affairs at TSU, said the university wants students and their parents to know that good customer service is a priority.

“We’re very excited … to welcome new Tigers into our family,” Ford said.

In addition to the university’s great faculty and staff, a number of TSU freshmen said they want to be part of the unique experience only a historically black college or university can offer.

“I chose TSU because of my heritage and the history I can learn here,” said Memphis native Tavion McCullough, who will be majoring in business administration.

Activities were planned throughout Move-in Day for the new freshmen, including orientation and a barbecue for them and their families. Before they start class on Aug. 21, students will have an opportunity to participate in an open house to learn about their colleges and academic departments.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

Total solar eclipse provides opportunity for TSU to showcase its excellence to the community

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University is using the once-in-a-lifetime total solar eclipse to showcase its excellence to the community.

The university will have a “Blue and White Total Solar Eclipse Viewing Day Party” on Aug. 21 to recognize the historic day. Organizers expect as many as 10,000 to attend.

“It’s going to be a fun day,” said TSU Dean of Students Frank Stevenson. “We want it to be a day that you will remember where you were on this day. It will also be an opportunity to showcase a little bit of Tennessee State University.”

Events are planned from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hale Stadium on TSU’s main campus, and at Avon Williams, the university’s downtown campus. Both are free and open to the public.

The event at the stadium will include comments from TSU President Glenda Glover, TSU researchers, NASA engineer Dr. Virginia Tickles, as well as performances by TSU’s nationally acclaimed Aristocrat of Bands. There will also be free food.

Aug. 21 is also the first day of classes at TSU. Student Government Association President JerMilton Woods said the eclipse events are a chance to show incoming freshman what TSU has to offer.

“It’s a moment for us to kind of gather, love on each other as a family, and just watch something stellar happen,” Woods said.

The last time a total solar eclipse could be seen from Nashville was July 29, 1478, according to NASA. After Aug. 21, the next one visible from Nashville will be on Aug. 16, 2566.

“It’s going to be exciting,” said TSU junior Willie Moore of the Aug. 21 eclipse. “This is a big thing. I want to make sure I am in the right place to see it.”

Because of the large number of people expected to attend the TSU events on Aug. 21, TSU police plan to beef up security with additional patrols.

Highlights of the planned TSU eclipse events include:

  • Safe viewing presentation (Hale Stadium, 10:20 a.m.)
  • NASA speaker-Dr. Virginia Tickles (Hale Stadium, 12:05 p.m.)
  • The Solar Eclipse: What’s Happening Now? (Hale Stadium, 12:30 p.m.)
  • TSU Aristocrat of Bands performs (Hale Stadium, 12:45 p.m.)
  • Words from TSU President Glenda Glover (Hale Stadium, 1:10 p.m.)
  • Full solar eclipse; viewing also on plaza of Avon Williams Campus (1:27 p.m.)

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU President Glover outlines plans to increase student success and university growth at annual meeting of faculty and staff

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – “Let us work to make TSU the University of choice” was the charge Tennessee State University President Glenda Glover posed to faculty and staff during the university’s fall institute on Monday.

Hundreds of employees attended the annual event to get an update on year-long initiatives and plans for the upcoming academic year. Most importantly, they were reminded of the vital role they have in serving students and the university.

“We’re here for the purpose of educating our students,” President Glover said. “There must be a continued commitment to make a contribution each day, to make TSU better. Each year when I stand before you, I have great news on the progress we’re making, but there is more work to be done.”

Glover discussed the university’s new strategic plan that includes four goals: increase four-year graduation rates; ensure campus health and safety; improve customer service; and sustain/diversify revenue streams.

Called Impact 20/20, the plan also details the expansion of the campus’ physical footprint with the addition of two new academic buildings, Health Sciences and Engineering, along with two newly constructed residence halls to alleviate the growing need for housing.

Demetra Scruggs, a clinical supervisor in TSU’s Dental Hygiene Department, said she was motivated by the plans the president outlined.

“TSU is a great school,” Scruggs said. “And the initiatives Dr. Glover talked about today will make it even better.”

The president also said the university aims to increase student enrollment at least 5 percent by 2020.

To make that happen, she said the university is looking at ways to raise more money for student scholarships and research, which is among its challenges.

Despite its challenges, Glover said TSU has done an excellent job preparing students for the workforce, an accomplishment she hopes to build upon even more with new funding.

Recently, the university received a $2 million career development grant from the United Negro College Fund to provide TSU with the tools to prepare and ultimately help students secure employment immediately following graduation.

Other accolades included a recent ranking that showed TSU graduates average $48,100 in starting salaries.

EDsmart, a nationally recognized publisher of college resources and rankings, ranked TSU No. 6 out of the nation’s top 30 historically black colleges for highest starting salaries for graduates.

“When students see that they will graduate from this institution with a great projected salary, it makes the decision to attend TSU the obvious choice,” said Charles Jennings, Jr., director of the TSU Career Development Center.

Employees also heard from Dr. Mark Hardy, vice president for academic affairs; Dr. Achintya Ray, chair of the Faculty Senate; and Staff Senate Chair Linda Goodman, all of whom told faculty and staff they play a vital role in the success of TSU.

The faculty staff institute is held in August and January prior to the beginning of each academic semester.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

Total solar eclipse could spur interest in astronomy, TSU scientist says

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – The total solar eclipse on Aug. 21 could spur new interest in astronomy, said a Tennessee State University scientist.

Dr. Geoffrey Burks is an astronomer and associate professor of physics at TSU. He said the Aug. 21 event is once-in-a-lifetime, but its impact will probably be long lasting, particularly in the minds of youngsters.

“It’s just so rare to be able to see something in your lifetime where the sun is covered up in the middle of the day,” Burks said. “They’ll remember this a long time.”

TSU is having a “Blue and White Solar Eclipse Day Party” to recognize the historic day. Events are planned from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hale Stadium on TSU’s main campus, and at Avon Williams, the university’s downtown campus. The event at the stadium will include comments from TSU President Glenda Glover, NASA engineer Dr. Virginia Tickles, TSU researchers, as well as performances by TSU’s Aristocrat of Bands. There will also be free food.

Dr. Trinetia Respress, chair of TSU’s Department of Educational Leadership and one of the organizers of the events, said she believes Aug. 21 is a day students in particular will never forget.

“I think it’s something they will enjoy, whether you’re in science, or not in science,” she said.

During a solar eclipse, the moon passes between the sun and Earth and blocks all or part of the sun for up to about three hours, from beginning to end, as viewed from a given location.

Typically, there are two solar eclipses each year somewhere on the Earth, but most of the time the very narrow path of the total eclipse is a shadow over the ocean.

The one occurring on Aug. 21 is unique because it crosses the entire United States, and Nashville is the largest city within the entire eclipse’s path.

The last time a total solar eclipse could be seen from Nashville was July 29, 1478, according to NASA. After Aug. 21, the next one visible from Nashville will be on Aug. 16, 2566.

“This is a big thing,” said Willie Moore, a junior civil engineering major at TSU. “I want to make sure I am in the right place to see it.”

Burks said the Aug. 21 eclipse might also draw more attention to astronomy research. At TSU, its research and astronomy professors have received national recognition. The university owns and operates eight robotic telescopes at the Robotic Observatory Center in the mountains of southern Arizona.

In 1999, a team led by TSU astronomer Greg Henry announced the discovery of a shadow of a planet crossing a distant star. The discovery made national and international news, and was lauded by then President Bill Clinton.

“I want America to know about your enormous contributions to research,” Clinton said the following year at a higher education leadership banquet in Washington, D.C. “I want every American to know … Tennessee State astronomers made the world’s first direct detection of a planet orbiting another star.”

Last year, Dr. Henry was part of a team of astronomers who discovered an extrasolar planet scientists say has the most eccentric orbit ever seen.

 

Department of Media Relations

Tennessee State University
3500 John Merritt Boulevard
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
615.963.5331

About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.

 

TSU faculty, staff, students excited about total solar eclipse

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (TSU News Service) – Tennessee State University’s faculty, staff and students are excited about the opportunity to see the once-in-a-lifetime total solar eclipse on Aug. 21.

“This is a big thing,” said Willie Moore, a junior civil engineering major at TSU. “I want to make sure I am in the right place to see it.”

Astronomers say solar eclipses are not uncommon. There are typically two of them each year somewhere on the Earth, but most of the time the very narrow path of the total eclipse is a shadow over the ocean.

The one occurring on Aug. 21 is unique because it crosses the entire United States, and Nashville is the largest city within the entire eclipse’s path.

The last total solar eclipse visible in Nashville was July 29, 1478, according to NASA. After Aug. 21, the next one that can be seen in Nashville will be on Aug. 16, 2566.

“I am really excited about it,” said Peggy Earnest, chief of staff, Office of Student Affairs at TSU. “We are just privileged. We won’t see this again in the same spot in many more years.”

During a solar eclipse, the moon passes between the sun and Earth and blocks all or part of the sun for up to about three hours, from beginning to end, as viewed from a given location.

On Aug. 21, the partial eclipse (when the moon starts to inch over the sun) begins at 11:58 a.m. The start of the full totality (meaning the sun is completely covered by the moon) in Nashville will begin at 1:27 p.m. and ends approximately 1:29 p.m. The partial eclipse ends at 2:54 p.m.

Viewers are asked to practice safety during the eclipse and not look directly at the sun, except when it is completely blocked during the period of total eclipse, or totality.

 

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About Tennessee State University

With more than 9,000 students, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a comprehensive, urban, co-educational, land-grant university offering 38 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degrees. TSU has earned a top 20 ranking for Historically Black Colleges and Universities according to U.S. News and World Report, and rated as one of the top universities in the country by Washington Monthly for social mobility, research and community service. Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University celebrated 100 years in Nashville during 2012. Visit the University online at tnstate.edu.